TIME weather

Cyclone Bears Down on the South Pacific

Left to right: Tropical Cyclone Olwyn in the Indian Ocean heading south for landfall near Learmonth on the west coast of Australia, Tropical Cyclone Nathan meanders northeast of Cooktown, Queensland, Australia in the Coral Sea, Tropical Cyclone Pam tracks due south heading for the islands of Vanuatu in the southern Pacific Ocean and Tropical Depression 3 heads west-northwest towards Guam in the northern Pacific Ocean on March 11, 2015.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration /EPA Left to right: Tropical Cyclone Olwyn in the Indian Ocean heading south for landfall near Learmonth on the west coast of Australia, Tropical Cyclone Nathan meanders northeast of Cooktown, Queensland, Australia in the Coral Sea, Tropical Cyclone Pam tracks due south heading for the islands of Vanuatu in the southern Pacific Ocean and Tropical Depression 3 heads west-northwest towards Guam in the northern Pacific Ocean on March 11, 2015.

Wind speeds have reached 165 mph

A category 5 cyclone is pummeling the island nation of Vanuatu, a storm set to be one of the worst in that country’s history.

Wind speeds have reached 165 mph, fast enough to destroy homes according to the National Weather Service. Flooding and landslides may also occur. This is only the 10th category 5 cyclone to hit the region since 1970.

Vanuatu, population 224,000, is on red alert, and the center of the storm is expected to hit early Saturday morning local time.

[Weather Channel]

TIME weather

Mountain Climbers Discover Frozen Corpses on Mexican Peak

Aereal view of the Citlaltepetl volcano or Pico de Orizaba, the highest mountain in Mexico and the third highest in North America in Veracruz State, Mexico on June 1, 2014.
Alfredo Estrella—AFP/Getty Images Aereal view of the Citlaltepetl volcano or Pico de Orizaba, the highest mountain in Mexico and the third highest in North America in Veracruz State, Mexico on June 1, 2014.

The bodies could be the victims of a 1959 avalanche that killed three people

Mountain climbers in Mexico stumbled onto a scene from The Walking Dead this week after they found two corpses sticking out of a glacier on Mexico’s tallest peak.

Inclement weather prevented officials from digging out the remains of the bodies on the Pico de Orizaba volcano, the Weather Network reports, but a second attempt was made Friday.

Authorities believe the bodies could be the victims of a 1959 avalanche that killed three people and that a third corpse could be in the area. Many relatives of other missing climbers have contacted officials about identifying the bodies since the climbers’ shared their discovery. Clothing that may have been preserved in the ice could help forensic experts determine the identities of the deceased climbers.

[Weather Network]

TIME Environment

El Niño Arrival Too Late for California Drought

"Too little, too late and too weak to provide much relief for drought-stricken California"

El Niño has finally arrived, but the precipitation brought by the weather event is unlikely to alleviate California’s severe drought, officials said Thursday.

“After many months of watching, El Niño has formed,” said Mike Halpert, an official at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center. “Unfortunately, this El Niño is likely too little, too late and too weak to provide much relief for drought-stricken California as California’s rainy season is winding down.”

El Niño, a cyclical phenomenon that lasts several years, begins with warming in the middle of the Pacific Ocean and eventually affects weather around the world. In the United States, it can lead to storms along the West Coast and affect hurricanes and other tropical storms. Tropical storm activity could be reduced due to El Niño, but it’s too soon to know for certain, the NOAA said.

Forecasters have been waiting to declare the start of El Niño for nearly a year. The late arrival may make El Niño-related storms “weak in strength” with “fairly low influence on weather inclement,” Halpert said.

TIME weather

‘Last Hurrah’ Winter Storm Hitting Mid-Atlantic, Extending to East Coast

Plucky Bostonians are saying bring it on, we want the record!

Millions of people in 28 states faced winter weather on Thursday as a late-season storm swept across North America.

Drivers in Kentucky were left stranded on the road as snow piled around them on Interstate 65. A snowy runway at New York’s LaGuardia Airport caused an airplane to skid off the road and the city of Washington was effectively a ghost town, thanks to piles of snow that shuttered federal government operations.

Temperatures were significantly colder than average — anywhere from 10 to 30°F — across the region.

The governors of Alabama, Mississippi, West Virginia and New Jersey all declared states of emergency on Thursday, the Associated Press reports. But at long last, one of the worst winters in recent memory may be relenting, according to Mike Halpert, deputy director of the National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center.

He told the Associated Press the storm “might be winter’s last hurrah.”

But in Boston, a city two inches away from breaking its all-time snow record, some residents said bring it on.

“I want the record. We earned the record,” said Erin O’Brien, professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts-Boston.

TIME weather

Snow, Ice, Floods to Pummel U.S. in Final Winter Storm

Storm will move from Kentucky to New York City

Around 47 million Americans were under a severe weather watch Wednesday as a winter storm threatened to pelt Kentucky, the Ohio Valley and southern Plains with ice and record-setting snow before moving toward New York City and Washington, D.C.

Heavy rain was forecast to freeze as what is expected to be the last major system of the winter moved toward the East Coast after pounding the Rockies and northern Texas on Tuesday.

In Kentucky, rain heavy enough to cause flooding was expected to turn into snowfall of up to 10 inches late Wednesday — five times the average March snow for Louisville and just short of the all-time March record of 12 inches…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME weather

These Surreal Photos Show the Beaches of Southern California Covered in Ice

After a freak hailstorm hit Orange County

As the rest of the country suffered through a particularly gruesome winter, residents of Southern California have been quick to remind us that they have been enjoying months of clear skies and sunshine. But a rare hailstorm Monday left miles of California’s coastline covered with nearly an inch of hail, offering residents a rare opportunity to play in the “snow.”

Here, we gathered a collection of photos from Instagram and Twitter that captured this unexpected — and totally surreal — winter wonderland.

TIME weather

March Brings More Snow and Freezing Temperatures to U.S.

An infrared view of U.S. shows a storm poised to hit northern states across the nation with more snow and ice on March 2, 2015.
NOAA/Reuters An infrared view of U.S. shows a storm poised to hit northern states across the nation with more snow and ice on March 2, 2015.

Up to three inches of snow are expected from Minnesota to New York and northern New Jersey

A vast winter storm was moving across much of the frozen U.S. on Tuesday, dumping snow on the Rockies, the Great Lakes and as far east as western New England.

An accompanying blast of arctic air, meanwhile, was expected to keep the nation shivering even after February’s record-setting cold.

Up to three inches of snow are expected from Minnesota to New York and northern New Jersey, with between three and five inches expected in Wisconsin and Michigan, the Weather Channel said.

Read more from our partners at NBC News

TIME weather

Coolest Dad Ever Builds Homemade Luge Track For His Kids

One of the few great things about winter

Everyone knows that horrible winter weather is actually really awesome if you’re a kid. (Think sledding, snowman building, school cancellations and not having to worry about digging your car out of the snow.)

But one dad in New Jersey made winter even better for his young children by constructing a homemade high-speed sledding track. It’s pretty simple — and not quite as elaborate as the Olympics-themed backyard luge track one dad made last year — but it’s still awesome and his kids seem pretty into it.

He’s not like a regular dad, he’s a cool dad.

TIME weather

New England Is Braced for More Snow as a Historic Winter Continues

A woman walks through blowing snow in the East Boston neighborhood of Boston, Monday, Feb. 16, 2015
Michael Dwyer—AP A woman walks through blowing snow in the East Boston neighborhood of Boston, Monday, Feb. 16, 2015

Boston is on the verge of breaking a 20-year record for snowfall

Another four to seven inches of snow is expected to fall in Massachusetts early Monday, delaying any hope of respite from the extraordinarily harsh weather that has battered New England throughout February.

Boston is expected to receive up to four inches overnight, while other parts of the region, stretching into Rhode Island, may see as much as seven inches, according to the National Weather Service.

The snow storm is expected to pass before the morning commute, but the winter weather advisory calls on motorists to stay cautious and be alert for snow and ice patches on the road.

Boston has received 102 inches of snow this year, far exceeding the 34 inches considered to be normal and surpassing last year’s total of just over 56 inches. The twenty-year record for snowfall in Boston is 107.6 inches, according to media reports.

The average temperature in Boston for the month of February was just 19 degrees Fahrenheit, almost 13 degrees Fahrenheit colder than normal.

TIME weather

February Coldest Month in History for Some in U.S.

APTOPIX Winter Weather
Jim Cole—AP Krystal Koban removes snow from around her car during a winter storm, Monday, Feb. 2, 2015, in Henniker, N.H.

February brought historically low temperatures to parts of the U.S.

You weren’t imagining things. It really was the coldest month ever.

At least if you live in a handful of cities in the shivering Northeast. They just weathered the coldest month since reliable records were first kept, which for most places means a century or more of weather data.

Topping the misery index: Bangor, Maine — that’s pronounced “bang-or,” not “banger,” if you can stop your teeth from chattering long enough to say it.

The average temperature there should come in at 6.2 degrees for this month, said Corey Bogel, a meteorologist for the National Weather Service. That’s about 15 degrees …

Read more from our partners at NBC News

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