TIME

Philippine Storm Nears Same Typhoon-Ravaged Area

Philippines on Alert for strengthening Typhoon Hagupit
Image made available by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Dec. 4, 2014 showing Typhoon Hagupit. EPA

Government forecasters said Typhoon Hagupit was packing sustained winds of 127 miles per hour

(MANILA, Philippines) — Villagers in the central Philippines fled coastal homes and sparked panic-buying in grocery stores and gas stations as an approaching powerful storm brought back nightmares of last year’s deadly onslaught from Typhoon Haiyan.

Government forecasters said Typhoon Hagupit was packing sustained winds of 205 kilometers (127 miles) per hour and gusts of up to 240 kph (149 mph) over the Pacific, about 700 kilometers (435 miles) off the country’s eastern coast. It may hit Eastern Samar province on Saturday and barrel inland along the same route where Haiyan leveled villages and left more than 7,300 dead and missing in November last year.

Haiyan survivor Emily Sagales said many of her still-edgy neighbors in central Tacloban city, which was ravaged by Haiyan, packed their clothes and fled to a sports stadium and safer homes of relatives. Long lines formed at grocery stores and gas stations as residents stocked up on basic goods, she said.

“The trauma has returned,” the 23-year-old Sagales said. In the wake of last year’s typhoon, which killed her mother-in-law and washed away her home, she gave birth to her first child, a baby girl, in a crowded makeshift clinic filled with the injured and the dying near the Tacloban airport.

“It’s worse now because I didn’t have a baby to worry about last year,” she said.

Haiyan demolished about 1 million houses and displaced about 4 million people in the central Philippines. Hundreds of residents still living in tents in Tacloban have been prioritized in an ongoing evacuation.

Hotels in Tacloban, a city of more than 200,000 people still struggling to recover from last year’s massive damage, were running out of rooms as wealthier families booked ahead for the weekend.

“The sun is still shining but people are obviously scared. Almost all of our rooms have been booked,” said Roan Florendo of the hilltop Leyte Park hotel, which lies near San Pedro Bay in Tacloban.

The government put the military on full alert, workers opened evacuation centers and transported food packs, medicines and body bags to far-flung villages, which could be cut off by heavy rains.

In Manila, President Benigno Aquino III on Thursday led an emergency meeting of disaster-response agencies and ordered steps to prevent panic-buying and hoarding of goods.

Aquino checked on the readiness of Philippine air force aircraft, hospitals and police contingency plans to deal with possible looting similar to what happened in Tacloban after Haiyan crippled the city’s police force.

“I think we’ve been challenged worse by Yolanda,” Aquino told officials, referring to Haiyan’s local name. But during the nationally televised meeting, he was told that Hagupit — Tagalog for “smash” — has further strengthened.

Initially, forecasters said there was a chance the typhoon could veer north away from the Philippines in the direction of Japan. Science and Technology Secretary Mario Montejo, however, told Aquino on Thursday it was almost certain the typhoon would slam into the country’s eastern coast.

Some towns in the typhoon’s predicted path said they will shut schools on Friday. Inter-island ferries and some commercial flights were canceled.

The government also decided to move the venue of a meeting next week of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, which was to be attended by hundreds of diplomats from 21 member economies, from Albay province, which could be lashed by the typhoon, to the capital, Manila, which forecasters say will likely be spared.

TIME California

Heavy Rains Due to Hit California Again, Threatening Floods and Mudslides

Southern California braced itself for another deluge

Drought-stricken California was due for a fresh deluge of rain on Wednesday, with forecasters warning of possible floods and landslides from a significant dump of precipitation. A band of rain on Sunday triggered three mudslides near Malibu and forced nine miles of the Pacific Coast Highway to close. Wet blasts since then have set off flooding, knocked out power and sparked mandatory evacuation orders for parts of California. Los Angeles on Tuesday saw its wettest Dec. 2 on record when 1.15 inches doused the city.

Southern California will be drenched again on Wednesday…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME Know Right Now

Know Right Now: The Week’s Biggest Stories

From the grand jury decision in Ferguson to the Black Friday fever that's gripping the country

This week the country watched as a grand jury in Ferguson ruled on the shooting of teenager Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson, deciding not to charge the officer in the young man’s death.

Another member of Barack Obama’s cabinet left office, with Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel stepping down.

And finally, across the country Americans were bracing against the cold weather and searching for the best retail deals on Black Friday.

TIME weather

More Than 400,000 Lose Power on Thanksgiving

Thanks to a dangerous mix of snow and rain on the East Coast

More than 400,000 people along the East Coast lost power on the busiest cooking day of the year, thanks to a dangerous mix of snow and rain that downed power lines across the region.

New Hampshire was hit the hardest with more than 195,000 without power on Thanksgiving morning. More than 100,000 Maine residents and 55,000 New York residents were also left in the dark.

Almost 5,000 flights were delayed and 700 flights canceled Wednesday, as winter weather snarled air travel up and down the east coast. The roads weren’t much better — New Jersey Governor Chris Christie declared a state of emergency because of the condition on the roads, and Connecticut police recorded 125 accidents in just one day.

So if you’ve made it to the dinner table, the lights are on and and your food is hot, those are three things to be thankful for.

TIME

Morning Must Reads: November 27

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

200,000+ Without Power

As most of the U.S. prepares to celebrate Thanksgiving, spare a thought for more than 200,000 American families who were facing the holiday without electricity after heavy snow felled power lines from West Virginia to Vermont early Thursday

Is Turkey Actually Good for You?

Do the nutritional perks of turkey deserve to be at the center of your Thanksgiving feast? Our weekly poll of five experts answer the questions that gnaw at you

Ferguson Rallies Across the U.S.

Demonstrators across the U.S. took to the streets in protest against a grand jury’s decision not to indict officer Darren Wilson

TIME for Thanks: Public Figures Count Their Blessings

Thanksgiving is a time when families across the country gather around their dining room tables and reflect on life’s many blessings—not least of these being the blessing of family itself. This year, TIME asked public figures to reflect on what they’re thankful for

How Parkinson’s Disease Changed One Family

“Taking Care” is a series intimately covering the lives of caregivers and the people they care for. Photographer Abby Kraftowitz, who has been documenting one family since 2012, offers a deep look into those affected by the disease

Cricket Star Phillip Hughes Dies

Australian cricketer Phillip Hughes has died at Sydney’s St. Vincent’s Hospital. The 25-year-old was hospitalized in critical condition after he was hit on the head by a ball while batting during an important domestic tournament on Tuesday

8 Gadgets to Help You Survive Thanksgiving

Let’s be honest: Even if we love grandpa, we’ve heard the same story every year since 2003. So we’ve put together a Thanksgiving survival guide: eight gadgets for putting up with eight troublesome family members

Ebola Cases in Sierra Leone Will ‘Soon Eclipse’ Liberia

Sierra Leone will “soon” dethrone Liberia as the hardest-hit country in West Africa’s Ebola outbreak, the World Health Organization cautioned Wednesday. Nearly one-fifth of its total cases were reported in a three-week period that ended Sunday

Amazon Slashes Kindle Prices for Black Friday

Amazon’s $79 Kindle e-reader will be on sale for $49, and the company’s Kindle Fire tablets are also dramatically cheaper, with the Fire HD 6 going for a mere $79 (vs. its usual $99 price tag) and the Fire HD 7 on sale for $109 (vs. $139)

Cleveland Officer Shot 12-Year-Old Within Seconds on Scene

The Cleveland officer who fatally shot Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old boy, on Saturday was a rookie cop who fired his gun within moments of arriving on the scene, according to surveillance video and police statements released Wednesday

Avatar Sequels Will Be ‘Bitchin” Cameron Says

James Cameron has divided Avatar sequel scripts to a team that includes Rick Jaffa, Amanda Silva, Josh Friedman and Shane Salerno. “I can tell you one thing,” Cameron told Empire magazine, “they’re gonna be bitchin'”

Labor Group Plans Strike of Walmart Stores on Black Friday

Employees at Walmart stores in at least six states and Washington, D.C., plan to strike on one of the busiest shopping days of the year to protest workers’ wages and hours. For the third year in a row, OUR Walmart is organizing a massive strike on Black Friday

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TIME weather

Thanksgiving Storm Leaves Hundreds of Thousands Without Electricity

Wintry Weather Connecticut
An over-turned automobile on Interstate 84 snarls traffic, Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014 in Vernon, Conn. Jared Ramsdell—AP

Heavy snow plunged at least 248,000 Americans into darkness from West Virginia to Vermont

Heavy snow that disrupted travel plans for many Americans left at least 248,000 properties without electricity on Thanksgiving morning.

Power outages were reported from West Virginia to Vermont early Thursday — including 94,000 customers in Maine, 53,000 in New York, 41,000 in Massachusetts and 27,000 in New Jersey.

More than 700 flights were canceled — with almost 5,000 others delayed — and there were 125 accidents on snow-slicked roads in a single state on Wednesday, one of the busiest travel days of the year…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME weather

Over 4,000 Flights Delayed or Canceled Around U.S. Due to Winter Storms

Winter Storm Causes Delays For Thanksgiving Holiday Travelers
A group of friends traveling to San Francisco, Calif., walk through the terminal at Philadelphia International Airport Nov. 26, 2014 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania William Thomas Cain—Getty Images

Large swaths of the country face beastly conditions on one of the busiest travel days of the year

A wintry mix of snow and rain that crept up the East Coast on Wednesday slowed travel on one of the busiest days of the year.

According to the website Flightaware.com, 4,548 flights were delayed into, within or out of the U.S. Wednesday and 731 were canceled. While this isn’t a particularly large number of delays, so many people are traveling at present that accommodating stranded passengers could prove problematic, CNN reports.

Winter Storm Cato dropped over a foot of snow in some Mid-Atlantic states with snow also expected in New England, The Weather Channel reports. In parts of Maine, between three and five inches of snow had fallen by Wednesday evening. In West Virginia, according to CNN, up to 18 inches of snow has fallen. The adverse weather conditions mean bad news for drivers who faced slick roads across swaths of the East Coast and Midwest.

An estimated 46 million Americans were expected to travel over 50 miles from home this Thanksgiving, according to the AAA, the highest level since 2007. The majority are expected to travel by car.

As a precaution, governors in New York and New Jersey took steps to ensure traveler safety on Wednesday. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo restricted commercial traffic along I-84 and other parts of the New York State Thruway. In New Jersey, Gov. Chris Christie issued a precautionary state of emergency and sent more than 1,900 vehicles to plow and treat roads.

Thanksgiving Day looks clearer for most of the country, though the Pacific Northwest are set to face some wet weather that could snarl traffic on Turkey Day.

TIME weather

Holiday Snow Wreaks Havoc on Thanksgiving Travel Plans

Delays on the road and in the air all along the east coast

On the eve of one of the biggest travel holidays in the year, a storm is threatening the travel plans of 20 million people in the Northeast, according to a warning issued by the National Weather Service.

Wednesday’s expected Nor’easter will bring rain and snow to the north and the west of the I-95 corridor. Rain began to fall in the morning hours in Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., and quickly began to turn into snow, causing delays on I-95. Areas in West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New Jersey could expect three-to-six inches of snow by the end of the day. Some New England states will see up to half a foot of snow.

For those flying out of the east coast, over 200 flights were canceled by noon Wednesday.

The snow should abate all along the east coast by Thanksgiving Day, with temperatures climbing far enough above freezing to improve road conditions.

But it could always be worse: In Siberia, it was so cold that a plane got stuck to the frozen ground. After spending 24 hours on the tarmac, passengers finally got out of the aircraft and pushed it themselves on Wednesday, captured in this astounding video reported by Tass.ru.

TIME weather

Know Right Now: Northeast Braces for a Holiday Nor’easter

Watch today's #KnowRightNow to catch up on the latest trending stories

In today’s trending stories, winter weather will wreak havoc for the 41 million holiday travelers expected to hit the roads on Wednesday and Thursday. Storms could dump as much as 18″ of snow in northern New Jersey, and will affect most of the northeast.

Airports in Washington D.C., Philadelphia, and Newark, NJ are expected to experience the most cancellations and delays. Interstates 76, 81, and 90 will experience the worst weather and traffic.

And lastly, many major airlines are allowing customers to rebook without fees. More than 200 flight cancellations have already been announced for Wednesday.

TIME weather

Thanksgiving Travel Chaos Amid Winter Storms, More Than 200 Flights Canceled

Looming snowstorms and heavy rain will likely spur additional travel delays and cancellations during the beginning of the Thanksgiving weekend

More than 200 commercial flights were canceled by late Tuesday night ahead of the busiest travel day of the year for Americans, as weather forecasters predict that snowstorms and rain are likely to pound the northeast throughout Wednesday and Thursday.

Approximately half the flight cancellations came from just two airports, New York LaGuardia and Newark Liberty, according to USA Today.

On Tuesday, the New York City Office of Emergency Management issued a travel advisory that a “total of 3-5 inches of heavy, wet snow” is forecast to blanket the Big Apple Wednesday, resulting in “dangerous driving conditions throughout the day.”

The National Weather Service also issued numerous winter storm warnings for large swaths of the American northeast stretching from the Appalachia Mountains in North Carolina to the Maine coastline.

The news comes less than a week after the American Automobile Association predicted that more than 46 million Americans would travel 50 miles or more from their homes during the Thanksgiving weekend — the largest number for the holiday in the past seven years.

On a brighter note, drivers hitting the road will enjoy the lowest gasoline prices since December 2010 as global oil prices continue to slide. And that, at least, is something to be thankful for.

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