TIME weather

Anheuser-Busch Brewery Switches to Canning Water to Aid Flood Victims

The cans will go to those in need in Texas and Oklahoma

The next time Texans and Oklahomans crack open an Anheuser-Busch can, it may contain water instead of Bud Light.

The company has temporarily halted beer production at its Cartersville, Ga. brewery to instead can drinking water for victims of the severe flooding in Texas and Oklahoma. Approximately 50,000 cans are on their way to the two states. The company has a partner in the American Red Cross, which is helping distribute the water to the areas most in need.

Anheuser-Busch says the company switches to emergency production like this several times a year to help in crises. Earlier this month, it sent about 50,000 more cans to those affected by tornadoes and storms in the Oklahoma City area.

Twenty-five people have died in these recent floods, and more are missing.

TIME Apple

Everybody With an Apple Watch Is Now an Amateur Meteorologist

Apple Unveils iPhone 6
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images An attendee inspects the new Apple Watch during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on September 9, 2014 in Cupertino, California.

More like "cloudsourcing," right?

The latest update to popular iOS app Weather Underground lets Apple Watch wearers help crowdsource weather data straight from their wrists.

In a 5.0.1 update that was recently released for the free app, the new versions adds the following functionality: “Added crowd reporting, because your watch is waterproof, your phone is not. Tell us it’s raining from your wrist.” Basically, when you notice it’s starting to rain, you can tell the app, which then adds that to data from other users for more accurate weather reporting.

“Powered by 100,000+ weather stations, Weather Underground provides the world’s most accurate hyper-local weather forecasts, radar, maps, and severe weather alerts,” according to the app’s website.

In addition, the app boasts that it allows Apple Watch users to get all their weather data “at a glance,” including viewing current conditions both hourly and for the next 10 days.

The news of the app’s update comes after reports showed that Apple Watch third-party apps are expected to get a boost in quality by the fall, as developers will be able to create apps that run natively on the device.

 

 

TIME weather

Texas Floods: Dozens Rescued as State Struggles With Record Rain

Flood alerts extended nearly 800 miles from southern Texas to central Missouri

Dozens of people were rescued from flash flooding in central Texas early Friday, as emergency responders throughout the state struggled to cope with the wettest May on record.

Flood alerts extended nearly 800 miles from southern Texas to central Missouri, according to The Weather Channel’s Justin Abraham. He highlighted “major flash flooding issues around Dallas” after up to 6 inches of rain fell overnight.

Tow-truck driver Robert Levtzow, was stranded on a flooded Dallas street after responding to a police call.

“I was trying to put in reverse to get out and it died off and the water started rising immediately,” he told The Weather Channel. “I was scared, didn’t know really what to do [so] I called my wife immediately.”

Read the full story from our partners at NBC News

TIME Texas

National Weather Service Issues New Flash Flood Warning for Texas

Flooding in the state has already claimed 17 lives

The National Weather Service issued a new flash flood warning Thursday morning for large parts of Texas, as the state reels from extreme flooding that has already killed 17 people.

The new flood warning covers southern and central Texas from around San Antonio to Dallas and remains in effect until Friday morning. “This area is already saturated from recent rounds of heavy rain and will be susceptible to flash flooding… even with just short periods of rain,” the warning said.

At least 17 people have been killed by the severe weather in Texas so far this week. The storms have also damaged buildings, submerged cars and flooded major Texas cities Houston and Austin.

 

TIME weather

This Woman Was Almost Struck by Lightning and Filmed It

Damn nature, you scary

A woman from Ireland got dangerously close to a bolt of lightning earlier this month when out filming a rainstorm for her mother.

Nicola Duffy, a lecturer at the Institute of Technology Blanchardstown in Dublin, was recording the heavy rain when a bolt of lightning appeared to explode on the opposite side of the courtyard, several meters from where she was standing, reports TheJournal.ie.

In the video you see a streak of light and hear a huge bang before Duffy falls to the ground in shock.

Because there was no visible damage done to the building, some at the college believe the lightning strike Duffy filmed was in fact a reflection — but nonetheless still very nearby.

Either way, it’s pretty scary and Duffy’s video has racked up almost 300,000 views on YouTube.

[TheJournal.ie.]

TIME weather

May Is Already the Wettest Month in Texas History

A home on the Blanco River was taken off its foundation after heavy overnight rain caused flash flooding in Wimberley, Texas, May 24, 2015.
Rodolfo Gonzalez—AP A home on the Blanco River was taken off its foundation after heavy overnight rain caused flash flooding in Wimberley, Texas, May 24, 2015.

'It has been one continuous storm after another'

Flooding in Texas has taken the lives of at least 19 people and caused a virtual standstill across the state with school closings and road closures. It turns out all that rainfall has also set at least one new record: May 2015 is now the wettest month in state history, with over four days still to go.

Across Texas, the average rainfall in May has measured 7.54 inches, beating the June 2004 record of 6.66 inches, according to figures provided by the Office of the State Climatologist at Texas A&M University. The wettest region, located adjacent to Dallas-Fort Worth area, has received more than 20 inches of rain.

“It has been one continuous storm after another for the past week to 10 days in several regions of the state,” State Climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon said in a statement. “It has rained so much that the ground just can’t soak any more moisture into it, and many creeks and rivers are above flood stage.”

The beginning of El Niño and the flow of wet air from the South have both contributed to the record downpour, according to Nielsen-Gammon. He predicted that the wet weather should change within the next few days.

In some parts of the state, rivers and reservoirs went from 20% to 100% capacity in the past month. Still, a drought remained in other parts of America’s largest contiguous state.

TIME weather

Forecasters Predict ‘Below Average’ 2015 Hurricane Season—But Threats Still Lurk

hurricane NOAA prediction 2015
Getty Images

'We always hope for the best and prepare for the worst'

Forecasters expect this year’s tropical storm season to be weaker than usual with zero to two major hurricanes predicted to affect the United States, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced Wednesday.

The announcement came days before the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season on June 1. Hurricane season typically lasts until the end of November.

Overall, the agency predicted 6 to 11 named storms with winds of 39 mph or greater and 3 to 6 hurricanes with wind speeds of 74 mph or greater. Despite the “below average” prediction, officials from NOAA and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) stressed that communities typically affected by hurricanes, particularly along the Gulf Coast, should still prepare for the worst.

“No matter how many pitches Mother Nature throws at us, from only a few to a whole lot, if just one of those pitches gets through the strike zone we can be in for a lot of trouble,” said NOAA Administrator Kathryn Sullivan at a press conference. “Below average doesn’t mean no pitches get thrown our way.”

The El Niño weather phenomenon, which began this spring, is at least in part responsible for the suppression of storm activity, Sullivan said.El Niño tends to increase wind shear, the difference in wind speed and direction over a relatively short distance, which in turn subsequently slows down storm formation and growth.

In the NOAA press conference, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said that his city is better prepared to handle a major hurricane today than it was when the Hurricane Katrina hit 10 years ago as a Category 3 hurricane, killing more than 1,800 people—but he stressed that city residents should still prepare.It’s also important to remember that a storm doesn’t necessarily have to be powerful in order to wreck a lot of havoc. Superstorm Sandy wasn’t technically strong enough to be rated as a hurricane when it made landfall in New Jersey on Oct. 29, 2012—yet it caused north of $60 billion in damage because of its sheer size and because it squarely hit some richest, most populated coastal territory in the U.S. There’s no way to predict today where any hurricanes that may form in 2015 could make landfall—and location matters as much as strength.

“We always hope for the best and prepare for the worst,” he said. “We have a lot of work to do, but we’ve learned a lot of the path.”

TIME weather

Heavy Rain Threatens to Wash Out Memorial Day Weekend

Severe thunderstorms were predicted across much of the country

Millions of Americans were under the threat of flash floods this Memorial Day weekend as heavy rain was forecast for waterlogged parts of Texas, Arkansas and the southern Plains.

Thunderstorms in the Midwest, Plains, Texas threatened to bring hail, wind and even isolated tornadoes on Saturday and Sunday, the Weather Channel said.

Average rainfall of up to 3 inches is possible over the next week in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri and parts of Louisiana and Arkansas, with high spots of 5 inches more possible.

“Additional flash flooding is likely with already saturated grounds and creeks, streams and rivers at bank…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME weather

At Least 19 Tornadoes Touch Down From Texas to Minnesota

Storms moved through rural Lyon County, Kan.
Matthew Fowler—AP Storms moved through rural Lyon County, Kan., on May 16, 2015.

A powerful storm system stretching from Texas to Minnesota brought flash flood warnings early Sunday after kicking up at least 19 damaging tornadoes overnight and pounding the region with baseball-sized hail.

Thousands of customers were without power but there were no immediate reports of any deaths or injuries.

Forecasters said the system was continuing its march eastward as radar showed storms across Iowa, Missouri and a large area of Texas.

Severe storms were likely Sunday for the Upper Midwest and mid-Mississippi Valley, including the possibility of isolated tornadoes. Flash flood warnings were also in effect in many areas, including north Texas, NBC DFW reported.

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME Science

One Astronaut’s Stunning Vine Shows a Huge Lightning Storm From Space

"A majestic performance that inspires awe and respect"

American astronaut Terry Virts posted a breathtaking Vine recently that showed a huge lightning storm as seen from the International Space Station. It’s the latest Vine that astronauts have been posting since they started using the app. “Massive lightning storm over India,” Virts wrote on Twitter. “A majestic performance that inspires awe and respect.”

Astronauts have recorded tons of fun footage during their time in space, including this fascinating video from Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, who explained how exactly they use the bathroom in zero gravity.

Now that Virts, Cristoforetti and Anton Shkaplerov will be in a space longer than anticipated, perhaps we’ll see more of these short clips soon.

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