TIME weather

See Astronaut’s Photo of Hurricane Jimena From Space

Hurricane Jimena Space Station Kjell Lindgren
Kjell Lindgren—NASA A view of hurricane Jimena taken from the International Space Station and posted to Twitter by NASA Astronaut Kjell Lindgren on Aug. 30, 2015.

NASA astronaut Kjell Lindgren captured this image of Hurricane Jimena from the International Space Station and posted it to Twitter on Sunday.

Jimena is a Category 4 hurricane that’s located more than 1,330 miles east of Hilo, Hawaii. Weather experts predict it will remain a Category 3 hurricane or greater through Tuesday. According to The Weather Channel, on Saturday and Sunday Jimena was one of three Category 4 hurricanes in the Pacific, along with hurricanes Kilo and Ignacio. Such a concentration of storms is rare.

TIME weather

Florida Faces Flood Threat After Tropical Storm Erika

There could be "significant flooding of streets"

Flood warnings were in effect for most of Florida early Monday as the aftermath of Tropical Storm Erika was expected to bring at least five inches of rain.

The National Weather Service warned people in flood-prone areas to “take action to protect [their] property” after moisture was drawn northward following the storm that killed 20 people in the Caribbean last week.

There could be “significant flooding of streets” and rip currents causing dangerous boating conditions off the coast, the NWS said. Flash flooding and gusty winds were also possible, forecasters warned…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME weather

2 Killed in Seattle-Area Windstorm

Northwest Weather seattle windstorm
Joshua Trujillo—AP People look at a row of downed trees after they were knocked down during a windstorm on Aug. 29, 2015, in Lynnwood, Wash.

Half a million people were left without power

Two people were killed on Saturday in a powerful Seattle-area windstorm that left nearly half a million residents without power, authorities said.

Police said that golf course manager James Fay, 36, of Gig Harbor died after a tree fell on his car while driving home from Costco with his daughter, who was uninjured, the Seattle Times reports. Another victim, Samara Iereneo, 10, of Burien, was killed by a falling tree branch while attending a birthday party at a friend’s home, police said.

About 463,000 people across the Pacific Northwest lost power due to the high-speed winds, which were up to 63 mph in some parts of Washington. The gusts also led to several road and highway closures due to falling trees and branches.

[Seattle Times]

TIME

Tropical Storm Erika Weakens

Dominica goverment orders suspencion of activities due to tropical Storm Erika
Robert Tomge—EPA General view after the passage of Tropical Storm Erika in the Eastern Caribbean in Roseau, Dominica on Aug. 28, 2015.

Tropical Storm Erika dissipated after killing at least 20 people on the Caribbean island of Dominica

(HAVANA) — Tropical Storm Erika dissipated early Saturday, even as its remnants began drenching parts of eastern Cuba. But it left devastation in its path, killing at least 20 people and leaving nearly 50 missing on the small eastern Caribbean island of Dominica, authorities said.

In Haiti, one person died in a mudslide just north of Port-au-Prince, and at least four others were killed in a traffic accident that apparently occurred in the rain.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami said the storm had degenerated into a trough of low pressure by early Saturday after mountains and an unfavorable environment in Hispaniola knocked Erika below tropical storm force.

The eastern Cuban city of Santiago was hit by about two hours of heavy rain as the storm was falling apart Saturday morning. Residents reported no flooding or other damage, saying they wished it would rain more to help alleviate a months-long drought that has hit eastern Cuba particularly hard.

“It’s a little cloudy, there’s some wind, but not very strong. But I wish it would keep raining to fill up the reservoirs, because we really need it,” said Jorge Barrera, a 56-year-old mechanical engineer.

Dominica Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit said in a televised address late Friday that damage inflicted by the storm set that island back 20 years. Some 15 inches (38 centimeters) of rain fell on the mountainous island.

“The extent of the devastation is monumental. It is far worse than expected,” he said, adding that hundreds of homes, bridges and roads have been destroyed. “We have, in essence, to rebuild Dominica.”

Nearly 50 people have been reported missing in Dominica, and that number is expected to rise, opposition leader Lennox Linton said after leaving a meeting with the prime minister and other politicians. The island’s airports remained closed, and some communities were still isolated by flooding and landslides.

On Friday evening, Skerrit asked people to share their resources with each other as foreign aid trickled in.

“This is a period of national tragedy,” he said. “Floods swamped villages, destroyed homes and wiped out roads. Some communities are no longer recognizable.”

Before dissipating, Erika also knocked out power to more than 200,000 people in Puerto Rico and caused more than $16 million in damage to crops there, including plantains, bananas and coffee.

In Haiti, authorities evacuated 254 prisoners in Gonaives to other locations because of flooding, and two people were hospitalized after their home in Port-au-Prince collapsed in heavy rains.

Four people died and another 11 were hospitalized in Leogane, just west of the Haitian capital, when a truck carrying a liquor known locally as clairin crashed into a bus and exploded. Authorities said it apparently was raining when the accident occurred.

While the storm was stumbling over the Dominican Republic and Haiti, John Cagialosi, a hurricane specialist at the center, warned that people in Florida should still brace for heavy rain, said “This is a potentially heavy rain event for a large part of the state,” he said.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott earlier declared a state of emergency for the entire state and officials urged residents to fill gas tanks and stockpile food and water.

Erika was a particularly wet storm, and moved across a region that has been struggling with drought.

Given how dry Puerto Rico and parts of Florida have been, “it could be a net benefit, this thing,” said MIT meteorology professor Kerry Emanuel.

At 9:30 EDT Saturday, the remnants of Erika were located about 130 miles (205 kilometers) east of Camaguey, Cuba, and were moving west-northwest near 22 mph (35 kph) in a general motion expected to continue into the evening, the Hurricane Center said. The storm’s maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph).

The Hurricane Center said Erika’s remnants were expected to move near the coast of eastern and central Cuba on Saturday and into the southeastern Gulf of Mexico on Sunday. It cancelled future public advisories.

Still, the remnants of Erika were expected to produce rainfall of 3 to 6 inches (7.6 to 15.2 centimeters) with maximum amounts of 10 inches (25.4 centimeters) possible across parts of the Dominican Republic, Haiti and eastern and central Cuba through Sundays, the Hurricane Center said.

It added that the rains could cause life-threatening flash floods and mudslides. It starting on Sunday, rainfall of 3 to 5 inches (7.6 to 12.7 centimeters), with locally heavier amounts, is possible across southern and central Florida. Gusty winds could occur over southern Florida beginning Sunday.

Meanwhile in the Pacific, Jimena turned into a powerful Category 4 hurricane with maximum sustained winds near 150 mph (240 kph). The Hurricane Center said it was expected to remain a major hurricane through Monday, though it did not pose an immediate threat to land.

___

Coto reported from San Juan, Puerto Rico. AP writers Carlisle Jno Baptiste in Roseau, Dominica, Ezequiel Abiu Lopez in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, Ben Fox in Miami and Tamara Lush in St. Petersburg, Florida contributed to this report.

TIME Florida

Florida Declares State of Emergency As Tropical Storm Erika Nears

The storm could hit Florida on Monday

(TALLAHASSEE, Fla.) — Gov. Rick Scott is declaring a state of emergency as Tropical Storm Erika nears Florida.

The storm could hit the peninsula Monday. Scott made his declaration shortly after forecasters adjusted the trajectory of the storm to show that it’s predicted to go through the middle of the state.

Scott’s emergency order says Erika “poses a severe threat to the entire state.”

The order calls for the activation of the National Guard and gives authorities the ability to waive tolls and rules to allow emergency crews and vehicles to move throughout the state.

A hurricane hasn’t hit Florida in 10 years. The latest forecasts show that Erika will remain a tropical storm when it makes landfall.

On Friday, Erika lashed Puerto Rico with wind and rain and had killed at least four people. The storm was about 90 miles east-southeast of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republican, and was moving west at 17 mph with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph.

Read next: Tropical Storm Erika Kills 4 People in Dominica

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TIME weather

Tropical Storm Erika Kills 4 People in Dominica

Tropical Storm Erika is pictured in the Atlantic Ocean northeast of Venezuela in this NASA handout satellite photo
NASA/Reuters Tropical Storm Erika is pictured in the Atlantic Ocean northeast of Venezuela in this NASA handout satellite photo on Aug. 26, 2015.

The storm caused blackouts and took out water supplies on the island

(ROSEAU, Dominica) — Streets across Dominica turned into fast-flowing rivers that swept up cars as Tropical Storm Erika pummeled the eastern Caribbean island, unleashing landslides and killing at least four people.

The storm, which forecasters said could reach Florida as a hurricane on Monday, knocked out power and water supplies on Dominica as it dumped 15 inches (38 centimeters) of rain on the small island and headed west into the Caribbean Sea.

An elderly blind man and two children were killed when a mudslide crashed into their home in the southeast of the island, said Police Superintendent Daniel Carbon. Another man was found dead near his home in the capital of Roseau after a mudslide, but the cause of death was could not be immediately determined, Carbon told The Associated Press.

Police said another 20 people have been reported missing.

Erika was centered about 175 miles (280 kilometers) west of Guadeloupe, and was moving west at 15 mph (24 kph) with maximum sustained winds that had slipped slightly to 45 mph (75 kph), according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Erika was expected to move near Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands on Thursday and be near or just north of the Dominican Republic on Friday as it heads toward Florida early next week, possibly as a hurricane.

Chris Landsea, a meteorologist at the hurricane center, said the storm could dissipate if it passed over Hispaniola or Puerto Rico or it could gather and pose a potential threat to Florida next week. “The uncertainties are very high,” he said.

As the storm entered the Caribbean, it did the heaviest damage to Dominica, an island of about 72,000 people of lush forests and steep terrain. Authorities were still conducting a full damage assessment after rivers surged over their banks and walls of mud surged into homes.

About 80 percent of the island was without electricity, and water supply was cut off, authorities said. Trees and light poles were strewn across streets as water rushed over parked cars and ripped the scaffolding off some buildings. The main airport was closed due to flooding, with water rushing over at least one small plane.

The main river that cuts through the capital overflowed its banks and surging water crashed into the principal bridge that leads into Roseau.

“The capital city is a wreck,” policewoman Teesha Alfred said. “It is a sight to behold. It’s a disaster.”

Erika was likely to hit the island of Hispaniola, which is shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic, said chief forecaster James Franklin at the National Hurricane Center.

“That would certainly not be good news for Hispaniola,” he said. “They’re very vulnerable to flooding. And even if Erika is a weak system that could be very bad there.”

Officials shuttered schools, government offices and businesses across the region and warned of flash flooding because of dry conditions caused by the worst drought to hit the Caribbean in recent years. Authorities warned power and water service might be temporarily cut off.

Puerto Rico Gov. Alejandro Garcia Padilla said the storm could bring badly needed rains to the parched U.S. territory.

“We’re happy given the dry conditions, but it does highlight the need to be on alert,” he said, adding that heavy downpours could lead to flash floods. He activated the National Guard as a precaution.

The heaviest rains were expected to hit Puerto Rico’s eastern region, with the storm expected to pass about 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of the island overnight Thursday, said Odalys Martinez, with the National Weather Service in San Juan.

Erika is expected to dump between 4 to 8 inches (10 to 20 centimeters) of rain across the region, with up to 12 inches (31 centimeters) in some areas.

Dozens of flights were canceled in the region, and the U.S. Coast Guard closed all ports in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Meanwhile in the Pacific, Ignacio strengthened into a hurricane. The storm’s maximum sustained winds increased Thursday morning to 90 mph (150 kph).

Hurricane Ignacio was centered about 1,135 miles (1,825 kilometers) east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii, and was moving west-northwest near 13 mph (20 kph).

Also in the Pacific, a new tropical storm formed Thursday morning. Tropical Storm Jimena had maximum sustained winds near 45 mph (75 kph) and was expected to strengthen to a hurricane Friday. Jimena was centered about 890 miles (1,430 kilometers) south-southwest of the southern tip of Mexico’s Baja California peninsula.

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Coto reported from San Juan, Puerto Rico. Associated Press reporters Ben Fox and Tony Winton in Miami contributed to this report.

TIME weather

This Graphic Shows How Hurricane Katrina Changed New Orleans

How one of the nation's deadliest storms left an American city a different place

Correction appended

On Aug. 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, after gaining strength in the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Within days the city’s levees collapsed, tens of thousands were left stranded in their homes, and thousands more sought shelter at the city’s Superdome, where conditions rapidly deteriorated. Almost 2,000 people died in the storm, and hundreds of thousands were forced to relocate, some permanently.

Ten years on, New Orleans is a city still recovering, a place where the storm’s path still leaves a scar. The costliest hurricane on record dramatically changed the city’s demographics, neighborhoods, and economy. Below, this graphic helps illustrate how one of the nation’s deadliest hurricanes forever altered an American city.

Katrina3

Correction: This graphic originally misstated the costs of various hurricanes. They are in the billions of dollars.

Read next: New Orleans, Here &

TIME weather

Tropical Storm Erika Approaches the Eastern Caribbean

Tropical Storm Erika is pictured in the Atlantic Ocean northeast of Venezuela in this NASA handout satellite photo
NASA/Reuters Tropical Storm Erika is pictured in the Atlantic Ocean northeast of Venezuela on Aug. 26, 2015

Tropical storm warnings were issued for Puerto Rico, the U.S. and British Virgin Islands and the Leeward Islands

(SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico) — Governments ordered schools, airports and even casinos to close and they prepared shelters as Tropical Storm Erika approached the eastern Caribbean on Wednesday.

The storm was located about 245 miles (395 kilometers) east-southeast of Antigua and was moving west at 17 mph (28 kph). Maximum sustained winds increased Wednesday morning to near 45 mph (75 kph), but the storm was not forecast to gain strength over the next two days.

Erika was expected to move just north of Barbuda late Wednesday as it enters the Caribbean, said Philmore Mullin, director of Antigua and Barbuda’s National Office of Disaster Services.

He said the twin-island nation could experience flash flooding given the extremely dry conditions caused by the worst drought to hit the Caribbean in recent years.

“This is a serious storm, and they need to make sure preparations are in place,” he said.

Authorities in the nearby Dutch Caribbean territory of St. Maarten said schools and government offices would be closed on Thursday. They also asked that casinos, restaurants and other businesses close by midnight Wednesday. Officials warned they might temporarily suspend power and water service as the storm approaches.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Erika would move over or near parts of the Leeward Islands on Wednesday night and then near Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands on Thursday.

All airports in the U.S. Virgin Islands will be closed to incoming flights until Friday, and government offices will be closed as well, said Gov. Kenneth Mapp.

“This is a fast-moving storm, and so we expect conditions to deteriorate rapidly,” he said, warning that authorities would not rescue anyone during tropical storm force winds.

Tropical storm warnings were issued for Puerto Rico, the U.S. and British Virgin Islands and the Leeward Islands. Erika was expected to dump between 3 to 5 inches (8 to 13 centimeters) of rain, and up to 8 inches (20 centimeters) in some areas.

Antigua-based regional airline LIAT and Puerto Rico-based Seaborne Airlines have canceled more than two dozen flights through Friday because of the storm, and officials in Puerto Rico said they would suspend ferry transportation between the main island and the popular sister islands of Culebra and Vieques starting Thursday.

Meanwhile in the Pacific, Tropical Storm Ignacio gained some strength. The storm’s maximum sustained winds increased to nearly 60 mph (95 kph), and it was expected to strengthen to a hurricane by Thursday.

Ignacio was centered about 1,425 miles (2,290 kilometers) east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii, and was moving west at 9 mph (15 kph).

___

Associated Press reporter Judy Fitzpatrick in Philipsburg, St. Maarten contributed to this report.

TIME Louisiana

Hurricane Katrina by the Numbers: 10 Years Later

Katrina remains the most catastrophic and costly hurricane in U.S. history

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the tragic day that Hurricane Katrina violently swept through the southeastern U.S. The historic storm killed almost 2,000 people, left thousands stranded without homes and scarred many lives for years to come.

Katrina initially touched down in southeast Louisiana as a Category 3 storm on Aug. 29, 2005, at 6 a.m. As it worked its way up the southeast, it left the city of New Orleans unrecognizable. Over 100,000 homes were destroyed, and 80% of the city was flooded.

The government issued close to $142 billion in relief funds for the southeast region of the country, providing injured and displaced people, food, shelter and medical care.

The southeastern U.S. is still recovering 10 years later. The population of New Orleans dropped drastically after Hurricane Katrina, from 483,633 residents before the storm, down to around 200,000 in 2006. Relief organizations like Habitat for Humanity and the American Red Cross have made it possible for the New Orleans population to increase to approximately 378,315 residents.

Watch the video above to see the evolution of New Orleans, 10 years after Hurricane Katrina.

Read next: New Orleans, Here & Now

TIME weather

Hurricane Danny Strengthens Into Category 3 Storm

National Hurricane Center Danny
Joe Raedle—Getty Images Stacy Stewart, Senior Hurricane Specialist at the National Hurricane Center, tracks Hurricane Danny on computer screens as it becomes the first of the 2015 Atlantic hurricane season on Aug. 20, 2015 in Miami.

Danny is likely to weaken over the weekend

(MIAMI) — Hurricane Danny has strengthened into a Category 3 storm as it moves across the Atlantic far from land.

The hurricane’s maximum sustained winds Friday had increased to near 115 mph (185 kph). The U.S. National Hurricane Center says the hurricane is not expected to intensify, and a weakening trend is forecast to begin later Friday.

The hurricane is centered about 900 miles (1448 kilometers) east of the Leeward Islands.

Hurricane Danny doesn’t currently pose a threat to land but the hurricane center says those in the Leeward Islands should monitor its progress.

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