TIME Britain

Harry Potter Owls Mistreated, Animal Cruelty Group Says

PETA has accused 'The Making of Harry Potter' tour of mis-treating owls

The successful Warner Bros studio tour of ‘The Making of Harry Potter’ has come under fire for its treatment of animals.

The Harry Potter attraction at Warner Bros Studio Tour London opened in 2012 and allows fans to tour the sets, sample Butterbeer and meet animals from the franchise, including Harry’s owl.

Animal rights group PETA has accused the tour of mistreating the owls that appear on the tour. After secretly filming the tour, PETA has accused the tour operators of keeping the “distressed birds… tethered in tiny cages for hours and forced to perform tricks.”

“Confining frightened owls to tiny cages where they can only chew at their tethers in frustration goes against every message of respect and kindness that J.K. Rowling’s wonderful books taught us,” PETA director Mimi Bekhechi told the BBC.

Warner Bros Studio Tour London told the BBC, “It is essential the welfare of the birds… is of the highest standard.” They also said that they had asked the company that owns the birds, Birds and Animals, to “review this matter.”

Meanwhile a spokesperson for Birds and Animals told the BBC, “The owls are always given regular breaks and closely monitored by a vet. Now that we have had the opportunity to see the footage, we have instigated a review of the issues raised.” They added: “We will take appropriate action to ensure that the birds and animals always receive the very best care.”

[BBC]

TIME U.K.

A 15-Year-Old Just Redesigned the British Pound Coin

This photo issued by HM Treasury shows the side of a new one pound coin announced by the Government.
The Royal Mint—AP This photo issued by HM Treasury shows the side of a new one pound coin announced by the Government.

Young man designs old coin

The new British one pound coin has been designed by a 15-year-old who beat out more than 6,000 entries.

David Pearce’s drawing contains the national emblems of the United Kingdom, with a rose, leek, thistle and shamrock emerging from a Royal Coronet, reports Sky News. The drawing was slightly refined by coin artist David Lawrence and lettering expert Stephen Raw.

The teenager from the West Midlands city of Walsall said, “I spent a lot of time researching what coin designs looked like and what sort of designs would represent all parts of the UK before submitting my idea and I honestly cannot believe I have won.”

The Royal Mint

The coin is being replaced for the first time in more than 30 years because of its vulnerability to counterfeiters.

Pearce’s design will feature on the new currency that will be released in 2017.

[Sky News]

Read next: Prince Harry: Behind ‘My Tough Decision’ to Leave the Army

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TIME remembrances

Free Bassist Andy Fraser, ‘All Right Now’ Co-Writer, Dies

Andy Fraser in London.
Richard Lewis—WireImage for Gibson Musical Instruments UK/Getty Images Andy Fraser in London

The co-author of the "All Right Now" rock anthem died in California at age 62

TEMECULA, Calif. (AP) — Andy Fraser, who co-wrote the rousing rock anthem “All Right Now” when he was the teenage bassist for the British rock band Free, has died in California at age 62.

Fraser had been living in the Southern California desert community of Temecula, where he died Monday, the Riverside County coroner said in a statement. The cause of death is not yet known and remains under investigation.

At age 15, the London-born Fraser briefly became a member of John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. The group functioned as a training ground for young British rockers including Eric Clapton and Rolling Stones guitarist Mick Taylor.

Within a year, Fraser became a founding member of Free. The band’s most prominent member was singer and guitarist Paul Rodgers, who would also go on to front Bad Company and The Firm.

The band’s biggest hit by far was 1970’s “All Right Now,” which remains one of the defining hits of classic rock radio. Fraser also produced the track and plays a bass solo on it.

The song is also a staple of football stadiums. The Stanford University and University of Southern California marching bands each play it at virtually every game.

Fraser kept playing music for most of his life, but he would never equal the success he had as a teen with Free, which broke up in 1972.

He and Rodgers took the stage together to play “All Right Now” at Woodstock ’94, the reboot of the classic music festival.

TIME Britain

Prince Harry Needs a New Job

Prince Harry Hosts Coach Core Graduation Ceremony
Chris Jackson—Getty Images Prince Harry chats with Coach Core graduates during a Coach Core Graduation event at St James's Palace on Jan. 14, 2015 in London, England.

The 30-year-old prince is leaving the armed forces after 10 years and is looking for a new job

It’s official: Prince Harry is looking for a new job.

The 30-year-old royal is set to end his 10-year military career, Kensington Palace confirmed in a statement on Tuesday. That career has seen Harry qualify as an Apache pilot and complete two tours of Afghanistan. Yet come June, when he will leave the armed forces, the prince will be “actively considering other longer term employment opportunities.”

In the statement, Harry said that, “After a decade of service, moving on from the Army has been a really tough decision. I consider myself incredibly lucky to have had the chance to do some very challenging jobs and have met many fantastic people in the process.” He added, “I am considering the options for the future and I am really excited about the possibilities…. So while I am finishing one part of my life, I am getting straight into a new chapter.”

Harry, who already serves as the patron of several charities, already lined up volunteering stints that could very well lead to a full-time gig.

The prince will be be spending part of the summer volunteering with field-based conservation experts in Africa and spending time learning how local communities in sub-Saharan Africa are working to protect and conserve natural resources and wildlife.

Following his time in Africa, Harry will head back to London, where he is slated to volunteer with the U.K.’s Ministry of Defense’s Recovery Capability program, which supports wounded, injured and sick military staff. He’ll also continue to work with case officers at London District’s Personnel Recovery Unit, which he has been doing since last year, alongside both those who are administering and receiving physical and mental care. According to Kensington Palace, this work “will enable him to continue developing his knowledge of the entire recovery process, placing him in an informed position to further support wounded, injured, or sick servicemen and women into the future.”

Working with veterans makes sense for Harry, who last year founded the Invictus Games, a multi-sport event for wounded military men and women. In Harry’s statement on Tuesday, he revealed his plans to continue his work with the event, saying he was set on “making sure the next few Invictus Games are as amazing as the last.”

Finding a suitable working role can be challenging for a royal, especially one wanting to avoid a fully packed schedule of official royal appearances and overseas tours—and one who has a reputation as a party boy. Many royals, past and present, have spent their time working with charities. Harry’s late mother, Princess Diana, was particularly known for her charity work, serving as president or patron of more than 100 charities. Similarly, Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, serves as the patron of various charities, including the East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices and the National Portrait Gallery. Then there’s Harry’s older brother William, the Duke of Cambridge, who has opted for service-based work. After seven years in the military himself, William is now gearing up to work as an air ambulance helicopter pilot, based in Cambridge and Norwich. (William, who is second in line to the throne, after his father Charles, has said he’ll donate his salary to charity.)

No matter what job Harry eventually chooses, he’ll have to balance it with his other lifelong work as a member of the royal family. The prince knows this. According to Kensington Palace, Harry will continue to support his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, attending official engagements in her honor, including embarking on a royal tour to New Zealand in May.

Read next: Prince Harry: Behind ‘My Tough Decision’ to Leave the Army

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TIME Television

British PM Joins Jeremy Clarkson Controversy as New Details Emerge

Television presenter Jeremy Clarkson is mobbed by journalists as he leaves an address in London, March 11, 2015.
Peter Nicholls—Reuters Jeremy Clarkson is mobbed by journalists in London, March 11, 2015.

The politician and the Top Gear host are long-time friends

In the wake of Jeremy Clarkson’s suspension a huge number of fans have come out to offer their support — including the prime minister, David Cameron.

In an interview with the BBC, Cameron was asked to comment on the incident which saw Clarkson, a 54-year-old auto journalist and presenter of Top Gear suspended by the BBC after he allegedly punched a producer. The final episodes of the current Top Gear season were also dropped. Noting that Clarkson was a friend of his, Cameron said, “because he is such a talent and he amuses and entertains so many people, including my children, who’d be heartbroken if Top Gear was taken off air, I hope this can be sorted out, because it’s a great programme and he’s a great talent.”

He added that he didn’t “want to interfere” in the BBC’s handling of the incident. Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg echoed Cameron on LBC Radio, saying, “The guy’s obviously incredibly popular and the show that he does provides entertainment to millions of people, but who is responsible for determining whether he carries on or not is his employers.”

Though the BBC has only referred to the incident as a “fracas,” according to a report in the Daily Mirror, Clarkson hit the Top Gear producer after he’d finished filming “when he was told he would not get the steak he wanted,” as all that was available was “soup and a cold meat platter.”

There are plenty of Clarkson fans who have been actively campaigning to have the presenter reinstated at the popular auto show. An online petition asking for Clarkson’s return to Top Gear was started on Tuesday and has already amassed more than 700,000 signatures. The series has a huge following, both in Britain and around the world, and fans seem to particularly love Clarkson’s often offensive humor and disregard for political correctness. One signature on the petition, from Charlie Houghton of Chelmsford, England, includes the note, “Jeremy is a bastion of light in a dark PC world.”

This isn’t the first time that Clarkson has found himself at the center of a controversy. Just last year, the presenter was given a final warning from the BBC after unused Top Gear footage, found by the Daily Mirror, appeared to show Clarkson use the N-word. Other past incidents — bigoted commentary, as well as physical altercation — have prompted many to call for his dismissal over the years.

The BBC appears to be taking the latest incident seriously. BBC executive Ken MacQuarrie will chair a disciplinary hearing in order to determine whether Clarkson stays or goes. Yet BBC director general Tony Hall told the Guardian that there was no set timeline for the hearing, saying on Thursday, “We have got to get the people who are impacted by this together. We began that work yesterday.” He also said, “I am not going to speculate [what will happen to Clarkson]. The first task is to get the facts and once you’ve got the facts then you can make decisions, but I need facts.”

For his part, Clarkson seems to be taking the latest media storm in stride. He reportedly told a group of reporters outside his London home on Wednesday night that the suspension would allow him to take in some soccer, saying, “At least I’m going to be able to get to the Chelsea match tonight.”

Read more: Here’s 6 Times the BBC Should Have Suspended Jeremy Clarkson But Didn’t

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TIME Music

Rhodes Is Never ‘Turning Back Around’ in His New Video: Premiere

The hotly tipped singer's new clip is premiering exclusively on TIME

It’s a bold statement when an artist chooses to go by one name, but singer-songwriter Rhodes — first name: David — has the talent to back up his singular moniker.

The 25-year-old, who hails from Hitchin, east England, began his musical career just two years ago — but he’s already opened for the likes of Sam Smith (to whom he is routinely compared), Laura Marling, Rufus Wainwright and London Grammar. Plus, he played at both Glastonbury and the London Burberry show in 2014. Rhodes has also released three EPs in the past 18 months and has been busy recording his debut album, due out this summer. The first single from the album, called “Turning Back Around,” will be released on April 5, but the video for the track premieres on TIME today.

The video was shot over several days in Cyprus earlier this year. “I wrote the song about running away from something and wanted the momentum of the percussion to feel like I was never turning back,” Rhodes says of the track. In addition to the building drums, the serene, soaring vocals of the song show why he’s been compared to greats like Smith, Adele and even Coldplay’s Chris Martin.

Watch up top.

TIME england

London Rail Work Unearths Thousands of Skeletons From Bedlam

Scientists hope thousands of skeletons recently found in a Bedlam can reveal new information about the bubonic plague

(LONDON) — They came from every parish of London, and from all walks of life, and ended up in a burial ground called Bedlam. Now scientists hope their centuries-old skeletons can reveal new information about how long-ago Londoners lived — and about the bubonic plague that often killed them.

Archaeologists announced Monday that they have begun excavating the bones of some 3,000 people interred in the 16th and 17th centuries, who now lie in the path of the Crossrail transit line. They will be pored over by scientists before being reburied elsewhere.

One recent workday, just yards from teeming Liverpool Street railway station, researchers in orange overalls scraped, sifted and gently removed skeletons embedded in the dark earth. In one corner of the site, the skeleton of an adult lay beside the fragile remains of a baby, the wooden outline of its coffin still visible. Most were less intact, a jumble of bones and skulls.

“Part of the skill of it is actually working out which bones go with which,” said Alison Telfer, a project officer with Museum of London Archaeology, which is overseeing the dig.

Due to open in 2018, the 73-mi. trans-London Crossrail line is Britain’s biggest construction project, and its largest archaeological dig for decades. The central 21-kilometer (13-mile) section runs underground, which has meant tunneling beneath some of the oldest and most densely populated parts of the city.

For Londoners, that has brought years of noise and disruption, but for archaeologists it’s like Christmas. Almost every shovelful of earth has uncovered a piece of history, or prehistory: bison and mammoth bones; Roman horseshoes; medieval ice skates; the remains of a moated Tudor manor house.

Chief archaeologist Jay Carver says the Bedlam dig could be the most revealing yet.

“It’s going to be archaeologically the most important sample we have of the population of London from the 16th and 17th centuries,” Carver said.

Bedlam cemetery opened in 1569 to take the overspill as the city’s churchyard burial grounds filled up. It is the final resting place of prosperous citizens and paupers, religious dissenters including the 17th-century revolutionary Robert Lockyer and patients from Bedlam Hospital, the world’s first asylum for the mentally ill. The hospital’s name, a corruption of Bethlehem, became a synonym for chaos.

Tests on the bones by osteologists may reveal where these Londoners came from, what they ate and what ailed them — which in many cases was the plague. There were four outbreaks of the deadly disease over the two centuries the cemetery was in use, including the “Great Plague” that killed 100,000 people in 1665.

Carver says researchers will analyze DNA taken from pulp in the skeletons’ teeth to help fill in the “evolutionary tree of the plague bacteria.”

The technique was used to discover the plague bacterium, Yersinia pestis, in 14th-century skeletons excavated at another Crossrail site, identifying them as victims of the Black Death that wiped out half the city’s population in 1348.

Scientists should be able to compare the bacterium found in Bedlam’s plague victims with the 14th-century samples, helping to understand whether the disease — which still infects several thousand people a year — has evolved over the centuries.

Sixty archaeologists working in shifts — 16 hours a day, six days a week — will spend about a month removing the remains. After scientific study, they will be reburied on Canvey Island in the Thames Estuary — the latest in a long line of Londoners to move east out of the congested city.

The old burial ground will be the site of a new train station, whose users will probably give little thought to the history beneath their feet.

But Telfer says she never forgets that these fragile bones were once living, breathing individuals.

“When you are doing something like this, you do feel a connection with them,” she said. “I think you have a responsibility to treat them with great respect. It’s quite a special process.”

TIME movies

Fifty Shades Is on Track to Earn $500 Million

Sam Taylor-Johnson, Jamie Dornan, Dakota Johnson and E.L. James pose for photographers upon arrival at the UK premiere of the film Fifty Shades of Grey in London, Feb. 12, 2015
Joel Ryan—Invision/AP Sam Taylor-Johnson, Jamie Dornan, Dakota Johnson and E.L. James pose for photographers upon arrival at the UK premiere of the film Fifty Shades of Grey in London, Feb. 12, 2015

Fifty Shades of Grey has earned $338.4 million from global box offices, becoming Universal Studios’ highest-grossing R-rated film internationally, and is fast approaching a combined domestic and international haul of $500 million.

The film has also been No. 1 for the third consecutive week in a row and is the best-selling film of the year so far.

Its $338.4 million overseas earnings now outrank those of Universal’s previous best-performing R-rated international hit, Ted, which earned $332.4 million. Domestic earnings of $147.8 million mean the film has earned $486 million so far.

The largest foreign market for the film has been the U.K., where it has earned $46.9 million.

[Deadline]

TIME Bizarre

Man Falls 600 Ft. Down Mountain, Almost Lands on Rescue Team

170990559
polarisandy—Flickr/Getty Helvellyn in winter

And uses up his store of good luck for quite some time

While climbing a mountain Sunday in England’s rugged Lake District, a British man tumbled 600 ft. down a snow-covered slope — only to land in the path of a rescue team.

David Spain, 28, suffered minor injuries — a dislocated shoulder, cuts and bruises — after falling down the 3,200-ft. peak of Helvellyn mountain, which has killed three people this year. He was propelled downward by a gust of wind during a blizzard that started midclimb, according to the Manchester Evening News.

He ended up near a rescue team conducting a training exercise. “I shouted and shouted until they saw me … I was really lucky,” said Spain, who is currently recuperating with his fiancée until his wedding in May.

“This is one lucky chap — he should buy a lottery ticket,” said rescue official Mike Blakey.

[Manchester Evening News]

TIME Soccer

Barcelona, Juventus Win in Champions League

Barcelona's Luis Suarez celebrates during the Champions League round 16 match between Manchester City and Barcelona at the Etihad Stadium, in Manchester, England, Feb. 24, 2015
Rui Vieira—AP Barcelona's Luis Suarez celebrates during the Champions League match at the Etihad Stadium in Manchester, England, on Feb. 24, 2015

The Spanish club is in command to reach the quarterfinals for the eighth straight year

(MANCHESTER, England) — Luis Suarez marked his return to England by scoring both Barcelona’s goals in a 2-1 win over Manchester City in the Champions League on Tuesday night, putting the Spanish club in command to reach the quarterfinals for the eighth straight year.

Suarez, who transferred from Liverpool last summer, scored close-range goals in the 16th and 30th minutes.

Sergio Aguero got City’s goal in the 69th, and the hosts played a man short after defender Gael Clichy was given his second yellow card in the 73rd by German referee Felix Brych.

Lionel Messi could have boosted Barcelona’s lead, but City goalkeeper Joe Hart saved his penalty kick in the final seconds of stoppage time after a foul by Pablo Zabaleta. Messi sent a header wide off the rebound.

The second leg of the total-goals series is March 18 in Spain. Man City was knocked out by Barcelona on 4-aggregate at the same stage last season and had a player ejected in both legs.

In the night’s other first-leg, second-round match, Juventus beat Borussia Dortmund 2-1 in Turin.

Carlos Tevez put the hosts ahead in the 13th minute, but Marco Reus tied the score five minutes later when he came in alone on goal after defender Giorgio Chiellini slipped.

Alvaro Morata created the opener with a cross/shot that goalkeeper Roman Weidenfeller parried into Tevez’s path and scored the tiebreaking goal in the 43rd.

Juventus midfielder Andrea Pirlo got hurt and left in the 37th,

The Bianconeri have lost one of 15 European games since moving into Juventus Stadium in 2011, a defeat to Bayern Munich two years ago.

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