TIME California

This California Town Conserved So Much Water It Had to Dump 550,000 Gallons Of It

"Hopefully, this will be a learning experience," one resident said

California is going through one of the worst droughts in its history, with residents around the state being asked to conserve as much water as possible. But the town of Poway did such a good job, officials had to dump more than half a million gallons.

According to Poway’s Mayor, Steve Vaus, the water sat in the overheated Blue Crystal Reservoir for so long, that a chemical imbalance of chloramine developed, rendering it unsafe to drink, ABC10 News reports.

“It was a perfect storm of conservation and heat,” Vaus told ABC10 News.

The amount that was dumped could have supplied four households for a year, the station says.

Vaus said that the water couldn’t be released back into the town’s lake, as it would’ve been too expensive to transport it there from the reservoir. Instead, it was released into a nearby canyon.

“Hopefully, this will be a learning experience,” Poway resident Susan Killen told ABC10 News.

The city is trying to come up with a plan to prevent this kind of situation from happening again, but is facing monetary restrictions — a standalone recycling system would cost over $1 million.

[ABC10 News]

TIME Syria

U.S. Drone Strike Kills Senior ISIS Leader

Mideast Syria Islamic State
Uncredited—AP This photo provided by a website of the Islamic State militants, taken June 25, 2015, shows fighters of the Islamic State group infiltrate toward Syrian government forces positions in the predominantly Kurdish Syrian city of Hassakeh, Syria

Tariq bin Tahar al-'Awni al-Harzi, a Tunisian, was killed along with another fighter

(WASHINGTON) — A coalition airstrike in Syria has killed a senior Islamic State leader, who has been responsible for moving fighters and weapons from Libya to Syria, the Pentagon said Thursday.

A senior U.S. official said that Tariq bin Tahar al-‘Awni al-Harzi, a Tunisian, and another fighter with him were killed by a U.S. drone strike and that there were no reports of any civilian casualties in the operation. The official was not authorized to discuss the operation publicly so spoke on condition of anonymity.

According to Capt. Jeff Davis, a Pentagon spokesman, al-Harzi was killed June 16 in Shaddadi. He said that al-Harzi coordinated the use of suicide bombing attacks in Iraq, and helped with the movement of foreign fighters back and force across the Syria-Iraq border.

Davis said al-Harzi’s death will hurt the Islamic State’s ability to move foreign fighters in and out of the region.

According to the military joint task force coordinating the operations in Iraq and Syria, there were airstrikes at four locations in Syria that day, including two near Al Hasakah, which is near Shaddadi. Thestrikes near al Hasakah hit an Islamic State tactical unit and destroyed a vehicle and two antenna arrays.

Last September, the U.S. Treasury Department imposed economic sanctions on al-Harzi and seven other individuals that it said have helped finance or facilitate the movement of foreign fighters joining the Islamic State and the Nusra Front. Both groups have been targeted by coalition strikes in Syria.

Treasury officials designated al-Harzi a global terrorist, saying he was based in Syria. The Treasury statement identified him as the Islamic State group’s “amir of suicide bombers,” saying he recruited foreign fighters for suicide attacks in Iraq and Syria.

In a related matter, Vice President Joe Biden spoke with Iraq Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi Thursday to talk about the ongoing efforts to defeat Islamic State militants.

TIME Civil Rights

Montana Polygamist Seeks ‘Legitimacy’ After Supreme Court Ruling

"Ours is a happy, functional, loving family," Nathan Collier tells TIME

On Tuesday, Nathan Collier went to the Yellowstone County Courthouse in his hometown of Billings, Montana, to register to get married to his partner Christine. The problem? Collier has been married to wife Victoria since 2000. And under Montana law, bigamy is outlawed except for faith reasons; Collier is not marrying Christine and Victoria due to his religious beliefs, making his marriage license illegal under bigamy laws.

“Everyday, we have to break the law to exist as a family,” Collier said in an interview with TIME. “We’re tired of it.”

The Montana trio argue that under Friday’s landmark Supreme Court decision recognizing same-sex marriage across the country as legal, their polygamous relationship should be legally recognized and guaranteed the same rights as heterosexual and homosexual marriages. “If you read the justice’s statement, it applies to polygamists,” Collier said.

He’s referring to the dissent by Chief Justice John Roberts, who argued that the reasoning for giving same-sex couples the right to marry “would apply with equal force to the claim of a fundamental right to plural marriage.”

Spurred by Roberts’ words, the three decided to go to the courthouse Tuesday armed with the Supreme Court ruling. County clerks initially denied to give a marriage license upon learning that Collier’s marriage with Victoria had not been dissolved. But the clerk returned afterwards, saying that they would refer to the county attorney’s office before making a decision. The county’s chief civil litigator is looking to have a formal response by early next week:

Collier and his two “wives” have a long and complicated history since meeting in 1999. In 2000, Collier legally married Victoria; he and Christine had a “religious ceremony” that year as well. After breaking up, Christine legally married another man; that marriage ended in divorce in 2006. In 2007, Collier and Christine again had a religious ceremony, and Christine joined Victoria and Collier in their home. Together, the family has five children.

The way Collier, Victoria, and Christine were treated at the courthouse made the family feel “violated,” Collier said. “We feel entitled for a legal legitimacy and for [the Yellowstone County Courthouse] to deny this is a violation of our civil rights … We feel the marriage equality law applies to us.”

Collier says that all his family seeks to do is be legally recognized and not live in fear anymore. If that means that he can bring polygamous relationships to the national conversation, Collier says he’d be willing to be arrested or sue the state if his license gets denied. “Ours is a happy, functional, loving family,” he said. “I’m not trying to redefine marriage. I’m not forcing anyone to believe in polygamy. We’re only defining marriage for us. We just want legitimacy.”

TIME Soccer

U.S. Files Formal Extradition Request For Seven FIFA Officials

Argentine businessmen Mariano Jinkis and Hugo who are wanted by U.S. prosecutors in a FIFA bribery investigation, are escorted by police officers after they turned themselves in to authorities in Buenos Aires
Enrique Marcarian —REUTERS Argentine businessmen Mariano Jinkis and his father Hugo who are wanted by U.S. prosecutors in a FIFA bribery investigation, are escorted by police officers after they turned themselves in to authorities in Buenos Aires, Argentina, June 18, 2015

The requests are based on a U.S. probe into alleged bribery

(ZURICH) — The United States has submitted a formal request for Switzerland to extradite seven FIFA officials arrested as part of a corruption probe in Zurich in May, Swiss officials said Thursday.

Switzerland’s Federal Office of Justice said the requests were received July 1, within the 40-day deadline required.

They are based on a U.S. federal probe into alleged bribery and racketeering worth more than $150 million involving high-ranking officials at soccer’s world governing body.

All seven men, who face around 20 years in prison, have already objected to extradition.

They will be heard by Zurich police and granted a 14-day period to respond to federal officials about the extradition request, after which the Federal Office of Justice will rule on whether to extradite them. That ruling can be appealed to Switzerland’s top criminal court and supreme court.

The seven men, arrested May 27 in early-morning raids at a luxury Zurich hotel, include FIFA vice president Jeffrey Webb of the Cayman Islands and former FIFA vice president Eugenio Figueredo of Uruguay.

Costa Rican soccer federation president Eduardo Li was arrested two days before he was due to formally join FIFA’s executive committee.

Former Brazilian federation chief Jose Maria Marin led the 2014 World Cup local organizing committee and is a member of the FIFA panel organizing the Rio de Janeiro Olympics tournaments.

The others are Venezuela FA chief Rafael Esquivel; FIFA staffer Julio Rocha, a development officer from Nicaragua; and Costas Takkas, a Briton who works for CONCACAF President Webb.

The seven are among 14 indicted by the U.S. Justice Department. Four more men have entered guilty pleas in the wide-ranging corruption case.

TIME faith

A Cannabis Church Tests Indiana’s Religious-Freedom Law

Members of the congregation at the First Church of Cannabis sing and dance during the church's first service on July 1, 2015, in Indianapolis.
Michael Conroy—AP Members of the congregation at the First Church of Cannabis sing and dance during the church's first service on July 1, 2015, in Indianapolis

The group claims opposition to their pot worship is religious persecution

A church devoted to the legalization of marijuana held its first service in Indianapolis on Wednesday.

The First Church of Cannabis, founded in March of this year with members who identify as Cannaterians, is seeking to legalize marijuana in Indiana as a religious liberty. The church is citing the state’s controversial Religious Freedom and Restoration Act, which went into effect on Wednesday. The law, which permits companies and individuals to defend themselves in legal proceedings by citing religious beliefs, has been attacked by opponents who argue that it could be used by those who want to discriminate against LGBT people. But the First Church of Cannabis hopes to turn that concern on its head, using the law to allow for legal marijuana use.

The gathering on Wednesday included Christian hymns, from the traditional “Amazing Grace” to a rendition of the marijuana smokers’ anthem, “Mary Jane.”

But the service after the hymns was decidedly nontraditional, including testimony from church members on medical marijuana and pot growers arguing for their legalization. (The church grounds had no marijuana, as marijuana possession is illegal in Indiana.)

The Cannaterians, a group which counts its worshipers in the thousands and asks its members for a $4.20 tithing per month, view marijuana as a religious sacrament, according to Bill Levin, the “Grand Poobah” of the church, who said that opposition to the church and its teachings was akin to religious persecution.

“Among its distinguishing features are its belief in the gift of Cannabis from a supreme power from which man and woman are to use for the betterment of humankind,” the church’s website reads.

The First Church of Cannabis isn’t the first group to challenge the intersection of federal law and religion. Canna Care, a “Christian-based” medical marijuana dispensary in Sacramento, Calif., fought with the Internal Revenue Service on the company’s tax bill under a 1982 law that did not recognize drug trafficking as a business, thereby making it illegal for the group to pay taxes.

Some in Indiana’s religious community reacted negatively to First Church of Cannabis.

“I don’t believe it’s a religion,” said Bill Jenkins, a local pastor of an evangelical church. “I believe it’s a drug house.”

Read next: Episcopalians Vote to Allow Gay Marriage in Churches

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TIME U.S.

This Obituary Is Only 2 Words But It’s Perfect

Well done, Douglas Legler

A short and sweet obituary for North Dakota resident Douglas Legler ran on Wednesday.

Per Legler’s request, the obit simply read: “Doug died.”

Legler’s daughter Janet Stoll told reporters that her father had always insisted on the two words. “I’m sure he’s laughing up there now,” she said.

h/t Fusion

TIME U.S.

Here’s How All Those “National Days” Get Made

Zoovio co-owner and creator of National Day Calendar Marlo Anderson, eats some homemade fudge as he poses for photos on National Fudge Day at his Mandan, N.D. business on June 16, 2015.
Will Kincaid—AP Zoovio co-owner and creator of National Day Calendar Marlo Anderson, eats some homemade fudge as he poses for photos on National Fudge Day at his Mandan, N.D. business on June 16, 2015.

The "National Day Calendar" is an online compendium of pseudo-holidays that charges $1,500 to $4,000 for "national day" proclamations.

(NEW YORK) — To most Americans, July 4 is Independence Day. But on Marlo Anderson’s calendar, it’s also Caesar Salad Day and Barbecued Spareribs Day.

Anderson is the mastermind of the National Day Calendar, an online compendium of pseudo-holidays that has become a resource for TV and radio stations looking to add a little levity to their broadcasts.

The 52-year-old co-owner of a VHS digitizing company in North Dakota started the calendar in 2013 and soon realized the site could also be a way for people to declare their own special days. So last year, he started charging $1,500 to $4,000 for “national day” proclamations.

“People certainly don’t need to use us. It’s just we really give it a jumpstart,” he said.

Marketing experts give Anderson credit for seizing on the desire by companies and groups for another way to promote themselves, though they question the effectiveness some of the resulting campaigns. It’s not the only reason for celebration, but food seems to be a common subject for special days.

Already, the National Day Calendar has given its blessing to more than 30 made-up holidays. A crouton maker paid for National Crouton Day (May 13), a seafood restaurant submitted National Fried Clam Day (July 3) and a craft beer maker came up with National Refreshment Day (fourth Thursday in July).

Anderson’s venture, which he says brings in roughly $50,000 a year, underscores the free-for-all nature of such days.

In 1870, Congress established the first four federal holidays with New Year’s Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Since then, only six more annual federal holidays have been added, with the most recent being Martin Luther King Jr. day in 1983. But even the authority of those holidays is limited; although they’re broadly observed, they’re technically only legally applicable to federal employees.

A few dozen other dates are also recognized in the U.S. code, including Mother’s Day, National School Lunch Week and American Heart Month. Mayors, presidents and other lawmakers can declare days honoring individuals and causes too, although those usually aren’t widely observed.

Beyond that, there’s no single authority for declaring the legitimacy of special days, which can become part of culture in myriad ways, including marketing campaigns, advocacy efforts and folklore.

The often murky origins present an opportunity for the National Day Calendar, which has emerged to bestow an air of authority on special days. For a price, the site mails official-looking proclamations that Anderson prints out and frames at Zoovio, his VHS digitizing business.

Boston Market’s chief brand officer, Sara Bittorf, said the idea for National Rotisserie Chicken Day (June 2) came from the chain’s ad agency, but noted the day was one of few approved by the National Day Calendar’s selection committee.

Since the National Day Calendar doesn’t have its own staff, that selection committee is made up of four Zoovio employees.

Amy LaVallie, a committee member, said the general rule is to pick days with broad appeal. It’s why “National Sean Connery Day” was rejected, she said, but Boston Market’s submission passed muster.

“National Rotisserie Chicken Day, okay? People like chicken. Simple as that,” LaVallie said.

Still, some question the validity of Anderson’s calendar declarations.

“It seems like hokum to me, but more power to him,” said Robert Passikoff, president of Key Brands, a consulting firm. “Ask him if they have a P.T. Barnum day, and see if they’re celebrating a sucker born every minute.”

While special days give companies another way to promote a product, Passikoff said their effectiveness would depend largely on whether there’s a natural interest in the category. He said National Donut Day (June 5) gets a lot of attention because the pastries are popular and the day has interesting origins; the Salvation Army says it began during World War I when its workers gave soldiers coffee and doughnuts in the trenches.

As for a day celebrating rotisserie chicken, Passikoff questioned whether anyone would really care.

While the National Day Calendar is a quick way for companies to get recognition for a special date, it isn’t the only keeper of notable days.

In 1957, brothers William and Harrison Chase started Chase’s Calendar of Events as a reference for the media. The first edition was 32 pages, but the book has since mushroomed to 752 pages and includes federal holidays and events like musical festivals, as well as days celebrating things like squirrels, pooper scoopers and s’mores.

It costs $80 and is used by places like libraries and media outlets.

Holly McGuire, editor-in-chief of Chase’s, said she and her team try to gauge whether people actually “observe” particular dates when deciding what should be included in the book.

“Really, in the last 10 or 20 years, people have just been throwing them out there. They may take or not. We try to bring a little order to the chaos,” McGuire said.

For instance, McGuire said Chase’s doesn’t list a day for chocolate since there are about three floating about and she can’t figure out how they came to be. Yet the book lists a “Sneak Some Zucchini Onto Your Neighbor’s Porch Night,” which is intended to relieve people of squash from “overzealous planting.”

McGuire didn’t provide details on Chase’s methods for investigating the legitimacy of special days, but said a couple retweets on Twitter wouldn’t qualify.

“We’ve got a team and we’re constantly looking at things, kind of like dictionary editors do with new words,” she said.

People can submit special days for inclusion in Chase’s, but acceptance doesn’t hinge on payments.

At the National Day Calendar, by contrast, one-time proclamations for birthdays, anniversaries and other occasions are on sale for $19.99 or $39.99. The price for ongoing inclusion in the calendar is higher.

For $1,500, Anderson provides a framed proclamation. For $2,500, he helps arrange interviews with the media. And for $4,000 and travel expenses, he’ll show up to present proclamations at events. So far, Anderson says three groups have taken him on that offer.

This fall, he’s traveling to New York for National Dumpling Day (Sept. 26); the day was submitted by TMI Corp., a distributor of Asian foods.

TIME 2016 Election

Top Officials Aware of Clinton’s Private Email Address in 2009

Hillary Clinton
Whitney Curtis—Getty Images Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to supporters at Christ the King United Church of Christ in Florissant, Miss., on June 23, 2015.

Clinton turned her emails over to the State Department last year

(WASHINGTON) — Senior Obama administration officials, including the White House chief of staff, knew as early as 2009 that Hillary Rodham Clinton was using a private email address for her government correspondence, according to some 3,000 pages of correspondence released by the State Department late Tuesday night.

The chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, requested Clinton’s email address on Sept. 5, 2009, according to one email. His request came three months after top Obama strategist David Axelrod asked the same question of one of Clinton’s top aides.

But it’s unclear whether the officials realized Clinton, now the leading Democratic presidential candidate, was running her email from a server located in her home in Chappaqua, New York — a potential security risk and violation of administration policy.

The emails ranged from the mundane details of high-level public service — scheduling secure lines for calls, commenting on memos and dealing with travel logistics — to an email exchange with former President Jimmy Carter and a phone call with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Carter mildly chided Clinton about how to handle the release of two hostages held in North Korea, while Clinton recounted that Rice, her predecessor, “called to tell me I was on strong ground” regarding Israel.

One day in November 2009, aide Huma Abedin forwarded Clinton a list of 11, back-to-back calls she was scheduled to make to foreign ministers around the world.

“Can’t wait. You know how much I love making calls,” Clinton responded.

In one email, Clinton tells Abedin, “I heard on the radio that there is a Cabinet mtg this am. Can I go? If not, who are we sending?” Clinton was later informed it wasn’t a full Cabinet meeting.

The emails also reflect the vast scope of Clinton’s network, after several decades in Washington. She asks aides for restaurant recommendations for a meal with California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein (whom she refers to as DiFi), advises her future 2016 campaign chairman John Podesta to wear socks to bed, and passes on advice from former campaign strategist Mark Penn with the note “overlook the source.”

Clinton’s emails have become an issue in her early 2016 campaign, as Republicans accuse her of using a private account rather than the standard government address to avoid public scrutiny of her correspondence. As the controversy has continued, Clinton has seen ratings of her character and trustworthiness drop in polling.

The emails, covering March through December 2009, were posted online as part of a court mandate that the agency release batches of Clinton’s private correspondence from her time as secretary of state every 30 days starting June 30.

The newly released emails show Clinton sent or received at least 12 messages in 2009 on her privateemail server that were later classified “confidential” by the U.S. government because officials said they contained activities relating to the intelligence community.

At least two-dozen emails were also marked “sensitive but unclassified” at the time they were written, including a December 2009 message from Abedin about an explosion in Baghdad that killed 90. Though Clinton has said her home system included “numerous safeguards,” it’s not clear if it used encryption software to communicate securely with government email services. That would have protected her communications from the prying eyes of foreign spies or hackers.

Still, Clinton’s correspondence from her first year as the nation’s top diplomat left little doubt that the Obama administration was aware that Clinton was using a personal address.

“The Secretary and Rahm are speaking, and she just asked him to email her — can you send me her address please?” Amanda Anderson, Emanuel’s assistant, wrote.

Abedin passed along the request to Clinton. “Rahm’s assistant is asking for your email address. U want me to give him?”

Less than a minute later, Clinton replied that Abedin should send along the address.

In June, Axelrod requested her address, according to a message to Clinton from chief of staff Cheryl Mills.

“Can you send to him or do you want me to? Does he know I can’t look at it all day so he needs to contact me thru you or Huma or Lauren during work hours,” Clinton replied, referencing some of her top aides.

The White House counsel’s office was not aware at the time Clinton was secretary of state that she relied solely on personal email and only found out as part of the congressional investigation into the 2012 Benghazi, Libya, attacks, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Once the State Department turned over some of her messages in connection with the Benghazi investigation after she left office, making it apparent she had not followed government guidance, the White House counsel’s office asked the department to ensure that her email records were properly archived, according to the person, who was not authorized to speak on the record and requested anonymity.

Separately, the State Department on Tuesday provided more than 3,600 pages of documents to the Republican-led House committee investigating the deadly 2012 attacks in Benghazi, Libya, includingemails of Susan Rice, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations at the time, and former Clinton aides Cheryl Mills and Jake Sullivan.

The regular releases of Clinton’s correspondence all but guarantee a slow drip of revelations from the emails throughout her primary campaign, complicating her efforts to put the issue to rest. The goal is for the department to publicly unveil 55,000 pages of her emails by Jan. 29, 2016 — just three days before Iowa caucus-goers will cast the first votes in the Democratic primary contest. Clinton has said she wants the department to release the emails as soon as possible.

Clinton turned her emails over to the State Department last year, nearly two years after leaving the Obama administration. She has said she got rid of about 30,000 emails she deemed exclusively personal. Only she and perhaps a small circle of advisers know the content of the discarded communications.

Terrence A. Duffy, the executive chairman of the CME Group in Chicago, writes to Clinton that he had dinner on Dec. 1 with “a mutual friend of ours,” South Carolina GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham. “Lindsey always talks about how much he likes you and said if I were to be in contact with you to say hi from him.”

Graham is now running for president, primarily on a foreign policy platform focused heavily on attacking Clinton’s credentials.

State Department aide P.J. Crowley wrote to Clinton in November 2009 that she’d earned a front-page New York Times photo upon her arrival in Afghanistan. The picture prompted an online poll in which 77 percent liked Clinton’s coat.

“Thx!,” Clinton responded. “I bought the coat in Kabul in 03 and thought it should get a chance to go home for a visit!”

___

Associated Press writers Jack Gillum, Eileen Sullivan, David T. Scott, Stephen Braun, Donna Cassata, Ted Bridis, Alan Fram and Ken Thomas contributed to this report.

TIME Soccer

U.S. Heads to World Cup Final With 2-0 Win Over Germany

"I knew what I had to do"

(MONTREAL) — Carli Lloyd buried a penalty kick, Hope Solo got another shutout and the United States beat top-ranked Germany 2-0 on Tuesday night to advance to the title match at the Women’s World Cup.

Lloyd’s penalty kick in the 69th minute went into the right side of the goal less than 10 minutes after Celia Sasic shot wide on a penalty kick for Germany.

“Just slotted it home. I knew what I had to do,” Lloyd said.

Solo has posted five straight shutouts for the United States in the tournament. Kelley O’Hara came in off the bench and scored in the 85th minute, delighting the pro-American crowd.

The second-ranked United States will play the winner of Wednesday night’s match in Edmonton between defending champion Japan, ranked No. 4, and sixth-ranked England. The final is set for Sunday at Vancouver’s BC Place.

“It’s a dream come true,” Lloyd said. “This is what we trained for.”

It was the fourth World Cup meeting between Germany and the U.S. In each of the first three games, the winner went on to win the title.

The marquee matchup led to lines of fans waiting to get in about three hours before the game. The line for the main souvenir stand snaked up a half-dozen ramps to the building’s third level at one point.

The stadium built for the 1976 Olympics, where the East German men won the gold medal, was filled nearly to its blue fabric roof, mostly with fans cheering for the United States. The crowd was announced at 51,176.

Previous games in Montreal had the stadium less than half full, with the upper bowl completely empty.

The United States had several good chances from the start. Julie Johnston missed on a header off a corner kick from Megan Rapinoe, and Alex Morgan’s breakaway in the 15th minute was stopped by goaltender Nadine Angerer.

There was a scary moment in the first half when Germany’s Alexandra Popp and American midfielder Morgan Brian collided in front of the U.S. goal following a free kick from about 25 yards out.

Television cameras caught blood in Popp’s hair, and Brian was prone on the field for several minutes. Both players returned to the match.

After a scoreless first half, Lloyd had a header bounce inches wide to open the second.

Sasic’s penalty kick came after Johnston fouled Popp in the box. Sasic fooled Solo, who went right, but her kick went wide left, prompting a roar from the crowd.

Sasic went into the match as the tournament’s high scorer with six goals.

Shortly thereafter, Annike Krahn got a yellow card for fouling Morgan in the box, but replays showed it occurred just outside. Lloyd’s penalty kick was her third goal in three matches.

O’Hara scored on Lloyd’s left-footed cross.

The United States tweaked its formation for the match. Morgan started up top, with Lloyd as an attacking midfielder with Rapinoe and Tobin Heath on the wings.

The U.S. had success in its quarterfinal against China when it had Lloyd roaming up top and Brian back as a holding midfielder. Lloyd scored the lone goal in the 1-0 victory.

The United States improved to 3-1 against Germany in World Cup matches and 19-4-7 overall.

The United States has won two World Cup titles, but none since 1999. The Americans have appeared in the semifinals of all seven of the women’s tournaments.

Germany has also won the title twice, in consecutive tournaments in 2003 and ’07.

This tournament has played out with FIFA embroiled in scandal.

Earlier Tuesday, FIFA confirmed that President Sepp Blatter would skip the World Cup final, as U.S. officials pursue a criminal investigation into the game’s ruling body.

Blatter’s second-in-command, secretary general Jerome Valcke, also will be absent from the biggest event in women’s soccer “due to their current commitments in Zurich,” FIFA said in a statement Tuesday.

TIME LGBT

Americans Are Using a U.S. Flag Photo Filter to Protest the Gay Marriage Ruling

The posts come in direct response to Facebook's "Celebrate Pride" rainbow filter

Some Americans are using a web service by Rightwingnews.com to add an American flag filter to their Facebook profile photos as part of the backlash against the legalization of gay marriage in the U.S.

The move is a direct response to Facebook’s “Celebrate Pride” rainbow filter, which allows users to show their support of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to legalize gay marriage on June 26. Over 26 million people implemented Facebook’s filter in the days after the ruling.

However, one Twitter user, featured in the Independent, pointed out that the Rainbow flag and the American flag are not mutually exclusive symbols.

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