TIME National Security

Study: Passport Officers Struggle to Spot Fake Photo IDs

Officers failed to recognize faces were different from ID photos 15% of the time in a test situation

Officials charged with issuing passports mistakenly accepted photo identification displaying a different person 14% of the time, according to the results of a study published Monday.

The study asked officials to accept or reject someone based on whether a displayed photo matched the person before them. They mistakenly accepted someone with a different photo displayed almost 15% of the time and mistakenly rejected someone whose real photo was displayed 6% of the time.

“At Heathrow Airport alone, millions of people attempt to enter the UK every year. At this scale, an error rate of 15% would correspond to the admittance of several thousand travellers bearing fake passports,” said Rob Jenkins, a psychology researcher at the University of York and study co-author.

Officers fared even worse on a separate test that asked them to match a current photo with identification photos taken two years prior. They matched the photos incorrectly 20% of the time, a figure equivalent to the performance of an untrained control group.

The study, which tested 27 Australian passport officers, found that training had little influence on officers’ ability to identify faces on passports correctly. The best way to address faulty identification is to hire people who are innately better at identifying faces, researchers concluded.

“This study has importantly highlighted that the ability to be good at matching a face to an image is not necessarily something that can be trained,” said University of Aberdeen professor Mike Burton, a study co-author. “It seems that it is a fundamental brain process and that some people are simple more adept at it than others.”

TIME Food & Drink

The 13 Best Cheese Shops in America

Star Provisions, Atlanta Heidi Geldhauser

Travel + Leisure names the shops that stock the finest local and imported cheese

Cheese—in all its gooey, crumbly, farm-fresh, or cave-aged incarnations—is having a moment. Thanks to the restaurant trend of gourmet mac and cheese and the opening of at least one grilled cheese truck per town, even kids are learning to distinguish Emmentalers from Edams, Goudas from Gruyères. Historic or hip, America’s best cheese shops are as widely varied as the dairy products they peddle.

Cured, Boulder, CO

Leave it to an active town like Boulder to support a cheese shop owned by a professional cyclist: Will Frischkorn, who oversees Cured with his wife, Coral, rode in the Tour de France before going to culinary school. Although the Frischkorns are partial to American creameries, each summer they honor Will’s past life with a Tour-themed tasting series, featuring a regional cheese and a beer or wine from each leg of the race.

Cheesemonger’s Choice: Fruition Farms’ sheep’s-milk ricotta, from nearby Larkspur, which is available seasonally, while its flock is at pasture from spring to late fall, and is delivered still warm from the farm ($28/pound).

Star Provisions, Atlanta

Atlanta is considered the capital of the New South, so it’s only right that its best gourmet market stocks the largest selection of southern cheeses in the U.S.—made in Georgia, Tennessee, the Carolinas, and beyond. Its Cheese & Crackers program lets members sample three regional offerings per month. Located in the Westside, Star Provisions is attached to fine-dining spot Bacchanalia and also includes a butcher, a bakery, and a seafood counter.

Cheesemonger’s Choice: Hunkadora, an ash-covered, farmstead chèvre round from North Carolina’s Prodigal Farm, where goats live in and around old school buses ($9).

Formaggio Kitchen, Cambridge, MA

Renowned for its rare selections, Formaggio Kitchen was opened in 1978 by Ihsan Gurdal, a former member of the Turkish Olympic volleyball team. In 1996, the store added America’s first man-made cheese cave, constructed in a subterranean office space to mimic the same cool, damp environment used to age cheeses throughout Europe.

Cheesemonger’s Choice: Ekiola Ardi Gasna, which takes its name from the Basque for a mountain hut—the sort that husband-and-wife owners Désiré and Kati Loyatho take turns sleeping in during the summer while their sheep graze in the high Pyrenees pastures ($31/pound).

Fromagination, Madison, WI

Nicknamed America’s Dairyland, Wisconsin produces more than a quarter of the nation’s cheese. Fromagination (est. 2007) stocks a wide assortment from the state’s creameries, plus Madison-made items, such as crackers, charcuterie, preserves, and relishes—perfect ingredients for a picnic just across the street in Capitol Square.

Cheesemonger’s Choice: Martone, a mixed-milk cheese from LaClare Farms in the nearby town of Malone, which features a mild, buttery flavor imparted by cow’s milk and a tangy citrus note from goat’s milk ($19.99).

James Cheese Company, New Orleans

Richard and Danielle Sutton opened their Uptown shop in 2006, a year after Hurricane Katrina, when the city was still in its rebuilding phase. But it wasn’t the first time they took a major risk in the name of cheese: in 2002, they left their jobs and moved to London, where Richard became manager of the 200-year-old Paxton & Whitfield cheese shop. The store’s location in the St. James neighborhood inspired the name of their cheese company upon their return to the Big Easy.

Cheesemonger’s Choice: Dancing Fern from Tennessee’s Sequatchie Cove Farm, a delicately grassy Reblochon-style wheel with a slight walnut flavor ($26.95/pound).

READ THE FULL LIST HERE.

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TIME Gadgets

Navdy Projects Apps Onto Your Car’s Windshield

My car’s in-dash navigation system did me wrong a few months back, sending me on a wild goose chase around the greater Boston area.

In a fit of despair, tears and anger-sweat, I finally relented, pulled over and used an ever-updated GPS app on my phone, which pointed me in the right direction in less than a minute.

Not long after, my car was due for one of its 10,000-mile checkups, at which point I asked the dealership to update the GPS software with the newest routes. Should be free, right? It’s not. They wanted $200. Give me an hour and I can make you a list of 100 things I’d rather spend $200 on.

What I could do is spend a measly $20 or less on a smartphone mount for my car, but that solution feels equal parts inelegant and unsafe, with all the docking and unlocking and app poking and whatnot.

I’ll admit to being intrigued by upcoming efforts from Apple and Google to more deeply integrate my phone into my car’s infotainment system, but this Navdy doodad looks pretty interesting as well. It’s basically a projection system that sits on your dash and beams a transparent interface onto your windshield.

 GPS system
Navdy

It’s compatible with Apple and Android phones, and taps into Google’s Maps app to display turn-by-turn directions near your line of sight. You can also make and take calls and respond to notifications — tweets, text messages and the like — with simple gestures (thumbs up to answer a call, left and right swipes to navigate) and voice commands. It lets you control music apps as well, and there are no monthly fees to use any of the features. The GPS system is always updated, in other words.

It’ll be available early next year, with pre-order pricing set at $299 until early September of this year. The regular price will be $499. That’s expensive, yes, but I like the idea of being able to take it quickly from car to car (I have 13 cars*). And just a quick note that the company is using a Kickstarter-like pre-funding system wherein it collects the money from pre-orders to help fund the production of the product. The whole “early next year” thing could be a moving target.

Here’s a demonstration video of the Navdy in action:

*We actually only have one family car, and my wife drives it most often. But imagine if we had 13!

TIME Travel

Delta Tops Airline Performance Rankings

Delta Airlines Inc. Terminal Ahead Of Earnings Figures
A Delta Air Lines Inc. airplane departs Ronald Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, July 18, 2014. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

United ranked last on the annual list

Delta Airlines is the best all around pick for consumer fliers, according to Airfarewatchdog’s annual rankings. While the other legacy carriers, United and American, continue to struggle at the bottom of the list, Delta rose to the top spot from number six last year.

The list uses data on flight cancellations, on-time arrivals, baggage mishandling, denied boardings and customer satisfaction to rank America’s eight largest airlines. United rounded out the list with the lowest overall score, unsurprising given its bottom rank in customer satisfaction and number of denied boardings.

Discount carriers fared well in customer satisfaction scores, but that didn’t translate into high rankings in overall performance. Customers ranked JetBlue first and Southwest second for satisfaction, despite their low scores in flight cancellations and on-time arrivals. JetBlue in particular was hit hard by extreme weather earlier this year at its New York City headquarters and in Boston, where it also has major operations.

TIME Iraq

American Carriers Are Now Banned From Flying Over Iraq

Justice Department Files Suit To Block Proposed Merger Of American and US Airways
An American Airlines jet takes off behind US Airways jets at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport August 13, 2013 in Arlington, Virginia. Win McNamee—Getty Images

The announcement comes as the U.S. begins air strikes in Iraq

The Federal Aviation Administration has banned U.S. carriers from flying over Iraq, the agency announced Friday.

The ban was handed down just hours after the U.S. launched airstrikes in the country for the first time since U.S. troops pulled out of Iraq in December 2011. The American strikes were targeting forces from militant group the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) which were endangering Erbil, a city that’s home to a U.S. consulate and several American advisors.

ISIS has been taking control of several parts of Iraq, and the armed conflict between it, the Iraqi military and Kurdish forces in northern Iraq has created a “potentially hazardous situation,” the FAA told American pilots Friday. The FAA’s ban allows for certain exceptions if pilots get prior permission from the agency or if they need to divert into Iraqi airspace because of an emergency situation.

The move is the latest in a string of similar restrictions issued by the FAA, which recently temporarily banned U.S. carriers from flying into Israel’s main airport as fighting raged between the Israeli military and Hamas fighters in the Gaza Strip. It’s not yet clear if European aviation regulators will follow suit and also issue an Iraqi airspace ban, as they did with Israel in the wake of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 disaster, which was struck down by a missile last month while flying over violence-wrought eastern Ukraine.

The FAA on July 31 banned U.S. planes from flying in Iraqi airspace below flight level 300, or 30,000 feet. While U.S. commercial operators have historically been allowed to fly over Iraq at at least 20,000 feet, they have been banned from actually landing in Iraq since 2003.

MONEY Travel

Tips for International Travelers

Combining destinations for a grand tour? Try these tips for intra-European travel.

Planes

Flying on European discount airlines can be surprisingly affordable. However, be sure to factor the (many) fees into the price, says George Hobica of Airfarewatchdog.com. On Ryanair, lose your boarding pass and you’ll pay $20 for a new one.

Trains

For the best fares, book directly through railway websites, not U.S. ticketing agencies, says Thomas Meyers of Eurocheapo.com. Buying your ticket more than two months in advance can save you as much as 60%.

Automobiles

Most European cars are manual, so request an automatic if you need one—and be prepared to pay a premium, says Ellison Poe of Poe Travel. If you’re crossing international borders, read up on each country’s laws. France, for example, requires you to carry warning reflectors.

Related:

4 Ways to Visit Europe This Fall—for 33% Less!

MONEY Travel

4 Ways to Visit Europe for 33% Off

True, the Continent is expensive, but choose an unexpected location, time it right, and you’ll be surprised by just how much you can save. Here are four great alternative choices that offer all the amazing attractions of the most popular destinations -- for a whole lot less.

  • Budapest (Instead of Prague)

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    A sunrise illuminates the Danube River and Chain Bridge, which connects Budapest's East and West sections. Douglas Pearson—Getty Images

    How Much You Can Save: 25%

    Why Here: Like Central European capitals Prague and Vienna, Buda­pest is known for its glittering ­riverfront, coffee culture, and ­classical-music scene. “Still, it’s one of the more affordable large cities on the Continent,” says Roger Wade, founder of Priceof­Travel .com. Food and wine are about 75% cheaper in Budapest than in Vienna, and the Hungarian city offers amazing deals on lodging; the average room rate in Buda­pest is $104, vs. Prague’s $138, according to hotel comparison site ­Trivago.com. The city is also evolving at a startling pace, says Ellison Poe of Poe Travel: “Even last year’s guidebooks are as stale as week-old angel food cake.”

    See and Do: Start with a tour of the old city, which is divided by the Danube River. For a bargain option, Wade recommends the “Original” walk from TripToBudapest Free Walking Tours. This three-hour stroll passes sites such as the Danube Promenade, lined with iconic 19th-century buildings, and the neoclassical St. Stephen’s Basilica. Want a more in-depth take? Context Travel is known for its scholar-led tours; topics range from Budapest’s 19th- and 20th-century golden years to a look at the city’s current politics ($50).

    Head back to St. Stephen’s for $21 Thursday concerts, or get dolled up for an opera at the Hungarian State Opera House. With good matinee seats as low as $20, prices are a fraction of those in Vienna, says Poe. Later walk along Falk Miksa, Buda­pest’s antiques street, to window-shop for paintings, glassworks, jewelry, and more, says Daniel Göczo˝, a guide with JoAn VIP Travel.

    Eat and Drink: Sample authentic Hungarian dishes, such as layered potatoes or duck breast, for $12 at Café Kör, says Attila Dankovics, concierge at the Kempinski Hotel Corvinus Budapest. Or try the Great Market Hall for traditional street foods such as lángos, flatbreads topped with sour cream and cheese, or kürto˝skalács pastries.

    Dankovics also suggests enjoying a $3 glass of wine at one of the city’s “ruin bars,” which are housed in buildings abandoned during the communist years.

    Stay: In Budapest, as in many European cities, you’ll miss out on great bargains if you dismiss anyplace with “hostel” in the name. The Maverick Hostel, housed in a renovated mansion, has private rooms for just $37 a person (unless other­wise stated, all rates in this story are for October). Or for an affordable indulgence, book the Lánchíd 19 Design Hotel, where some rooms overlook the iconic Chain Bridge (from $110).

  • Lisbon (Instead of Rome)

    201408_TRV_02
    A street car pauses in front of Lisbon's Triumphal Arch. Sylvain Sonnet

    How Much You Can Save: 38%

    Why here Like classic ­European capitals such as Rome and Madrid? Then you’ll love Lisbon. The city can go toe to toe with the big names on food and wine, architecture, and museums, but at a fraction of the cost. A three-course meal runs $42 (vs. $61 in Madrid), according to cost-of-living index Numbeo.com, and at $120 a night, average hotel rates are 38% lower than Rome’s, says research firm STR.

    See and Do: Take a peek into the city’s history at the Museu Nacional do Azulejo ($7), housed in a former convent. The museum has a stunning collection of azulejos, the hand-painted tiles that cover buildings throughout Lisbon. For something a bit more modern, there’s the industrial-­looking Museu da Eletricidade (entry is free). Fashion lovers should hit the Museu do Design e da Moda (MUDE), another free option, this one stocked with more than 1,200-plus haute couture masterpieces.

    Want an ensemble you can take home? Explore the shops in Príncipe Real. Lisbon-based blogger José Cabral of oalfaiatelisboeta .com recommends Espaço B for smart designs by European designers. Many stores offer a VAT refund, which you’ll redeem at the airport, for savings of up to 23%.

    Take a break from the bustle at the 18th-century, rococo-style National Palace of Queluz, 20 minutes outside the city. Admission is $10 if you arrive at 3:30 or later. Be sure to see “the fountain-dotted gardens,” says Your-Lisbon-Guide .com founder Mary H. Goudie.

    Eat and Drink: The cuisine at Mini Bar is reminiscent of the food at Spain’s late El Bulli, which was known as one of the world’s most experimental restaurants, says Joel Zack of Heritage Tours Private Travel. But while El Bulli’s tasting menu was about $320, the six-course prix fixe at Mini Bar is a more palatable $53.

    Prefer something traditional? Try Cantinho do Bem Estar ($32) in Bairro Alto, known for generous portions of codfish and black pork, says Anja Mutic, Everthe­Nomad.com travel writer. For a nightcap head downtown to 1930s-era bar Ginginha do Carmo for a $2 ginginha, a traditional sour cherry liqueur.

    Stay: In the riverfront area of Cais do Sodre, seek out the hip LX Boutique Hotel ($135), says Mutic. Request a room with views of the Tagus River. Or try the simple rooms at the nearby Lisb’on ­Hostel. Rates drop slightly after Oct. 15; book a private room for $90, including breakfast.

  • Dalmatian Coast (Instead of the Amalfi Coast)

    201408_TRV_03
    Sun worshipers lounge on a beach outside Dubrovnik's city walls. LifeStyle—Alamy

    How Much You Can Save: 19%

    Why Here: Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast cities of Split (to the north) and Dubrovnik (to the south) have a lot in common with the Amalfi Coast of Italy. There’s the stunning scenery, sea-to-table cuisine, olive oils, and, of course, fantastic wines. Yet Croatia, while pricier than it once was, is still the more affordable. Last year the average hotel rate in Amalfi was $315, vs. Dubrovnik’s $254, according to Hotels.com.

    See and Do: Pick up the Split Card (complimentary if you’re staying three days) at the tourism bureau for local discounts and free access to museums. Split is a great city to explore on foot. Start by wandering the café- and market-packed streets of Diocletian’s Palace, built in the early fourth century. Next explore the Riva promenade, which is flanked by stately palms and yacht-dotted waters. For a dose of nature, visit Marjan, a reserve just a 20-minute walk from the city center.

    In Dubrovnik soak in the view from the top of Mount Srdj. You could take an $18 cable car, but consider hiking the 40 or so minutes to the lookout point, says Croatian private city guide Anada Pehar. Warm day? Take a dip in the Adriatic at Banje Beach, just outside the old town. The UNESCO-protected Lokrum Island (ferry: $12), with its beautiful grounds and free-roaming peacocks, is a good alternative if it’s not quite swimming weather.

    Later, stroll the 1.24-mile wall that circles the old city ($18). You’ll see St. Savior Church, where bullet holes from the 1991 siege of Dubrovnik are still visible, and the Friars Minor Pharmacy, one of Europe’s oldest.

    Eat and Drink: Make an excursion to Mali Ston, 50 minutes north of Dubrovnik by car. There, take the $27 Bota ˆSare tour, a boat ride through a family-owned oyster bay, which includes wine, grappa, and oyster tastings. Back in Dubrovnik, snag a table at Bota Oyster & Sushi Bar in the old city (dinner: $16) for sushi made with local fish, says Pehar. In Split you’ll find hearty homestyle Dalmatian cuisine—grilled calamari and stuffed peppers—at the charming Villa Spiza (dinner: $20).

    Stay: Croatia’s low-season rates don’t kick in until November, when you’ll find deals like 36% off at Dubrovnik’s stunning five-star Hotel Dubrovnik Palace (­regularly $296).

    Similarly, rates at Split’s centrally located Hotel Luxe drop from $224 to $95 in November. Going earlier? Look to Tripping.com— an aggregator for sites such as FlipKey.com and HomeAway.com—to find convenient apartment rentals for as little as $60 a night.

  • Berlin (Instead of London)

    201408_TRV_05
    Berliners hang out at Gürlitzer Park. Weller—Anzenberger/Redux

    How Much You Can Save: 50%

    Why Here: Germany’s largest city is also its capital of cool. Packed with contemporary art, indie music, and innovative restaurants and lounges, the vibe is reminiscent of London at its most swinging. The prices, though, couldn’t be more different: The average Berlin hotel room is about half the cost of those in England’s capital, according to Trivago.com. Plus, while the euro is no bargain for Americans, it beats the pound.

    See and Do: Skip the touristy sightseeing buses, which charge more than $23 a head, and board public Bus 100 ($3.50). You’ll get the same great view of sites such as the stately Reichstag and the neoclassical Brandenburg Gate.

    Spring for a $33 three-day Museum Pass. With access to 50 institutions like the Jewish Museum Berlin ($12), housed in Daniel Libes­kind’s striking steel-and-glass building, and architectural gem Bauhaus-Archiv ($8), you’ll make up the cost in as little as two visits.

    Berlin’s gallery scene (there are over 400) is not to be missed. Start in the Scheunen­viertel neighborhood or the historic Jewish quarter, says Andrea Schulte-Peevers, author of Lonely Planet Berlin. “Stop in Kicken Berlin for its avant-garde photography from the 1920s.” The neighborhood is also known for its street art, so keep your eyes peeled as you walk.

    Eat and Drink: At Der Hahn ist tot!, which focuses on rural German and French cuisines, you’ll find a $26 four-course menu that changes weekly, says lifestyle guide Henrik Tidefjaerd of berlinagen­ten.com. Check out Markthalle Neun, a mix of food trucks and stalls that sell curry wurst, homemade pasta, and German wines on Thursday evenings.

    Berlin’s nightlife is legendary, but you don’t have to stay out until 5 a.m. to enjoy it. Chef Kolja Kleeberg of Michelin-starred Restaurant Vau suggests cocktails like the Rum Traders Rum Sour at Le Croco Bleu (drinks: $12). The rooftop Monkey Bar at the 25hours Hotel is great for sips with a view (drinks from $5). Order a Hugo, made with sparkling wine, mint, and elderflower.

    Stay: “Hotels are a bargain in Berlin, with rates at top properties priced close to $100 a night,” says Bob Diener, co-founder of Getaroom .com. Doubles start at $130 at the stylish and centrally located Circus Hotel. For an even better price, try the Motel One. Branches of this hotel are located throughout the city, and start at $94 per night.

    Read More:
    Tips for International Travelers

TIME Travel

Tokyo: What to See and What to Skip

There's nowhere else quite like Tokyo, so here's what you need to know to plan your visit

Aerial view of Tokyo and its Tower from the World Trade Center Building. April 2014 Frederic Soltan—Corbis

What is it about Tokyo that can make visitors feel as if the city belongs not in another country, but on another planet? Perhaps it’s the schizophrenia at the heart of what was once Edo—stately, tree-lined Omotesando giving way to the pinball frenzy of Shibuya, Tomorrowland Shinjunku meeting the timeless Meiji Jingu shrine. Tokyo contains multitudes, which we mean literally—the metro are is home to more than 35 million people, and on a muggy day in August you can feel nearly every one of them. Forget about navigating above ground—even the taxi drivers are dependent on GPS. But there is truly no other place on Earth—or elsewhere—like it, and those who can endure the over-stimulus will find themselves drawn back again and again.

  • What to see:

    -Meiji Jingu (1-1 Yoyogi-Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku. Meijijingu.or.jp): Tokyo doesn’t have many green spaces, which is a serious problem for a recreational runner. So you can imagine my pleasure on one of my first days there when I found a shady green park not far from where I was staying in Shibuya. Just one problem: the park housed Meiji Jingu, one of the most important Shinto shrines in Japan, and the white-gloved Japanese policeman who began whistling furiously at me was not happy to see a sweaty gaijin lumbering into a sacred space. Provided you’re not working out, however, Meiji Jingu is a rare oasis of tranquility amid the constant buzz of Tokyo.

    Edo-Tokyo Museum
    Edo-Tokyo Museum in Tokyo, Japan. Angelo Hornak—Corbis

    -Edo-Tokyo Museum (1-4-1 Yokoami, Sumida-ku; edo-tokyo-museum.or.jp): Today Tokyo is the center of Japan, home to about a quarter of the country’s population, but that reign is relatively recent. The city was founded in the 1600s as Edo, the seat of the shoguns (as opposed to the emperor, who reigned in Kyoto to the southwest). This museum details ordinary life in the city from the time of the shoguns through the firebombing during WWII to today, giving a sense of history to a city that sometimes seems to live in a perpetual present. As a bonus, the museum is located in the Ryogoku neighborhood, home to the main sumo-wrestling arena.

    -Tokyo Skytree (1-1-2 Oshiage, Sumida-ku; www.tokyo-skytree.jp/en): Visitors who believe Tokyo is a vertically-aligned, Blade Runner-esque city of skyscrapers are surprised to find that most of the capital is made up of squat buildings rarely more than a few stories high. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t towers, and at 2,080 ft., the new Tokyo Skytree is the tallest freestanding tower in the world. While the top-viewing level is only 1,480 ft. above the ground, that’s more than enough height to get a view of Tokyo’s endless sprawl.

  • What not to see:

    J
    Pedestrians walk past a show window of a clothing store at Harajuku shopping district in Tokyo February 28, 2014. Yuya Shino—Reuters/Corbis

    -Harajuku: The origin point of Japan’s youthquake, the Harajuku neighborhood was played out back when Gwen Stefani appropriated Japanese girl street style for her 2004 song “Harajuku Girls.” You can still check out the pedestrian-only Takeshita Dori if you want to find an overpriced designer T-shirt, but you’d be better off strolling nearby Omotesando, one of the few tree-lined boulevards in Tokyo.

     

  • Where to eat and drink:

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    Detail of sushi at Sushi Dai, Tsukiji Fish Market. Greg Elms—Getty Images

    -Sushi Dai (5-2-1 Tsukiji, Chuo): It may be clichéd, but you can’t go to Tokyo without stopping by the Tsukiji fish market, where the daily catch that will find its way to sushi plates around the city is auctioned off early in the morning. Get the freshest of the fresh at nearby Sushi Dai, where you’ll discover that raw fish makes for a surprisingly good breakfast.

    -Gonpachi (1-13-11 Nishi Azabu, Minato-ku): If the cavernous Gonpachi looks familiar, that’s because it is said to have inspired the Tokyo restaurant where Uma Thurman slices through the Crazy-88s at the end of the first Kill Bill. But Gonpachi isn’t just about the scenery—it serves dressed up izakaya food, popular in Japanese pubs, and was good enough for former President George W. Bush when he visited Japan in 2002.

    -New York Bar (Park Hyatt Hotel, 3-7-1 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku): Tokyo is a barfly’s delight, with drinking establishments that range from back-alley beer joints to cocktail lounges where your whiskey comes with perfectly spherical balls of ice. The New York Bar is more the latter—you’ll recognize it from the 2003 film Lost in Translation—and it’s not cheap. But you can’t put a price on the view from the top of the Park Hyatt Hotel.

  • Where not to eat or drink:

    148631016
    A bar in the Roppongi district, Tokyo. Greg Elms—Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images

    -Roppongi: This seedy district has been the foreigner’s first stop in Tokyo since American occupiers set up shop there after World War II. Roppongi has its own kind of charm, if your thing is loud bars, expensive drinks and nights that end after sunrise. It’s not as dangerous as it’s often made out to be—though there are occasional reports of spiked drinks and inflated bar tabs—and the sheer frenzy of the neighborhood makes it worth visiting once. But only once.

  • Where to stay:

    The Park Hyatt Hotel, location of the film Lost in Translation, and busy traffic at night, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, Asia
    The Park Hyatt Hotel, location of the film Lost in Translation, in Tokyo, Japan. Christian Kober—Robert Harding World Imagery/Corbis

    -Park Hyatt Hotel (Park Hyatt Hotel, 3-7-1 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku): If you’re coming for the New York Bar, why not cut down the commute and stay a night? Possibly the price—even the least expensive rooms cost nearly $500 a day. But the Park Hyatt is the rare landmark in Tokyo—a city that has been lacking in great international hotels—that has stood the test of time, even before it was immortalized in film. And if you can swim, don’t miss a dip in the sky pool, on the 47th floor of the hotel, which has floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the city.

TIME Aviation

How a Dutch Firm Plans to Find MH370 in Seabeds Less Mapped Than Mars

Australia Malaysia Plane
In this map released on July 31, 2014, by the Joint Agency Coordination Centre, details are presented in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in the southern Indian Ocean. AP/Joint Agency Coordination Centre

Australia said Wednesday that Fugro has won the bid to relaunch MH370's search

A Dutch firm is attempting to crack one of aviation’s greatest unsolved mysteries: how Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, a Boeing 777 carrying 239 people, vanished in an age of surveillance and technology.

The Australian Transportation Safety Board (ATSB) said Wednesday it selected the Dutch technical consultancy Fugro to relaunch the search for MH370 after a month-long tender process that solicited bids the world’s most advanced deep sea searchers, according to the firm’s statement.

Unlike some of its fellow bidders, Fugro historically hasn’t focused on deep-sea recovery, but rather on geotechnical services like underwater mapping for off-shore oil and gas clients. Other bidders like the UK-based Blue Water Recoveries and the Odyssey Marine Exploration specialize in recovering modern shipwrecks or search-and-recovery in deep ocean exploration.

Fugro, which has pursued some underwater search missions in European waters, attributes its win not to advanced technology, but instead to a calculated balance.

“In the initial phases of the search, a number of companies deployed very accurate and very sophisticated autonomous underwater vehicles. The advantage of such technology is that it’s very accurate, but the bad side is that it takes a lot of time to cover a square meter,” Rob Luijnenburg, Fugro’s director of corporate strategy, told TIME. “What we’re doing now is a combination of sufficient resolution and the capability to survey a reasonably large seabed in a relatively short time.”

Fugro had previously worked in conjunction with Bluefin Robotics to develop the Bluefin-21 vehicle used in search efforts during April and May. At that time, officials had suspected the plane’s pinger had run out of battery, and swapped in the Bluefin-21 for the Towed Pinger Locator. Other Fugro missions devoted to search-and-recovery have involved partnerships with the UK to recover helicopters downed over water, and ship recoveries near the Netherlands.

Fugro has already been directly involved in the MH370 search, too. Since June, one of Fugro’s ships, the Fugro Equator, has been working with a Chinese ship to conduct preliminary bathymetric surveys (i.e. underwater mapping of the terrain) around the target area. While radars mounted on the two ships have already mapped nearly 60,000 sq. km—much of that area is in the designated search area—Fugro’s AUS 60 million contracted mission involve only the Fugro Equator and another of Fugro’s ships, the Fugro Discovery. The two ships will each tow sonar scans near the seabed to produce higher resolution maps and possibly locate debris.

“Previous estimates [of the seabed] are very, very rough. The resolution is not good enough to find little bits of pieces of aircraft—that we do with the [towed] sonar equipment,” Luijnenburg said.

The designated search area, about 600 miles south of the previous phase’s area, was decided in June by Inmarsat scientists after re-analyzing satellite data. The area, roughly double the size of Massachusetts, is the latest patch of ocean in what’s been a hopscotch around the largely uncharted South Pacific. Estimates indicate that existing maps of this territory are about 250 times less accurate than surveys of Mars and Venus.

To navigate such difficult underwater terrain, further complicated by treacherous weather conditions, Fugro has connected with experts including Donald Hussong, a sonar guru. Hussong, who was brought out of partial retirement to assist Fugro’s sonar towing logistics, said the two vessels will each be equipped with 9 or 10 km. of cable that will tow scanners about 100 to 150 m. above the sea floor. The existing maps, while crude approximations, will be enough to prevent the sonar from impacting the ocean floor, which could dislodge the equipment.

Hussong estimates that the relaunched search over 60,000 square km. will span approximately 9 to 10 months—a heartbeat compared to the nearly 2 years it took locate Air France Flight 447’s debris, a mere 6.5 km from the center of the search. If the Dutch firm’s towed sonars locate debris, then the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, which aided in locating the Titanic’s wreckage in 1985, will contribute two autonomous underwater vehicles.

But thus far, absolutely nothing—not even a suitcase, life vest, or crumpled paper—has turned up. Fugro is hopeful that the wreckage will be located, but the Dutch firm acknowledged that there’s a chance the massive search might yet again emerge fruitless.

“If we have contrast between the hard surfaces of debris and sediments naturally on the bottom [of the ocean], then we should find it.” Hussong told TIME. “If it’s some place on a rocky bottom or the side of a cliff, it’ll be difficult.”

Inmarsat, however, the agency that dictates the search area alongside Australian and Malaysian authorities, remains more than cautiously optimistic that Fugro will solve MH370’s mystery.

“We remain highly confident in the analyses conducted,” an Inmarsat spokesperson told TIME in an e-mail, adding that the scale of the task shouldn’t be underestimated. “The next phase of the search is being handled by those trained in this sort of work and we are hopeful that evidence will be found.”

MONEY Tech

5 Outrageous Ways People Try to Game Online Reviews

Crowd of Pinnochios
iStock

The inn that threatened $500 fines to guests writing negative reviews is hardly the only example of an attempt to manipulate the user-review system.

How much do user reviews and ratings matter to businesses? Consider this: According to one study, millennials trust online opinions even more than the input of people they know. In other words, online reviews matter A LOT. The consensus thinking is that a restaurant with a slew of nearly unanimous five-star ratings is a can’t-miss, while only a fool would book a hotel with just a dozen reviews, 10 of them two stars or less.

Because these comments can make or break a business, it’s understandable that attempts to game the system and boost one’s ratings are widespread. With Yelp celebrating its 10th anniversary this week and instances of review manipulation still going viral, now seems like a fine time to recap the many ways that businesses, their customers, and even the review sites themselves have compromised the integrity of online reviews.

Threatening to Fine Negative Reviewers
The revelation that an upstate New York inn would charge you $500 if it hosted your event and any of your guests posted an negative online review went viral this week. “If you stay here to attend a wedding anywhere in the area and leave us a negative review on any internet site you agree to a $500 fine for each negative review,” states the policy of the hotel, the Union Street Guesthouse in Hudson, N.Y. The move—and corresponding bad publicity—hasn’t exactly helped the establishment’s online ratings. At last check, the guesthouse had 1.5 stars on Yelp, with many reviews (and one-star ratings) posted after word spread about the $500 fine.

It’s the latest example of businesses threatening guests or customers who dare to bash them in reviews. There is quite a long history of businesses suing individuals who have posted negative reviews on the web, and while such suits usually end up decided in favor of the reviewer, the threat of a lawsuit—or just some nasty emails—can have a chilling effect on how freely reviewers voice their opinions. Especially if they’re negative.

A Consumer Reports study on online ratings services, meanwhile, criticized Google+ Local because businesses could reach out to customers and convince them to swap out a negative review for a positive one, after some cajoling and perhaps, offering a refund or making other amends. “This can skew the ratings positively,” the story explained, “because assuaged customers can always delete their previously negative reviews.”

Campaigning for Rave Reviews
Last week, Businessweek took note of a curious ranking in central Florida. This area, of course, is where Walt Disney World, Universal Studios Orlando, and several other premier tourist attractions are located. And yet, according to TripAdvisor reviewers, the most popular tourism attraction not only in Orlando but for all of Florida is the Stetson Mansion, an obscure 10,000-square-foot 19th century home once owned by the man credited with inventing the cowboy hat.

As you might expect, when guests have a nice time visiting the mansion, they’re asked to offer their thoughts (and a five-star rating, hopefully) at TripAdvisor—which became a phenomenon as a hotel review site but has dramatically increased attraction reviews in recent years. No one has been suspected of fraudulently penning reviews of the Stetson Mansion, but it says something that Yelp discourages businesses from soliciting reviews in the manner of the mansion, due to the feeling that actively asking customers to post their opinions taints the process. (It’s not like restaurants or businesses would be asking unhappy customers to write reviews, now would they?) There are also bizarre instances of hotels having so many reviews that researchers assume the management has been attempting to game the system. How? Among other things, they ask favorite guests to flood the site with five-star reviews, with the hopes that they drown out the comparatively small number of negative reviews.

Writing Blatantly Fake Reviews
For a while, the fake review business operated pretty much out in the open, with entrepreneurial, ethically questionable individuals offering their opinions (and five-star ratings) to any business that forked over a few bucks. Just last summer, Edmunds.com, the car-research site, sued a company that spammed its user review section with fraudulent reviews of car dealerships.

Hotel staffers have been busted writing reviews that praise their establishment and criticize the competition, and Yelp once unearthed a conspiracy of local businesses that agreed to post positive reviews of each other to collectively boost their ratings. A cat-and-mouse game has developed, in which fake reviewer accounts are banned from the sites, prompting them to create new accounts, attempt to post at other sites, and otherwise continue to manipulate ratings. It’s enough for some consumer groups to give review sites awful reviews themselves.

Blackmailing on the Behalf of Reviewers
It’s not just the businesses that are trying to work the user review system. Reviewers themselves have been known to act in a way that’ll make you question the validity of any opinions you read online. “Yelpers don’t have any professional protocol,” David Chang, the celebrity chef in charge of Momofuku explained recently to FiveThirtyEight. “They sit down and say, ‘If you don’t do this, we’re going to give you a bad Yelp score.’ We’re like, what the f***?” (For that matter, Chang had little good to say about the quality and trustworthiness of legitimate Yelp reviews: “I’m just going to come out and say: Most of the Yelp reviews are wrong. They just are.”)

The (UK) Telegraph reported earlier this year that there has been a huge rise in restaurant, B&B, and hotel owners being blackmailed by customers. Essentially, they’ve been threatening that if they don’t receive free food or wine, or perhaps a discount on their room rate, they’ll bash the establishment in a TripAdvisor review. This week, Consumerist.com wrote that Yelp should reconsider its “Elite Yelper” program—in which frequent raters are given free swag and other perks—because quantity of reviews does not equate to quality, and because it opens up the door to businesses trying to bribe the elites in order to secure better reviews.

In early 2013, one company even created a frequent reviewer $100 membership program, complete with a card the user could flash when asking for a table at a restaurant or checking into a hotel. The idea was that showing such a card—dubbed “the douche card” by one pithy online commenter—would give you premium service. But what it really did was serve as a subtle threat to the business: Give me the best, or I will give you a horrible online review.

Giving Preferential Treatment to Advertisers
Over the years, the most common complaint about Yelp by businesses is that it basically forces them into advertising on the site. Doing so helps push the business up to the top of review pages, and failure to pay up allegedly means that sometimes a business’s positive reviews are harder for Yelp users to see. Yelp has always disputed this characterization, but this past spring, the FTC announced that thousands of businesses have filed complaints against Yelp for its passive-aggressive advertising sales push.

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