TIME How-To

How to Hide Anything on Your iPhone

TIME.com stock photos Social Apps iPhone
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

You have a right to privacy. Here’s how to protect it.

The eyes may be the window to your soul, but your iPhone is the peephole into your daily life. Who you contact, which apps you use, which selfies you snap — it’s all right there. So if you care about your privacy, it’s worth taking some simple steps to protect it. Here are seven ways to keep digital snoops at bay.

Pair Touch ID With a Complex Password

If you’re already using your fingerprint to unlock your iPhone, you’re on the right track. (If not, tap Settings >Touch ID & Passcode and add it now.) Here’s another trick: add a complex password to enter each time you power up your phone. (Tap Settings > Touch ID & Passcode, disable Simple Passcode and follow prompts). For a stronger passcode that’s quick to enter, stick to all numbers and aim for up to 12 digits. That won’t stop a dedicated hacker, but it’s tougher for an unwanted onlooker to figure out than a standard 4-digit password.

Nix the Notifications on Your Lock Screen

Hide your notifications by going to Settings > Notifications and toggling off the Show on Lock Screen slider. Alternately, you can also fine tune this setting so that only certain apps can place notifications on your lock screen using the options right below this setting. You can even block notifications from individual message threads: go into the message, tap the word Details on the upper right hand corner of your screen and slide the Do Not Disturb Button to the left. Voila.

Hide Clandestine Contacts

There’s no built-in setting for hiding individual contacts, but there are some smart workarounds. The simplest way is never to save the person’s name so only their number appears in your recent calls list. To hide all your recent and favorite contacts in the App Switcher – which appears atop your screen when you press the home button twice – tap Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > Contacts > Show in App Switcher and toggle off Phone Favorites and Recents.

Deep-Six Secret Texts

This one’s easy – just delete them. Swipe left on the Messages screen to delete entire exchanges at once. If you only want to nix certain parts of a thread, hold your finger on the offending text bubble, tap More when it pops up, select each bubble you want to delete using the check marks at left, then tap the trash icon at the bottom left of your screen.

Zap Photos and Videos

Here’s one case when you’re better off using a third-party app instead of the iPhone’s built-in option. While you can hide any photo from your camera roll by holding your finger on it, then selecting Hide, the Hidden Album is not password-protected. Instead, try a free app like KYMS or Private Photo Vault, which require a password to access. Just remember to permanently delete the originals from the default iPhone photo app afterwards.

Make Apps Disappear

Don’t want anyone who borrows your phone to know you’re on Tinder or have a Private Photo Vault? There are two ways around this. First, you can hide apps inside another folder like your “Extras” by holding down the app icon until it starts shaking, then dragging it into the desired folder. Second, you can hide app icons altogether by dragging them into the dock, then using Spotlight to access it. Get a detailed explanation for how to do both tricks here.

Hide Your Search History in Safari

If you just want to browse privately for a while, open Safari, tap the page icon in the lower right corner, then tap Private. To clear your entire browser history, go back to your phone’s home screen, tap Settings > Safari > Clear History and Website Data. Pro tip: download the DuckDuckGo search engine and use it instead. Unlike Safari, it never stores your search history.

TIME Dating

Lena Dunham Thinks Tinder Is for Murderers

The cast of Girls discusses the dating app

The girls of Girls had a conversation about Tinder on People TV, and the actress’ personal reactions to the dating app are pretty in line with what their characters might think.

Zosia Mamet, who plays the curious yet naive Shoshanna, didn’t know what it was—but wanted it explained. Jemima Kirke, who plays the sexually liberated Jessa, thinks it’s a sex site. Allison Williams, the overachieving Marni, knows all about Tinder and was quick to clarify that it is “a dating app… if you’re talented at it, you can have sex eventually.”

And, finally, Lena Dunham, who plays the neurotic Hannah Horvath, sincerely believes that Tinder is a place people go when they want to be murdered.

“It’s not about being famous, it’s not about being anything, it’s not even about being in a committed relationship,” Dunham said. “I believe Tinder is a tool for murder.”

See the video at People

MORE: There’s Now a Tinder for Dogs

TIME Dating

So Online Dating King Sam Yagan Has Never Been on an Online Date

2013 Time 100 Gala - Arrivals
Chief Executive Officer of Match Sam Yagan attends the 2013 Time 100 Gala at Frederick P. Rose Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center on April 23, 2013 in New York City. Jennifer Graylock—Getty Images

We're talking about the entrepreneur who cofounded OkCupid and now heads up the company that owns Tinder

Sam Yagan, the CEO of online dating juggernaut Match Group (which owns Tinder and Match.com), and the cofounder of OkCupid, revealed during a Reddit AMA session on Monday that he has never been on an online date.

Yagan, who was listed in the 2013 TIME 100, admitted that the other three co-founders of OkCupid (OkC) had never been on an online date, either.

He explained: “We were all dating our future wives when we started OkC. And before that, we were basically in college where online dating wasn’t really pervasive.”

Dissatisfied with this answer, one Redditor quipped: “Sounds like a ringing endorsement!”

Nonetheless, Yagan reiterated his belief that online dating was “the most effective tool ever created” for finding “affection or companionship.” He also offered guidance to one frustrated Redditor, going by the name “Warlizard,” who wondered why he had yet to find “true love” on an online dating site.

Yagan ventured: “Maybe have a more inviting username than ‘warlizard’? :).”

The king of the “swipe right” universe declined to confirm if a paid version of Tinder was in the works, nor was he able to satisfy everyone with a question to ask in the limited time available.

As one put it: “So, just like on OkCupid, you respond a couple times and disappear?”

TIME Careers & Workplace

Why 2014 Was Actually a Great Year for Women in Tech

woman-looking-laptop
Getty Images

Despite the reported incidents of sexism from hackathons to boardrooms, 2014 finally got women to talk and people to listen

This story was originally published at the Daily Dot.

Technology has a sexism problem.

In 2014, revealing investigations and heartfelt admissions ripped the wool off the eyes of the industry and exposed the extent of this very raw and very real truth.

The news about women in technology this year was so dispiriting that you might’ve thought twice before encouraging the women in your life to pursue careers in the field. Countless incidents of sexism from hackathons to boardrooms have demonstrated just how exhausting and insufferable the industry can be for women: harassment lawsuits against companies like Tinder and Zillow; advice to women from the CEO of Microsoft saying they shouldn’t ask for raises, and harassment at GitHub that led to the public departure of a popular female developer—to say nothing of Gamergate.

At first glance, it’s just another year full of a number of very high-profile events highlighting how toxic the tech industry can be towards women.

But look again: 2014 was actually a great year. Not because of the things that happened, but because women are finally talking about their experiences. Perhaps more importantly, people are listening…

Read the rest of the story at the Daily Dot.

TIME apps

Hinge Secures $12 Million of Funding to Help Steal Tinder’s Crown

Hinge

Wants to be the Facebook to Tinder's MySpace

In the world of dating apps, Tinder has long ruled the scene. But its smaller competitor, Hinge, has been working hard in the last year to steal Tinder’s “cool kid” stature.

In fact, the company — which just announced a $12 million investment round with Shasta Ventures Thursday — thinks that it has the power to be seen as the equivalent of Facebook to Tinder’s MySpace.

“Hinge’s trust and transparency are changing the landscape of the dating industry in much the same way Facebook did to social networking in the age of MySpace,” Shasta partner Tod Francis said in a statement. Shasta’s contribution adds to $8.6 million that has been raised previously.

But how do Hinge and Tinder differ?

Rather than showing users virtually any unscreened member of the opposite sex within a five mile radius, Hinge shows users a smaller selection of potential suitors every day at noon that is curated from friends of friends (and friends of friends of friends). Hinge users also get to see matches’ full name, college, and other information culled from Facebook.

When being interviewed about the weird world of app dating last year, McLeod told TIME, “We are trying to harness this feeling of a house party — you go, you see people in your world, friends of friends, that’s the dynamic we’re trying to create.”

Tinder, in comparison, is more of a 10-story club that’s at capacity.

Hinge told TIME that when it polled 500 people who actively use both apps, 59% think Hinge is “a tool to meet people” vs. 16% on Tinder. Furthermore, 64% think Tinder is “a game to play with” vs. 14% on Hinge.

In the last year, Hinge’s undisclosed user base has grown five-fold, and the app has launched in 24 new markets. Although it still has a ways to go before it competes with Tinder’s 600% growth in 2014.

TIME

Campaign Against Sex Trafficking Launches on Tinder

Swipe right for awareness

Correction appended: Nov. 8, 2014

Tinder users looking for a hook-up might be surprised to come across a number of profiles featuring women with cuts and bruises on their faces and bodies. And that newfound awareness is exactly the mission of Irish advertising agency EightyTwenty, which has partnered with the Immigrant Council of Ireland to launch a campaign against sex trafficking that leverages the no-cost distribution channel of the dating app.

The fake profiles, which use models so as not to exploit actual victims, begin with conventionally alluring photographs of the women. But as users swipe to see more, they see images of the abuse that victims of sex trafficking often endure. The series ends with a PSA that juxtaposes Tinder users’ options with the entrapment victims face: “Your options are left or right,” one version reads. “Sex trafficking victims have no options. You have the option to help end it now.”

The campaign’s website says the agency has received “a large number of comments from users who are shocked upon hearing about the realities of sex trafficking in a modern society.” They estimate that the illicit industry yields €200 million ($248 million) annually for foreign and domestic criminal gangs.

The campaign stands to receive criticism from activists who oppose sex trafficking but don’t support a wholesale ban on prostitution. Immediately after prompting the user to “help end it now,” the PSA links to the website for Turn Off the Red Light, a coalition that aims to end both sex trafficking and prostitution. It’s a conflation of one issue that people agree, more or less universally, is harmful, and another which is much more complicated. Melissa Gira Grant, a journalist and author of Playing the Whore, has spoken out about the way in which anti-prostitution groups oversimplify the problems sex workers face. As she wrote in the Guardian in 2011, “When politicians, social service providers and celebrity philanthropists insist that sex workers are selling ourselves, they engage in the same kind of dehumanisation that they claim johns do to us.”

There’s also the question as to whether Tinder is the right place for such a PSA. The men who most need to hear this message, some would argue, are men who pay for sex, not men who use Tinder to find sexual (and romantic) partners whose interactions involve no exchange of funds (although this argument assumes the two groups are mutually exclusive and ignores reports of escorts advertising their services on Tinder). Still, despite these critiques, the campaign stands to raise awareness about a major problem among a group of people who had previously been unaware, or at least unmotivated to act. And that, say advocates, is better than nothing.

Correction: The original version of this story incorrectly named Melissa Gira Grant as a sex worker activist and author. She is a journalist and author.

MONEY the photo bank

The Secret Data Hidden in Your Snapshots

Just by uploading pictures from your camera to the web, you might have left a trail of breadcrumbs for anyone to follow.

You’ll often see this maxim posted in national parks: “Take only pictures, leave only footprints.” But what if your photograph IS your footprint, and it can be tracked by anyone who might follow it?

German photographer Philipp Schmitt visualizes those digital footprints in his “Location-Based Light Painting Project.” In his small town near Stuttgart, he sets up a 35mm digital camera and, with long-exposure black-and-white images, “maps” each geotagged photo taken around the touristy Heilig-Kreuz-Münster city center.

How does he do it? Fluent not only in English and German but in numerous coding languages, Schmitt created an iPhone-based app that pinpoints his location using Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates, then scours the web to cross-reference those bearings with any “geotagged” photographs taken there. (Such photos have GPS information embedded in the image file or were later attached to a map, like these examples from Google Panoramio and Flickr.) When his physical path intersects with the geolocations of those images, his smartphone emits a sound. The sound, in turn, triggers a strobe light attached to the phone. Schmitt stalks his predecessors around the scene, effectively “painting” the area with the tiny lights, while a camera on a tripod records his movements. In the end, he geotags the resulting photos—which are themselves aggregations of geotagged photos—so that, as he explains, “they add to the mass of noise they’re documenting.”

The first series of photographs Schmitt made during the project are nighttime cityscapes; a glowing orb marks each of the original photographers’ vantage points. The second series goes one step further, employing a long-exposure technique to show the “ghosts” of the photographers, using a second person as a stand-in. Contemporary large-format photographer Matthew Pillsbury also uses long-exposures to visualize the inhabitants of public and private spaces, while artist Corinne Vionnet similarly aggregates existing color photographs of tourist locations around the world found online and layers the shots (taken from slightly different perspectives and times of day) in the computer. Philipp Schmitt, however, is the first to use an app to fire lights which symbolize the footsteps of those who once visited a location.

Schmitt, a student in Interaction Design at Hochschule für Gestaltung Schwäbisch Gmünd in southern Germany, got the idea from watching out his home window as tourists photographed the town church fountain. He started wondering, “How many photos have been taken of that stupid fountain?” Schmitt explains:

The amount of existing photos is just extraordinary. According to Wikipedia, Google Panoramio alone archives more than 65,000,000 geotagged images. Popular landmarks are so thoroughly documented by photographers that PhotoSynth can create 3D models of these places just using pictures.

This is all well and good when you want your location to be known, when you are aware that—via the particular camera or smartphone you use—your GPS coordinates are being logged, mapped, and disseminated globally. What if you aren’t aware? Schmitt’s strobes also cast light on a darker issue: online privacy. How much information should you share and when, in an age when oversharing on social media can result in a lost job when recruiters search your profile prior to your interview, when sites like Facebook track the clicks of your digital footprint and share them with advertisers, when Tinder users are scouring your photos for personal details, and when geotagged images in a Craigslist post can reveal the layout and location of your home and all of your personal possessions. (MONEY details the repercussions of your personal data falling into the wrong hands as it relates to recent data breaches and what you should do about it here.) In the case of geotagged images, it is possible to strip this data from your image files by adjusting settings on your camera and phone and opting out of attaching it when you upload them publicly.

Right now, it’s just a photographer or two who may be peering in your apartment windows like Arne Svenson as he “tests the limits of privacy,” stealing your Facebook photos like Paulo Cirio and the team of Jonathan Pirnay and Jörn Röder, or following in your geotagged footsteps (almost in real time, if he so chooses) like Philipp Schmitt. Still, that’s just one small leap away from electronic billboards targeting you in public spaces based on personal or geotagged data. Schmitt has already open-sourced parts of the code “to encourage people to do their own location-based light paintings.” Feel free to download it here, then geotag your images and add to the noise. Just make sure if you leave a trail, it’s one you don’t mind others following.

This is part of The Photo Bank, a section of Money.com dedicated to conceptually-driven photography. From images that document the broader economy to ones that explore more personal concerns like paying for college, travel, retirement, advancing your career, or even buying groceries, The Photo Bank will showcase a spectrum of the best work being produced by emerging and established artists. Submissions are encouraged and should be sent to Sarina Finkelstein, Online Photo Editor for Money.com:sarina.finkelstein@timeinc.com.

More from The Photo Bank:
FREE MONEY! (If You _ _ _ _ It)
Looking at ‘Rich and Poor,’ 37 Years Later
When the DynaTAC Brick Phone Was Must-Have Technology

 

TIME relationships

Men Swipe Right on Tinder 3 Times as Much as Women

App Tinder
Tinder App Franziska Kraufmann—picture-alliance/dpa/AP

More "likes" than "nopes"

Men apparently see much more that they like on Tinder than women do.

On the popular dating app, which has users swipe right to indicate they “like” a potential match and swipe left to say “nope,” men are almost three times as likely to swipe right than women are, the New York Times reports. Men do it 46% of the time, while women do it just 14% of the time.

MORE: The new dating game

The Times, citing an unnamed source, reports that Tinder now has close to 50 million active users. Co-founder and CEO Sean Rad touted its more realistic appeal to physical attraction over the algorithms that other dating sites say yield compatible matches, algorithms viewed skeptically by social scientists.

“When was the last time you walked into a bar and someone said, ‘Excuse me, can you fill out this form and we’ll match you up with people here?’” Rad said. “That’s not how we think about meeting new people in real life.”

[NYT]

TIME celebrity

Here Are Bill Murray’s Thoughts on Tinder

He doesn't need it to get a date

Bill Murray dropped by Jimmy Kimmel Live on Tuesday to talk about his new movie St. Vincent — but ended up talking about Tinder instead.

Kimmel brought up the mobile dating app, kind of out of nowhere, asking Murray if he’d ever consider using it (or if he’d even heard of it.) Murray indeed knows about Tinder, but he has no interest in participation. “I feel like I’ve lived that life and I can live that life any moment,” he says with confidence. He then goes on to prove just how skilled he is at hitting on people without the help of an app, and things get a little weird.

TIME apps

Tinder Thinks You’ll Pay to Find a Match. Swipe Right?

Does this mean there will be less bathroom mirror selfies?

Money can’t buy love, but it might be able to buy you a better Tinder date.

The free, location-based mobile dating app, which allows users to swipe right in hopes of finding a match and left to pass, will begin offering “a few premium features” come November, CEO and co-founder Sean Rad recently said at the Forbes Under 30 Summit.

Rad didn’t provide many details, Forbes reported from the event in Philadelphia, but said the new features are ones that “users have been begging us for” and “will offer so much value we think users are willing to pay for them.”

Does this mean less bathroom mirror selfies? Probably not. But Rad hinted that the pay-for-play features might focus on opening up location restrictions, allowing people to make connections while they’re traveling to new places. He also said the “premium” options will cater to areas outside of romance, like “local recommendations when traveling, trying to make friends, doing business.”

“Revenue has always been on the road map,” he added.

But don’t worry, you can still swipe for free while procrastinating at work: “The core offering will always remain free,” Rad said. “At least that’s the plan.”

Watch the full interview below:

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