TIME Apple

This Tinder Apple Watch App Uses Your Heartbeat to Find a Match

The Apple Watch.

They’ve dubbed it ‘Hands-Free Tinder’

If you’re using Tinder for the Apple Watch, there may be no swiping required.

That’s because a Texas agency has created a way for the app to be used on the new Apple device, and to use the device owner’s heartbeat to determine whether the potential match is a yes, or a no.

The agency, T3, showed how the heartbeat monitor works in a YouTube video, which you can watch below. They’ve dubbed it “Hands-Free Tinder.” If the heart rate goes up, that’s a match. But if it doesn’t, well, that person’s passed for someone else.

The announcement of the app comes as sales of the Apple Watch have been reportedly flagging since its launch. Fortune polled Apple analysts to see just how many Apple Watches they believed were sold during the first nine weeks of sales. The average? About 4.5 million units.

Check out the hands-free Tinder app here:

TIME Tinder

Now You’ll Know If That Celebrity On Tinder Is Real

Tinder App
Cyberstock—Alamy

It could prevent you from being "Catfished"

Celebrities are just like us — they swipe on Tinder.

So to make sure its users don’t get fooled by fake accounts, Tinder unveiled Verified Accounts on Tuesday as a way to show that a celebrity really is that singer or athlete you’ll never be lucky enough to match with.

Just like on Facebook, Twitter, and other social networks, Tinder will add a small blue checkmark in the corner of the celebrity’s profile photo so users know it’s a verified account.

It’s not clear if the company has been dealing with incidents of folks impersonating public figures, much to the eventual disappointment of some of its users, but it’s not hard to see why a dating app like Tinder, which has enough users to generate 26 million matches every day, would need this. We only need to turn to MTV show Catfish to see why. In almost every episode of the show, the hosts help a poor regular joe find out that the seemingly wonderful person they’ve been dating online has fabricated their identity, sometimes parading as a small-time celebrity.

And since Tinder requires users to use their Facebook identity in the app, it wouldn’t be surprising to see celebrity impersonators every now and then.

TIME Match.com

IAC Says It’s Planning an IPO For Match.com

IAC Will Turn Match Dating Service Into a Separate Business
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images The Match.com logo and website.

Portfolio of dating sites also includes OkCupid, Tinder

IAC/InterActiveCorp is planning an initial public offering for The Match Group, the dating conglomerate behind popular sites such as Match.com, OkCupid, and Tinder.

IAC expects The Match Group to issue less than 20% of its common stock in the IPO, with IAC’s remaining stake in The Match Group represented by both high- and low-vote common shares.

“The Match Group is poised for substantial growth in the coming years,” said Greg Blatt, chairman of The Match Group, in a statement Thursday. The IPO is expected to be completed in the fourth quarter of this year.

The Match Group’s portfolio of dating sites, made up of 40 brands around the world, generated revenues of more than $780 million and profits of more than $260 million in 2013. The success of these sites has clearly prompted IAC to move towards an IPO, and the market has responded in kind: Shares of IAC rose more than 5% in premarket trading Thursday following the news of the planned stock offering, reported CNBC.

The company also announced that Joey Levin, formerly CEO of its search & applications business, has been named CEO of IAC and has joined its board of directors.

TIME Advertising

1 in 5 Tinder Users Swipe Right on Brands

Tinder Plus Launch Party With Jason Derulo And ZEDD
Gabriel Olsen—FilmMagic Sean Rad arrives for the Tinder Plus Launch Party With Jason Derulo And ZEDD at Hangar 8 on June 17, 2015 in Santa Monica, California.

People really do love brands

Dating app Tinder is proving that people really do love brands — enough to “swipe right” to match with them 20% of the time, according to Tinder co-founder Sean Rad. Rad is courting advertisers at the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity this week as the company continues to build out its ad offerings, Advertising Week reports.

So far, Tinder has let brands create profiles on the app just as a human user would, paying to have it show up in users’ feed of potential suitors they endorse by swiping right, or reject by swiping left. Bud Light, the movie Spy, and Orbitz are among the earliest to advertise on the app.

“Users can match with these brands when they swipe right, and what we’ve seen sort of consistently when we’ve done this is an over 20% swipe right rate, which is amazing engagement,” Rad told Advertising Week.

Tinder also recently introduced another revenue source: Tinder Plus, a paid tier that offers features like the ability to “undo” swipes and to temporarily match with users in a different part of the world.

But the company also seems to have additional plans for its ad products, namely something to do with swiping up, a variant on Tinder’s signature side-swiping user interface. Rad revealed that the company is in the process of filing a patent for the swiping interface in any direction — including up/down — though he avoided answering questions as to what these new directions will be used for.

TIME Dating

Whitney Wolfe Wants to Beat Tinder at Its Own Game

The woman who sued Tinder for sexual harassment is back. And her new app, Bumble, could change the dating game

On a sunny May morning in NYC, Whitney Wolfe smoothes her hair (golden) takes a sip of her iced coffee (black) and points across the leafy patio at a handsome guy sitting with a friend. “You swiped right in your head just now,” she says. “So did I.” Wouldn’t it be nice, she continues, if there were a bubble over his head listing his job and his education? Wouldn’t it be nice if you could just get up and say ‘Hi?’ And wouldn’t it be nice if there was no way he would think you were desperate or weird if you did?

A year after she was ousted from Tinder and nine months after she sued the company for sexual harassment, Wolfe is back with a dating app of her own, dubbed Bumble. In essence, the app is an attempt to answer her train of questions above. It works just like other dating apps—users see pictures of other users, swipe right if they like what they see, and get matched if the interest is mutual. But there’s one essential difference: on Bumble, only women can send a message first.

For Wolfe, 25, that key difference is about “changing the landscape” of online dating by putting women in control of the experience. “He can’t say you’re desperate, because the app made you do it,” she says, adding that she tells her friends to make the first move and just “blame Bumble.” Matches expire after 24 hours, which provides an incentive for women to reach out before it’s too late (the women-message-first feature is only designed for straight couples—if you’re LGBTQ, either party can send the first message.)

Wolfe says she had always been comfortable making the first move, even though she felt the stigma around being too forward. “I would say ‘I’m just going to go up to him,’ and all my girlfriends were like ‘Oh no no no no, you can’t do that,'” she says. “Guys found it to be ‘desperate,’ when it wasn’t desperate, it was part of a broken system.”

Like many startup founders, Wolfe has big ambitions for the service: “It’s not a dating app, it’s a movement,” she says. “This could change the way women and men treat each other, women and men date, and women feel about themselves.”

Bumble launched about six months ago and seems to be catching on. With around half a million users sending 200,000 messages per day, it’s growing about 15% every week, Wolfe claims. Some 60% of matches turn into conversations. While Bumble has not yet monetized and won’t disclose the details of its funding, Wolfe’s partner and major funder is Andrey Andreev, founder of Badoo, the multi-billion dollar European social network. Their Austin-based office has only six employees—and five of them are women.

Wolfe was a co-founder at Tinder and widely credited with boosting that app’s popularity on college campuses. She was fired in the midst of a breakup with Justin Mateeen, the service’s chief marketer. Last year she filed a sexual harassment lawsuit against the company, alleging that Mateeen had publicly called her a “whore,” that then-CEO Sean Rad had dismissed her complaints against Mateen’s harassment as “dramatic,” and that her male colleagues stripped her of her co-founder title because they said that having a woman on the founding team would “make the company seem like a joke.” The lawsuit was later settled out of court and Wolfe is reported to have walked away with over $1 million, with no admission of guilt by either party. Tinder is owned by IAC.

Wolfe won’t discuss the lawsuit, except to say that anyone who expected her to disappear afterwards probably didn’t know her very well. “It was never like I was going to go hide in the bushes,” she says. And while the whole messy incident has been held up to illustrate the challenges women face in a notoriously bro-friendly tech culture, Wolfe stops short of calling out sexism in tech. “This isn’t necessarily a tech problem, this is a society problem,” she says. “I don’t think it’s been socially acceptable for women to drop out of college and start a tech company.”

Wolfe is adamant that “Bumble has nothing to do with Tinder,” but the comparisons are inevitable—they have similar matching mechanisms (the swipe) similar designs (Tinder designers Chris Gulczynski and Sarah Mick also designed Bumble) and similar marketing on college campuses. Still, Wolfe insists she’s not trying to beat Tinder at its own game. “It’s important to me that nothing we do harms Tinder,” she says. “I still hold equity in the company. It’s my baby.”

But that doesn’t mean she’s not using similar tactics to get it off the ground. One of Wolfe’s major contributions to Tinder was her ability to get college students to download the app. A former member of Kappa at Southern Methodist University, Wolfe shows up at sororities with yellow balloons, cartons of yellow Hanky-Panky lacy underwear, and always, she says, “a cute purse.” Then she hands out a thong to each sorority sister who sends out 10 invitations to Bumble. “By the end, I’d show up and they’d be like ‘Go away, we’re already all on it!'” she says.

Because of the female-first messaging model, Bumble seems to be free of some of the sleaziness that plagues Tinder, at least for now. Men post pictures of themselves wearing button downs (not muscle tees) or hugging their moms (not endangered species.) And because they can’t message first, guys can’t hedge their bets by swiping right on every girl they see and messaging all of them to see who bites.

Female users say they’ve been impressed with the guys on Bumble. “I felt like I was being punked or something, because all the guys are really good looking and had really good jobs,” explains Lauren Garzon, a 32-year old hotel manager in NYC. “So I was like, ‘Ya, I do want to date all of you.'” She says she was disappointed that few of the guys she messaged wrote back, but Jen Stith, a spokeswoman for Bumble, says the company is considering adding a time limit to encourage guys to respond more quickly to messages.

Why do men use the app? “Because girls like it,” says Bryan Oltman, a 28-year old Bumble user and software engineer who used to work at OKCupid. “And girls like it because it gives them more control over the conversation than other dating apps.”

Besides, just as women are sick of waiting for men to make the first move, some guys are sick of always having to come up with a line. “It’s flattering when someone reaches out to you,” says Larry Mahl, a 32-year old New Yorker who works at Yelp. “It’s easier as a guy, you’re swiping and then just letting the girls take the next step.” Plus, he adds, “the women are so impressive.”

Wolfe pulls out her cell phone, which is hot pink with a bright yellow bumble-bee decal on the back, and shows me a guy she matched with in Costa Rica, of all places. “Hot, right?” she says. (Wolfe is dating someone, but still swipes and messages in order to get user feedback.) She had messaged him that she was the founder of the company, and asked him for his thoughts. He only had one thing to say: “This is going to be the next big thing.”

TIME Music

Hilary Duff’s Music Video for ‘Sparks’ Is Basically a Tinder Ad

The new clip features colorful choreography and some adventurous first dates

Product placement is the norm for big-budget pop videos these days, but Hilary Duff’s new video for “Sparks” takes the concept to a whole new level — it’s pretty much one giant ad for Tinder. Duff’s adventures with the dating app have been covered widely, and now we know why she’s been so open about this part of her personal life (and why she’s been bringing camera crews along with those dates).

It’s almost a shame, though, because the real sparks fly when the Younger star shows off her dance moves. If Tinder is the price of admission for some flashy Hilary Duff choreography, so be it. But an alternate version with the singer putting her pop-star bona fides center-stage? Now that’s something to swipe right for.

Read next: Hilary Duff Talks Younger, Lying About Her Age and the Status of Her Album

TIME Behind the Photos

These Photographers Make You Swipe Right on Tinder

Dating apps offer new business opportunities for portrait photographers

With over 50 million singles on Tinder, distinguishing yourself from the flock can prove laborious. No longer will the bathroom-mirror selfies of chiseled abs or the dog-loving-frank-smile combo be enough. That’s why some photographers are banking on the popularity of the impish dating app by offering their services to make users look their best.

“People have this tendency to create their dating profile in less than 10 minutes even though it could be the most important thing they do for their love life,” says British photographer Saskia Nelson. In May 2013, she set up Saturday Night’s Alright after spending eight years on online dating sites and growing tired of seeing the same blurry and dingy portraits. “My pet peeves are red eyes and messy bedrooms in the background. For one, people want to connect with your gaze. If they see two scarlet lasers coming out of your eyes, they’re going to move on. And, having a pile of dirty clothes behind you is not a great way to make an impression. Remember you’re trying to sell yourself and your lifestyle.”

To help her clients figure out what characteristics of theirs to put forward, Nelson sends them tips and a questionnaire ahead of the photo shoot. She advises them to treat the session as they would a date, and thus prep for it in a similar manner. Wear clothes (and underwear) that make you feel good, trim your beard, bring props that showcase your interests. She also has them thinking about who their current inspirations are or when they are at their happiest. “I go from photographing a senior to a 22-year-old.” she says. “With that kind of range, I like to know whom I’m meeting ahead of time so I can prepare.” Then, they go out for a stroll through a neighborhood of London that fits her customer’s personality. Battersea Park, Ladbroke Grove or Southbank for the even-tempered; Brick Lane, Shoreditch or London Fields for the edgier ones.

In New York, similar online dating experiences led Charlie Grosso, an advertising and editorial photographer, to launch Tinder Photography last October. She sees it as a way to supplement her income between assignments, have a bit of fun and elevate the standards of the images she comes across when perusing the app. “I wanted to apply my storytelling skills to creating dating profile pictures,” she says. Therefore, she spends a few hours with her clients wandering the city in hopes of uncovering their endearing idiosyncrasies and capturing them using both a single-lens reflex and an iPhone. The latter, she claims, helps make people look more relaxed. “The time I spend walking and talking with them is just as important as those when I point my camera at them. The goal is to make images look less staged, and more like snapshots,” she adds.

Though photographer Max Schwartz is not one for deception when it comes to dating profile portraits, his start in the business came after he jokingly created a fake website called Tinder Headshots. It quickly went viral. As it took a life of its own, he felt compelled to follow through. Used to working with actors and male models, this new practice helped him hone in on his people skills. “It’s like speed dating,” he says. “I have thirty minutes to get to know the sitter and have them warm up to me enough that they relax in front of the camera. I found that when people talk about themselves and their passion, their expression changes. That’s often the sweet spot.”

Rather than try to recreate candid moments, Schwartz favors the traditional headshot. “It’s more straightforward and as engaging, especially if the person comes across as warm and approachable,” he says. “Guys often try to look too stoic or overly manly.” And, in keeping as close to the truth as possible, he refuses to retouch the resulting images. “There’s nothing worse than going on a date and realizing that the person looks nothing like their pictures. They should look like themselves, just the best version of themselves,” notes the Brooklynite with marketing acumen. He recently developed a spin-off, Look Like a Boss, headshots meant for LinkedIn.

No matter the style, online profile photo services are thriving. Nelson dedicates herself entirely to it now and has hired a second shooter. She has plans to expand to other cities, and perhaps other countries. “I have such an extensive experience of online dating,” she says, “that I want to share it with others.” She recommends trying to spend 20 minutes a day on dating website or apps and allocating no more than one hour to a first date. “The photographs are just the beginning.”

Laurence Butet-Roch is a freelance writer, photo editor and photographer based in Toronto, Canada. She is a member of the Boreal Collective.

TIME relationships

A Creepy Amount of Tinder Users Aren’t Even Single

Check out this new research before you swipe right

Next time you’re matched with someone on Tinder, don’t hold your breath that it could be your soulmate: New research has revealed that 30% of Tinder users are already married and almost half aren’t even single.

The data from GlobalWebIndex (GWI) shows that only 54% of people on the dating platform are “single,” while 3% are “widowed/divorced.” Another 12% are “in a relationship.”

Tinder released a statement Friday disputing the GWI’s findings.

“The results of this tiny, 681 person study in the UK is a totally inaccurate depiction of Tinder’s userbase—this firm is making guesses without having any access to real data on our millions of users worldwide,” the statement said. “Here are the facts: the single largest age group on Tinder, making up more than half of our entire userbase, is 18-24, and 93%+ of them have never been married according to the UK’s Office of National Statistics. Without revealing any data about our users, simple logic should reveal that it’s essentially impossible for any of these claims to be accurate. Their methodology seems severely and fundamentally flawed.”

GWI points out, though, that its finding of a high number of married users could mean Tinder’s CEO Sean Rad was right when he called the service “not just a dating app but a ‘social discovery platform.'” Then again, maybe Tinder could be a gateway drug to the dating site for cheaters, Ashley Madison.

TIME Love

Meet the Jewish Matchmaker of Your Mother’s Dreams

Erin Davis The logo for Shabbatness is a Challah-shaped heart.

Inspired by her grandmother's Holocaust survival, Erin Davis wants to set up Jewish singles — without anyone having to swipe left or right

I’m sitting in a Manhattan apartment watching the sun set with 11 of New York’s most eligible Jewish singles. It’s Friday night and the table is a traditional Shabbat setting—a Kiddush cup filled with red wine, freshly-blessed candles and challah bread that’s been ripped apart and passed around the table. The crowd is hushed as Erin Davis a 30-year-old, waif-like blond, our host for the night, announces it’s time for ice breakers, where we’ll read funny and ironic facts about each other and guess who it could be.

Later I’ll leave after arranging a date with an adorable man handpicked by Davis whom my mother would kvell—ahem, gush—over. This is “Shabatness,” an invite-only service that sets up young Jewish professionals over Shabbat dinners.

Davis is quite rare, a matchmaker who does things the artisanal way, setting up singles through dinner parties, not apps or algorithms. She started hosting at least one Shabbat dinner a month in 2013. “I felt there was a void in the Jewish community of Shabbat dinners in intimate homes,” she says. “ And I realized it was an ideal environment for singles to meet each other.”

She interviews singles and promises those selected for the dinner a potential partner, a night of unlimited alcohol and a meal, at her apartment or one of the guests’ who chooses to host, all for just $36—a division of 18, or chai in Hebrew, a lucky number in Judasim—The idea became a business when Davis applied and received a fellowship through PresenTense, a social entrepreneurial program with a focus on the Jewish community. Davis got access to mentors, donors and business classes to put her vision in place.

Labe Eden, a committee member at PresenTense who has attended a few Shabbatness dinners, says he was struck by Davis and her idea from the get go. He explains it as a more wholesome experience than dating at a bar. “You don’t have to necessarily impress anybody. You get to be you,” he says.

The idea could seem old school—but each dinner has its own special twist. One dinner was called Bourbon and Beatbox, where American Idol contestant and special guest Jay Stone beatboxed the Shema, a prayer from the Torah. One night it was Magic and Macarons, where a Jewish magician performed and macarons were served for dessert. Another called Shabbat in the Sky was held in a 52nd-floor penthouse in New York’s financial district. And her next one will feature only male homosexual couples.

Even with modern traditions, the core of the evening is Judaism. Davis’ inspiration comes from her own grandmother, Rose Goldberg, who survived the holocaust in hiding after being sent to the ghettos of Wladimir Wolynsk in Poland. “I used to think she was just this old-school sweet Polish lady,” Davis says. But after traveling Europe and researching the genocide, she felt it a strong pull toward preserving Jewish heritage and rituals.

And it’s a heritage that’s getting diluted. A 2013 PEW study revealed that the percentage of U.S. adults who say they are Jewish when asked about their religion has been cut by about half since the late 1950s. And more than half of Jewish Americans have married a non-Jewish spouse.

“The studies disturb me, and there are small things to do to keep the tradition alive but make it our own,” she says. And the recent rise of anti-Semitism across Europe is especially troubling to her, even thought it’s not prevalent in New York.

“It’s a huge passion of mine to take a direct role in stopping [anti-Semitism,]” she says. “A lot of it goes back to my grandma’s story. It’s inspired me to do whatever I can to continue the tradition and to modernize Shabbats to make them for the times today.

Davis incorporates bits of tradition into each dinner she hosts, whether it’s a group of modern Orthodox Jews or, what’s more common, a group of Secular ones. (At the dinner I attended, fewer than half the group could read Hebrew.)

There are small touches of Jewish customs like her logo, a heart-shaped Challah bread, and the business’ name, “Shabbatness.” Nes means miracle in Hebrew, Davis says. “So my mom said: ‘What about the miracle of Shabbat?’”

A handful of miracle couples have come out of her dinners—and one marriage is on the way. My own experience after Shabatness resulted in a handful of dates, a very classic courtship, and a typical falling out of disinterest by both parties—but it was a better match for me than any tech-assisted dating I’ve tried. Apps have taken dating and turned it into a giant game of hot-or-not, where choices are endless and real relationships are few and far between.

Sure, JDate is popular and apps like Tinder and Hinge are growing, but that has consequences.

“The larger a pool of potential dates you have, the more the paradox of choice causes people to freeze up,” says Ori Neidich, one of Davis’ PresenTense mentors. “Erin has tapped into a need, you still have to meet people in person no matter what because that kind of chemistry can never be imitated by technology.”

Old-school matchmaking is making inroads onto the scene for the crowd of those sick of swiping their phones to no end. Aside from Davis’ Shabbat model, there are others trying to reinvent the process. Train Spottings uses matchmakers, known as ‘conductors,’ who scope the New York City Subway scene for singles to match with clients. And San-Francisco-based Dating Ring, available in multiple cities, assigns users with personal matchmakers, only syncing up matches with permission from both users. There’s also Married at First Sight, a reality series about couples who agree to marry a complete stranger selected ‘scientifically.’

Patti Stanger, whose 8th season of Bravo’s Millionaire Matchmaker premiered in December thinks that Davis is on to something as “religion is the number one deal breaker” in relationships.

“You don’t just have to do it for Shabbat, there can be Christian dinners, Muslim dinners,” Stanger says. “There are ways to do this for any type of common interest.”

Davis has a long way to go before the company is truly ringing in a profit. Her goal is to make it a 501(c)(3), a nonprofit and tax-exempt organization similar to the Birthright Israel Foundation.

“I’ve seen the passion behind birthright donors and the sustenance of Jewish practice and the formation of Jewish couples,” Davis says.

Davis’ grandparents, who met in hiding from the Nazis, were married for more than 40 years until her grandfather’s death in 1990.

“As I got older and moved to New York, I started getting closer to [my grandmother,]” Davis says, noting that all Grandma Roza wants is for her children and their children to marry Jewish people and continue the traditions.

“There are seven grandkids and seven great grandkids, which she wants many more of as soon as possible!” Davis says, laughing. “My last Shabbatness was called “Shabubbe,” she explains her play on the word Bubbe, Yiddish for grandmother. The group of singles honored Grandma Roza’s 90th birthday by eating Polish food with pictures of her all around. “It was very sentimental.”

Read next: Watch a Passover-Themed A Cappella Parody of ‘Uptown Funk’

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME marketing

Next Time You Swipe Right, It Could Be a Marketing Stunt

Tinder users at SXSW duped by marketing stunt for movie

All’s fair in love and marketing: a movie debuting at SXSW in Austin used the dating app Tinder as a marketing tool over the weekend, and some users were accidentally catfished.

According to Adweek, Tinder users have been falling for another user called “Ava.” The only problem? “Ava” is actually a fake account to promote Ex Machina, a movie about robots debuting at SXSW last weekend.

“Ava” told one would-be-Tinder-hookup to check out her Instagram, which was packed with promotional materials for Ex Machina. And her photo is actually of Swedish actress Alicia Vikander, who plays a bot in the movie.

So think before you swipe: you could be flirting with an ad.

[Adweek]

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com