TIME Style

Sarah Jessica Parker’s Shoe Line to Launch in Dubai

Sarah Jessica Parker
Sarah Jessica Parker. Nigel Waldron—Getty Images

The "Sex and the City" star is set to appear in the United Arab Emirates promoting her shoe line's international debut

Sarah Jessica Parker is perhaps taking a cue from her Sex and the City alter ego and heading to the United Arab Emirates with her shoe line.

But while Carrie Bradshaw visited Abu Dhabi in the franchise’s second film (which was panned by critics), Parker is preparing to launch her SJP Collection in Dubai, marking the line’s debut in the international market. The collection will be available from Dec. 3 and Parker will be making appearances at Harvey Nichols on Dec. 7 and Bloomingdale’s on Dec. 9 to promote the line.

Parker created the shoe collection with the CEO of Manolo Blahnik, George Malkemus. The shoes, which are already available to buy in the US, are identifiable by the signature strip of grosgrain ribbon on the back of every heel.

[The National]

TIME russia

Watch Dozens of Passengers Help Push a Frozen Russian Plane

A group of intrepid passengers helped push a plane stuck on a Russian tarmac despite freezing temperatures

Though it sounds like a punchline of a joke, scores of passengers at an airport in Igarka, Russia, located about 100 miles north of the Arctic Circle, tried to push a frozen aircraft that was stuck on the tarmac on Wednesday. It wasn’t an easy task. The New York Times reports that the temperature in Igarka was -47.2°F (-44°C) and the aircraft, a Tupolev-134 jet, weighed 70-tonnes.

Oksana Gorbunova, a spokeswoman for the West Siberia Transportation Prosecutor, told Tass news agency: “In order to deliver the plane to the taxiway, the passengers were invited to leave the plane and move to a bus parked nearby. After that, some of them arbitrarily left the bus and approached the plane trying to assist with the use of physical force.”

A video of the mission was recorded and uploaded to YouTube where it quickly went viral.

Though there have been conflicting reports on why the plane broke down — and who was responsible for the mishap — the transportation prosecutor told the New York Times in a statement that the aircraft’s braking system had frozen and another key part had stalled. The statement added that prosecutors “will assess the legality of the actions of all those involved.”

[NYT]

TIME feminism

Pick-Up Artist Julien Blanc Has Been Banned From Singapore

The seduction guru has been barred from entering Singapore to teach seminars which have been branded as misogynistic

Singapore has joined the growing list of countries that aren’t willing to allow pick-up artist (PUA) Julien Blanc cross its borders.

Blanc is an “international leader in dating advice” for Los Angeles based company Real Social Dynamics, who travels around the world teaching seminars, or “boot camps” as RSD calls them, to swathes of men eager to learn how to seduce women. PUAs like Blanc have long courted controversy for their seduction tactics, which many women have criticized for being manipulative and sexist. Yet the furor toward Blanc exploded across the internet and around the world after videos and photos surfaced of him describing and demonstrating grabbing women and forcing their heads into his crotch. Blanc later told CNN that the images were taken out of context and a “horrible attempt at humor.”

Yet the backlash against Blanc was strong enough that petitions in Australia, the UK and now Singapore have resulted in the countries’ governments blocking or rescinding the PUA’s visa. In Singapore, a change.org petition against allowing Blanc into the country received more than 8,000 signatures. Authorities released a statement about the decision to deny Blanc’s visa on Wednesday, reports the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. “Blanc has been involved in seminars in various countries that advised men to use highly abusive techniques when dating women,” the statement read. “Violence against women or any persons is against Singapore law.”

MORE: Is Julien Blanc The Most Hated Man In The World?

[ABC]

TIME World

Venice Wants to Ban Your Offending, Noisy Suitcase Wheels

Businessman pulling rolling suitcase
Getty Images

Leave your efficient, easy-to-transport wheelie suitcase at home, says the gondola-filled city

Venice’s city council is considering a ban on rolling suitcases in response to residents’ complaints about the loud noise tourists make ambling about the streets with their stuffed racket-makers.

The incessant sound of wheeled suitcases is giving Venetians “serious discomfort” and also leading to the “progressive deterioration” of centuries-old paving slabs, marble steps and foot bridges, the city council said, the Telegraph reports.

Tourists who use rolling suitcases could be fined up to 500 euros ($620), but residents would be exempt from the ban. Luggage equipped with air-filled wheels would be permissible for the city’s 27 million annual visitors.

“The law won’t come into effect until May, so hopefully by then one or two companies might start producing trolley suitcases with air-filled wheels,” said Maurizio Dorigo, the council’s planning director.

[The Telegraph]

TIME Iran

Iranian Officials Seem Cautiously Optimistic About the Nuclear Talks

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, attends a meeting in Tehran, Sept. 7, 2014.
Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, attends a meeting in Tehran, Sept. 7, 2014. AP

Releases in Iran's state-controlled media seem to indicate the country is preparing for a deal at the nuclear talks in Vienna

There’s no shortage of pessimism about whether Iran and six world powers can reach a comprehensive deal on the country’s nuclear program by Nov. 24, the self-imposed deadline. Time is short, and as a senior U.S. official said before leaving for Vienna, where the talks began, “we have some very serious gaps to close.” But those looking for optimism need search no further then Tehran’s official media. Tightly controlled by the regime that is the ultimate authority on any pact, the country’s media may be preparing the Iranian public for an agreement.

While hardliners in Tehran grump about the talks, Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei has clearly aligned himself with the negotiators—even posting an interview with one of the diplomats, deputy foreign minister Abbas Araqchi, on his personal website this week

“Araqchi basically said ‘We’re winning this, we’re not giving in,’” says Abbas Milani, who heads the Iranian studies department at Stanford University. Milani was astonished by the post. Never before had Khamenei’s office made the site a forum for another official, even one understood, as Araqchi is, to be serving as the Leader’s personal representative. It signaled a full embrace of the talks by the man who, as his title makes clear, holds ultimate power in the Islamic Republic.

“The headline was that the leader has had oversight of the entire negotiating process,” says Milani. “It’s clear to me this was an attempt to make a claim for victory and dissuade the idea that [Iranian President Hassan] Rouhani is doing this on his own and will get all the credit.”

On the same day as that post, the man Khamenei named to lead Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps was widely quoted on government outlets as saying that a nuclear deal was consistent with the ideals of the 1979 Islamic Revolution, which remains the litmus test for all government endeavors.

Mohammad Ali Jafari, the commander, also appeared to prepare the public for elements of a deal that may not look like a win for Iran. “If it appears that there are aspects of this where we’re accepted humiliation, first of all it’s not true — we are winning,” Jafari insisted. “But those perceptions of humiliation are because of the clumsy management and inexperience of some of our negotiators.”

The goal, the commander said, was the removal of the economic sanctions imposed on Iran by Washington and other world powers. “God willing, this goal will be reached,” Jafari said.

There was more. Ali Larijani, speaker of the Iranian parliament, which is dominated by conservatives, spoke of “our spirit of resistance” taught by Khamenei and his predecessor Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomenei as “the reason or our success, and why in spite of all efforts by the enemy they could not stop our progress on the nuclear front.”

“It is possible to have a deal,” Larijani added. “It’s just important for the U.S. not to ask for new conditions.”

Some in Iran complained that new conditions are just what the U.S. has indeed demanded. One hardline member of the parliament, or majlis, claimed to have seen the contents of an eight-page proposal Secretary of State John Kerry reportedly showed Iranian negotiators in Oman the previous week, and compared it to the Treaty of Turkmenchy, the 1828 capitulation to Russia that Iranians consider the epitome of humiliation, losing not only territory in the Caucasus but even the right to navigate on the Caspian Sea, which forms Iran’s northern border.

But to Iran watchers, what’s truly significant is that such grumbling is only background noise in what appears to be a concerted effort by Iran’s top echelon to set the foundation for a deal—if not on Monday, then if the talks are extended, as they may well be. There may be more riding on it than just escape from economically ruinous sanctions. The New York Times on Thursday quoted Amir Mohebbian, a conservative adviser long tied to the Leader’s office, predicting a nuclear deal as a harbinger of a strategic change in Iran’s entire political orientation.

“If there is a deal, and if it is good, the entire system will go along with it,” Mohebbian said in Tehran. “There will be a huge political shift after the deal. It is my conviction that those who make decisions within the system want it to be alive and supported. For survival, we need to change.”

It’s just such a change that President Obama has repeatedly said a nuclear deal might herald, opening the way for Iran to end its pariah status and return to “the community of nations.” So it’s possible Mohebbian is saying no more than what the administration wants to hear. But the expectations of a deal are running high in Iran, and the government appears to be doing much less than it might to discourage them.

TIME World

A CDC Epidemiologist Talks About Life on the Front Lines of the War Against Ebola

Redd, right, with local medical student Francis Abu Bayor.
Redd, right, with local medical student Francis Abu Bayor. Christina Socias—CDC

The CDC's Dr. John Redd spent weeks in Sierra Leone, combatting Ebola. He talks with TIME about the experience

Dr. John Redd, a captain in the U.S. Public Health Service, was sent in September by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to Sierra Leone, one of the three West African countries most devastated by the Ebola epidemic. The 52-year-old was assigned to Makeni, the capital of the northern district of Bombali (pop. 434,000). After six weeks battling the deadly disease, Redd returned to his home in Santa Fe, N.M., where he described his experience to Time Inc. senior editorial adviser Richard B. Stolley.

 

THE ROLE OF CDC DOCTORS DEPLOYED TO FIGHT EBOLA IS NOT PATIENT CARE. WHY?

I am a medical epidemiologist, and epidemiologists control disease at a population level. I volunteered to go to Sierra Leone with CDC to help control the outbreak and support local efforts to slow it down.

 

WASN’T IT DIFFICULT FOR YOU NOT TO TREAT PATIENTS?

I was treating patients, but not one at a time. That’s public health. I was supporting the system of outbreak control so that there will ultimately be fewer patients to treat.

 

WHAT WAS YOUR GOAL?

To slow down the spread and reduce transmission, because that’s what really controls an outbreak like Ebola. It’s the public health measures that will end the outbreak, not treatment, as important as treatment is.

 

HOW DID YOU PROCEED?

First is case identification or case finding. That means helping local authorities find people in the community as early as possible who have the disease or may have it, moving them into holding centers so they are removed from their community while their labs are pending, and then sending patients who are positive to an ETU, Ebola Treatment Unit. That’s where personnel from Doctors Without Borders, the International Red Cross and other aid organizations work – the part of the Ebola system most people are familiar with.

 

WHAT WAS THE LOCAL MEDICAL INFRASTRUCTURE LIKE?

Though extremely under-resourced by American standards, there is an existing public health surveillance system, just as in the U.S., where we have systems to count cases of diseases like influenza. In Sierra Leone, it had been used for diseases other than Ebola, like malaria and typhoid fever. The country also has an existing clinical medical system, which starts with very small health stations in many villages. In my district there were more than 100 of those, leading all the way to the government hospital in Makeni.

 

WHAT WAS THE EBOLA SITUATION WHILE YOU WERE THERE?

We investigated more than 800 patients with suspected Ebola, and more than half were confirmed with the disease. There were over 100 deaths, but that is probably an underestimate. There’s a delay in reporting deaths from ETUs, and some deaths in rural areas are not reported. By the time I left, the numbers in our district had begun to decrease. But in -areas around Freetown—the capital of Sierra Leone—cases are still on the rise.

 

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST CONTACT WITH A PERSON WITH EBOLA?

I saw my first patient the day after I arrived, through a window in a holding center in Makeni. We could not go inside. We had three holding centers with a total of 140 beds, with a physical gradation according to patient risk. In the middle of each center were confirmed patients waiting transit to an ETU in another district. They were vomiting, had diarrhea and were very weak. Anyone who treated those patients, mainly nurses from Sierra Leone, needed to be in full protective gear in spite of the heat – near 100ºF – and high humidity. Those nurses were incredibly heroic. There was another section for patients waiting for blood test results, and a third for patients being observed for 21 days after their tests turned out negative. This separation of patients, and the nursing procedures, were all designed to minimize the risk that someone who was negative could get the disease there.

 

WHEN DID YOU WITNESS YOUR FIRST EBOLA DEATH?

It was the same morning. As many as eight people were dying some days.

 

HOW DID THE SURVEILLANCE PROCESS WORK?

We had about 100 college and public health students from Sierra Leone, mostly men, some women, whose classes had been cancelled because of Ebola. For now, school isn’t happening in Sierra Leone. They were the team’s disease detectives. Every morning they would ride their motor bikes out to respond to alerts that a household member was ill or had died. They would call an ambulance to remove the body or take the patient to a holding center. We had only four ambulances, so sometimes we would have to ask patients to walk to the holding center. We had to be very practical about it. Then the surveillance officer would talk to the family about who might have come in contact with the patient. These contacts would be followed for 21 days.

 

WHERE WERE THESE FAMILIES LOCATED?

Mostly in the south of the district, around Makeni. But some were in villages in the rural north. Many did not have electricity, and most did not have running water or flush plumbing. Unfortunately these conditions are conducive to the transmission of Ebola.

 

THESE INVESTIGATORS WERE GOING HOUSE TO HOUSE AND LITERALLY KNOCKING ON DOORS?

That is correct.

 

YOU SEEM TO HAVE GOTTEN CLOSE TO THOSE YOUNG PEOPLE. HAVE YOU STAYED IN TOUCH?

Yes, especially with a med student named Francis Abu Bayor. We worked side by side over there, and we’ve been emailing since. He was the leader of the surveillance team and in charge of our database on all the patients. He was an absolute optimist. His phrase was “challenge.” He would say, “Dr. John, we have a challenge” and that could mean anything from a new Ebola outbreak in a previously unaffected neighborhood to the printer being out of paper. Everything was just a challenge to be overcome.

 

IS HE STILL THERE?

He’s waiting for medical school to reopen. On my last day there, we gave him a stethoscope, which is traditional in medicine. My parents gave me one when I graduated from med school. Getting hold of a stethoscope was pretty convoluted. I ordered it from Amazon.com and had it delivered to a doctor in Atlanta who was coming to Sierra Leone. When he arrived in Freetown, he gave it to another doctor who was staying in my hotel. Then the three of us who had worked with Francis — Brigette Gleason, Tiffany Walker and I — presented it to him. He told me he was so inspired by his connection with CDC that he was going to make his career in public health.

 

WHAT WERE OTHER OBSTACLES YOU HAD TO OVERCOME?

Fuel was a constant problem because the investigators had to travel so far. So I put in a request to the CDC Foundation for fuel money, and it was granted. One of my jobs most afternoons was to take those fuel vouchers to the gas station and fill up the vehicles that were transporting the blood samples. And sometimes I’d fill up the investigators’ motor bikes as well.

 

WAS A SICK PERSON EVER RELUCTANT TO GO TO THE HOLDING CENTER?

Sometimes, at first. I helped in a few cases. We would talk to the head of the household and to the chief of the village. And we talked to the sick person, of course. To make sure I myself was not exposed to Ebola, I never passed over the threshold of a house. I’d ask the person to come out and we would talk from a distance in the street, usually a dirt path or road. Nobody was taken against their will, and I never saw anyone refuse to go. People were quite aware of Ebola because the education they had received had been very effective.

 

HOW DID FAMILIES REACT WHEN THIS HAPPENED?

It could be tragic. In some cases, it was the last time they ever saw their loved one. They would say goodbye in the house, and because they were contacts, they would have to remain there and be monitored for Ebola. Getting information on that patient in the holding center could be very difficult, though the surveillance officers tried. If the person turned out to be positive, he or she would be taken away to a distant treatment unit, where sometimes they died. Those were some very touching situations.

 

ONCE IN THE HOLDING CENTER, WHAT HAPPENED?

Patients with possible Ebola would receive medications for malaria and typhoid fever, intravenous fluids and also oral rehydration solution, which contains water, sugar and salt. And the blood draw would go as quickly as possible. That had to be done in full protective equipment. It’s quite a heroic job for someone to be drawing blood on Ebola patients all day long. Their dedication is hard to imagine. I was there 42 days, which I found very challenging, physically, mentally and emotionally. But the local health workers have been working like that for months.

 

HOW WERE THE BLOOD SAMPLES TESTED?

They had to be driven four to five hours to a CDC run lab in a town called Bo, which would email or telephone me the results. We had more than 800 samples sent for testing while I was there, and our goal was to have no more than 48 hours between someone’s lab test and learning whether they were positive or negative. It’s below 48 hours now, which considering the logistics is a real victory.

 

THEN WHAT?

There were many days when I would go to the holding centers to deliver blood test results to the nurses and help with the disposition of patients. If positive, we would get that person to a treatment center as quickly as possible, but it was three to four hours away. We, the lab and the treatment center were all in different locations. One way to conceptualize this is to imagine someone is suspected of Ebola in Dallas, has to be taken to Fort Worth to draw blood, then the blood is driven to Wichita, Kans., and if positive, the patient is transported from Fort Worth to Little Rock, Ark., for treatment. That is based on the actual drive times in Bombali.

 

HOW WERE THE ROADS?

Mostly dirt. It was the end of the rainy season, which meant that they were often mud. The vehicle carrying the lab samples crashed twice in one week because of road conditions. One of the scariest moments for me was hearing about those two accidents. I worried that there were unsecured blood samples at the site, but they were packed in a strong puncture-resistant container, and the samples were fine and were tested normally.

 

WHAT WAS THE CDC PRESENCE IN YOUR DISTRICT?

About 60 CDC personnel were in Sierra Leone at any one time, and we had seven staying in Makeni and working in Bombali and the adjacent district, Tonkolili. Six were doctors or epidemiologists, and one was a communications specialist because a vast part of outbreak control is educating people. We all stayed in the same hotel, and often ate breakfast and dinner together. Lunch was a PowerBar at our desks. Most everybody worked until midnight or 1 a.m., but one evening we all got together to relax and watch a movie I had on my laptop —Die Hard—and some of the hotel employees watched too. It was a nice diversion. I felt extremely close to the CDC colleagues I was working with.

 

ANY CHANCE TO EXERCISE?

Four or five times a week, I got on the elliptical at the hotel for an hour at the end of the day. It didn’t plug into the wall, didn’t need electricity. So when the power went out, which happened frequently, I kept going in the dark. The other people in the gym would laugh, but exercise is very important to me, both at home and traveling. When the lights were on, I was on my BlackBerry most of the time on the elliptical. That was routine multi-tasking.

 

HOW DID YOU PROTECT YOURSELF FROM EBOLA?

The most important thing was no touching. No shaking hands, no hugging. It was a massive societal change. I’d never been to Sierra Leone before, but I’d heard that the people are affectionate and physical. It was really something to live in that reality where you never touch another person — except a couple of times when I inadvertently bumped into someone at a meeting. Also, before being posted, we were trained at CDC in Atlanta in the use of personal protective equipment which all of us carried in backpacks at all times. Fortunately I never needed to put mine on.

 

DID YOU EVER GET SICK OVER THERE?

I got mild food poisoning after a weekend trip to CDC headquarters in Freetown. At first, I didn’t know what it was, but I followed all our established procedures. I isolated myself in my hotel room for 24 hours. We had a supply of MREs [meals ready to eat] so I didn’t have to leave. I checked my temperature and reported it to my supervisor so a decision could be made as to how to handle it, depending upon the symptoms, and if needed, discussions with Atlanta. My symptoms went away quickly, and I never had a fever. It wasn’t Ebola.

 

WHAT WERE BURIALS LIKE?

Every person who died, no matter what the circumstances were, was supposed to be tested for Ebola with a cheek swab and then buried safely. The body was quickly placed in a body bag, which was sprayed with chlorine by a protected burial team. Then it was taken to a new and separate communal cemetery especially set aside for this purpose. To the burial teams’ great credit, they were extremely respectful. Families could not say goodbye at a funeral and could not be at the burial, but could wait nearby. And after the ground was also sprayed with disinfectant, loved ones could leave small memorials and markers there. Seeing that cemetery was one of the most moving experiences of my entire life.

 

THESE WERE HIGHLY EMOTIONAL MOMENTS. DID YOU EVER FIND YOURSELF IN TEARS?

I did cry a couple of times, but only in the evenings at the hotel, not in public. I think most of the CDC workers cried at one time or another. All of the CDC people supported one another a great deal, because everyone realized how stressful it was. So I never felt alone. I felt emotional very frequently, and tears were close, but the days were so busy and long that I was able for the most part to keep my attention on the matters at hand.

 

DID YOU FINALLY GET ACCUSTOMED TO THE DANGER?

I never felt personally threatened, but of course my risk was not zero. To keep it at zero, I would have had to stay home. We were all accepting some level of risk. But it was more the constant psychological cost of having to worry about it, of never touching people, maintaining distance, having to stay disconnected from potential patients. It was like a blanket over all our activities. On a human level, it was very difficult, many hours a day, seven days a week, and it was frequently very sad.

 

WHAT WAS THE FEELING ABOUT AMERICANS THERE?

I didn’t feel a negative vibe even once. People said thank you routinely. It was really touching. When I spoke to the young men and women we were working with, I would emphasize that we were brothers and sisters in the fight against Ebola. We were all on the same team. I think that’s the way everyone felt.

 

HOW DID YOUR OWN FAMILY FEEL ABOUT YOUR ASSIGNMENT?

They were very supportive. My wife, Bernie, actually encouraged me to go to Sierra Leone. She is a physician herself and understood both the gravity of the situation and the contribution I could make to it. Most deployments are for 29 days, and when the CDC asked me to stay longer, she said it sounded like a good idea. We kept in touch mostly by email, but I bought a local phone card and we talked a couple times each week. The connection wasn’t bad. I was able to see my daughters at college on Skype from time to time. It helped that they didn’t seem worried. When we talked or e-mailed, I tended to emphasize the positive aspects of what we were doing and minimized the sad things I’d seen.

 

NOW THAT YOU’RE BACK HOME, ARE YOU IN QUARANTINE?

Technically, I was not. I was in a category that’s called low risk, but not zero risk for 21 days. I had to report on my temperatures twice a day to both the state of New Mexico and CDC. I wasn’t supposed to go to work, but Sandia National Laboratories was very supportive and understanding. I am detailed there by CDC as an epidemiologist on their International Biological Threat Reduction team. I could leave home briefly to buy food or something like that, but my wife was happy to take care of those things. I was told to report any illness or symptoms immediately. It ended November 19, and I’m fine.

 

WHAT DID YOU LEARN IN SIERRA LEONE?

As a physician, I learned how quickly someone can get terribly sick from Ebola and die. As a medical epidemiologist, I saw that the public health efforts to which CDC is contributing are going to be what eventually ends this outbreak. As a human being, I learned how hard working, brave and heroic my Sierra Leonean colleagues were. At no time did I feel that what I was doing was futile. Ultimately, what I really learned about Ebola is that it is controllable.

 

WOULD YOU GO BACK?

Without question.

TIME World

These Maps Show Which Countries Are the Happiest

Costa Rica is number one, according to the Happy Planet Index

If you’re looking for a change of scenery and considering moving to a new country, you may want to consider Costa Rica. According to the Happy Planet Index (HPI), it’s the happiest country on Earth, followed by Vietnam, Colombia and Belize.

These maps, created by MoveHub, show the happiness level of each country across the globe. The HPI is calculated using “global data on life expectancy, experienced well-being and Ecological Footprint.” It’s an “efficiency measure,” ranking countries on “how many long and happy lives they produce per unit of environmental input.”

Check it out:

Happines Index Around the World

As you might have noticed, some of the world’s high-income nations have considerably low happiness ratings, and that’s because many of those countries have high ecological footprints. Also, as MoveHub points out, “the data does not take into account internal inequality measures and human rights issues tied to some countries which are high up in the rankings.” So keep that in mind as you browse the maps. Still, though, we do believe that Costa Rica seems really, really nice.

Read next: The U.S. Is No Longer the Most Popular Country in the World

TIME feminism

Watch Notorious Pick-Up Artist Julien Blanc Say Sorry

The disgraced PUA told CNN: "I feel horrible"

After widespread backlash from around the world, notorious pick-up artist (PUA) Julien Blanc has attempted to apologize for causing offence.

The self-described “leader in dating advice,” Blanc works for LA-based company Real Social Dynamics and travels the world teaching seminars and “bootcamps” to men on how to meet and seduce women. Though he’s certainly not the first PUA to cause controversy, many felt that Blanc crossed the line from sexist and offensive to violent and dangerous when videos and photos surfaced of him describing and demonstrating grabbing women and forcing their heads into his crotch.

In one video, he can be heard telling a group of men, “In Tokyo, if you’re a white male,” Blanc says in one video to a room full of rapt men, “you can do what you want. I’m just romping through the streets, just grabbing girls’ heads, just like, head, pfft on the d–k. Head, on the d–k, yelling, ‘Pikachu.’”

MORE: Julien Blanc: Is he the most hated man in the world?

But after the backlash prompted the Australian government to revoke his visa and other countries around the world to consider similiar measures, Blanc said. “I 100 percent take responsibility,” Blanc told CNN. “I apologise 100 percent for it. I’m extremely sorry. I feel horrible, I’m not going to be happy if I feel like I’m the most hated man in the world. I’m overwhelmed by the way people are responding.”

Blanc also maintained that he did not teach his customers to choke or abuse women and passed off a picture of him with his hand around a woman’s neck as a “horrible, horrible attempt at humour.” He added that much of the controversy was over comments and actions that had been “taken out of context in a way.”

Yet he did assure Cuomo that he would be “re-evaluating” everything he had put out online and everything he would be putting out in the future.

[CNN]

TIME National Security

Obama Said to Order Review of U.S. Hostage Policy

In the wake of several high-profile hostage cases with terror groups

President Barack Obama has ordered a review of how the United States responds to Americans who are detained abroad, according to a recent letter from a Pentagon official to a member of Congress, in the wake of several high-profile hostage cases with terror groups.

The letter from Christine Wormuth, undersecretary of defense for policy, came in response to an inquiry from Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., and outlines that emphasis will be placed on themes including “family engagement, intelligence collection, and diplomatic engagement policies.”

The government’s refusal to pay ransom has been publicly debated in recent months following the executions of Americans by the militant group Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria. Hunter’s letter was dated Aug. 20, one day after a video emerged of the beheading of journalist James Foley. A similar video appeared in September showing the death of journalist Steven Sotloff and, this past weekend, of American aid worker Peter (Abdul-Rahman) Kassig.

On Monday, according to ABC News, National Security Council Spokesman Alistair Baskey said the “comprehensive review” would include the FBI, Departments of Defense and State and larger intelligence community.

Read more at ABC News

TIME Britain

Watch as the Man Who Wants to Be Britain’s Next Prime Minister is Taken Down by a Former Pop Singer

Myleene Klass attacked Ed Milliband over policy for a new tax on properties worth more than $3 million

Ed Miliband, the beleaguered leader of Britain’s opposition party Labour, was taken down on Monday night by a surprising foe: former UK pop star and television presenter Myleene Klass.

The clash took place on the UK panel show The Agenda, where both Miliband, who hopes to be voted in as Britain’s next prime minister in next year’s election, and Klass appeared as guests. Klass wasted no time in taking Miliband to task for his party’s proposed tax on homes worth £2 million ($3.1 million) or more — widely known as the “mansion tax” — in order to put more funds into the country’s National Health Service (NHS).

“For me, it’s so disturbing – the name in its own right: ‘mansion tax’” said Klass, who rose to fame in the early aughts, when she took part in Simon Cowell’s reality TV show Popstars. “When you do look at the people who will be suffering this tax, it’s true a lot of them are grannies who have had these houses in their families for a long, long time. The people who are the super, super rich buying their houses for £140 million, this is not necessarily going to affect them because they’ve got their tax rebates and amazing accountants. It’s going to be the little grannies who have lived in those houses for years and years.”

For his part, Miliband seemed unprepared for the attack, in spite of recent criticism in the UK press and rumors of backlash from within his own party. He responded to the criticism by noting, “I totally understand that people don’t like paying more in tax. The values of my government are going to be different to the values of this [current Conservative] government.”

Yet Klass continued to grill the politician on precise figures, while questioning whether the tax would actually help improve national health care.

“You may as well just tax me on this glass of water. You can’t just point at things and tax them,” she said.

Many people watching the interview took to social media to comment on Miliband’s weak defense:

 

 

 

 

Of course, there were also viewers who were turned off by Klass — who has an estimated net worth of £11 million ($17.2 million) — arguing that a tax on millionaires would cause suffering:

 

 

 

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