TIME World

Watch 100 Years of German Beauty in Less Than 2 Minutes

Featuring a tribute to the model Claudia Schiffer

A video created by the Seattle-based production company Cut.com aims to showcase the evolution of style in Germany from the 1910s to the present. In a minute-and-a-half clip, model Brooke Williams dresses up like a woman from a 1953 East Germany propaganda poster and the German supermodel, Claudia Schiffer, who was especially popular in the 1990s.

Previous episodes in this “100 years of beauty” series have highlighted different fashion trends in American, Persian, Korean, Russian, Mexican, Indian, Italian, and Filipino cultures.

 

TIME World

Staring at Moss Is an Actual Hobby in Japan

Next time you go on a hike, don’t stop to look at just rock formations, flowers and streams. Take some time to look at the moss as well. At least that’s what people in Japan are doing, anyway.

The latest travelling trend in the country is moss-viewing. Japan is home to about 1,600 of 20,000 moss species, and many sites around the country feature lush, rolling carpets of the plant. Takeshi Ueno, a plant ecology professor interviewed for The Japan Times, often leads moss-viewing excursions in area around Lake Shirakoma, considered a “precious moss-covered forest” according to the Bryological Society of Japan.

The trips are especially popular among women, according to Ueno. One participant on a moss-viewing expedition, Mari Sugiyama, said seeing clusters of mosses helped her forget about “competitive society.” “What I like (about mosses) is that they are surviving with toughness as they reach out for water and light,” she said.

TIME Cycling

See the Crazy Fans of the Tour de France

Wearing costumes and wielding props, these devoted fans cheer for their Tour de France favorites

TIME brazil

These 5 Facts Explain Brazil’s Crippling Scandals

Brazil Dilma Rousseff
Giuseppe Lami—AP Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff speaks during a joint press conference with Italian Premier Matteo Renzi, at Chigi's Premier Palace in Rome on July 10, 2015.

From a tanking economy to rampant corruption scandals, the 'B' in BRICS is in trouble

There are a series of scandals growing in Brazil, Latin America’s biggest country and one of the world’s most important emerging markets. The fallout could bring down a president who was reelected less than a year ago. Here are the 5 facts that tell the story:

1. Brazil’s Economy

Scandals are most damaging when an economy is slowing down. Brazil had a $2.35 trillion economy in 2014, the seventh-largest in the world. But 2015 has gotten off to a rocky start; foreign investment is down from $39.3 billion in the first five months of 2014 to $25.5 billion this year. Overall investment in the country has fallen for seven straight quarters.

Even worse, Brazil’s currency, the real, has lost 20 percent of its value since January. This by itself isn’t a bad thing—a less valued currency should make its assets cheaper and more attractive to foreign investors. Instead, Brazil’s economy is expected to shrink 1.5 percent this year.

Political scandals, and the uncertainty they create, are helping to scare off investors. The most visible involves Petrobras, the state-controlled oil company. As the scandal has unfolded, Petrobras stock has fallen 60% over the past year, and the company has had to write off $2 billion in bribery-related costs, while grappling with low oil prices.

(World Bank, Economist, Google Finance, CNN Money)

2. Petrobras Investigation

Why is a corruption scandal involving one company causing such shockwaves? Because it implicates the country’s highest political officials. The scandal began in March 2014, when Petrobras’s chief of refining was caught in a money-laundering investigation. In a bid for leniency, he confessed that companies awarded contracts from his division had diverted 3 percent of each contract’s value into political slush funds. Most of the money went to members of the governing Workers’ Party or their coalition allies. Initial estimates value the bribes at nearly $4 billion. Over two dozen executives from Brazil’s largest construction companies have already been arrested, and more than 50 politicians are now under investigation.

(Economist, WSJ)

3. Dilma Rousseff

This scandal could reach to the political mountaintop, because current Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff served as energy minister and chairwoman of Petrobras during the years of alleged corruption. There is still no evidence that Rousseff had knowledge of wrongdoing. But given the number of politicians from her Workers’ Party implicated in the scandal, a growing number of people say she is at least guilty of unpardonable negligence. Political opponents are calling for her impeachment, and the public’s suspicion is reflected in her poll numbers. In June 2012, Rousseff enjoyed a 59 percent favorability rating; in March 2014, around the time the scandal broke, her numbers had fallen to 36 percent. Her favorability rating has now plummeted to just 15 percent, according to Brazilian pollster CNT-MDA. Nearly 63 percent of Brazilians favor impeachment. On March 15, 1 million demonstrators gathered to protest Rousseff and the corruption of her government and the worst is probably yet to come.

(Financial Times, Bloomberg (a), Bloomberg (b), Reuters (a), Reuters (b))

4. Lula

Why? Because her mentor and political patron, former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, is now being investigated for influence-peddling on behalf of Brazil’s construction giant Oderbrecht. Oderbrecht’s CEO was arrested last month on charges that he paid Petrobras nearly $155 million in bribes. When Lula left office, he held an approval rating of 90 percent, and Rousseff, his chosen successor, rode his coattails to the presidency. Rousseff should be worried; if Lula is indicted, he may blame Rousseff’s government, withdrawing his support for her. If so, Rousseff defenders within the ruling party may finally turn their backs on her.

Lula isn’t the only former president being investigated over Petrobras. Fernando Collor de Mello, Brazil’s president in the early 1990s, had over $1 million is cash and vehicles seized last week while investigators determine his role in Petrobras bribes.

(Wall Street Journal, Guardian, New York Times)

5. CARF and other scandals

Petrobras has dominated international headlines, but it’s not the only corruption scandal threatening the government. The latest involves the Administrative Council of Fiscal Resources (CARF), a division of the finance ministry. It’s alleged that some of its members, tasked with resolving tax disputes filed by corporations, ruled in favor of firms in exchange for 1 to 10 percent of the saved revenue. Over the last 10 years, the government is believed to have lost tax revenue of much as $5.8 billion. That’s nearly 50 percent more than the bribery figures associated with the Petrobras case. But because this case involves mid-level bureaucrats instead of top government officials, it receives far less attention from international media.

By the way, don’t forget Brazil hosts the 2016 Summer Olympics. Brazil has budgeted $8 billion for the Rio de Janeiro games—but Rio Mayor Eduardo Paes has bragged publicly that 57% of the financing will come from private sources instead of taxpayer pockets. Given Brazil’s current political climate, this news will raise eyebrows and new questions.

(Economist, Guardian)

 

TIME World

You Can Now Watch Old-Timey Newsreels on YouTube

There's more than a million minutes of history

Historical footage from two of the world’s prominent newsreel archives is now being made available on YouTube, the Associated Press and British Movietone announced Tuesday, creating a massive resource for students researching history projects to curious culture-vultures and the billions in between.”

The Associated Press and British Movietone YouTube channels will together feature more than a million minutes of footage spread across 550,000 historical news videos, the AP announced Tuesday in a statement, marking the largest-scale addition of historical news to YouTube since its inception in 2005.

The footage, which dates back as far as 1895, ranges topics from war to vintage fashion, and so far includes footage of the Titanic leaving Belfast Lough in April 1912, the burning of Bergen-Belsen concentration camp after its liberation, the Harlem Globetrotters playing in Paris in 1967, Charlie Chaplin on his honeymoon, and much more.

Check out the current offerings by visiting the AP and British Movietone archives.

TIME World

See a Lake in Turkey That Naturally Turned Completely Red

Evaporation has allowed the algae to thrive

A salt lake in Turkey turned completely red as a result of an algae bloom.

Lake Tuz Gola, the country’s second-largest lake, has been evaporating in the hot summer, Stony Brook University marine ecology research professor Christopher Gobler told ABC News. The evaporation has killed plankton, which eat algae, allowing the sea organisms to thrive.

“The algae is thriving and will probably [be] red until the lake fully evaporates, probably next month during the peak of summer heat,” he said.

Tourists often walk across the dry lake during summer, and water returns in the winter.

TIME royals

Celebrate Prince George’s Birthday with the Cutest Photo Yet

Royal Baby #1 turns two on Wednesday

On the eve of Prince George’s second birthday, parents Prince William and Kate Middleton shared an adorable photo of Royal Baby #1.

Prince George birthday
Mario Testino—APPrince George with his father, the Duke of Cambridge, in the gardens at Sandringham House, Norfolk, England, on July 5, 2015.

The picture, which features a toothy grin from both father and son, was taken at Princess Charlotte’s christening on July 5 at the Queen’s Sandringham estate.

“This photograph captures a very happy moment on what was a special day for The Duke and Duchess and their family,” a spokesman for Kensington Palace said. “They are very pleased to share this picture as they celebrate Prince George’s second birthday.”

TIME england

Footage of Young Queen Elizabeth Giving Nazi Salute Causes Controversy in Britain

queen nazi salute
The Sun

The tape was shot in 1933

A British tabloid newspaper has published footage of Queen Elizabeth II giving a Nazi salute as a child.

The tape, shot in 1933, appears on the website of the Sun, and in still form in the newspaper. It depicts Elizabeth, her mother, her sister Margaret and her uncle Edward (later Edward VIII) playing at Balmoral in Scotland. The degree to which Edward, who reigned for about 11 months in 1936 before abdicating, was sympathetic to the Nazis has long been the subject of historical speculation, while his successor, George VI, led Britain through World War II.

Buckingham Palace released a statement after the video was published, saying, “It is disappointing that film, shot eight decades ago and apparently from Her Majesty’s personal family archive, has been obtained and exploited in this manner.” The Sun‘s own coverage includes a military historian’s attempt to put the gesture in its historical perspective: “I don’t think there was a child in Britain in the 1930s or ’40s who has not performed a mock Nazi salute as a bit of a lark.”

 

 

TIME South Pacific

5 Men Rescued After Days Adrift in Pacific Ocean

boat at sea
Getty Images

Their condition wasn't immediately clear

Five men were rescued Saturday from a small boat 184 miles northeast of the Pacific island nation of Kiribati, after being adrift since Wednesday.

Details about the men remained sparse after they were rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard. The fishermen apparently set out to sea on Monday but were reported missing on Wednesday after leaving Teraina Island, 1,000 miles south of Hawaii, CNN reports. The U.S. Coast Guard said in a statement that the men were “in a skiff with no engines, little provisions and no lifesaving equipment.”

 

The five men were found by an HC-130 Hercules originating from Oahu after several days of searching. The Hercules crew air-dropped food, water, flares, and other essentials before the men were rescued by a Panamanian cargo ship, the Shourong Harmony.

Their condition wasn’t immediately clear.

TIME bosnia and herzegovina

Witness Scenes From the Remembrance of Srebrenica 20 Years Later

Bosnians mourned at a mass funeral for 136 newly identified victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre on July 11, 2015

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