TIME Money

Apple CEO Tim Cook Earned $9 Million Last Year, Double His 2013 Pay

Pay hike comes after a stellar 2014 for the tech firm

Apple CEO Tim Cook’s total pay for 2014 was $9.22 million, more than double the financial compensation he received the year before.

Cook earned a salary of $1.75 million and his non-equity incentive compensation was $6.7 million, reports Bloomberg. His 2013 pay package was $4.25 million, according to files sent to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday.

The pay increase comes after a highly successful 2014 in which Apple’s company value exceed $700 billion and the price of stocks rose above $119 per share, according to Bloomberg.

The boost comes amid optimism surrounding new products such as the iPhone 6 Plus and Apple Pay.

Cook succeed Steve Jobs as head of Apple just months before the company’s enigmatic founder died of pancreatic cancer.

[Bloomberg]

MONEY Tech

Google Wants to Sell You Cell Phone Service

Google is reportedly planning to become a wireless provider by piggybacking off of Sprint and T-Mobile's networks.

TIME Davos

How Technology Is Making All of Us Less Trusting

A technician checks the light in the Congress Hall before the start of the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) 2014 in Davos Jan. 21, 2014
Denis Balibouse / Reuters

The world's major tech companies better pay attention to the growing backlash—before it's too late

Davos Man, take note: the technology that has enriched you is moving too fast for the average Joe.

That’s the takeaway from the 2015 Trust Barometer survey, released by public relations firm Edelman every year at the World Economic Forum in Davos. This year’s survey, which came out Wednesday, looks at thousands of consumers in 27 countries to get a sense of public trust in business, government, NGOs, and media. This year, it’s falling across the board, with two thirds of nations’ citizens being more distrustful than ever of all institutions, perhaps no surprise given that neither the private nor the public sector seems to have answers to the big questions of the day—geopolitical conflict, rising inequality, flat wages, market volatility, etc.

What’s interesting is how much people blame technology and the speed of technological change for the feeling of unease in the world today. Two to one, consumers in all of the countries surveyed felt that technology was moving too quickly for them to cope with, and that governments and business weren’t doing enough to assess the long term impact of shifts like GMO foods, fracking, disruptors like Uber or Apple Pay, or any of the the myriad other digital services that effect privacy and security of people and companies.

That belies the conventional wisdom amongst tech gurus like, say, Jeff Bezos, who once said that, “New inventions and things that customers like are usually good for society.” Maybe, but increasingly people aren’t feeling that way. And it could have an impact on the regulatory environment facing tech companies. Expect more push back on sharing economy companies that skirt local regulation, a greater focus on the monopoly power of mammoth tech companies, and closer scrutiny of the personal wealth of tech titans themselves.

Two of the most interesting pieces of journalism I have read in recent years look at how the speed of digital change is effecting culture and public sentiment. Kurt Andersen’s wonderful Vanity Fair story from January 2012, posited the idea that culture is stuck in retro mode—think fashion’s obsession with past decades, and the nostalgia that’s rife in TV and film—because technology and globalization are moving so fast that people simply can’t take any more change, cognitively at least. Likewise, Leon Wieseltier’s sharp essay on the cover of the New York Times book review this past Sunday lamented how the fetishization of all things Big Tech has led us to focus on the speed, brevity and monetization of everything, to the detriment of “deep thought” and a broader understanding of the human experience.

I agree on both counts. And I hope that some of the tech luminaries here at Davos, like Marissa Mayer, Eric Schmidt, and Sheryl Sandberg, are paying attention to this potential growing backlash, which I expect will heat up in the coming year.

TIME Software

Microsoft Shows Off Windows 10 and ‘HoloLens’

Alex Kipman
Microsoft engineer Alex Kipman releases a miniature helicopter designed on a hologram device and then created on a 3-D printer at an event demonstrating new features of Windows 10 at the company's headquarters on Jan. 21, 2015 Elaine Thompson—AP

Headset lets users view and interact with 3D images

(REDMOND, W.A.) — Microsoft on Wednesday took the wraps off a new version of Windows — and a new wearable 3D gadget it calls the HoloLens.

The company showed the new headset, which lets users view and interact with three-dimensional images, at an event where it also revealed new features coming to the company’s flagship operating software.

Executives said Windows 10 is designed to embrace the way people use computers today — offering a familiar experience as they switch back and forth from personal computers to tablets, smartphones and other gadgets such as gaming consoles or even holographic projectors.

While it’s designed to let apps work in similar fashion on all those devices, Windows 10 will also come with a new Web browser that will be closely integrated with Cortana, the company’s voice-activated answer to Siri. Microsoft is expanding Cortana to serve as a search engine and personal assistant, capable of answering questions and responding to commands such as “Play music” on desktop and laptop computers, as well as mobile devices.

And in a break from past practice, Microsoft announced that Windows 10 will be released later this year as a free upgrade for anyone owning a computer or gadget that’s currently running Windows 8.1 or 7, the two previous versions of the software.

Microsoft is making a big bet that Windows 10 will help it regain ground the company has lost to the mobile computing boom. Windows has long been the dominating operating software for desktop and laptop computers, but that business has suffered as more people have begun using smartphones and tablets. Microsoft tried to reach those users by emphasizing touch-screen features in its last update, Windows 8, but many traditional PC users found it jarring and difficult to navigate.

Hoping to win back a larger audience, Microsoft is promising Windows 10 will provide a familiar experience to users on across devices, and a common platform for software developers to create apps that work on all of them.

“Windows 10 is built for a world in which there are going to be more devices on the planet than people,” CEO Satya Nadella told reporters and industry analysts at Microsoft’s headquarters. He said Microsoft wants to “enable that seamless cross-over, across devices as you move around at home and at work.”

Rivals including Apple and Google have also been working toward that goal, by making apps that, for example, save files or photos created on a PC and let the user retrieve them on a smartphone. But analysts say new features in Windows 10 could give Microsoft an edge.

For example, Microsoft executives showed new versions of the company’s Word app, its Outlook email service and a photo-storage app that look and act similarly on different screen sizes. They also promise to synchronize files so that changes made on one device would appear when the app is opened on another gadget.

Windows 10 will be used in Microsoft’s Xbox gaming systems as well. A new Xbox app for computers running Windows 10 will give gamers one place to find messages, video clips and games they have played on multiple devices. Microsoft gaming executive Phil Spencer also suggested programmers may eventually use Windows 10 to create other apps for TVs tied to an Xbox console.

As for the company’s new hologram device, executives did not say when it will be available for sale. But they talked about using it for games as well as more serious purposes, such as helping a surgeon visualize a new operating technique or showing someone how to perform plumbing repairs. Nadella said it will be priced to appeal to both consumers and businesses.

And there won’t be a Windows 9. Microsoft has skipped ahead in naming the next version, from Windows 8 to Windows 10, as though to put more distance between them.

TIME Archaeology

Scientists Unlock Secrets of Ancient Scrolls Near Pompeii

Italy Ancient Scrolls
David Blank, professor of Classics from the University of California, looks through a microscope at an ancient papyrus at the Naples' National Library, Italy, Jan. 20, 2015. Salvatore Laporta—AP

The breakthrough could help find more long-lost texts in a ruined library

Scrolls charred in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii are being read for the first time in almost 2,000 years, thanks to new X-ray technology.

The scrolls were recovered about 260 years ago from the ruins of the ancient Roman city Herculaneum, near Pompeii, preserved in a grand villa believed to be owned by the family of Julius Caesar’s father-in-law, the New York Times reports.

In the famous eruption, they were burned black by a blast of hot gas and had been thought to be indecipherable, since any attempt to unroll the brittle scrolls would destroy them.

But thanks to the new, advanced imaging technology, scientists in Naples, Italy have begun to decipher the first lines of two scrolls. CNET reports that the X-rays are so powerful that researchers analyzed the handwriting to determine the author of one of the scrolls, Epicurean philosopher Philodemus. These scrolls are just a small piece of what is thought to be still buried in the library of the Herculaneum villa, and this breakthrough could lead to the rediscovery of many long-lost texts by Rome and Greece’s most famous philosophers, according to the NYT.

The results appeared in the scientific journal Nature.

“This study, without compromising the physical integrity of the roll, has not merely discovered traces of the ink inside it, but has also helped identify with a certain likelihood the style of handwriting used in the text, along with its author,” the researchers conclude in the report.

“It holds out the promise that many philosophical works form the library of the ‘Villa dei Papiri’, the contents of which have so far remained unknown, may in future be deciphered without damaging the papyrus in any way.”

[CNET]

TIME technology

A Chinese Company 3D-Printed This Five-Story Apartment Building

And a 12,000 square foot mansion

In the not-so-distant future, you might be able to have your 3D printed cake and eat it in your 3D printed apartment.

A Chinese company unveiled a five-story apartment building and three-story mansion that were constructed using a 500-foot-long 3D printer, CNet reports.

Construction company WinSun presented the apartment building at Suzhou Industrial Park:

Here’s the 11,840-square-foot mansion:

According to CNet, the villa cost about $161,000 to build, decreased production time between 50 and 70 percent and saved between 30 and 60 percent of construction waste.

This isn’t WinSun’s first 3D construction feat. In April, the company claimed to print 10 houses in less than 24 hours.

The future is here.

TIME technology

These Are The 25 Worst Passwords of 2014

TIME.com stock photos Computer Keyboard Typing Hack
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

Make sure your password isn't on this list

SplashData, which makes password management applications, has released its annual list of the 25 worst passwords based on files containing over 3.3. million passwords leaked in 2014.

“123456” and “password” hold the top two spots, as they have every year since the company started producing this round-up in 2011. New passwords appearing on this year’s edition include “696969” and “batman.”

Here is the full list:

1. 123456
2. password
3. 12345
4. 12345678
5. qwerty
6. 123456789
7. 1234
8. baseball
9. dragon
10. football
11. 1234567
12. monkey
13. letmein
14. abc123
15. 111111
16. mustang
17. access
18. shadow
19. master
20. michael
21. superman
22. 696969
23. 123123
24. batman
25. trustno1

Cyber-security experts often say that the harder the password is for you to remember, the more secure it is. If your password is on this list, consider this smart and easy tip TIME recently received from security expert Bruce Schneier:

Come up with an entire phrase that’s easy for you to remember, and then use the first instance of each letter, number and symbol from each word in the phrase, keeping punctuation intact as well.

WATCH: How to Make a Strong Password

Read next: Why Your Passwords Are So Easy to Hack

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Companies

Facebook’s Hiring Spree Signals New Tech Offensive

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during a Reuters interview at the University of Bogota
President, founder and CEO of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg speaks during a Reuters interview at the University of Bogota on Jan. 14, 2015. Jose Gomez—Reuters

The social networking giant aims to add nearly 1,200 new employees to its ranks

Facebook is hiring, big time.

The social networking company’s recent acquisitions and investments in several tech companies, which specialize in niche markets like drone production, virtual reality and data centers, is helping drive the latest round of recruitment, according to Reuters.

“We are an ambitious company run by an ambitious CEO,” Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, told Reuters. “Our users are growing and our business is growing and we want to support that.”

Facebook reportedly had 8,348 full-time employees at the end of last September and is looking to hire at least 1,200 new staff members in the coming months.

[Reuters]

TIME technology

Elon Musk to Build a Test Track for his Hyperloop Dream

Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk talks at the Automotive World News Congress at the Renaissance Center in Detroit
Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk talks at the Automotive World News Congress at the Renaissance Center in Detroit on Jan. 13, 2015. Rebecca Cook—Reuters

CEO of Tesla Motors and Space X plans to build a five-mile test track for the sci-fi transportation system

Elon Musk just brought his Hyperloop project one step closer to reality.

The Tesla Motors founder said Thursday he intends to build a testing facility for the ultra-fast transportation system. The five-mile track would most likely be in Texas, Musk said in a tweet.

Musk’s Hyperloop would involve strapping passengers into pods, or a train, and shooting them through a tube at warp-speed to their destination. In theory, a 500-mile trip between San Francisco and Los Angeles would take less than an hour.

Musk, whose projects include luxury electric car company Tesla, the private space flight company Space X, and solar power installer SolarCity, first laid out his audacious vision for a Hyperloop 18 months ago. Since then, he’s remained mostly silent about the topic while focusing on his day jobs.

But on Thursday Musk addressed the topic once again on stage at the Texas Transportation Forum, and then in a series of tweets. He said in a tweet that his Hyperloop track would be open to other companies and students “to test out their pods.” He also mused about holding an annual student “pod racer” competition. Musk did not mention whether his track would merely serve as an open test-bed, or whether he would also try out his own ideas there.

In addition to discussing the Hyperloop project, Musk said he had donated $10 million to the Future of Life Institute, to ensure that artificial intelligence is “beneficial to humanity.” His concern is that robots could one day be smart and independent enough to rise up against humans, like in the plot of a pulp science fiction novel.

“It is best to prepare for, to try to prevent a negative circumstance from occurring, than to wait for it to occur and then be reactive,” Musk said in a video posted on the institute’s website.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

TIME technology

What Wikipedia’s First Users Got Wrong

FRANCE-LOGO-WIKIPEDIA
The "Wikipedia" logo is seen on a tablet screen on Dec. 4, 2012 in Paris Lionel Bonaventure—AFP/Getty Images

The web behemoth went live on Jan. 15, 2001

These days the real challenge would be finding someone who doesn’t use Wikipedia all the time. But, back in 2003, when TIME first mentioned the word in its pages, the challenge in writing about Wikipedia was explaining what it was.

Wikipedia had launched on Jan. 15, 2001 — that’s 14 years ago Thursday — and contained a mere 150,000 entries when TIME explained that “To contribute to wikipedia.org, an online encyclopedia, all you need is Web access.” The 113-word blurb continued:

Wikipedia (“wiki” comes from the Hawaiian word for fast) invites visitors to create new entries or edit existing ones. This may sound like a recipe for chaos–a disclaimer on the site reads, “It is of course possible for biased, out-of-date or incorrect information to be posted.” But since thousands of people review updates and changes every day, false information usually gets corrected.

Still, even two years later, in 2005, it was obvious that not everybody got the point. That was when TIME profiled Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales and discovered that many potential users, misunderstanding his product and his role, made a major mistake: they thought that he had written every page. As TIME reported:

…the e-mails that make him laugh out loud come from concerned newcomers who have just discovered they have total freedom to edit just about any Wikipedia entry at the click of a button. Oh my God, they write, you’ve got a major security flaw!

As the old techie saying goes, it’s not a bug, it’s a feature. Wikipedia is a free open-source encyclopedia, which basically means that anyone can log on and add to or edit it. And they do. It has a stunning 1.5 million entries in 76 languages–and counting. Academics are upset by what they see as info anarchy. (An Encyclopaedia Britannica editor once compared Wikipedia to a public toilet seat because you don’t know who used it last.) Loyal Wikipedians argue that collaboration improves articles over time, just as free open-source software like Linux and Firefox is more robust than for-profit competitors because thousands of amateur programmers get to look at the code and suggest changes. It’s the same principle that New Yorker writer James Surowiecki asserted in his best seller The Wisdom of Crowds: large groups of people are inherently smarter than an élite few.

At that point, Wikipedia’s 1.5 million entries included 500,000 in English.

Today’s article count? On its birthday, the encyclopedia boasts about 4.7 million entries in English alone — and that’s perhaps the only statistic in the world for which citing Wikipedia isn’t, as TIME once put it, a recipe for chaos.

Read more: A Brief History of Wikipedia

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser