TIME weather

See Astronaut’s Photo of Hurricane Jimena From Space

Hurricane Jimena Space Station Kjell Lindgren
Kjell Lindgren—NASA A view of hurricane Jimena taken from the International Space Station and posted to Twitter by NASA Astronaut Kjell Lindgren on Aug. 30, 2015.

NASA astronaut Kjell Lindgren captured this image of Hurricane Jimena from the International Space Station and posted it to Twitter on Sunday.

Jimena is a Category 4 hurricane that’s located more than 1,330 miles east of Hilo, Hawaii. Weather experts predict it will remain a Category 3 hurricane or greater through Tuesday. According to The Weather Channel, on Saturday and Sunday Jimena was one of three Category 4 hurricanes in the Pacific, along with hurricanes Kilo and Ignacio. Such a concentration of storms is rare.

TIME space

See Photos of Last Night’s ‘Supermoon’

One of the three largest full moons of this year rose in the sky last night

TIME space

See Highlights From The ‘Supermoon’

The "supermoon" is the first of this year’s three largest apparent full moons

The so-called “supermoon,” one of the three largest apparent full moons of this year, rose in the sky last night.

Time readers can watch highlights from a live stream of the moonrise hosted by the Slooh observatory. The broadcast was guided by the observatory’s expert Paul Cox, and explains the the difference between the “supermoon” and a “mega moon,” and how much larger tonight’s moon appears compared to the “mini moon” in March, along with other details and insights.

TIME space

Buzz Aldrin Wants to Colonize Mars Before 2040

To Phobos and beyond

By 2039 humans will be calling Mars home, if things go according to Buzz Aldrin’s plan.

The second man on the moon is teaming up with the Florida Institute of Technology to develop a master plan to colonize the red planet in less than 25 years. Aldrin chose 2039 to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, which first allowed man to walk on the moon.

Aldrin’s plan involves using Mars’ moons as pit-stops for astronauts on the way to the planet. People who arrive on Mars would stay there for at least a decade. He is seeking input from NASA on the plan, though the space agency already has its own initiative to put astronauts on Mars in the mid-2030s.

At the Florida Institute of Technology, Aldrin will be a faculty adviser and research professor for aeronautics. He will also lead the Buzz Aldrin Space Institute, set to open this fall.

[The Guardian]

TIME A Year In Space

See the Best Photos From an Astronaut’s Fifth Month in Space

Astronaut Scott Kelly just passed the five-month mark in his yearlong stay aboard the Space Station. Here is a collection of the best photos he's snapped so far

TIME is following Kelly’s mission in the new series, A Year In Space. Watch the first two episodes here.

MORE: See more photographs from Scott Kelly’s yearlong mission in space here.

TIME 3-D printing

NASA Just 3-D Printed Part of a Rocket

Cygnus Spacecraft Launches from Pad-0A
NASA—Getty Images A NASA rocket.

It's more efficient than traditionally produced rocket parts

NASA is getting closer to 3-D printing a rocket engine.

The space agency announced Wednesday that it had built a turbopump using a 3-D printer. The device, which is designed to boost the power of an engine, is one of the most complex rocket parts ever designed with a 3-D printer.

According to NASA, the 3-D printed turbopump has 45 percent fewer parts than a turbopump made via traditional methods. The device is able to power a rocket engine capable of generating 35,000 pounds of thrust and is able to survive in an environment where fuel is burned at greater than 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

NASA is also 3-D printing injectors and other engine parts in order to make the production of future spacecraft more efficient.

Here’s a video of the 3-D printed fuel pump in action:

TIME space

See Breathtaking Views of the National Parks From Space

Yosemite, Redwood, and other famous parks as they look from outer space

TIME space

See the Massive Mountain on Dwarf Planet Ceres

Ceres Dawn Mountain
NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA NASA's Dawn spacecraft spotted this tall, conical mountain on Ceres on Aug. 19, 2015.

It's just a bit shorter than Mt. Everest

Very small worlds can do very big things—providing you’re willing to grade on a curve. Take the dwarf planet Ceres, the largest body in the asteroid belt, which is currently being orbited by the Dawn spacecraft. Ceres is just 591 miles (952 km) across—or 73% of the size of Texas—with only 3% of Earth’s gravity. If you weigh 150 lbs. here, you’d weigh 4.5 lbs. there.

But Ceres has a mountain—and it’s a whopper, as evidenced by this latest image sent home by Dawn, orbiting at an altitude of 915 miles (1,470 km). The mountain stands 4 miles (6 km) tall—a bit shorter than Mt. Everest, which tops out at 5.49 miles (8.83 km). But context is everything. A 4-mile-tall mountain on a tiny world like Ceres is the equivalent of a 49.8-mile-tall (80.1 km) mountain on Earth, or nine times taller than a pipsqueak like Everest. The Ceres mountain is not terribly active—at least as evidenced by the absence of debris at its base—but it is scored by a bright streak running down its side, which suggests some kind of dynamic processes at least in the past.

Every pixel of the Dawn image represents 450 ft. (140 m) of Ceres’ surface, which is already an impressively granular resolution. In the future, the spacecraft will approach the surface at just 25% of its current altitude, improving image detail dramatically. Whatever secrets Ceres is keeping Dawn may soon reveal.

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TIME space

Here are the Most Heart-Stopping Photos of Saturn from the Cassini Mission

As the spacecraft completes its final flyby of Saturn's moon Dione, TIME reflects on the most spectacular images from the mission thus far

TIME space

See Cassini’s Haunting Final Images of Saturn’s Moon Dione

The spacecraft made its final flyby of the mysterious moon on August 17

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