MONEY identity theft

Target to Pay $10 Million Settlement in Data Breach Lawsuit

Target has agreed to pay $10 million in a proposed settlement to the customers who lost money in that 2013 hack.

MONEY Shopping

5 Makeup Names Just As Tasteless As “Underage Red”

Red lipstick on lips
Getty Images

The lipstick that has sparked controversy among Sephora customers doesn't stand alone in its tastelessness

Consumers are voicing outrage on Twitter about a new shade of lipstick sold by Sephora under the Kat Von D label.

Critics have said that the color, called “Underage Red,” sexualizes young girls and trivializes pedophilia. The lipstick line already includes a rosy hue called “Lolita.”

This isn’t the first time Kat Von D has made headlines for a makeup name: Back in 2013, Sephora pulled a lipstick from the line called “Celebutard” after customers complained.

But the brand is not alone in applying objectionable names to cosmetics. MAC also offers a peach lipgloss called “Underage,” and several other companies are guilty of labeling makeup with offensive phrases. Here are five other examples that are—or were—equally terrible. Most, fortunately, seem to have been discontinued.

1. “Miso Happy With This Color” by OPI

Puns that tacitly support an extremely tired stereotype about how Asian people speak? Offensive.

2. “I’m Not Really A Whore” by Naughty Nailz

So much for celebrating womanhood. Even among other polishes named “Dirty Slut,” “Nympho,” “Trophy Wife,” and “Gold Digger,” this one stood out as particularly self-loathing. It doesn’t even have a retro ring to it, like “Brazen Hussy.”

3. “What’s A Tire Jack?” by OPI

According to the copywriter assigned to describe this tire-black color, it “speaks to rule-breaking feminine drama”—whatever that means. What it sounds like is another lame joke about women being bad with tools.

4. “Give Me Moor” by OPI

Clearly whoever named this shade skipped Othello in high school English, or else he or she would have realized it’s in poor taste to name a dark nail polish hue with an old racial slur.

5. “Iris I Was Thinner” by OPI

Just what women and teens need: A reminder that it’s “normal” to hate your body. And let’s not even get into the grammatical error.

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TIME psychology

This Is Why You Overshop in Ikea

We take you through the popular furniture and home goods store to show you how the layout affects your buying habits

It’s easy to overshop. But at Ikea, it’s almost impossible not to spend more than you originally budgeted.

That’s because the Swedish furniture retailer designs its stores to trigger impulse purchases while making it difficult for shoppers to make a mad dash for the exits. It’s a way to take advantage of Americans’ changing shopping habits, which TIME’s Josh Sanburn detailed in this week’s magazine.

Our current phase of overconsumption began about 30 years ago, when Americans began committing close to half of their annual expenditures to nonnecessities. It was the beginning of a gradual decline in the cost of consumer goods, the growth of everyday credit-card use and the rise of big-box stores and discount retailers that pushed their way into communities nationwide, forcing down prices and profits for those competing around them.

In the past decade, the cost of cell phones, toys, computers and televisions has plunged, thanks in part to overseas manufacturing. The rise of “fast fashion”–popularized by the growth of clothing outlets like Gap, Forever 21 and American Eagle selling $10 T-shirts and $30 jeans–is now driven by low-cost imports H&M and Uniqlo. Today the average U.S. household has about 248 garments and 29 pairs of shoes. It purchases, on average, 64 pieces of clothing and seven pairs of shoes annually, at a total cost of $1,141 a year, or $16 per item.

“When the question is why do we have so much stuff, one reason is because we can,” says Annie Leonard, executive director of the environmental group Greenpeace USA and the creator of The Story of Stuff, an animated video about excessive consumerism. “For a huge percentage of this country, there is no longer an economic obstacle to having the illusion of luxury. It’s just that this stuff is so cheap.”

Watch the video above to go inside one Ikea store in Brooklyn and see how its strategy works, and read more here.

Read next: My House Is Ground Zero in the Clutter Wars

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

MONEY

Is Daylight Saving Time a Conspiracy to Get You to Spend More Money?

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Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

Businesses have special reason to love when there seems to be more time in the day to shop, play golf, dine out, and take advantage of added sunlight.

At 2 a.m. on Sunday morning, an hour of time will disappear in most of the country. Daylight saving time will kick in, and when the clock hits 2 a.m. it’ll instantly be 3 a.m. instead.

The sudden change can have some strange effects. In Ohio, for instance, bars have been ordered to close 30 minutes earlier than usual in the wee hours of Sunday morning. Normally, establishments authorized to sell alcohol in the state have last call at 2:30 a.m., but because of the time shift, there is no 2:30 a.m. that night, and bars therefore must simply shut down at 2.

In Washington, D.C., meanwhile, the Alcohol Beverage Regulation Administration has announced that bars and nightclubs will “automatically gain an additional hour to sell and serve alcoholic beverages between 3 a.m. and 4 a.m. on the morning of Sunday, March 8.” In previous years, D.C. bars had to apply for permission and pay $200 to stay open an “extra” hour when daylight saving time kicked in.

Beyond the quirks, the impact of daylight saving time might seem to be little more than feeling groggy due to a lost hour of sleep. Researchers have noted other negative effects, however, such as increased heart attacks because people get less sleep when we “spring forward.” Likewise, some data suggests that on the Monday after daylight saving time (so, March 9 this year), there are more traffic accidents, again because people aren’t as well rested and have slower reaction times than usual.

Daylight saving time also has a big impact on the economy. When days are longer—or rather, when they seem longer due to extended daylight—people tend to spend more money on everything from tourism and recreation to shopping and restaurants.

The golf industry, which has suffered from declining popularity for years, is “the most important reason we’re still doing and expanding the period of daylight saving time,” Michael Downing, a Tufts University professor and author of Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time, explained on public radio a year ago. Downing also said that one of the original arguments for daylight saving time—it would save energy and money—is just plain false today:

We’re told we’re saving energy, but when Americans go outside and go to the park and go to the mall, we don’t walk—we get in our cars and drive. So for the past 100 years, the dirty secret is daylight saving increases gasoline consumption.

In any event, try to catch up on sleep as soon as you can after daylight saving time takes effect. And by all means take advantage of the opportunities that this period’s “longer” days provide. Just understand that you’re paying for it.

MONEY Odd Spending

Snuggie Maker to Pay $8 Million Over Customer Complaints

The makers of popular “as seen on TV” items like the Snuggie have agreed to an $8 million settlement over deceptive business practices.

MONEY Shopping

Miami Megamall Would Be the Biggest in the U.S.

The developers behind Minnesota’s Mall of America want to build an even larger shopping attraction in Florida.

MONEY Shopping

5 Astounding Things About America’s Biggest Mall Planned in Miami

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Courtesy of American Dream Mall

There will be hundreds of stores and an indoor ski slope. More surprising is the possibility of sea lion shows, submarine rides, and which group will likely be the most important customer base.

If a proposal first revealed this week in the Miami Herald is approved and actually built, the suburbs of Miami would become home to the largest mall in the U.S. It’s been estimated that the megamall will cost $4 billion to complete, but that’s hardly the only eye-popping factoid attached to the monumental project. Here are a few more:

It’ll occupy a whopping 200 acres. That’s roughly double the acreage of the Mall of America in Minnesota. The Miami megamall, dubbed the American Dream, has been proposed by a Canadian company called Triple Five. The firm also owns and manages the Mall of America, as well as another American Dream, a much-maligned complex near the East Rutherford, N.J., sports venues once known as Xanadu that’s taken more than a decade to develop and still isn’t open; and North America’s largest mall, the 5.3-million-square-foot behemoth with two hotels, a water park, and 800+ stores in West Edmonton, Canada.

The project is supposed to employ tens of thousands. Construction will reportedly require 25,000 workers, and about that many permanent jobs are expected to be needed to keep the complex running as imagined, according to Triple Five. As for the criticism that many of these jobs would be low-paying retail and tourism gigs, Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez told the Miami Herald that all jobs are good jobs, though there seems to be some confusion as to how many jobs will actually be created. “Everybody is focused on high-paying jobs,” Gimenez said. “Not everybody is qualified for them. Twenty-thousand jobs are twenty-thousand jobs.”

There will be sea lion shows and submarine rides. Triple Five isn’t in the business of creating mere places to shop. Instead, it develops “tourism retail and entertainment complexes,” and points to a quickie Time.com post as proof that the Mall of America is the country’s “Most Popular Attraction,” drawing some 40 million visitors annually. (Meanwhile, a story from sister publication Travel & Leisure left the Mall of America off its “Most Visited Tourist Attraction” list because it wasn’t deemed culturally or historically significant.)

In any event, Triple Five markets its malls as full-fledged destinations, not simply shopping centers; one particularly ambitious plan envisioned chartered flights heading to Newark, N.J., just so rich folks the world over could visit the American Dream in the swamps of Jersey. Among the over-the-top features in the works for the American Dream Miami are an indoor ski slope, skating rink, water park, amusement park with a roller coaster, Ferris Wheel, live sea lion shows, hotels, condominiums, and submarine rides.

It’ll be neighbors with two other enormous malls. As the Miami New Times pointed out, the proposed American Dream mall is planned to be built in Miami Lakes, at the intersection of the Florida Turnpike and I-75. Given the location and scope, it would likely compete directly with two existing monster malls in greater Miami, the Aventura Mall and Sawgrass Mills—which currently rank, respectively, as the third- and seventh-largest malls in the U.S.

The mall isn’t necessarily aimed at Floridians. Instead, the key demographic that may lead to the American Dream Miami’s success (or failure) is that of wealthy international tourists. Foreign visitors constitute one-third of foot traffic at shopping hubs like the Aventura Mall, according to Miami Today, with an outsized portion coming from Brazil, Colombia, and Argentina. Canadians and Europeans come in abundance as well, and the foreigners tend to spend far more time and money during their shopping excursions than Americans because 1) they’re rich foreigners; and 2) it’ll likely be a while before they get another opportunity to go on a wild spending spree in America in the future.

Foreign visitors have even begun flocking to South Florida around Thanksgiving, and it’s not for turkey dinners. “More and more South Americans now really understand that because of the great discounts, Black Friday is a terrific time to travel to the U.S. to shop,” a Saw Grass Mills executive explained.

MONEY Shopping

Are Malls Losing Their Cool, or Still Standing Strong? An Exchange

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Brennan Linsley—AP

Mike Kercheval, president and CEO of the International Council of Shopping Centers:

I write in response to Kerri Anne Renzulli’s January article, “Why Teens Hate Shopping at ‘Teen’ Clothing Stores,” and in particular to her contention that “Malls Are No Longer a Hangout.” In arguing this point, MONEY joins a steady stream of voices to incorrectly write-off the shopping center industry.

Renzulli accurately points out that e-commerce sales are increasing at about four times the growth rate of physical retail establishments. But a closer look at the stats shows that actual e-commerce sales still amount to just 6% of total retail sales (with the balance happening at brick-and-mortar locations) and that consumers make 78% of their purchases at shopping centers.

It is true that some major teen-oriented retailers have announced store closings recently, but teenagers remain a driving force in the retail industry—and, yes, they still visit the mall. Teens are simply shifting where their spending dollars go to. In fact, their demand for new brands and styles has generated a need for more retail space from fast-fashion brands such as Zara, H&M and Forever 21, each of which have recently announced big expansion plans—mostly in shopping malls. And when teens have been asked—as they were in this recent survey by Teen Vogue—they point convincingly to an omni-channel approach, one which still puts brick-and-mortar (or the mall) retail at the core of their purchasing habits.

Like shoppers of all ages, teens will use mobile and online to complement their shopping experience, but they still prefer to walk into a store and feel the merchandise before they buy that next pair of designer jeans. They also go to malls to enjoy the social experience. During the past holiday shopping season, Jason Wagenheim, vice president and publisher of Teen Vogue, said, “the mall remains the most important part of the overall omnichannel shopping story” for the millennial shopper, especially 16 to 26 year-olds. He pointed out that even though millennials are shopping more online and through mobile, “the brick-and-mortar experience still greatly matters.”

The bottom line is that consumers today want to choose where and when they can shop, and they are using online technologies to enhance their shopping experience, but malls and shopping centers will continue to be the number one distribution channel of goods, services, and entertainment.Retail tastes change over time, and brands will come and go, but people of every generation clearly want to shop in stores.

Kerri Anne Renzuli responds:

My article was focused not on the state of shopping centers or malls but rather on the growing disinterest of teens in teen-targeted retail brands, a point that was underscored by the ongoing management shake-up at—and disappointing earnings released today by—Abercrombie & Fitch.

That said, I stand by my contention that teens are less likely than in past decades to use the mall as a nexus of social gatherings. The numbers seem to paint a pretty clear picture: Teens are spending less of their leisure time at malls and ascribe decreasing cultural importance to them. In 2014, according to Piper Jaffray, teens visited the mall an average of 29 times a year—still a lot, as you point out, but down from 38 times in 2007.

As I note in my article, so-called “fast fashion” brands like H&M and Zara that are aimed at a broader demographic have indeed absorbed some of the teen traffic lost by Abercrombie and the like. But teens tend to see these retailers as primary destinations, much like large department stores. By contrast, many of the struggling teen brands like Wet Seal and Aeropostale have historically benefited from incidental foot traffic from teens wandering the mall with friends—which they are doing less of now. The number of stores visited per mall trip has dropped from five to three since 2007.

While teens still gather at the mall, other types of retail establishments, particularly “fast casual” eateries like Chipotle and Starbucks, are growing in popularity. And with teens choosing to spend more of their time and income in restaurants, it’s become even harder for teen brands to attract the attention and wallets of their core audience.

 

MONEY Shopping

Here’s Why Target Is Planning to Cut Thousands of Jobs

Target's job cuts come on top of the ones linked to its retreat from Canada. No word yet on the impact to #AlexFromTarget.

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