MONEY Health Care

This Scary Retirement Expense Just Got Even Scarier

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GIPhotoStock—Getty Images/Cultura RF

The estimated tab for health care costs in retirement is huge—and getting bigger every year, according to a new study.

If you’re worried about paying for your health care in retirement, get ready to worry more.

A healthy couple retiring this year at age 65 will pay $266,589 for health care in retirement, according to the 2015 Retirement Healthcare Costs Data Report by health data provider HealthViews. That’s a 6.5% jump from HealthView’s projections a year ago.

If medical costs continue their rapid rise, the tab will be even larger in the near future: Expected lifetime health care expenses will rise to $320,996 for a couple retiring in 10 years at age 65, the study found.

And that’s just what you’ll pay for Medicare Parts B and D, which cover routine medical care and prescription drugs, and a Medicare supplemental insurance policy, which most Medicare recipients buy to help with co-pays and deductibles. It doesn’t include all the out-of-pocket costs that traditional Medicare doesn’t cover, including dental, vision, and hearing services, and co-pays.

When you factor in those expenses, projected retirement health care costs rise to $394,954 for a couple retiring this year at age 65 and $463,849 for a couple retiring in 10 years. And those numbers don’t even count long-term care, which can add tens of thousands of dollars if you need extensive help at home or in a nursing home.

To put those costs in perspective, HealthViews estimates that a couple retiring today will spend 67% of their Social Security benefits on health care costs over their lifetimes. For a couple retiring in 10 years at age 65, medical care will suck up 90% of their Social Security income. That’s troubling considering that for many, Social Security makes up the majority of their retirement income. Even for middle income and wealthier families, Social Security accounts for about one-third of retirement income.

But Social Security benefits won’t be able to keep up with health care inflation. Social Security benefits have averaged a 2.6% annual cost of living increase over the past decade (and just 1.4% the past four years), while health care costs have risen more sharply. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, health care costs will rise 5% to 7% over the next eight years.

HealthView numbers are higher than other surveys on health care retirement costs. In Fidelity Benefits Consulting’s annual retirement health care costs report for 2014, a 65-year-old couple retiring today will need an average of $220,000 to cover medical expenses throughout retirement.

Counterintuitively, estimates of total lifetime health care costs are lower for people in poor health at retirement. HealthView’s estimates show that total retirement health care costs will be lower on average for someone with diabetes because of a shorter life expectancy. The total health care costs for a typical 55-year-old male with Type II diabetes will be approximately $118,000, compared to $223,000 for his healthy counterpart, primarily because the 55-year-old with diabetes has an expected longevity of 76, vs. 86 for a healthy male.

Of course, these are just averages. You can’t know exactly what your health will be after you retire, how much medical treatments will cost you, or how long you will live.

That said, even a rough guide can be a useful planning tool. So take a look at your insurance coverage. Consider the likelihood for each type of expense, as well as the average Medicare costs by age, to come up with an estimate of the savings you’ll need to fund these costs. Kaiser recently published a study on Medicare costs by age, which breaks down Medicare spending into its main components—hospitals, doctors, and drugs—and measures how much Americans spend on these services at different ages.

To prepare for that spending in advance, take a look at your sources of your retirement income. If you have a health savings account, do everything you can not to touch it now but let it grow tax free. It is an excellent vehicle for funding future medical expenses. Ditto for a Roth IRA, which lets your money grow tax free. For more tips on planning for retirement health care costs, check out MONEY’s stories here, here, and here.

MONEY Taxes

How to Make Tapping a $1 Million Retirement Plan Less Taxing

adding machine printing $100 bill
Sarina Finkelstein (photo illustration)—Mike Lorrig/Corbis (1); iStock (1)

With a seven-figure account balance, you have to work extra hard to minimize the tax hit once you starting taking withdrawals.

More than three decades after the creation of the 401(k), this workplace plan has become the No. 1 way for Americans to save for retirement. And save they have. The average plan balance has hit a record high, and the number of million-dollar-plus 401(k)s has more than doubled since 2012.

In the first part of this four-part series, we laid out how to build a $1 million 401(k) plan. Part two covered making your money last. Next up: getting smart about taxes when you draw down that $1 million.

Most of your 401(k) money was probably saved pretax, and once you start making withdrawals, Uncle Sam will want his share. The conventional wisdom would have you postpone taking out 401(k) funds for as long as possible, giving your money more time to grow tax-deferred. But retirees must start making required minimum distributions (RMDs) by age 70½. With a million-dollar-plus account, that income could push you into a higher tax bracket. Here are three possible ways to reduce that tax bite.

1. Make the Most of Income Dips

Perhaps in the year after you retire, with no paycheck coming in, you drop to the 15% bracket (income up to $73,800 for a married couple filing jointly). Or you have medical expenses or charitable deductions that reduce your taxable income briefly before you bump back up to a higher bracket. Tapping pretax accounts in low-tax years may enable you to pay less in taxes on future withdrawals, says Marc Freedman, a financial adviser in Newton, Mass.

2. Spread Out the Tax Bill

Taking advantage of low-tax-bracket years to convert IRA money to a Roth can cut your tax bill over time. Just make sure you have cash on hand to pay the conversion taxes.

Say you and your spouse are both 62, with Social Security and pension income that covers your living expenses, as well as $800,000 in a rollover IRA. If you leave the money there, it will grow to nearly $1.1 million by the time you start taking RMDs, assuming 5% annual returns, says Andrew Sloan, a financial adviser in Louisville.

If you convert $50,000 a year to a Roth for eight years instead, paying $7,500 in income taxes each time, you can stay in the 15% bracket. But you will end up paying less in taxes when RMDs begin, since your IRA balance will be only $675,000. Meanwhile, you will have $475,000 in the Roth. Another benefit: Since Roth IRAs aren’t subject to RMDs, you can pass on more of your IRAs to your heirs.

3. Plot Your Exit from Employer Stock

Some 401(k) investors, often those with large balances, hold company stock. Across all plans, 9% of 401(k) assets were in employer shares at the end of 2013, Vanguard data show—for 9% of participants, that stock accounts for more than 20% of their plan.

Unloading those shares at retirement will reduce the risk in your portfolio. Plus, that sale may cut your tax bill. That’s because of a tax rule called net unrealized appreciation (NUA), which is the difference between the price you paid for the stock and its market value.

Say you bought 5,000 shares of company stock in your 401(k) at $20 a share, for a total price of $100,000. Five years later the shares are worth $50, or $250,000 in total. That gives you a cost of $100,000, and an NUA of $150,000. At retirement, you could simply roll that stock into an IRA. But to save on taxes, your best move may be to stash it in a taxable account while investing the balance of your plan in an IRA, says Jeffrey Levine, a CPA at IRAhelp.com.

All rollover IRA withdrawals will be taxed at your income tax rate, which can be as high as 39.6%. When you take company stock out of your 401(k), though, you owe income tax only on the original purchase price. Then, when you sell, you’ll owe long-term capital gains taxes of no more than 20% on the NUA.

Of course, these complex strategies may call for an accountant or financial adviser. But after decades of careful saving, you don’t want to jeopardize your million-dollar 401(k) with a bad tax move.

MONEY 401k plans

The Secrets to Making a $1 Million Retirement Stash Last

door opening with Franklin $100 staring through the crack
Sarina Finkelstein (photo illustration)—Getty Images (2)

More and more Americans are on target to save seven figures. The next challenge is managing that money once you reach retirement.

More than three decades after the creation of the 401(k), this workplace plan has become the No. 1 way for Americans to save for retirement. And save they have. The average plan balance has hit a record high, and the number of million-dollar-plus 401(k)s has more than doubled since 2012.

In the first part of this four-part series, we laid out what you need to do to build a $1 million 401(k) plan. In this second installment, you’ll learn how to manage that enviable nest egg once you hit retirement.

Dial Back On Stocks

A bear market at the start of retirement could put a permanent dent in your income. Retiring with a 55% stock/45% bond portfolio in 2000, at the start of a bear market, meant reducing your withdrawals by 25% just to maintain your odds of not running out of money, according to research by T. Rowe Price.

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That’s why financial adviser Rick Ferri, head of Portfolio Solutions, recommends shifting to a 30% stock and 70% bond portfolio at the outset of retirement. As the graphic below shows, that mix would have fallen far less during the 2007–09 bear market, while giving up just a little potential return. “The 30/70 allocation is the center of gravity between risk and return—it avoids big losses while still providing growth,” Ferri says.

Financial adviser Michael Kitces and American College professor of retirement income Wade Pfau go one step further. They suggest starting with a similar 30% stock/70% bond allocation and then gradually increasing your stock holdings. “This approach creates more sustainable income in retirement,” says Pfau.

That said, if you have a pension or other guaranteed source of income, or feel confident you can manage a market plunge, you may do fine with a larger stake in stocks.

Know When to Say Goodbye

You’re at the finish line with a seven-figure 401(k). Now you need to turn that lump sum into a lasting income, something that even dedicated do-it-yourselfers may want help with. When it comes to that kind of advice, your workplace plan may not be up to the task.

In fact, most retirees eventually roll over 401(k) money into an IRA—a 2013 report from the General Accountability Office found that 50% of savings from participants 60 and older remained in employer plans one year after leaving, but only 20% was there five years later.

Here’s how to do it:

Give your plan a shot. Even if your first instinct is to roll over your 401(k), you may find compelling reasons to leave your money where it is, such as low costs (no more than 0.5% of assets) and advice. “It can often make sense to stay with your 401(k) if it has good, low-fee options,” says Jim Ludwick, a financial adviser in Odenton, Md.

More than a third of 401(k)s have automatic withdrawal options, according to Aon Hewitt. The plan might transfer an amount you specify to your bank every month. A smaller percentage offer financial advice or other retirement income services. (For a managed account, you might pay 0.4% to 1% of your balance.) Especially if your finances aren’t complex, there’s no reason to rush for the exit.

Leave for something better. With an IRA, you have a wider array of investment choices, more options for getting advice, and perhaps lower fees. Plus, consolidating accounts in one place will make it easier to monitor your money.

But be cautious with your rollover, since many in the financial services industry are peddling costly investments, such as variable annuities or other insurance products, to new retirees. “Everyone and their uncle will want your IRA rollover,” says Brooklyn financial adviser Tom Fredrickson. You will most likely do best with a diversified portfolio at a low-fee brokerage or fund group. What’s more, new online services are making advice more affordable than ever.

Go Slow to Make It Last

A $1 million nest egg sounds like a lot of money—and it is. If you have stashed $1 million in your 401(k), you have amassed five times more than the average 60-year-old who has saved for 20 years.

But being a millionaire is no guarantee that you can live large in retirement. “These days the notion of a millionaire is actually kind of quaint,” says Fredrickson.

Why $1 million isn’t what it once was. Using a standard 4% withdrawal rate, your $1 million portfolio will give you an income of just $40,000 in your first year of retirement. (In following years you can adjust that for inflation.) Assuming you also receive $27,000 annually from Social Security (a typical amount for an upper-middle-class couple), you’ll end up with a total retirement income of $67,000.

In many areas of the country, you can live quite comfortably on that. But it may be a lot less than your pre-retirement salary. And as the graphic below shows, taking out more severely cuts your chances of seeing that $1 million last.

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What your real goal should be. To avoid a sharp decline in your standard of living, focus on hitting the right multiple of your pre-retirement income. A useful rule of thumb is to put away 12 times your salary by the time you stop working. Check your progress with an online tool, such as the retirement income calculator at T. Rowe Price.

Why high earners need to aim higher. Anyone earning more will need to save even more, since Social Security will make up less of your income, says Wharton finance professor Richard Marston. A couple earning $200,000 should put away 15.5 times salary. At that level, $3 million is the new $1 million.

MONEY retirement planning

This Is the Best State for Retirement

Historic buildings on Lincoln Highway, West 16th Street in downtown Cheyenne, Wyoming
Ian Dagnall—Alamy Historic buildings on Lincoln Highway, West 16th Street in downtown Cheyenne, Wyoming

No, it's not Florida.

If you could choose any place in America to retire, which locale would be best? Florida perhaps? Or somewhere with a lot of culture, like New York or San Francisco? Not according to one new report, which finds the best U.S. state for retirees is…Wyoming.

According to Bankrate’s annual “Best and Worst States to Retire” ranking, released on March 23, the “Equality State” state is the best place for seniors to settle down. The ranking is based on six different factors—cost of living, crime rate, community well-being, health care quality, tax rate, and weather—and weights the importance of each using a national survey on what Americans value in retirement.

Arkansas comes in last, with poor marks in everything but living expenses, while Wyoming gets the crown for its top-10 low crime and good weather, low tax burden, and a cost of living and well-being scores in the top 20.

Wyoming’s biggest weak spot? Health care, where the state comes in a humble 37. Minnesota, the state ranked as has having the best healthcare in the country, is listed number 11 overall.

That might make some readers balk, but Chris Kahn, who has spearheaded the report for years, has become accustomed to criticism.

“I get a lot of letters saying this should be most important, that should be most important, there isn’t consensus there,” says Kahn. “I guess the one thing I’ve learned from all this is I’m never going to make a ranking that’s going to please everyone.”

Related: MONEY’s Best Places to Retire

If critics don’t like the list, they have only their fellow Americans to blame. Respondents to Bankrate’s survey ranked health care third on the list of retirement location priorities, behind crime and cost of living. In another surprise, more people (40%) said they would rather live near mountains, rivers, and other outdoor recreation than said they wanted access to a beach (25%), and only a quarter of respondents said being close to family was the most important factor in deciding where to retire.

“I consider this ranking a conversation starter,” says Kahn. “Don’t just go where you think you ought to go or where you had a good vacation. You should really be thinking about things like the cost of living, the health care system, the taxes—all that data is out there.”

Here’s the full list:

State Overall rank Cost of living Crime rate Community well-being Health care quality Tax rate Weather
Wyoming 1 19 5 20 37 1 8
Colorado 2 30 25 6 14 19 3
Utah 3 7 22 19 7 23 6
Idaho 4 3 2 27 21 27 7
Virginia 5 22 4 15 13 21 10
Iowa 6 11 12 4 5 22 39
Montana 7 27 19 8 24 13 9
South Dakota 8 26 11 31 15 3 29
Arizona 9 32 41 2 22 17 5
Nebraska 10 9 20 16 11 26 21
Minnesota 11 33 15 5 1 45 48
Maine 12 38 3 28 4 37 27
North Dakota 13 29 10 23 16 15 43
Kansas 14 10 32 13 25 25 17
Vermont 15 41 1 3 10 42 35
New Hampshire 16 39 7 17 6 7 49
Wisconsin 17 25 13 21 3 46 46
Massachusetts 18 43 21 22 2 40 11
Delaware 19 37 42 7 8 36 18
Michigan 20 18 29 14 17 30 45
Pennsylvania 21 34 16 36 23 41 22
Washington 22 36 36 9 19 24 40
Texas 23 14 38 37 41 4 23
North Carolina 24 28 33 30 30 34 19
South Carolina 25 24 48 26 35 (tie) 9 16
Illinois 26 21 24 32 32 38 36
Nevada 27 35 44 45 43 8 4
Florida 28 31 39 18 35 (tie) 20 28
Indiana 29 5 30 34 40 29 34
Tennessee 30 2 47 40 38 (tie) 6 24
California 31 46 31 10 34 47 2
Maryland 32 40 34 11 27 44 13
Georgia 33 15 35 33 42 16 20
Ohio 34 17 27 41 31 33 37
Alabama 35 12 43 35 33 10 41
Mississippi 36 1 23 44 47 11 42
New Mexico 37 13 50 38 48 14 1
Rhode Island 38 42 18 46 9 43 12
Connecticut 39 48 6 24 12 48 14
Oklahoma 40 4 40 29 49 12 26
Oregon 41 44 28 12 29 35 31
Missouri 42 16 37 39 38 (tie) 18 38
Kentucky 43 6 9 49 45 (tie) 28 33
Hawaii 44 50 26 1 20 31 32
New Jersey 45 45 8 43 18 49 15
Louisiana 46 20 49 48 45 (tie) 5 44
West Virginia 47 23 14 50 50 32 47
Alaska 48 49 46 25 28 2 50
New York 49 47 17 42 26 50 25
Arkansas 50 8 45 47 44 39 30

Read next: The Complete Guide to Retiring Abroad

MONEY 401(k)s

How to Build a $1 Million Retirement Plan

$100 bricks and mortar
Money (photo illustration)—Getty Images(2)

The number of savers with seven-figure workplace retirement plans has doubled over the past two years. Here's how you can become one of them.

The 401(k) was born in 1981 as an obscure IRS regulation that let workers set aside pretax money to supplement their pensions. More than three decades later, this workplace plan has become America’s No. 1 way to save. According to a 2013 Gallup survey, 65% of those earning $75,000 or more expect their 401(k)s, IRAs, and other savings to be a major source of income in retirement. Only 34% say the same for a pension.

Thirty-plus years is also roughly how long you’ll prep for retirement (assuming you don’t get serious until you’ve been on the job a few years). So we’re finally seeing how the first generation of savers with access to a 401(k) throughout their careers is making out. For an elite few, the answer is “very well.” The stock market’s recent winning streak has not only pushed the average 401(k) plan balance to a record high, but also boosted the ranks of a new breed of retirement investor: the 401(k) millionaire.

Seven-figure 401(k)s are still rare—less than 1% of today’s 52 million 401(k) savers have one, reports the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI)—but growing fast. At Fidelity Investments, one of the largest 401(k) plan providers, the number of million-dollar-plus 401(k)s has more than doubled since 2012, topping 72,000 at the end of 2014. Schwab reports a similar trend. And those tallies don’t count the two-career couples whose combined 401(k)s are worth $1 million.

Workers with high salaries have a leg up, for sure. But not all members of the seven-figure club are in because they make big bucks. At Fidelity thousands earning less than $150,000 a year have passed the million-dollar mark. “You don’t have to make a million to save a million in your 401(k),” says Meghan Murphy, a director at Fidelity.

You do have to do all the little things right, from setting and sticking to a high savings rate to picking a suitable stock and bond allocation as you go along. To join this exclusive club, you need to study the masters: folks who have made it, as well as savers who are poised to do the same. What you’ll learn are these secrets for building a $1 million 401(k).

1) Play the Long Game

Fidelity’s crop of 401(k) millionaires have contributed an above-average 14% of their pay to a 401(k) over their careers, and they’ve been at it for a long time. Most are over 50, with the average age 60.

Those habits are crucial with a 401(k), and here’s why: Compounding—earning money on your reinvested earnings as well as on your original savings—is the “secret sauce” to make it to a million. “Compounding gives you a big boost toward the end that can carry you to the finish line,” says Catherine Golladay, head of Schwab’s 401(k) participant services. And with a 401(k), you pay no taxes on your investment income until you make withdrawals, putting even more money to work.

You can save $18,000 in a 401(k) in 2015; $24,000 if you’re 50 or older. While generous, those caps make playing catch-up tough to do in a plan alone. You need years of steady saving to build up the kind of balance that will get a big boost from compounding in the home stretch.

Here’s how to do it:

Make time your ally. Someone who earns $50,000 a year at age 30, gets 2% raises, and puts away 14% of pay on average will have $547,000 by age 55—a hefty sum that with continued contributions will double to $1.1 million by 65, assuming 6% annualized returns. Do the same starting at age 35, and you’ll reach $812,000 at 65.

Yet saving aggressively from the get-go is a tall order. You may need several years to get your savings rate up to the max. Stick with it. Increase your contribution rate with every raise. And picking up part-time or freelance work and earmarking the money for retirement can push you over the top.

Milk your employer. For Fidelity 401(k) millionaires, employer matches accounted for a third of total plan contributions. You should squirrel away as much of the boss’s cash as you can.

According to HR association WorldatWork, at a third of companies 50% of workers don’t contribute enough to the company 401(k) plans to get the full match. That’s a missed opportunity to collect free money. A full 80% of 401(k) plans offer a match, most commonly 50¢ for each $1 you contribute, up to 6% of your salary, but dollar-for-dollar matches are a close second.

Broaden your horizons. As the graphic below shows, power-saving in your forties or fifties may bump you up against your 401(k)’s annual limits. “If you get a late start, in order to hit the $1 million mark, you will need to contribute extra savings into a brokerage account,” says Dirk Quayle, president of NextCapital, which provides portfolio-management software to 401(k) plans.

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2) Act Like a Company Lifer

The Fidelity 401(k) millionaires have spent an average of 34 years with the same employer. That kind of staying power is nearly unheard-of these days. The average job tenure with the same employer is five years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Only half of workers over age 55 have logged 10 or more years with the same company. But even if you can’t spend your career at one place—and job switching is often the best way to boost your pay—you can mimic the ways steady employment builds up your retirement plan.

Here’s how to do it:

Consider your 401(k) untouchable. A fifth of 401(k) savers borrowed against their plan in 2013, according to EBRI. It’s tempting to tap your 401(k) for a big-ticket expense, such as buying a home. Trouble is, you may shortchange your future. According to a Fidelity survey, five years after taking a loan, 40% of 401(k) borrowers were saving less; 15% had stopped altogether. “There are no do-overs in retirement,” says Donna Nadler, a certified financial planner at Capital Management Group in New York.

Even worse is cashing out your 401(k) when you leave your job; that triggers income taxes as well as a 10% penalty if you’re under age 59½. A survey by benefits consultant Aon Hewitt found that 42% of workers who left their jobs in 2011 took their 401(k) in cash. Young workers were even more likely to do so. As you can see in the graphic below, siphoning off a chunk of your savings shaves off years of growth. “If you pocket the money, it means starting your retirement saving all over again,” says Nadler.

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Resist the urge to borrow and roll your old plan into your new 401(k) or an IRA when you switch jobs. Or let inertia work in your favor. As long as your 401(k) is worth $5,000 or more, you can leave it behind at your old plan.

Fill in the gaps. Another problem with switching jobs is that you may have to wait to get into the 401(k). Waiting periods have shrunk: Today two-thirds of plans allow you to enroll in a 401(k) on day one, up from 57% five years ago, according to the Plan Sponsor Council of America. Still, the rest make you cool your heels for three months to a year. Meanwhile, 40% of plans require you to be on the job six months or more before you get matching contributions.

When you face a gap, keep saving, either in a taxable account or in a traditional or Roth IRA (if you qualify). Also, keep in mind that more than 60% of plans don’t allow you to keep the company match until you’ve been on the job for a specific number of years, typically three to five. If you’re close to vesting, sticking around can add thousands to your retirement savings.

Put a price on your benefits. A generous 401(k) match and friendly vesting can be a lucrative part of your compensation. The match added about $4,600 a year to Fidelity’s 401(k) millionaire accounts. All else being equal, seek out a generous retirement plan when you’re looking for a new job. In the absence of one, negotiate higher pay to make up for the missing match. If you face a long waiting period, ask for a signing bonus.

3) Keep Faith in Stocks

Research into millionaires by the Spectrem Group finds a greater willingness to take reasonable risks in stocks. True to form, Fidelity’s supersavers have 75% of their assets in stocks on average, vs. 66% for the typical 401(k) saver. That hefty equity stake has helped 401(k) millionaires hit seven figures, especially during the bull market that began in 2009.

What’s right for you will depend in part on your risk tolerance and what else you own outside your 401(k) plan. What’s more, you may not get the recent bull market turbo-boost that today’s 401(k) millionaires enjoyed. With rising interest rates expected to weigh on financial markets, analysts are projecting single-digit stock gains over the next decade. Still, those returns should beat what you’ll get from bonds and cash. And that commitment to stocks is crucial for making it to the million-dollar mark.

MONEY 401(k)s

Here’s How to Tell If You’re Saving Enough for Retirement

This month's MONEY poll looks at our habits when it comes to retirement savings. Click through the gallery to see how you compare with your fellow readers.

  • Men Have Bigger Balances

    Money

    But women are 10% more likely to enroll in a workplace plan, and they save at higher rates (up to 12%) than their male colleagues.

  • Most of Us Will Save More This Year

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    Money

    In a poll of more than 500 MONEY readers, the majority said they’d put away more for retirement this year than last year.

  • How Much We’re Socking Away

    Average 401(k) contribution in 2014
    Money

    The average 401(k) contribution last year was up 15% from 2009.

  • What We’ll Be Living On in Retirement

    For most people, Social Security will account for a substantial portion of income in retirement.

  • Trending in the Right Direction

    150318_RET_NestEgg_Slideshow_6
    Money

    401(k) balances topped out at a record $91,300 at the end of 2014, according to Fidelity.

  • But Still Not Good Enough

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    The Natixis Global Retirement Report ranks the U.S. 19th, behind Australia (3), Germany (9), and Japan (13), but ahead of the United Kingdom (22).

  • The States That Save the Most

    150318_RET_NestEgg_Slideshow_4
    Money

    San Jose—home to many well-paid high-tech workers—leads the nation in 401(k) participation. Bringing up the rear: El Paso, Texas, where workers save just 5.7% of salary.

  • Are You Saving Enough?

    150318_RET_NestEgg_Slideshow_8
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    The average employee is saving just over 8%, the highest rate in the past four years.

TIME tennis

Andy Murray Tells Wayne Odesnik ‘Good Riddance’ After 15-Year Ban for Steroids

FILE - In this Wednesday, June 27, 2012 file photo, Wayne Odesnik of the United States returns a shot during a first round men's singles match against Bjorn Phau of Germany at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, England. The International Tennis Federation has banned American player Wayne Odesnik for 15 years after a second doping violation
Sang Tan—AP Wayne Odesnik of the United States returns a shot during a first round men's singles match against Bjorn Phau of Germany at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, England, on June 27, 2012

"He is a cheat and it is good for everyone in tennis he is dealt with in the right way"

British tennis star Andy Murray has welcomed a 15-year ban for the relatively unknown American player Wayne Odesnik, who on Wednesday was revealed to have tested positive for multiple banned substances, including steroids, from Dec. 17 and Jan. 12 tests.

“It is good for tennis that they got him off tour. It is the end of his career and he can’t even come on site to events or coach. That is a good thing,” Murray, the world’s fourth-ranked player, told BBC Sport on Wednesday.

“He is a cheat and it is good for everyone in tennis he is dealt with in the right way.”

When the news of Odesnik’s suspension first broke, Murray tweeted:

The 267th ranked Odesnik, who retired almost immediately after the news became public, had previously tested positive for human growth hormone in 2010.

In a statement on Wednesday, he blamed his latest positive result on unknowingly taking a contaminated over-the-counter-supplement.

“I was immediately heartbroken as words could not describe my shock and disappointment,” he said. “Being the most tested American tennis player on tour, I would never knowingly have taken any chance of consuming a banned substance.”

While steroids have damaged the reputation of many other sports, tennis has remained relatively free from controversy.

MONEY Financial Planning

The Real Risks of Retirement

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Walker and Walker/Getty Images

Acknowledging all the financial risks you face in retirement can be an empowering experience.

When you’re planning for retirement, you think about how much money you’ll spend, places you’d like to visit, what health care will cost. But do you think about risk? And do you think about the right risks?

By that, I mean, have you considered any risk other than running out of money?

There are other risks to face.

No generation before today, for one, has ever looked at such a long retirement with largely themselves alone to rely on.

And we’ve seen two market crashes in a decade — 2000 and 2008 — only to raise our heads up and go through a global economic slowdown. Thanks a lot. What’s next?

Some risks you can actually control, however.

You can’t predict where the markets will be be six or 12 months from now. But you can tell yourself you’re going to get a handle on the other things that have as much of an impact on your retirement as your portfolio’s performance.

These are non-market risks that often arise within your own household.

Here’s my list of the special risks faced by current and future retirees:

  • Living a very, very, very long life
  • Having too much of your wealth in your house
  • Not saving enough
  • Having to take care of your parents
  • Having to support your adult children
  • Paying oversized college costs
  • Not having control of your budget
  • Forgetting about inflation
  • Persistently low returns in the markets and low interest rates
  • Ultra-volatile market swings just as you stop working

Oh, and, timing. All of these things could happen around the same time.

A silly little step you can take toward addressing these risks is to drop the word “risks” and substitute “issues.” If these are “issues,” maybe someone can do something about them. Maybe that person is you.

I find that some clients don’t realize that they themselves are the ones who determine that their financial plan won’t work. Hoping that your portfolio grows to the sky so it can support you isn’t really much of a defense against overspending. Overspending is something you control.

Or maybe it’s not you. Having your elderly parents to take care of, to worry about, to help financially, is not exactly a choice.

But when you factor something like caring for an elderly parent into your retirement plan, you can start to walk around this issue, take its measure, and begin to see ways to cope. Or begin to see that you can’t cope with this responsibility. You may have to find other resources — speak to other family members, seek out public programs, look for nonprofit groups that help with such things as respite care.

Coping with the issue can mean raising your hand, saying you can’t really handle it all, and asking for help.

Or it can mean that you did your research and you didn’t find a solution for every conundrum. Coping with the issue can mean you realize it’s a pothole and you’re going to hit it.

Okay, so you might live to be 100 or close to it. Did you set a portion of your portfolio aside for very long-term growth? Or did you consider delaying Social Security benefits until age 70 — and by doing that, pump up your check for the rest of your life, no matter how long?

Or, let’s say you figure you will have to live with low returns for a long while. Have you allocated enough to cash or short-term investments to handle your spending needs? Or did you divide your portfolio into buckets for different purposes? And then did you come up with an income strategy for one bucket so that you don’t have to dip into your other buckets?

When you strategize like this in the face of risk, it’s easier to see the actions you can take, even if you can’t make the risk go away.

As financial planners, we don’t often discuss these non-market risks. The one risk we do talk about with clients all the time is market risk, because we know quite a bit about that. Markets are difficult and ever-changing. While that may seem impenetrable to the client, it doesn’t really intimidate us.

But the real risks to the client’s retirement? Many of them lie out there, beyond investments. They may be outside a financial adviser’s perfectly organized financial plan, but they still exist. And clients have to steer around them.

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Harriet J. Brackey, CFP, is the co-chief investment officer of GSK Wealth Advisors, a South Florida registered investment advisory firm that manages more than $330 million. She does financial planning for clients and manages their portfolios. Before going into the financial services industry, she was an award-winning journalist who covered Wall Street. Her background includes stints at Business Week, USA Today, The Miami Herald and Nightly Business Report.

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