TIME

5 Money Habits of the Filthy Rich You Can Learn Now

How to save and invest your way to seven figures

Think it’s impossible to save a million bucks? It’s not. Fidelity Investments took a look at the 401(k) portfolios of its clients to see if those in the million-dollar-plus club have characteristics that make them stand out from the crowd.

Surprisingly, being super-rich wasn’t one of them. Although the average annual earnings of people with more than $1 million in their 401(k) was a substantial $359,000, Fidelity found that a number of these people had reported earnings of under $150,000.

As of the end of last year, more than 72,000 Fidelity clients had 401(k)s with more than $1 million in them — that’s more than double the number who had reached that monetary milestone just two years ago. Sure, investors across the board have benefitted from the stock market’s recovery, but the most retirement-ready people also displayed some specific saving and investing habits that helped them reach their goals.

They go slow and steady. “They really took a long term approach… took most of their careers to get there,” says Fidelity retirement expert Jeanne Thompson. The average age of Fidelity’s 401(k) millionaires is just under 60, and have been in the workforce for 30 years. It’s also worth noting that many of the people with the healthiest nest eggs also started saving for retirement early. “It’s not like it happened overnight,” Thompson says.

They max out their contributions. Fidelity found that million-dollar investors contribute roughly 14% of their income towards their 401(k)s — $21,4000 a year, on average. Now, this is above the annual amount workers under 50 are allowed to contribute — those workers are capped at contributing $18,000 a year in 2015 — but the average age of Fidelity’s million-plus 401(k) clients skews about 10 years higher than that. In other words, the most aggressive retirement savers seem to ramp up their contributions once they get the legal go-ahead to sock away more. By contrast, those with portfolios under $1 million contribute only $6,050 a year.

They don’t rely on target date funds. Target date funds have been pitched as a kind of “set it and forget it” option for investors, but a peek into the portfolios of the people who accrued $1 million or more shows that they don’t rely on them entirely or even primarily. As of the end of 2014, about 40% of these investors’ portfolios is in domestic equities, another 12% is in company stock and 6% is in foreign equities, on average. Only 10% of the average portfolio is allotted to target date funds.

They stay in equities. “To some extent, if you’re invested in cash you’re only going to have what you put in,” Thompson says. “Many people may be in retirement for 30 years or more,” she points out, so people might want to reevaluate if or when switching to a more conservative allocation is right for them. “As people are working longer and living longer, many will hold higher equity allocations,” she says. “You still have 30 years your money has to last…If you go too conservative too early you might not keep up with inflation.” On average, about three-quarters of the holdings of millionaire 401(k) clients are in equities — and remember, these are investors with an average age of around 60.

They don’t panic. “The key is when the markets go down not to panic,” Thompson says. Although it can be scary watching those numbers go down, selling at a loss only makes it harder to recover when the market eventually recovers. “They did bounce back, and so they’re were able, as equities rose, to ride the upswing,” Thompson says.

MONEY retirement planning

3 Ways to Be Sure You’re Not Fooling Yourself About Your Retirement Readiness

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Abrams/Lacagnina—Getty Images

Having a plan is important. But so is knowing whether your plan is realistic.

Are you on track toward a secure retirement? Before you answer, consider this: A new study shows that many people who aren’t preparing well for retirement apparently think they are—while others who actually are on track may erroneously believe they’re not.

In a recent study titled “Do U.S. Households Perceive Their Retirement Preparedness Realistically?” researchers from the University of Alabama and Ohio State found that 58% of the nearly 2,300 full-time workers age 35 to 60 polled in the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finances weren’t on a path to a secure retirement. They also concluded that just under half of those who are unprepared didn’t realize that they were falling short. No surprises there. Plenty of studies show that lots of people are woefully unprepared for retirement, while other research finds that many are overconfident about their prospects.

But the study also revealed some counterintuitive twists. For example, the researchers found that just over half of those who are actually preparing decently for retirement don’t view themselves as being on track. And among workers who weren’t prepared, those who had a traditional defined benefit pension were more likely to be unrealistic about where they stood than those who lack a pension. These sorts of surprising disconnects could be the result of people simply not knowing how to evaluate their retirement preparedness or, in the case of pensions, mistakenly thinking that the mere fact that they have a pension means they’ll have sufficient retirement income to maintain their standard of living.

Clearly, you’re better off being on track for retirement than not. But either way, it’s also important that your outlook be accurate, so you have a more realistic notion of what you must do to have a decent shot at a secure retirement. Here are three things you can do to make sure you’re being realistic about your retirement readiness.

1. Crunch the numbers—and I mean really crunch them. If you’ve been socking away money diligently in a 401(k) or other retirement plan and investing in a broadly diversified portfolio, chances are you’re making decent headway toward a secure retirement. But the only way to know for sure is to do a full-fledged assessment of your progress.

Specifically, you need go to a retirement calculator that uses Monte Carlo analysis and plug in such information as the amount you currently have saved, the percentage of salary you’re contributing to retirement accounts each year, how you’re investing your savings, when you plan to retire, and how much you expect to spend annually in retirement. Based on that information, the calculator can estimate the probability that you’re on track toward accumulating the resources necessary to generate the income you’ll need to sustain you throughout retirement. If you’re not comfortable doing this sort of exercise on your own, you should consider having a financial adviser run the numbers for you.

Check Out: Should You Bet Your Retirement On Warren Buffett?

2. Fine-tune your plan, if necessary. There’s no official standard of what constitutes “being on track.” Generally, though, if the type of analysis I recommend shows that you have less than an 80% or so chance of generating the lifetime income you’ll need once you retire, that’s a sign you need to step up your efforts. If that’s the case—and the study cited above suggests it will be for most people—you can see what steps might tilt the odds of success more in your favor.

Typically, the single best way to improve your retirement outlook is to increase the amount you contribute to a 401(k), IRA or other retirement savings plan. Contributing even an extra couple of percentage points of pay each year can fatten the size of your nest egg by 20% over the course of a career. Revising your investing strategy may also help, but be careful: Taking a more aggressive stance by loading up with more stocks may boost returns, but it also makes your portfolio more vulnerable to market setbacks. A more effective tweak: Look for ways to cut investment fees. Reducing annual costs by even a half a percentage point a year can have the same effect as saving roughly an extra 1% of pay throughout your career. Postponing retirement a few years, claiming Social Security at a later age, and downsizing or relocating can also increase your chances of retirement success.

Check Out: Drink That Latte! How To Save And Still Enjoy Life

3. Reassess your readiness periodically. Bumps and detours along the road to retirement are the rule, not the exception. Indeed, a recent TD Ameritrade survey found that two-thirds of Americans have had their retirement planning disrupted by a job loss, illness, or other problem. And even if you’re fortunate enough to sail through your career without such a setback, there’s always the possibility that a market downturn will devastate your nest egg and seriously damage your retirement outlook.

Which is why it’s crucial that every year or so you plug updated information up that retirement calculator and get a fresh evaluation of where you stand, and take corrective measures if necessary. In periods of market turmoil, you may also want to give your retirement plan a “crash test” just to be sure a severe market correction won’t irretrievably damage your retirement prospects.

Bottom line: If you want a secure retirement, you’ve got to plan for it during your career. But it’s also a good idea to have an accurate sense of whether that planning is actually panning out.

Walter Updegrave is the editor of RealDealRetirement.com. If you have a question on retirement or investing that you would like Walter to answer online, send it to him at walter@realdealretirement.com.

More From RealDealRetirement.com:

Can I Create My Own Pension Annuity?
The Biggest Retirement Income Mistake Most Americans Are Making
25 Ways to Get Smarter About Money Right Now

 

MONEY 401k plans

What You Can Learn From 401(k) Millionaires in the Making

These folks are doing all the right things to reach retirement with a seven-figure nest egg.

The 401(k) has become the No. 1 way for Americans to save for retirement. And save they have. The average plan balance has hit a record high, and the number of million-dollar-plus 401(k)s has more than doubled since 2012. In the first part of this series, we shared tips for building a $1 million retirement plan. Now meet workers on track to join the millionaires club—and get inspired by their smart moves. Once you hit your goal, learn more about making your money last and getting smart about taxes when you draw down that $1 million.
  • Greg and Jesseca Lyons, both 30

    Greg and Jesseca Lyons

    Carmel, Indiana
    Years to $1 million: 15
    Best move: Never cashed out their 401(k)s

    Though only 30, Greg and Jesseca Lyons are well on their way to reaching their retirement goals. The Lyons—he’s an operations manager for a small research company, she’s a product development engineer for a medical device maker—are on the same page when it comes to planning for the future.

    College sweethearts who have been married seven years, they made a commitment to start investing for retirement with their first jobs. They contribute 15% of their salaries. Employer matches bring that annual savings rate to about 19%. Together, they have $250,000 in their retirement accounts, invested 90% in stocks and 10% in bonds.

    Unlike many young people, they have resisted the temptation to cash out their 401(k)s when they changed jobs. Though they dialed back contributions for about six months when they were saving for a down payment, the Lyons didn’t stop putting money away. “We have stuck with the idea that retirement money is retirement money forever,” says Greg. His goal is to retire by age 60. For Jesseca, saving is about independence and financial security. “I love what I do, so I don’t see retiring early. But I don’t want to be worried or stressed out about our money either,” she says. “I am not going to sacrifice our retirement just to live a certain lifestyle now.”

  • Tajuana Hill, 46

    By starting to save for retirement at age 26, Tajuana Hill has put herselv on track to grow a seven-figure 401(k).
    Jesse Burke

    Indianapolis
    Years to $1 million: 17
    Best Move: Keeps raising her savings rate

    It’s taken Tajuana Hill, an employee trainer with Rolls-Royce, two decades to max out her 401(k), but she’s been a steady saver since her twenties. When she joined the firm at age 26, she put 10% of her pay into her plan right away. As her income rose, she ramped that up to 12%, then 17%, and finally 20% in January.

    Her reward: $224,000 in her 401(k)—all the more impressive since her employer offers no match. What has helped Hill is a side business she launched three years ago, Mimosa and a Masterpiece, an art studio where students can sip a drink during painting classes taught by local artists. The extra income let her pay off her credit cards, freeing up earnings from her day job so she could boost her 401(k) contributions.

    “When I retire, I hope to do it as a millionaire,” says Hill. If she sticks to this regimen, her 401(k) could top $1 million just as she reaches 65.

  • Steven and Melanie Thorne, both 37

    Steve and Melanie Thorne have been disciplined about hiking their retirement contributions with every raise. Melanie saves 10% of her pay in her plan, while Steve sets aside 12%. They even save extra in Roth IRAs.
    Jesse Burke

    York, Pennsylvania
    Years to $1 million: 15
    Best move: Invest in low-cost stock index funds

    Having a healthy stake in stocks is a hallmark of 401(k) millionaires. With decades to go until retirement, you can ride out market swings. That’s a philosophy Steven and Melanie Thorne have embraced. Together they have $310,000 in their workplace retirement plans, Roth IRAs, and a brokerage account, all invested 100% in stocks. “We are young, so we can be more aggressive,” says Steve, a security officer at a nuclear power plant.

    Investing is a passion for Steven, who first started saving for retirement with a Roth IRA when he was 18. He says he follows Warren Buffett’s philosophy about buying stocks: Be greedy when others are fearful, be fearful when others are greedy. But, he says, he and Melanie, a nurse, are buy-and-hold investors and keep most of their portfolio in low-cost index funds.

    Steven and Melanie have been disciplined about hiking their retirement contributions with every raise. Melanie saves 10% of her pay in her plan, while Steven sets aside 12%. They even save extra in Roth IRAs. They live below their means and direct tax refunds into retirement accounts, as well as save for college for their five year old son Chase. “We look for extra ways to save cash and keep our investment costs low,” says Steven.

  • Jonathan and Margaret Kallay, 56 and 53

    By saving more as big expenses fell away and their incomes rose, Jonathan and Margaret Kallay have been able to amass 401(k)s worth a combined $750,000.
    Jesse Burke

    Westerville, Ohio
    Years to $1 million: Four
    Best move: Power saving late

    Life can get in the way of saving for retirement, but ramping up your savings later in your career pays off. Jonathan and Margaret Kallay contributed only small amounts to their retirement plans early on. “It wasn’t much, about $50 a paycheck on a $13,000-a-year salary,” says Jonathan, a firefighter. Margaret, then an ER nurse, put away 5% of her pay.

    As big expenses fell away, the Kallays saved more. Married in 1993, the couple each paid child support for daughters from previous marriages until the girls reached 18. Once that ended and they paid off car loans, the money went toward retirement.

    Earning more has helped too. Jonathan worked extra shifts as a paramedic. Margaret got a business degree and is now a vice president at an insurance company, where she gets a generous company match. They each put about 15% in their 401(k)s, which total $750,000 and could hit $1 million in four years. They plan to quit work soon to spend more time traveling and spending time with their daughters and 5-year-old twin grandsons. “We’ve made a lot of sacrifices to invest for retirement,” says Jonathan. “It’s all been worth it.”

  • Mel and Heather Petersen, both 35

    Mel and Heather Petersen with sons Carter and Perry

    Reidsville, N.C.
    Years to $1 million: 17
    Best move: Buying rental properties to bring in more money

    Despite modest incomes in the early years of their careers, Mel and Heather Petersen have accumulated nearly $200,000 in retirement savings. Their strategy: Consistent saving. Mel, a public school teacher, says his salary has averaged about $40,000 most of his working life. Today he earns $50,000 a year. Heather, a marketing analyst who contributes 10% of her income to her 401(k), has seen a steadier increase in her earnings over the years, bringing the couple to a six-figure combined income.

    “We have always saved money for retirement no matter what our income, and never stopped no matter what financial challenges we have faced,” says Mel, dad to two boys, 8-year-old Carter and 4-year-old Perry.

    It helps that the Petersens supplement their retirement savings with income from rental properties that they began buying seven years ago. Several are paid off, and after expenses they gross about $5,000 a month in rental income. They hope to continue investing in real estate to boost their retirement savings. “We want to max out our retirement accounts down the road,” says Mel.

  • Larry and Christianne Schertel, both 58

    Larry and Christie Schertel

    Valatie, New York
    Years to $1 million: zero
    Best move: Kept faith in stocks

    Investors have enjoyed a roaring bull market for the past six years. But financial markets are cyclical. Even the most dedicated savers can panic and abandon stocks when the markets goes south.

    Despite the massive downturn during the Great Recession, Larry and Christianne Schertel didn’t budge from their 75% stock allocation. “When the market collapsed in 2008, we stayed the course and were nicely rewarded as the markets rebounded,” says Larry, an operations manager at a transportation company until his retirement this January. As they closed in on retirement, the Schertels reduced equities to about 60%. Together with Christianne, who works as an elementary school teaching assistant, the Schertels have just over $1 million in retirement accounts.

    In addition to their resolve during market fluctuations, the Schertels say automating their savings, living below their means, limiting debt, and investing in low-cost funds helped them reach the $1 million mark. “There really is no magic to it,” says Larry. “It is just being disciplined.”

MONEY Financial Planning

The Surprising Power of a One-Page Financial Plan

goal list
Getty Images

When it comes to thinking about the future, sometimes less is more.

Gather round, because here is today’s personal-finance lesson inspired by famed Hollywood screenwriter William Goldman: Nobody knows anything.

In other words, no one knows where the market is headed. No one can tell you exactly what financial moves to make. And no one knows where they are going to be 40 years from now.

Here is what you can do: Make your best guess and muddle through life the best you can. That’s the thesis of The One-Page Financial Plan, the new book by New York Times columnist Carl Richards.

Rather than over thinking everything to the point of paralysis, just jot down a few general goals, get started, and don’t beat yourself up over past mistakes. Reuters sat down with Richards to talk about the surprising power of simplicity.

Q: Personal-finance experts usually don’t talk about uncertainty. Why was that important for you?

A: The giant fantasy of financial planning is that we all know exactly where we will be in 40 years, so we just need to sit down and plan for it. That gives people a false sense of precision.

The reality is that most of us don’t even know where we will be six months from now. We don’t know what our utility bills will be in the future, let alone when we are going to retire or when we are going to die. So the natural human reaction is to say, aw, just forget it. But that’s not a good choice either.

Q: So what should people do?

A: Call it what it is—guessing. Give yourself permission to let go of all this anxiety, and just make the best guess you can and be committed to the process of guessing.

Q: Your book is called The One-Page Financial Plan. So what’s on that one page?

A: On my one-page plan, there is a statement at the top of what’s important: For my wife and I, it is to spend time with the family, and to serve in the community. Then there are three goals: To fully fund all retirement accounts, to fully fund our kids’ education accounts, and to put money away for a house.

That’s it.

Q: You have had some financial missteps yourself. How did those experiences inform the book?

A: When you write publicly about this stuff, people think you have everything figured out. But nobody is foolproof, and making financial decisions is hard.

We got caught up in a very basic mistake: Projecting a rapidly growing business, which meant we could afford a big house. It turned out the business didn’t keep doing that, and we were faced with the tough situation of owing far more than the house was worth. So we lost it.

Q: What is one trick people can use to get their finances under control?

A: I use what I call the 72-hour Test. Once I found myself with a stack of unread books on my desk, and I thought: ‘What if I just waited 72 hours between when I thought I had to absolutely have a book, and when I actually purchased it?’

The surprising reality is that after 72 hours, whatever it is, you usually discover you don’t need it anymore.

Q: What about debt—how much is too much?

A: I have yet to meet anyone who has paid down debt and was unhappy about it.

Maybe on a spreadsheet it makes sense to have some mortgage debt, and invest the difference in the stock market, and make a bunch of money. But paying off your home makes people really happy.

Q: We are all so anxious about money. Why is that?

A: Money is not just about math, it’s about emotions. The stuff you dream about, the stuff that keeps you awake at night, your most cherished dreams and your biggest fears. The rubber always meets the road with dollars. That’s a very potent cocktail.

 

MONEY Taxes

For Some Retirees, April 1 is a Crucial Tax Deadline

If you recently reached your 70s and aren't yet drawing money from your tax-deferred retirement accounts, you need to act fast.

For anyone who turned 70½ last year and has an individual retirement account, April 15 isn’t the only tax deadline you need to pay attention to this time of year.

With a traditional IRA, you must begin taking money out of your account after age 70½—what’s known as a required minimum distribution (RMD). And you must take your first RMD by April 1 of the year after you turn 70½. After that, the annual RMD deadline is December 31. After years of tax-deferred growth, you’ll face income taxes on your IRA withdrawals.

Figuring out your RMD, which is based on your account balance and life expectancy, can be tricky. Your brokerage or fund company can help, or you can use these IRS worksheets to calculate your minimum withdrawal.

Failure to pull out any or enough money triggers a hefty penalty equal to 50% of the amount you should have withdrawn. Despite the penalty, a fair number of people miss the RMD deadline.

A 2010 report by the Treasury Inspector General estimated that every year as many as 250,000 IRA owners miss the deadline for their first or annual RMD, failing to take distributions totaling some $350 million. That generates potential tax penalties of $175 million.

The rules are a bit different with a 401(k). If you’re still working for the company that sponsors your plan, you can waive this distribution rule until you quit. Otherwise, RMDs apply.

“It’s becoming increasingly common for folks to stay in the workforce after traditional retirement age,” says Andrew Meadows of Ubiquity Retirement + Savings, a web-based retirement plan provider specializing in small businesses. “If you’re still working you can leave the money in your 401(k) and let compound interest continue to do its work,” says Meadows.

What’s more, with a Roth IRA you’re exempt from RMD rules. Your money can grow tax-free indefinitely.

If you are in the fortunate position of not needing the income from your IRA, you can’t skip your RMD or avoid income taxes. You may want to reinvest the money, gift it, or donate the funds to charity, though a law that allowed you to donate money directly from an IRA expired last year and has not yet been renewed. Another option is to convert some of the money to a Roth IRA. You’ll owe income taxes on the conversion, but never face RMDs again.
Whatever you do, if you or someone you know is 70-plus, don’t miss the April 1 deadline. There’s no reason to give Uncle Sam more than you owe.

 

MONEY Health Care

This Scary Retirement Expense Just Got Even Scarier

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GIPhotoStock—Getty Images/Cultura RF

The estimated tab for health care costs in retirement is huge—and getting bigger every year, according to a new study.

If you’re worried about paying for your health care in retirement, get ready to worry more.

A healthy couple retiring this year at age 65 will pay $266,589 for health care in retirement, according to the 2015 Retirement Healthcare Costs Data Report by health data provider HealthView Services. That’s a 6.5% jump from HealthView’s projections a year ago.

If medical costs continue their rapid rise, the tab will be even larger in the near future: Expected lifetime health care expenses will rise to $320,996 for a couple retiring in 10 years at age 65, the study found.

And that’s just what you’ll pay for Medicare Parts B and D, which cover routine medical care and prescription drugs, and a Medicare supplemental insurance policy, which most Medicare recipients buy to help with co-pays and deductibles. It doesn’t include all the out-of-pocket costs that traditional Medicare doesn’t cover, including dental, vision, and hearing services, and co-pays.

When you factor in those expenses, projected retirement health care costs rise to $394,954 for a couple retiring this year at age 65 and $463,849 for a couple retiring in 10 years. And those numbers don’t even count long-term care, which can add tens of thousands of dollars if you need extensive help at home or in a nursing home.

To put those costs in perspective, HealthViews estimates that a couple retiring today will spend 67% of their Social Security benefits on health care costs over their lifetimes. For a couple retiring in 10 years at age 65, medical care will suck up 90% of their Social Security income. That’s troubling considering that for many, Social Security makes up the majority of their retirement income. Even for middle income and wealthier families, Social Security accounts for about one-third of retirement income.

But Social Security benefits won’t be able to keep up with health care inflation. Social Security benefits have averaged a 2.6% annual cost of living increase over the past decade (and just 1.4% the past four years), while health care costs have risen more sharply. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, health care costs will rise 5% to 7% over the next eight years.

HealthView numbers are higher than other surveys on health care retirement costs. In Fidelity Benefits Consulting’s annual retirement health care costs report for 2014, a 65-year-old couple retiring today will need an average of $220,000 to cover medical expenses throughout retirement.

Counterintuitively, estimates of total lifetime health care costs are lower for people in poor health at retirement. HealthView’s estimates show that total retirement health care costs will be lower on average for someone with diabetes because of a shorter life expectancy. The total health care costs for a typical 55-year-old male with Type II diabetes will be approximately $118,000, compared to $223,000 for his healthy counterpart, primarily because the 55-year-old with diabetes has an expected longevity of 76, vs. 86 for a healthy male.

Of course, these are just averages. You can’t know exactly what your health will be after you retire, how much medical treatments will cost you, or how long you will live.

That said, even a rough guide can be a useful planning tool. So take a look at your insurance coverage. Consider the likelihood for each type of expense, as well as the average Medicare costs by age, to come up with an estimate of the savings you’ll need to fund these costs. Kaiser recently published a study on Medicare costs by age, which breaks down Medicare spending into its main components—hospitals, doctors, and drugs—and measures how much Americans spend on these services at different ages.

To prepare for that spending in advance, take a look at your sources of your retirement income. If you have a health savings account, do everything you can not to touch it now but let it grow tax free. It is an excellent vehicle for funding future medical expenses. Ditto for a Roth IRA, which lets your money grow tax free. For more tips on planning for retirement health care costs, check out MONEY’s stories here, here, and here.

MONEY Taxes

How to Make Tapping a $1 Million Retirement Plan Less Taxing

adding machine printing $100 bill
Sarina Finkelstein (photo illustration)—Mike Lorrig/Corbis (1); iStock (1)

With a seven-figure account balance, you have to work extra hard to minimize the tax hit once you starting taking withdrawals.

More than three decades after the creation of the 401(k), this workplace plan has become the No. 1 way for Americans to save for retirement. And save they have. The average plan balance has hit a record high, and the number of million-dollar-plus 401(k)s has more than doubled since 2012.

In the first part of this four-part series, we laid out how to build a $1 million 401(k) plan. Part two covered making your money last. Next up: getting smart about taxes when you draw down that $1 million.

Most of your 401(k) money was probably saved pretax, and once you start making withdrawals, Uncle Sam will want his share. The conventional wisdom would have you postpone taking out 401(k) funds for as long as possible, giving your money more time to grow tax-deferred. But retirees must start making required minimum distributions (RMDs) by age 70½. With a million-dollar-plus account, that income could push you into a higher tax bracket. Here are three possible ways to reduce that tax bite.

1. Make the Most of Income Dips

Perhaps in the year after you retire, with no paycheck coming in, you drop to the 15% bracket (income up to $73,800 for a married couple filing jointly). Or you have medical expenses or charitable deductions that reduce your taxable income briefly before you bump back up to a higher bracket. Tapping pretax accounts in low-tax years may enable you to pay less in taxes on future withdrawals, says Marc Freedman, a financial adviser in Peabody, Mass.

2. Spread Out the Tax Bill

Taking advantage of low-tax-bracket years to convert IRA money to a Roth can cut your tax bill over time. Just make sure you have cash on hand to pay the conversion taxes.

Say you and your spouse are both 62, with Social Security and pension income that covers your living expenses, as well as $800,000 in a rollover IRA. If you leave the money there, it will grow to nearly $1.1 million by the time you start taking RMDs, assuming 5% annual returns, says Andrew Sloan, a financial adviser in Louisville.

If you convert $50,000 a year to a Roth for eight years instead, paying $7,500 in income taxes each time, you can stay in the 15% bracket. But you will end up paying less in taxes when RMDs begin, since your IRA balance will be only $675,000. Meanwhile, you will have $475,000 in the Roth. Another benefit: Since Roth IRAs aren’t subject to RMDs, you can pass on more of your IRAs to your heirs.

3. Plot Your Exit from Employer Stock

Some 401(k) investors, often those with large balances, hold company stock. Across all plans, 9% of 401(k) assets were in employer shares at the end of 2013, Vanguard data show—for 9% of participants, that stock accounts for more than 20% of their plan.

Unloading those shares at retirement will reduce the risk in your portfolio. Plus, that sale may cut your tax bill. That’s because of a tax rule called net unrealized appreciation (NUA), which is the difference between the price you paid for the stock and its market value.

Say you bought 5,000 shares of company stock in your 401(k) at $20 a share, for a total price of $100,000. Five years later the shares are worth $50, or $250,000 in total. That gives you a cost of $100,000, and an NUA of $150,000. At retirement, you could simply roll that stock into an IRA. But to save on taxes, your best move may be to stash it in a taxable account while investing the balance of your plan in an IRA, says Jeffrey Levine, a CPA at IRAhelp.com.

All rollover IRA withdrawals will be taxed at your income tax rate, which can be as high as 39.6%. When you take company stock out of your 401(k), though, you owe income tax only on the original purchase price. Then, when you sell, you’ll owe long-term capital gains taxes of no more than 20% on the NUA.

Of course, these complex strategies may call for an accountant or financial adviser. But after decades of careful saving, you don’t want to jeopardize your million-dollar 401(k) with a bad tax move.

MONEY 401k plans

The Secrets to Making a $1 Million Retirement Stash Last

door opening with Franklin $100 staring through the crack
Sarina Finkelstein (photo illustration)—Getty Images (2)

More and more Americans are on target to save seven figures. The next challenge is managing that money once you reach retirement.

More than three decades after the creation of the 401(k), this workplace plan has become the No. 1 way for Americans to save for retirement. And save they have. The average plan balance has hit a record high, and the number of million-dollar-plus 401(k)s has more than doubled since 2012.

In the first part of this four-part series, we laid out what you need to do to build a $1 million 401(k) plan. We also shared lessons from 401(k) millionaires in the making. In this second installment, you’ll learn how to manage that enviable nest egg once you hit retirement.

Dial Back On Stocks

A bear market at the start of retirement could put a permanent dent in your income. Retiring with a 55% stock/45% bond portfolio in 2000, at the start of a bear market, meant reducing your withdrawals by 25% just to maintain your odds of not running out of money, according to research by T. Rowe Price.

150320_MIL_TameMix
Money

That’s why financial adviser Rick Ferri, head of Portfolio Solutions, recommends shifting to a 30% stock and 70% bond portfolio at the outset of retirement. As the graphic below shows, that mix would have fallen far less during the 2007–09 bear market, while giving up just a little potential return. “The 30/70 allocation is the center of gravity between risk and return—it avoids big losses while still providing growth,” Ferri says.

Financial adviser Michael Kitces and American College professor of retirement income Wade Pfau go one step further. They suggest starting with a similar 30% stock/70% bond allocation and then gradually increasing your stock holdings. “This approach creates more sustainable income in retirement,” says Pfau.

That said, if you have a pension or other guaranteed source of income, or feel confident you can manage a market plunge, you may do fine with a larger stake in stocks.

Know When to Say Goodbye

You’re at the finish line with a seven-figure 401(k). Now you need to turn that lump sum into a lasting income, something that even dedicated do-it-yourselfers may want help with. When it comes to that kind of advice, your workplace plan may not be up to the task.

In fact, most retirees eventually roll over 401(k) money into an IRA—a 2013 report from the General Accountability Office found that 50% of savings from participants 60 and older remained in employer plans one year after leaving, but only 20% was there five years later.

Here’s how to do it:

Give your plan a shot. Even if your first instinct is to roll over your 401(k), you may find compelling reasons to leave your money where it is, such as low costs (no more than 0.5% of assets) and advice. “It can often make sense to stay with your 401(k) if it has good, low-fee options,” says Jim Ludwick, a financial adviser in Odenton, Md.

More than a third of 401(k)s have automatic withdrawal options, according to Aon Hewitt. The plan might transfer an amount you specify to your bank every month. A smaller percentage offer financial advice or other retirement income services. (For a managed account, you might pay 0.4% to 1% of your balance.) Especially if your finances aren’t complex, there’s no reason to rush for the exit.

Leave for something better. With an IRA, you have a wider array of investment choices, more options for getting advice, and perhaps lower fees. Plus, consolidating accounts in one place will make it easier to monitor your money.

But be cautious with your rollover, since many in the financial services industry are peddling costly investments, such as variable annuities or other insurance products, to new retirees. “Everyone and their uncle will want your IRA rollover,” says Brooklyn financial adviser Tom Fredrickson. You will most likely do best with a diversified portfolio at a low-fee brokerage or fund group. What’s more, new online services are making advice more affordable than ever.

Go Slow to Make It Last

A $1 million nest egg sounds like a lot of money—and it is. If you have stashed $1 million in your 401(k), you have amassed five times more than the average 60-year-old who has saved for 20 years.

But being a millionaire is no guarantee that you can live large in retirement. “These days the notion of a millionaire is actually kind of quaint,” says Fredrickson.

Why $1 million isn’t what it once was. Using a standard 4% withdrawal rate, your $1 million portfolio will give you an income of just $40,000 in your first year of retirement. (In following years you can adjust that for inflation.) Assuming you also receive $27,000 annually from Social Security (a typical amount for an upper-middle-class couple), you’ll end up with a total retirement income of $67,000.

In many areas of the country, you can live quite comfortably on that. But it may be a lot less than your pre-retirement salary. And as the graphic below shows, taking out more severely cuts your chances of seeing that $1 million last.

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What your real goal should be. To avoid a sharp decline in your standard of living, focus on hitting the right multiple of your pre-retirement income. A useful rule of thumb is to put away 12 times your salary by the time you stop working. Check your progress with an online tool, such as the retirement income calculator at T. Rowe Price.

Why high earners need to aim higher. Anyone earning more will need to save even more, since Social Security will make up less of your income, says Wharton finance professor Richard Marston. A couple earning $200,000 should put away 15.5 times salary. At that level, $3 million is the new $1 million.

MONEY retirement planning

This Is the Best State for Retirement

Historic buildings on Lincoln Highway, West 16th Street in downtown Cheyenne, Wyoming
Ian Dagnall—Alamy Historic buildings on Lincoln Highway, West 16th Street in downtown Cheyenne, Wyoming

No, it's not Florida.

If you could choose any place in America to retire, which locale would be best? Florida perhaps? Or somewhere with a lot of culture, like New York or San Francisco? Not according to one new report, which finds the best U.S. state for retirees is…Wyoming.

According to Bankrate’s annual “Best and Worst States to Retire” ranking, released on March 23, the “Equality State” state is the best place for seniors to settle down. The ranking is based on six different factors—cost of living, crime rate, community well-being, health care quality, tax rate, and weather—and weights the importance of each using a national survey on what Americans value in retirement.

Arkansas comes in last, with poor marks in everything but living expenses, while Wyoming gets the crown for its top-10 low crime and good weather, low tax burden, and a cost of living and well-being scores in the top 20.

Wyoming’s biggest weak spot? Health care, where the state comes in a humble 37. Minnesota, the state ranked as has having the best healthcare in the country, is listed number 11 overall.

That might make some readers balk, but Chris Kahn, who has spearheaded the report for years, has become accustomed to criticism.

“I get a lot of letters saying this should be most important, that should be most important, there isn’t consensus there,” says Kahn. “I guess the one thing I’ve learned from all this is I’m never going to make a ranking that’s going to please everyone.”

Related: MONEY’s Best Places to Retire

If critics don’t like the list, they have only their fellow Americans to blame. Respondents to Bankrate’s survey ranked health care third on the list of retirement location priorities, behind crime and cost of living. In another surprise, more people (40%) said they would rather live near mountains, rivers, and other outdoor recreation than said they wanted access to a beach (25%), and only a quarter of respondents said being close to family was the most important factor in deciding where to retire.

“I consider this ranking a conversation starter,” says Kahn. “Don’t just go where you think you ought to go or where you had a good vacation. You should really be thinking about things like the cost of living, the health care system, the taxes—all that data is out there.”

Here’s the full list:

State Overall rank Cost of living Crime rate Community well-being Health care quality Tax rate Weather
Wyoming 1 19 5 20 37 1 8
Colorado 2 30 25 6 14 19 3
Utah 3 7 22 19 7 23 6
Idaho 4 3 2 27 21 27 7
Virginia 5 22 4 15 13 21 10
Iowa 6 11 12 4 5 22 39
Montana 7 27 19 8 24 13 9
South Dakota 8 26 11 31 15 3 29
Arizona 9 32 41 2 22 17 5
Nebraska 10 9 20 16 11 26 21
Minnesota 11 33 15 5 1 45 48
Maine 12 38 3 28 4 37 27
North Dakota 13 29 10 23 16 15 43
Kansas 14 10 32 13 25 25 17
Vermont 15 41 1 3 10 42 35
New Hampshire 16 39 7 17 6 7 49
Wisconsin 17 25 13 21 3 46 46
Massachusetts 18 43 21 22 2 40 11
Delaware 19 37 42 7 8 36 18
Michigan 20 18 29 14 17 30 45
Pennsylvania 21 34 16 36 23 41 22
Washington 22 36 36 9 19 24 40
Texas 23 14 38 37 41 4 23
North Carolina 24 28 33 30 30 34 19
South Carolina 25 24 48 26 35 (tie) 9 16
Illinois 26 21 24 32 32 38 36
Nevada 27 35 44 45 43 8 4
Florida 28 31 39 18 35 (tie) 20 28
Indiana 29 5 30 34 40 29 34
Tennessee 30 2 47 40 38 (tie) 6 24
California 31 46 31 10 34 47 2
Maryland 32 40 34 11 27 44 13
Georgia 33 15 35 33 42 16 20
Ohio 34 17 27 41 31 33 37
Alabama 35 12 43 35 33 10 41
Mississippi 36 1 23 44 47 11 42
New Mexico 37 13 50 38 48 14 1
Rhode Island 38 42 18 46 9 43 12
Connecticut 39 48 6 24 12 48 14
Oklahoma 40 4 40 29 49 12 26
Oregon 41 44 28 12 29 35 31
Missouri 42 16 37 39 38 (tie) 18 38
Kentucky 43 6 9 49 45 (tie) 28 33
Hawaii 44 50 26 1 20 31 32
New Jersey 45 45 8 43 18 49 15
Louisiana 46 20 49 48 45 (tie) 5 44
West Virginia 47 23 14 50 50 32 47
Alaska 48 49 46 25 28 2 50
New York 49 47 17 42 26 50 25
Arkansas 50 8 45 47 44 39 30

Read next: The Complete Guide to Retiring Abroad

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