TIME public health

Bottled Water Company Issues Recall Over Possible E. Coli Contamination

The bottled water potentially at risk was produced between June 10 and June 18

A bottled water company has issued a voluntary recall over fears of E. coli contamination.

After traces of E. coli bacteria were found at one of the spring sources for Niagara Bottling LLC, the company has issued a voluntary recall for all 14 of its spring water products that are bottled at two plants in Pennsylvania.

The bottled water potentially at risk for contamination was produced between June 10 and June 18; customers are being urged not to consume those bottles. If consumers must drink the water, it should be boiled first.

E. coli bacteria are typically found in animal and human waste and can cause diarrhea, cramps and nausea. E. coli can be particularly dangerous for the very young, very old, and those with weak immune systems.

According to Niagara, the potentially affected products would have reference codes starting with either “F” or “A” and would have a date between June 10 and 18.

The products under voluntary recall are listed below:

  • Acadia
  • Acme
  • Big Y
  • Best Yet
  • 7-11
  • Niagara
  • Nature’s Place
  • Pricerite
  • Superchill
  • Morning Fresh
  • Shaws
  • Shoprite
  • Western Beef Blue
  • Wegman’s
TIME Transportation

General Motors Says 100 People Have Now Died from Faulty Ignition Switches

Faulty Ignition Switch Repair At A General Motors Dealership
Jeff Kowalsky—Bloomberg/Getty Images Shop foreman John Chapman performs a service recall on a General Motors Co. (GM) 2005 Saturn Ion at Liberty Chevrolet in New Hudson, Michigan, U.S., on Friday, April 25, 2014.

The malfunctioning switches have prompted the recalls of millions of GM vehicles

The death toll from faulty ignition switches in General Motors’ vehicles officially reached 100 this week, putting a grim tally on the long-running saga of the company’s delayed recalls.

The automotive firm’s compensation fund said it had approved the 100th compensation claim resulting from the issue on Monday, the New York Times reported.

This number, according to the Times, is significantly higher than the 13 deaths that GM claimed were the only ones from malfunctioning ignitions on multiple models.

Several lawsuits against the company allege that the actual death toll far exceeds even the latest number, and accuse the company of downplaying the number of deaths in multiple congressional hearings.

“The success of the cover-up for over a decade leaves most of the victims unaccounted for,” Robert Hilliard, one of the lead lawyers, told the Times. “One hundred is not even the tip of the iceberg.”

Read more at the Times

TIME Diet/Nutrition

Easter Egg Cookies and 8 Other Food Recalls This Week

healthiest foods, health food, diet, nutrition, time.com stock, almonds, nuts
Danny Kim for TIME

There were a total of 11 recalls

Every week lots of foods are pulled from grocery shelves for contamination. There were several recalls this week, but since not every recall reported by the Food and Drug Administration makes headlines, we’ve listed them for you. Here’s all the recalls that have happened over the last week.

Easter egg cookies
Brand: Silver Lake
Contaminated with: Undeclared egg
Silver Lake Cookie Company Inc. recalled its name-brand easter egg cookies sold in supermarkets in nine states due to undeclared egg allergen, which is a risk for people who are allergic to eggs.

Mixed Nuts
Brands: Nature’s Place, Ernest Klein and Aurora, and Belmont Market, Boiceville Market, Gaul’s Market, Green Hills Market, Harvest Co-Op Market, Hurley Ridge, Lees, Miles Market, Palmers Market, Union Market, Walter Stewart, Windfall Market and Wild Acorns
Contaminated with: Salmonella
Several companies recalled a variety of nuts due to potential contamination with the bacteria salmonella. Hannaford Supermarkets recalled Nature’s Place brand Roasted Unsalted Mixed Nuts and Nature’s Place Cranberry Mix after discovering walnuts included in the mixes could be contaminated with salmonella. Aurora Products, Inc. recalled products also containing potentially contaminated walnuts, many of which used store-branded labeling.

Cumin
Brand: Maya
Contaminated with: Undeclared peanuts
Maya Overseas Food Inc. recalled seven ounce packages of its cumin powder due to undeclared peanut allergen, which puts people with peanut allergies at risk.

Bran muffins
Brand: Whole Foods Market, southwest
Contaminated with: Undeclared milk and egg
Whole Foods Market is recalling its bran muffin six packs produced and sold in Southwest Region stores due to having undeclared milk and egg allergen, which was discovered during a routine product check. The allergens can cause health problems for people sensitive to milk and eggs.

Dip
Brand: La Terra Fina
Contaminated with: Listeria
La Terra Fina, which had previous spinach-related recalls expanded it’s recall this week to include its Chunky Spinach Artichoke & Parmesan Dip & Spread due to possible listeria contamination.

Sub sandwiches
Brand: GetGo
Contaminated with: Undeclared egg allergen
Select GetGo from Giant Eagle brand individually wrapped Grab-and-Go subs have been recalled due to having undeclared egg allergen, a problem for people allergic to eggs.

Kale pesto hummus
Brand: Hope
Contaminated with: Undeclared walnuts
Hope Foods recalled some of its kale pesto hummus due to having declared walnuts, which can be problematic for people with walnut allergies.

Golden Raisins
Brand: Deer Brand
Contaminated with: Undeclared sulfites
Best Foods Inc. recalled seven ounce packages of its Deer Brand Raisin Golden due to undeclared sulfites. The discovery is problematic for people who are sensitive to the sulfur-based compounds.

Danish pastry, rolls, cheese, pie and fried fish
Brand: Giant Eagle
Contaminated with: Undeclared egg and/or milk allergens
Giant Eagle recalled multiple food items due to undeclared egg and milk allergens, which can put people who are sensitive at risk.

TIME Diet/Nutrition

12 Recalled Foods Not to Eat This Week

Frozen Vegetable Lasagna
FDA Frozen Vegetable Lasagna

There were 17 food recalls in total this week

Every week lots of foods are pulled from grocery shelves for contamination. There were over a dozen recalls just this week, but since not every recall reported by the Food and Drug Administration makes headlines, we’ve listed them for you.

MORE Organic Frozen Foods Recalled Over Listeria Scare

Spinach
Brands: Simply Balanced, La Terra Fina, Cadia, Meijer, Wild Harvest and Wegmans
Contaminated with: Listeria
Several companies had recalls related to listeria-contaminated spinach this week. Simply Balanced and Cadia, Meijer, Wild Harvest and Wegmans brands recalled organic spinach packages. Wegmans had to recall up to 12,540 packages. La Terra Fina recalled spinach artichoke & parmesan dips and organic spinach dip.

Frozen meals
Brands: Amy’s Kitchen
Contaminated with: Listeria
Amy’s Kitchen, the popular frozen organic dinner company, voluntarily recalled over 73,890 cases of products due to possible contamination with listeria. Foods ranged from tofu vegetable lasagna to spinach pizza.

Ice cream
Brands: Blue Bell
Contaminated with: Listeria
The company made headlines earlier in March when five people in a Kansas hospital became ill, and three people died, from consuming Blue Bell ice cream products contaminated with listeria. This week, three flavors of 3 oz. ice cream cups were also recalled for possible contamination with the same bacteria.

Chocolate covered raisins and almonds
Brands: Lindt, Essential Everyday
Contaminated with: Undeclared hazelnuts and undeclared peanut allergen
Lindt recalled some of its 6.4 oz chocolate covered raisin bags and 6.4 oz chocolate covered almond bags for having undeclared hazelnuts. The products were sold in nine Lindt Chocolate Shop locations in the U.S. In addition, Supervalu Inc. recalled Essential Everyday chocolate covered raisins due to the presence of undeclared peanuts. Having undeclared nut allergens in products can be a serious a risk for people with nuts allergies.

Cod filets
Brands: Giant Eagle
Contaminated with: Undeclared soy
Giant Eagle recalled all lots of its name-brand Japanese Breaded Cod Fillets due to having undeclared soy, which is a risk for people who have soy allergies.

Paninis
Brands: Giant Eagle
Contaminated with: Undeclared egg
Giant Eagle recalled all lots of its name-brand Little Italy Paninis sold in its supermarkets due to having undeclared egg allergen, which is a risk for people with egg allergies.

Frozen Ravioli
Brands: Rising Moon Organics
Contaminated with: Listeria
Carmel Food Group recalled some of its Rising Moon Organics frozen ravioli items after it was discovered spinach from its supplier was contaminated with the bacteria listeria.

Walnuts
Brands: Aurora, Martin Food Products, Stop&Shop, Giant Carlisle Food Store, Giant of Maryland, Whole Foods Market
Contaminated with: Salmonella
Aurora Products, Inc. recalled its Natural Walnuts and Trail Mixes Containing Walnuts sold through the above retailers due to possible contamination with the bacteria salmonella.

Macadamia nuts
Brands: Nature’s Eats
Contaminated with: Salmonella
Texas Star Nut and Food Co. Inc. recalled Nature’s Eats macadamia nuts due to the detection of salmonella.

Kale and quinoa salad
Brands: Wawa
Contaminated with: Undeclared soy
Taylor Farms Florida Inc. recalled some of its Wawa brand Kale and Quinoa Salad due to undeclared soy in the dressing packet in the salad which could put people with soy allergies at risk.

Cookies
Brands: Giant Eagle
Contaminated with: Undeclared milk
Giant Eagle is recalling its Raisin Filled and Apricot Filled cookies which are sold in its supermarkets due to having undisclosed milk allergen, a risk for people with milk allergies.

O’Coconut products
Brands: Nutiva
Contaminated with:
Salmonella
Organic company, Nutiva, recalled O’Coconut products after learning they may be contaminated with salmonella.

Read next: Here’s the Terrifying Truth About Metal Shards in Your Food

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Diet/Nutrition

6 Foods Not to Eat This Week

Cadbury Accepts Kraft's Raised 11.9 ($19.7) Billion Pound Offer
Tim Boyle—Bloomberg/Getty Images

It's not every day you find out your favorite dinner might contain metal

Every week, you stock your fridge and pantry with the best of intentions: to cook more food at home. But every week, many foods are yanked off supermarket shelves—sometimes after you’ve already brought them home. This was a big week in headline-making food recalls but since not every recall reported by the Food and Drug Administration catches consumers’ attention, we decided to list them.

Company: Frontier Co-op
Product: Frontier/Simply Organic products manufactured with garlic powder.
Reason: Salmonella.

Frontier Co-op voluntarily pulled its products made with an organic garlic powder due to possible Salmonella contamination. The 39 affected product lines, like Ranch Mix Dressing and Fish Taco Seasoning, are sold under Frontier and Simply Organic brands. Though no illnesses have been reported yet, some of the product tested positive for the bacteria. Here’s the full report.

Company: Kraft Foods Group
Product: Original flavor of Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Dinner.
Reason: Small pieces of metal.

Kraft announced a voluntary recall of around 242,000 cases of its mac and cheese dinners due to the possibility that the packages have small pieces of metal inside. Ouch. The company has received eight complaints from consumers. Here’s the full report.

Company: Trader Joe’s Company
Product: Raw walnuts.
Reason: Salmonella.

Trader Joe’s announced Tuesday that it is voluntarily recalling several of its brand-name raw walnuts due to potential Salmonella contamination. Here’s the full report.

Company: Vitamin Cottage Natural Food Markets, Inc.
Product: Natural Grocers brand Organic Garlic Powder.
Reason: Salmonella.

Some of the company’s organic garlic powder was recalled after product from a supplier tested positive for the bacteria. The recall was expanded on Thursday. Here’s the most recent report.

Company: First Source, LLC
Product: Wegmans Organic Walnut Halves & Pieces
Reason: Salmonella.

No illnesses have been reported, but the company recalled the walnuts after salmonella was identified in specific grower lots. The walnut tubs were distributed in Wegmans’ 85 locations in New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Virginia, Maryland, and Massachusetts. They were sold between January 27 and March 17, 2015. Here’s the full report.

Company: Giant Eagle
Product: Seasonal Cut Out Cookies
Reason:
Undeclared milk content.

The company recalled lots of its Giant Eagle brand seasonal cut-out cookies (holiday themed) due to the presence of undeclared milk—an allergen—in the cookies. The cookies pose a serious risk for people who have milk-related allergies. Giant Eagle discovered the problem after customers complained about getting sick after eating the cookies. Here’s the full report.

TIME Food Safety

Here’s the Terrifying Truth About Metal Shards in Your Food

Inexpensive food from an industrialized food system has its downsides

Kraft Foods is recalling 242,000 cases of its Macaroni & Cheese product because “metal shards” have been found in some boxes. The recall is getting lots of attention both because of the size of the recall and because the product is so popular. But contamination of food with foreign objects, and metal pieces in particular, happens more often than you might think.

In January, Unibright Foods recalled about 50,000 pounds of prepared meat products that were shipped to seven U.S. states after it was discovered that packages might contain what the Department of Agriculture called “extraneous metal materials.” A restaurant in Illinois discovered a piece of stainless steel wire in one of the sukiyaki beef products.

Last June, Wegmans recalled 6,000 bags of ice sold in its stores across the northeast over a period of more than five months that contained metal pieces from a broken machine part. In that case, contaminated bags of ice were discovered by the company itself, and no shards were found in ice that was actually sold.

In 2012, metal pieces in private-label products made by Bay Valley Foods, resulted in a recall of 74,000 cases of boxed pasta mix products, including macaroni and cheese.

That same year, Kellogg recalled 2.8 million boxes of Bite Size Frosted and Unfrosted Mini-Wheats when “due to the possible presence of fragments of flexible metal mesh from a faulty manufacturing part.” The boxes were distributed across the country.

And those are just a few of the cases of metal contamination over the past few years. Nobody knows exactly how often that particular problem occurs. But while food recalls involving disease-causing agents like E. coli and salmonella get the most attention, recalls due to the contamination of foreign objects are far from rare.

It’s perhaps not so surprising that metal pieces end up in food products, given our industrialized food system. When a piece of machinery breaks off in an electronics factory or an automotive plant, that’s a problem. When it happens in the food chain, that’s downright dangerous, though apparently few deaths or serious injuries have been reported from such contamination.

Some companies are taking steps to reduce the problem, including some highly sophisticated ones like ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Production lines have been reconfigured and redesigned to minimize the number of parts that have metal moving against metal. |

But as long as we want a the wide variety of inexpensive food we get from our industrialized food system, the hazards of metal and other foreign objects making their way into our food supply will remain.

Read next: How Kraft’s Mac and Cheese Recall Will Affect Its Stock Price

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Autos

CEO Mary Barra Vows to Get Over GM’s Recall Crisis

The New York Times 2014 DealBook Conference
Thos Robinson — Getty Images General Motors CEO Mary Barra speaks onstage during The New York Times DealBook Conference at One World Trade Center on Dec. 11, 2014 in New York City.

She wants to focus on growing sales in the U.S. and China

Battled hardened General Motors chief executive Mary Barra pledged on Thursday to move past last year’s recall fiasco, which saw millions of small cars with defective ignition switches recalled.

“It was clearly a tragedy, and it was deeply troubling,” Barra told reporters this week as she unveiled new plans for 2015, according to the New York Times.

Barra says the company aims to expand its sales in the U.S. and China this year and is sharpening its sights on European markets.

“We have many launches this year, and we are going into them to win, not just to compete,” she said.

Read more at NYT

TIME Companies

Keurig Recalling Millions of Coffee Makers After Burn Complaints

More than 7 million units are being recalled after 90 reported burn-related injuries

Keurig Green Mountain has a problem: the coffee produced by more than 7 million of its brewing machines is a little too hot for java lovers.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission on Tuesday announced a recall of Keurig’s Mini Plus Brewing Systems, citing concerns about water that can overheat during the brewing process, spraying out and burning consumers. Keurig has received about 200 reports of hot liquid escaping from the brewer, including 90 of those that said they suffered burn-related injuries.

The company is recalling about 6.6 million units sold in the U.S. and 564,000 sold in Canada. For details about the units being recalled, see the CPSC report here.

The recalled units were produced between the end of 2009 and July 2014 and were sold at a handful of national retailers, as well as online on Keurig’s website. Keurig said consumers could contact the company for a free repair.

A bulk of Keurig’s sales are derived from the coffee portion packs it sells, not the brewing systems (though those devices are important to help maintain growth of the coffee sales). For the latest fiscal year, Keurig generated $822.3 million in sales from brewers and accessories, while the beverage packs had $3.6 billion in sales.

For those with a long memory, the Keurig recall will remind many of decades-old headlines involving McDonald’s and a cup of scalding coffee. In that infamous 1992 case, a New Mexico woman was severely burned by a cup of coffee she ordered at a drive through window. A state court jury awarded the woman $2.7 million in punitive damages, though a judge later drastically cut that award. The woman, Stella Liebeck, and McDonald’s reached an out-of-court settlement in 1994.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

TIME Recalls

What You Should Do About the Massive Airbag Recall

Car Dealerships Ahead Of Total Vehicle Sales Figures
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images Honda Motor Co. vehicles are displayed for sale at the Paragon Honda dealership in the Queens borough of New York, U.S., on Monday, Sept. 1, 2014.

Millions of cars from ten automakers are subject to an airbag recall. Here's what you need to know

Takata produces about 300,000 airbag replacement kits per month, possibly increasing to 450,000 or so. At that rate, it will take from 2 to 3 years to recall and replace the defective airbags in the 16-million to potentially 30-million affected vehicles in the U.S.

So what do concerned vehicle owners do in the meantime?

Takata is the only airbag manufacturer to use ammonium nitrate as a propellant for its inflators. Ammonium nitrate is affected by heat-and-cold cycling over time, plus humidity, that can cause it to become too forcefully explosive when ignited in a crash.

To fix this potentially lethal default the company says it has (1) changed the compression density force with new press machines; (2) rejected products that are not meeting quality standards; and (3) changed humidity control during production and assembly. Takata also says it also improved the hermetically-sealed package to minimize effects of moisture that would deteriorate the chemicals and make them less stable. Perhaps NHTSA should consider outlawing the use of ammonium nitrate in the first place, or at least use a safer chemical in the recall campaign.

But there are safer alternatives. It should be feasible to re-program the software in the vehicles’ airbag control modules (ACM). By changing the software, including the thresholds of activation and the control algorithms, the system could be made safer— as a temporary solution. The threshold to trigger the airbags could be raised so that it would take a crash at 30 mph, rather than 18 mph. In these low-speed collisions, the driver and passenger would still be protected by wearing their seat belts.

Since the driver and passenger airbags are dual-stage designs, they could be re-programmed to inflate only at the lower-pressure level to help ensure that the explosive force does not exceed levels that cause the metal canister to become lethal shrapnel. Because of the inherent instability of ammonium nitrate, such lower pressures in the canister cannot be absolutely guaranteed, but the risk would be reduced. (On the other hand, passenger risks would rise in a high-speed crash.)

To re-program your car’s Takata airbags, you’d drive over to your local dealership and download new software into your car’s ACM computer. It would likely take less than an hour, and then you’d drive away with a less-risky airbag system that could still offer protection in a crash. If the automakers and Takata cooperated, such software could be developed and tested and available probably within a month…. or maybe even a week.

I believe it should also be a requirement that each affected vehicle have a label attached permanently on the instrument panel, advising that the vehicle has been recalled and that a replacement airbag system has been installed. The date of such recall and replacement action should also be noted on the label.

Finally, I believe that all Takata airbag systems should have a “failsafe” pressure-relief mechanism to prevent any over-pressurization of the airbag. In the late-1970’s I became aware that too many pressurized beer kegs were exploding and propelling lethal shrapnel that injured or killed college students. I showed there was a solution, a simple device that would vent out any over-pressurization before it could cause the metal keg to explode. Lives have been saved by adopting such an inexpensive, simple device for beer kegs. Why not a use a similar device to prevent excessive forces from rupturing the metal canister that holds the airbag’s propellant? And yes, the canisters should be made stronger, too.

Byron Bloch has over 30 years of experience as an independent consultant and court-qualified expert in Auto Safety Design and Vehicle Crashworthiness. Over the years, he has inspected accident vehicles to evaluate how and why the occupants were severely injured, and exemplar vehicles to evaluate their structural details. He has qualified and testified as an expert in auto safety defect cases in Federal and State Courts coast-to-coast. He also lectures, writes, and appears on TV reports on auto safety design and vehicle crashworthiness.

TIME Autos

Ford Recalls 65,000 Fusion Vehicles

There are no known accidents caused by the issue

Ford has recalled 65,000 Fusion cars for noncompliance with a regulation on “theft protection and rollaway prevention.

The automaker announced Tuesday said that it is not aware of any accidents or injuries caused by the issue, but said that it would voluntarily fix the more than 56,000 affected vehicles in the United States, as well as 6,000 in Canada and 2,300 in Mexico.

The 65,000 vehicles recalled Tuesday is small in comparison to General Motors’ notorious recall this year, when more than 1 million vehicles worldwide were pulled over a faulty ignition switch that caused the deaths of at least 30 people.

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