MONEY home prices

WATCH: Foreign Buyers Push U.S. Home Prices Higher

From Russia, Canada, the Middle East and elsewhere, international buyers are moving in.

MONEY buying a home

7 Ways to Get Your Kid Out of Your Basement

College students slacking off and living in parents' basement
Adam Crowley—Getty Images

If your child is one of the 14% of millennials who have moved back in with their parents, here are some tips to nudge him (or her) out the door.

For most of us, leaving the nest was a rite of passage. We went to college, and then proudly headed out into the world to make our own way, while our parents turned our old room into another guest bedroom.

However, for a significant percentage of young adults, that rite of passage is now all about returning to the roost rather than flying solo. According to Gallup research, 14% of millennials (24-to-34-year-olds) have moved back in with their parents. The homeownership rate for those under age 35 was 36.2% in the first quarter of 2014, down from a historical high of 43.1% at the end of 2005, according to Census data. According to numerous economic reports on millennials, this is attributed to a weak job market, high cost of living, significant college debt, and other factors.

These kids, as well as any adult children who have decided to move back in with mom and pop are lovingly referred to as “boomerang kids.” Clearly the analogy is obvious.

For Mom and Dad, who would love to have the ‘kids across the hall’ become the ‘kids across town,’ here are seven pointers you might want to consider:

Start Charging Rent

Cut off the free ride. Yes, it sounds harsh, but you may be doing both you and your kid a favor. Managing money and a monthly budget is something that is not learned in school, and it is certainly not learned hanging out in your parent’s converted attic for free. Give your boomerang kids a real estate reality check. If the free ride comes to a screeching halt and they are paying rent, they will probably want to do it in their own apartment, closer to (or with) their friends, near downtown or a closer drive to their office. Charge rent and enforce it. Once they start getting that first-of-the-month monetary wake up call, it might shock their system enough to have them consider alternative arrangements. If they’re going to have a landlord no matter what, they’re likely to consider a new, more independent situation.

Collect Monthly Payments

Here’s another way to give them a foot out the door – but still a leg up. Start charging them monthly payments now. Let them know that they will have to come up with the monthly equivalent to local rents each month for the next six months. At the end of the six months, you will give them back all the money when they move out. That does three things: You teach them budgeting skills, you incentivize them to move, and you give them a financial helping hand on move-out day.

Be A Strict Landlord

No parties, no loud music, no guests after 10:00 pm. Keep the house rules strict. At some point, your kid is going to want to have a little independence, and some fun too. Living with a strict landlord may just be the incentive he or she needs to find a place of their own.

Set A Deadline…and Stick To It

If you can sense that your boomerang kid is riding out his or her free meal ticket under your roof as long as they can, help them visualize when that ride will end. Create a deadline for them to move out and stick to it, no matter what. It’s likely you never intended to have kids under your roof for more than two decades, so your children need to respect that…and they need to get on with their own lives. Even in a world where millennials are underemployed compared to their Gen X, Y and Baby Boomer counterparts, there are still plenty of ways for them to make a living that enables them to live with a roommate or two or three…elsewhere.

Help Them Get Organized and Overcome The Mental Hurdle

After all the financial aspects are considered, one of the biggest hurdles to making a big move is mental: it just feels overwhelming. So many things to do, buy and organize before it can actually happen. Your child may just need the expertise of someone who’s moved multiple times in their lives to talk them down off the “I’m too overwhelmed and can’t do this” ledge. Map out all the necessities and then make a list of the “nice to haves down the road” so they can see what’s an immediate need, and what can be done over the coming weeks and months.

Gift or Loan Them The Down Payment

Trulia’s latest survey showed that 50% of millennials surveyed plan go to their parents for help with the hefty down payment that’s required to purchase a home in today’s housing market. If you want your adult child up and out of your basement, consider giving them the financial head start now they need to form their own household and be independent.

Buy A Multi-Unit Investment Property

I am a huge proponent of purchasing multiunit properties, such as a duplex or triplex, because they are great investments. In the case of your “failure to launch” millennial, slot them into one of the units of your new property and rent out the others. The rental income is likely to cover much of the costs of ownership, and you’ll have a built-in property manager in the building to keep an eye on things. Plus, your boomerang kid is learning valuable management skills at the same time. It can be an investment property for you, and solve the “son or daughter is still in my basement” problem, all at the same time.

 

More on Financial Independence

4 Ways to Lighten Your Kid’s Debt Load

Is Living with Mom and Dad Starting to Cramp Your Style? Take These Steps to Independence

Taking Five Years to Earn a B.A. is Common—And Costly. Here’s How To Get Out in Four

MONEY Ask the Expert

Should I Pay Off Loans or Save for a Down Payment?

140605_AskExpert_illo
Robert A. Di Ieso, Jr.

Q: Should I use savings to pay off car loans or make a down payment? — Carmella F., Pittsburgh

A: The first line of business is to make sure you have enough savings for an emergency fund, a minimum of four months if both spouses are working, six months if one isn’t, says Pittsburgh financial planner Diane Pearson.

Paying off the $30,000 in two car loans you told us you have would deplete your savings. Not only does that leave you vulnerable to unforeseen expenses, plowing money into assets that only lose value as they age doesn’t make sense, says Pearson. When applying for a mortgage, banks would prefer to see $30,000 in savings plus car loans over no savings and vehicles owned free and clear.

MONEY Shopping

Poll: What’s Your Next Big-Ticket Buy?

Is there a major purchase in your future? Tell us what you're most likely to spend the big bucks on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MONEY

6 Acronyms Every Beginner Real Estate Investor Should Know

H-O-M-E letters in wooden blocks
Image Source—Getty Images

Pretty much every time you learn something new, you also learn a whole new vocabulary to go along with it. Real estate investing is no different. Real estate investors must understand the terms and investment vocabulary. Here are some definitions of common acronyms to get you started:

1. PITI

Principal (P), Interest (I), property Taxes (T) and Insurance (I). This is basically the “bottom line” or the minimum you need to calculate when thinking about purchasing an investment property with a loan. Usually it is calculated overall and on a month-to-month basis.

The overall number is what you would potentially spend on the property over the life of the loan. Month-to-month is the portion of PITI you have to pay each month to stay in good standing. This information will help determine how much rent you should charge.

Related: Trying to Choose The Right Loan? Stop Looking at Just The Rates!

2. LTV

Loan-to-Value, also important if you’re taking out a loan on your investment property, is calculated by dividing the loan by the property’s value, then expressing that as a percentage. For example, if the loan is $200,000 and the value of the property is $250,000, the LTV is 80%.

The lower the LTV, the more equity you have in the property, which means you have more room to negotiate should you decide to sell.

3. GOI

Gross Operating Income is the actual annual income collected from the property, which includes all sources of income (laundry, parking, storage, etc.) and takes into account any vacancies.

4. NOI

Net Operating Income is the income left over from your rents after paying all your monthly operating expenses. So, subtract your expenses from your GOI to get you the property’s NOI. For example, if you take in $10,000 in rents on all the units and spent $8,000 on maintenance, janitorial duties, supplies, accounting, insurance, taxes, and utilities, your NOI for the month was $2,000.

5. DCR

Debt Coverage Ratio is a term commonly used by lenders in underwriting loans for income-generating properties. It’s calculated by dividing the NOI by the total debt. Ratios of 1.20 and higher are considered average.

Related: Understanding Debt Service Coverage Ratio

6. CCR

Conditions, Covenants, and Restrictions are promises written into contracts where the parties agree to perform, or not perform, certain actions.

CCRs can occur in several contexts. There can be CCRs written into a deed when you purchase a property. Also, your tenants could sign a rental agreement in which they agree to certain conditions (such as “no pets allowed” and “you can live here as long as you pay rent, otherwise we can evict you”).

I’m sorry to disappoint you on that last one. CCR on the radio is much more exciting than the real estate investing version of CCR. But it’s an important term, so I hope I’m forgiven. Either way, I hope the acronyms listed above will help you in your quest to invest in real estate.

More from BiggerPockets:
10 Things I Hate About Working From Home
10 Rules For Investing in Real Estate Without Looking Like an Idiot
6 Tips to Turn Bad Tenants Into Amazing Tenants

This article originally appeared on BiggerPockets, the real estate investing social network. © 2014 BiggerPockets Inc.

TIME Economy

Millennial-Driven Housing Boom Could Be On The Way

A new study says as the economy improves many millennials could soon be leaving home — causing a housing boom within the next decade.

Young adults, so-called “millennials,” have been pushed by the recession to live with their parents into adulthood–but they really want to move out, according to a study by Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies. That study found that millennials could form 24 million new households by 2025.

Three main factors have been holding millennials back from moving out, said the Harvard study: A weak job market for recent graduates, high debt from student loans and tightened lending standards.

The report also found that the number of young people who buy homes increases as their incomes grow. As and the economy improves, millennials–which the study defined as those born between the years of 1985 and 2004–will make decisions about their living arrangements that will, by extension, affect the economy.

But don’t foresee a mass exodus from parents’ homes, the authors said. Millennials will probably just trickle out of their parents’ nest in what would look like a steady, slow recovery.

 

 

MONEY mortgages

30-year Mortgage Rates Edge Down For Second Straight Week

Mortgage rates declined slightly over the past week.

Average rates notched down slightly to 4.14% with an average of 0.5 points, down from last week’s 4.17%, according to Freddie Mac. A year ago, rates on 30-year mortgages were 4.46%.

The rate on an average 15-year mortgage was 3.22% with 0.5 points, down from 3.50% a year ago. For adjustable rate mortgages, a five-year ARM this week averaged 2.98% with 0.3 points and a one-year ARM averaged 2.40% with 0.4 points.

image (4)
Source: Freddie Mac survey.

 

MONEY buying a home

5 Reasons the Highest Offer Won’t Always Get You the House

140626_REA_5reasons_1
iStock—iStock

Conventional home buying wisdom says that whomever throws the most money at the seller will snag the house. That’s not always true! Here's why.

When it comes to buying a house, the highest priced offer gets the house…right? Not always! Sure, a hefty sum on an offer is the first thing that every seller wants to see, but any good real estate agent will advise their seller that each offer is a sum of its parts.

Here are five reasons why you may just beat that higher offer:

  1. Cash Is King

    If you can buy with all cash, you will likely win out over a higher-priced offer. According to RealtyTrac’s latest data, 43% of all home sales in 2014 have been all-cash deals. Savvy sellers know the benefits of an all-cash buyer: there is no issue involving mortgages and lenders, the escrow closes faster, and there is no appraisal to worry about.

  2. The Next Best Thing: A Pre-Approval Letter

    A pre-approval letter is the confirmation from your mortgage broker or bank that you’re ready to buy in a set price range and have been pre-approved for the loan. In essence, the pre-approval letter turns you into a virtual cash buyer, as mortgages are harder to come by these days. Someone may be offering to pay more, but if they are not pre-approved, you will have the leg up, even at a slightly lower price.

  3. Timeline Flexibility

    Closing is generally 30, 45, 60, or 90 days. Customizing the length to suit the seller’s needs can often seal the deal over a higher priced offer. A seller generally wants a fast closing. If you have all your ducks in a row, you may be able to pull off 30 days. But what if the house they are moving to won’t be ready for 60 days? They’ll need more time. Find out what they need, and then give it to them. I’ve seen many lower offers win using this tactic.

  4. The “Please Let Me Buy Your House” Letter

    I know, I know, you are thinking this is soooo cheesy. However, a friend of mine had three similar offers on the table when he was selling his house. Two of the offers came with very heartfelt letters.

    Related: Wanna Win a Bidding War? Write a Letter That’ll Crush the Competition

    He was actually put off by the buyer who didn’t send a letter because the others did and it made a huge impact—and he sold to one of the letter-writers, even though it was a slightly lower-priced offer than the non-letter writer. Writing a letter may not get you the deal, but if you are the one offer that doesn’t put pen to paper, it could lose it.

  5. Don’t Overload On Contingencies

    Contingencies are negotiating tools that give you an opportunity to walk away without consequence. The most common: the inspection, the financing, and the appraisal. However, every contingency you add makes your offer weaker, because it makes it that much harder to close the deal. Make sure you really need them before building them into your offer.

Here are’s some more details on specific contingencies and how to handle each:

    • Contingent Upon Inspection – I have heard other experts give you the “tip” to forgo the inspection contingency to make your offer more attractive. Here’s my advice: NEVER give up this one. After your inspection, you give the seller your list of problems, current and potential, along with the opportunity to fix them, adjust the price, or give you a credit back. If the seller does not agree to any of your requests, you can walk. You take a huge risk if you waive this. A much better option: offer to do the inspection in the first few days after opening escrow and to give a response to the inspection results within a few days.
    • Contingent Upon Financing – Don’t omit this one either, unless of course you are paying all cash. With most 30-to-45 day closings, you will usually have 17-to-21 days to get your mortgage approval. Having that pre-approval letter will make this finance contingency less of an issue for your seller.
    • Contingent Upon Appraisal – It’s very possible that the house may not appraise for what you have offered to pay. However, if you have done your homework, analyzed the comps of the neighborhood, and are comfortable with the price you have offered, then consider waiving this one. The risk is that you will have to come up with any difference between the appraised value and the negotiated sales price. Waiving this contingency really gives you a leg up over the competition, especially in a hot market where the seller is trying to get top dollar.

More from Trulia:
Style Your Vacation Home With Tips from Homepolish
8 Ways to Screw Up Your Home Sale
International House Hunters Shift to Urban Neighborhoods

Michael Corbett is Trulia‘s real estate and lifestyle expert. He hosts NBC’s EXTRA’s Mansions and Millionaires and has authored three books on real estate, including Before You Buy!

MONEY Housing Market

Housing Market Recovery Moving Forward, Except for This One Thing

For the first time during the housing recovery, four out of five of Trulia's Housing Barometer measures are at least halfway back to normal. But young adults are still struggling to get jobs.

How We Track This Uneven Recovery
Since February 2012, Trulia’s Housing Barometer has charted how quickly the housing market is moving back to “normal” based on multiple indicators. Because the recovery is uneven, with some housing activities improving faster than others, our Barometer highlights five measures:

  1. Home-price levels relative to fundamentals (Trulia Bubble Watch)
  2. Delinquency + foreclosure rate (Black Knight, formerly LPS)
  3. Existing home sales, excluding distressed sales (National Association of Realtors, NAR)
  4. New construction starts (Census)
  5. The employment rate for 25-34 year-olds, a key age group for household formation and first-time homeownership (Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS)

The first measure, home prices from our Bubble Watch, is a quarterly report. The other four measures are reported monthly; to reduce volatility, however, we use three-month moving averages for these measures. For each indicator, we compare the latest available data to (1) its worst reading for that indicator during the housing bust and (2) its pre-bubble “normal” level.

4 Out of 5 Measures Improve and Are At Least Halfway Home
All but one of the Housing Barometer’s five indicators have improved since last quarter, and all five have improved or remained steady since last year. Prices and the delinquency + foreclosure rate made the biggest strides:

Housing Indicators: How Far Back to Normal?
Now One quarter ago One year ago
Home price level 79% 68% 44%
Delinquency + foreclosure rate 74% 63% 53%
Existing home sales, excl. distressed 64% 61% 64%
New construction starts 50% 45% 41%
Employment rate, 25-34 year-olds 35% 39% 30%
For each indicator, we compare the latest available data to (1) its worst reading for that indicator during the housing bust and (2) its pre-bubble “normal” level.
  • Home prices continue to climb, though at a slower rate. Trulia’s Bubble Watch shows prices were 3% undervalued in 2014 Q2, compared with 15% at the worst of the housing bust; that means prices are nearly four-fifths (79%) of the way back to their “normal” level of being neither over- nor under-valued. Even better, as prices approach normal, price gains are slowing down and becoming more sustainable: for the first time in almost two years, no local market has had price gains of more than 20% year-over-year.
  • The delinquency + foreclosure rate was 74% back to normal in May, up from 63% one quarter ago. While fewer foreclosures means fewer discounted homes for sale, delinquencies and foreclosures have caused great pain for millions of households and the financial system. For the foreclosure crisis, the light at the end of the tunnel is getting brighter.
  • Existing home sales (excluding distressed) were 64% back to normal in May, up from 61% one quarter earlier. Distressed sales have plummeted as the foreclosure inventory has dried up. Non-distressed sales also stumbled from their peak last summer as higher home prices and mortgage rates reduced affordability, but in the past quarter non-distressed sales have resumed their climb.
  • New construction starts are 50% back to normal, up from 45% one quarter ago and 41% one year ago. Multi-unit starts — mostly apartment buildings — are leading the recovery: in 2014 so far, multi-unit starts accounted for 35% of all new home starts, the highest annual level in 40 years. This apartment boom started last year, and last year’s starts are now being completed, which is increasing the supply of apartments for rent.
  • Employment for young adults, however, took a step back. May’s three-month moving average shows that 75.6% of adults age 25-34 are employed, which is just 35% of the way back to normal. That’s down from 39% one quarter ago, though still an improvement from one year ago. Because young adults need jobs in order to move out of their parents’ homes, form their own households, and eventually become homeowners, the housing recovery depends on Millennials getting jobs.

What’s Missing from the Housing Recovery

First-time homebuyers are still missing from the housing recovery, making up just 27% of existing-home buyers according to NAR’s May report. That’s down a bit both from last month and from last year.

How has the recovery gotten this far without first-time buyers? Investors and other bargain-hunters bought homes near the bottom of the market, in late 2011, which boosted sales and home prices. Now that prices are near long-term norms – just 3% undervalued – the bargain-hunting engine is sputtering. Repeat buyers, who are trading in one home for another, are taking more of the market.

Would-be first-time homebuyers are stuck: rising prices and mortgage rates have reduced affordability before young adults have been able to recover from the jobs recession. A full recovery that includes first-time homebuyers is still years away; many young adults still need to find jobs and keep them long enough to save for a down payment and qualify for a mortgage. Until that happens, the clearest signs of recovery will be apartment construction and renter household formation, not first-time home buying, as young adults move from their parents’ homes into their own rental units.

NOTE: Trulia’s Housing Barometer tracks five measures: existing home sales excluding distressed (NAR), home prices (Trulia Bubble Watch), delinquency + foreclosure rate (Black Knight), new home starts (Census), and the employment rate for 25-34 year-olds (BLS). Also, our estimate of the “normal” share of sales that are distressed is 5%; Black Knight reports that the share was in the 3-5% range during the bubble. For each measure, we compare the latest available data to (1) the worst reading for that indicator during the housing bust and (2) its pre-bubble “normal” level. We use a three-month average to smooth volatility for the four indicators that are reported monthly (all but home prices). The latest published data are May data for the employment rate, existing home sales, new construction starts, and the delinquency + foreclosure rate; and Q2 for home prices.

See the original article, with more charts, here.

Jed Kolko is the chief economist of Trulia.

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