TIME psychology

5 Easy, Scientifically-Proven Tips for Controlling Your Eating Over the Holidays

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Eric Barker writes Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

1) Eating slowly allows more time for the “full” feeling to kick in.

2) Eat off a small plate. Without realizing it, we often judge whether we’re done by visual cues like an empty plate.

3) Keep the serving dishes in the kitchen. Merely having to get up to get more makes us less likely to keep eating.

4) Sit next to the people who are skinny and who never eat much. We’re influenced by those around us, even if we think we’re not.

5) If you do blow it and gorge yourself there’s still an upside: overeating on Thanksgiving can make you less likely to spend so much money on Black Friday.

For more tips, check out Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think. It’s by Brian Wansink, director of the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University.

This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

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TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME psychology

Should You Marry, Break Up, or Maintain the Status Quo?

Marty Nemko holds a Ph.D. in educational psychology from UC Berkeley and is a career and personal coach.

This internal debate may help you get clear

Should you marry your special someone, break up, or stay status-quo? It’s perhaps life’s biggest decision yet too many people choose a car more rationally.

Emotion should probably play a role in deciding whether to marry that person but in case you might like to bring more rationality to the process, perhaps this mock internal debate will be helpful.

(To reduce risk of unintended gender or sexual orientation bias, I’ve given the potential marriage partner an androgynous name: Leslie.)

Person: I love Leslie.

Alter ego: But you’re not sure what love means.

Person: Well, I care a lot about Leslie.

Alter ego: You care a lot about your dog. That doesn’t mean you should marry it.

Person: But I love spending time with Leslie. We laugh a lot. The sex is very good. And we simply like hanging out together.

Alter ego; That’s selective memory. Be honest with yourself: Sometimes, you find Leslie boring.

Person: Maybe my standards are too high. After a while, you get bored with anyone: hearing the same stories, the same political views.

Alter ego: Are you sure? I mean, some people are always learning and sharing ideas. I mean you read the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and TIME and are constantly sharing what you’ve learned. Leslie rarely does that.

Person: Maybe the problem is that I’m smarter than Leslie.

Alter ego: How important is that really? You’re looking for a marriage partner, not a consultant.

Person: But if I don’t respect Leslie’s mind, it will taint the relationship. I don’t want to be dismissive of Leslie’s opinions.

Alter ego: That’s a good point. You already do dismiss lots of Leslie’s ideas.

Person: Maybe I’m just being defensive. Unconsciously, I’m subject to the Not Invented Here syndrome: If it’s not my idea, it must be inferior.

Alter ego: If you’re honest with yourself, you do know that Leslie is less intelligent than you are.

Person: You’re right but intelligence isn’t everything. As I said, we have a great sex life, we seem to have the same appetite for it, and in our seven months together, sex is just as good as it was in the beginning, maybe better.

Alter ego: True but I get scared of what my mother told me, “If you put a penny in a jar every time you have sex the first year and take one out every time you have sex after that, you’ll never empty the jar.”

Person: I don’t think that applies to everyone. I don’t think it will apply to us.

Alter ego: Okay, the sex part gets an A, the intellectual compatibility a B-, which is generous. How about Leslie’s lovingness?

Person: That does worry me. I care deeply about Leslie. I would hurt myself in order to help Leslie but I don’t think the reverse is true.

Alter ego: And Leslie certainly doesn’t boost you up as much as you boost Leslie.

Person: Worse, Leslie seems to find fault with me more often than I feel I deserve.

Alter ego: Maybe you do deserve it.

Person: I don’t expect unconditional love but right now it feels a little too conditional. And if it’s that the way it is now, what will it be like a year from now? Five years from now? 40 years from now? Remember, it’s supposed to be “until death do us part.”

Alter ego: You’re catastrophizing. Leslie isn’t that bad.

Person: But I can’t give Leslie more than a C on lovingness.

Alter ego: What about how emotionally together Leslie is?

Person: There, I have to give Leslie an A.

Alter ego: And if you’re honest, you have to give yourself a C. You tend to be moody and you’re pretty insecure, so you need to process stuff with Leslie all the time. You’re always worried that Leslie doesn’t love you enough, maybe even would cheat on you.

Person: You’re right. I’m no basket case but I’m a bit needy and sad. If I were back out in the meet market, I might not attract someone as good as Leslie. A quality person doesn’t want to marry a needy stick in the mud.

Alter ego: And that’s compounded by your liking to smoke pot. You know the data is pretty much in. It does affect your brain’s functioning. Not just your memory or motivation but your emotional functioning.

Person: I’m not so convinced the data is in.

Alter ego: I think you’re rationalizing.

Person: Maybe.

Alter ego: This decision is feeling too unclear. I think you need to keep things as they are. Maybe in a few months, the decision will become clearer.

Person: Maybe Leslie and I should take a break, date other people?

Alter ego: That’s scary.

Person: This is feeling uncomfortable. I’ll think about this more later.

In sum

That internal dialogue considered eight factors which are key in a spouse:

  • Compatible level of intelligence
  • Similar sex drive
  • Enjoying each other in bed
  • Enjoying each other out of bed
  • How loving/giving the person is
  • How respectful the person is of you and you of the person
  • How emotionally together s/he is
  • Whether s/he has a substance abuse problem

Of course, reducing to a list the decision to marry or break up ignores the emotional. In the end, of course, you need to ask yourself the core question: “Do I love this person enough to want to spend the rest of my life with him or her?”

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME psychology

The #1 Way to Easily Improve All Your Relationships

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Eric Barker writes Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

Just try.

Put a small amount of conscious effort into trying to be a better friend, spouse, whatever.

That’s it.

Sounds ridiculous but research shows:

This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

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How To Make Your Life Better By Sending Five Simple Emails

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TIME

Life Lessons from a Seventy-Something

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Whatever you're thinking you'd like to do someday — start now

Answer by Dee Dees on Quora.

By the time people reach their 70s, they’re beginning to look back at the plans they made and dreams they had that never materialized. We always think we’ll achieve a goal when we finish school, or after we’re married, or after the kids are grown, or after we retire, and then one day we look up — and all those things have happened and we still haven’t realized our dreams.

That being said, the first thing I’d tell young people is “Start now.” Whatever you’re thinking you’d like to do someday — start now. If you want to backpack through Europe, do the research, get a passport, save the money. Take steps that will commit you to follow through. Plan it with a friend. Pay a deposit. You might want to start small by doing a one-week hike in Ireland. Plan something bigger for the next year.

I realize sometimes there are commitments to other people that hold us back from doing what we want. If you’re already married, holding a 9-5 job, parenting kids, you need to work around those responsibilities without leaving yourself in the dust. I’m not advocating being selfish, but I’m encouraging you to do what you can when you can.

It’s been said that at the end of life we regret the things we didn’t do more than those we did do. Be responsible in life, but always look for ways to have fun, enrich your life, and have no regrets.

The second thing I’d advise would be to start early planning for retirement. When you’re 20 or 30, retirement seems very far off, and you think you can start saving “later.” The sooner you start some kind of plan, whether savings, an IRA, or other, the more you will be able to enjoy life in your later years, and the less you will need to worry about how you’ll survive after the paychecks end.

This question originally appeared on Quora: What are some life lessons people in their 70s can share with the younger generations?

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME psychology

How Gratitude Can Change Your Life This Thanksgiving

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Nataly Kogan is the co-founder and CEO of Happier, a digital wellness company.

Join me in a thankfulness experiment.

My family emigrated from Russia to the United States when I was 13 years old. Refugee camps, city housing projects, food stamps, wearing donated clothes, being made fun of endlessly for everything from not speaking English to eating weird things for lunch (hot dogs apparently need to only be consumed inside hot dog buns, not sliced and slipped between pieces of dark brown bread): that’s the patchwork of memories my early life here is made of.

While we were almost entirely dependent on the kindness of strangers during that time, the stress and trauma we felt obliterated any notion of gratitude: when you’re just trying to survive, thankfulness seems like a luxury, not a coping strategy. For me, surviving the pain of that experience was all about coping, and my coping strategy was laser-focused on one goal: becoming happy. Really happy. It was an immigrant’s dream: The American Dream. Achieve a lot of things, be successful, make a lot of money. Move on and move up.

This sounds naïve but I hear adults with a lot more maturity and life experience than I had as a teenager talk about happiness the same way as I thought about it. Being happy was conditional. Situational. It would come after success, achievement, money, status, a certain home, a certain job. Research shows we’ve reversed the order of things completely–that small things and moments generate more satisfaction and happiness than large ones–but I didn’t know that then. Which is why I’m grateful that I only wasted 15 years chasing my big happy and not more.

One of the many things I learned while chasing The Big Happy was that even though a lot of satisfaction and pride comes with achievement, happiness does not. In fact, the chase of this idealized non-existent state of happiness left me depressed and exhausted. Luckily, it also left me hungry to find answers and inspired me to turn to science to see if I could find another way to happiness. The answer I found in every article and book and research paper I read was this: practice gratitude.

Confession: Practicing gratitude as a way to find inner peace, contentment, and lasting happiness seemed ridiculous to me. Too simplistic; too cliche.

I wanted to dismiss it but I couldn’t. I needed help. So I decided to follow the research and see where it led me: for a few months, I would practice gratitude intentionally and regularly. I was sure it wouldn’t work and certain that my experiment would allow me to feel justified in dismissing it as the solution it was purported to be.

My first step was to write down three good things about my day. Every day, even on days when this was a struggle. In one study participants who were asked to do this for 21 days reported feeling more optimistic, less anxious, and even slept better — immediately after and three and six months after the study. Another study showed that participants who kept a gratitude journal for 10 weeks reported having fewer health problems and spent more time exercising.

I also made it a rule to say thank you once a day. I wasn’t a rude person, just always in a hurry; and now I would actually pause to do it. Expressing gratitude to others has been shown to do everything from improving romantic relationships to increasing happiness and depressive symptoms. One of the most powerful ways to do this is by writing a gratitude letter to someone, but I found a simple text message to a friend had similar benefits if you mean it.

New research has shown that positive interactions with strangers leads to feeling more cheerful and increases the sense of belonging. So saying thank you to a barista who makes your coffee can lead to feeling happier just like saying thank you to friend does.

My third gratitude habit was to pause and savor something once a day. It sounded silly to have to learn to do this but I realized the stress of my early life had made pausing and savoring moments seem like another luxury I couldn’t afford. Every since I could remember I’d rushed through every experience in my life instead of being there. But I made a deal to try so I tried. I stopped eating while standing up. I would literally stop to smell the flowers I’d bought for our kitchen. In one study students were instructed to savor two pleasurable experiences per day and reflect on each for a few minutes. They showed significant increases in happiness and reduction in negative feelings.

There are three steps to savoring: Anticipate the experience, be present during it — no checking email while drinking your coffee — and then reflect on it for a few minute to extend its positive effect. Anticipation is key — studies have shown that planning a vacation makes you feel happier than actually taking it.

Here is the punch line: Despite my extreme skepticism, practicing gratitude changed my life.

It didn’t make me some happy-go-lucky person I was never going to be, or frankly, wanted to be. But I developed a fundamentally different way of thinking and moving through life, one in which I stopped taking for granted all the tiny good moments that were already part of it. I stopped looking for happiness out there and learned to find it right here. I felt more connected to friends, family, and my colleagues, and even on the toughest days, I managed my stress better (which research shows is a long-lasting effect of practicing gratitude.)

My advice? Use Thanksgiving as an opportunity to give gratitude a shot.

If you’re skeptical, do it anyway. If your reaction as you’re reading this is “This is so not for me,” do it as an experiment. If you don’t feel like thinking of something to be grateful for as you’re stuck in awful Thanksgiving traffic or dreading the stress of a huge family gathering, try it.

Oh, and I’m @natalykogan on Twitter when you want to thank me for inspiring you to start a habit that will change your life. Then I’ll thank you for giving me the gift of joy that comes from sharing and helping others. And that’s the simple power of gratitude.

 

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME psychology

The Psychology of the Dinner Menu

Tristan Stephenson is the author of The Curious Bartender: The Artistry and Alchemy of Creating the Perfect Cocktail.

How you're really making decisions when you go to a restaurant

A large part of the pleasure derived from browsing a restaurant’s menu, or selecting a wine, can be attributed to the sense of freedom provided by choice. Choice defines us, it supports our self-image, and it’s the gauge with which our friends and work colleagues evaluate our character, mood, and intellect.

This is all well and good, but what if the sensation of choice is actually an illusion? What if our gut feelings (pun intended — some of our what-to-eat decisions are undoubtedly driven by messages sent directly from the gut) are in fact controlled by a spectrum of influences and associations that, for the most part, we are all completely oblivious to?

A good waiter might recommend that madame” try the prawn cocktail but the thought that the prawns may be getting a little long in tooth is, more often than not, brushed under the cognitive carpet by an easier to stomach belief: the waiter as a reliable source of food related counsel. Then there is the boxing, circling, or general advertising of “House Special” dishes. Most of us would consider ourselves wise to such an overt marketing tactic, but the mind takes the position that the restaurant has our best interests at heart, choosing to ignore that special items are probably the establishment’s better earners. The stats show that a featured item will almost always outperform one that is not, and I know of some restaurants who offer incentives to staff who successfully sell-in key menu items. Where food is concerned we are susceptible to even quite obvious exertions of influence.

Did you know that we place more trust in menus that have a broad contrast of ink to paper tone? You probably didn’t until you read it just now (on a correctly contrasted screen or piece of paper, I hope) but from an early age your mind has been wise to this fact and has, unknown to you, pulled the appropriate strings to influence your decisions accordingly. The size and weight of the menu can also affect our choosing, where heavyweight binders suggest that the meal will carry some weight too.

Fancy some lemon tart to finish? Was it really freedom of choice that steered the decision, or is it the yellow tie that the waiter has been swinging in front of your face all evening? You might not have registered the tie consciously, but your subconscious mind filed the data nonetheless. Then, when asked for your dessert choice, since no obvious answer could be immediately given your mind answered a similar question, “What color dessert would I like?” — a much easier question to answer.

In psychological circles the “yellow tie” scenario is known as a primer — a subtle influence that our unconscious mind uses to generate quick responses to the problems with which we are presented. Priming effects are not limited to the physical dining experience either, it might be the smell of frying bacon on your walk to the restaurant, the aromas of which whisper in your ear as your eyes glance over that surprisingly tempting barbecue pork bun. Or a child, who in the discovery of the Pyramids of Giza in class that day, enthusiastically requests pizza for dinner after school (triangular shaped slices, of course).

I experienced this first hand earlier in the year. On the outside wall of one of my restaurants (which specialises in lobster and steak) we hung a 12ft sign that reads in bold, black uppercase:

MEAT

FISH

DRINK

The decision to do this was driven by the notion that a zero-bull, honest approach to our food (we don’t cater well for vegetarians) would help build trust with our guests. What the sign actually did was plant a mental checklist in the unconscious minds of our patrons suggesting that “meat, fish and drink” were essential purchases. The booze-filled carnivorous blow-outs that followed may have been unrelated, but there are hundreds of psychological studies that would indicate otherwise.

Perhaps the most recent factor to impact choice is everyone’s favourite dining partner: the smartphone. Today, our choices are digitally shared, assessed and graded with such ease and frequency that rapid feedback from peers regulates ever-more precise choices for future dilemmas. If this is true then choices should be much easier to make. Or they would be, if there weren’t so many damn things to choose from.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME psychology

How to Give a World Class Presentation: 10 Tips Backed by Research

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Eric Barker writes Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

  • Still nervous? Faking it until you make it works.

This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

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How To Make Your Life Better By Sending Five Simple Emails

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TIME psychology

5 Things Your Clothes Are Saying About You

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Eric Barker writes Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

Some findings about clothes from psychological research:

  1. Different color clothing says different things about you. Most interesting is that studies show red has some pretty unique effects. For the most part, red seems to mean sex. Research shows it makes men more attractive to women. It makes women more attractive to men. It helps hitchikers get picked up. (More on the odd and interesting effects of red here.)
  2. Dressing young can make you healthier. Glasses make you look smarter but less attractive. How a female celebrity dresses can tell you how short her marriage will be.
  3. You like brand name clothes because they make you seem high status and (hopefully) this will cause people to treat you better.
  4. Dark clothes = neurotic. Formal dress = conscientious. Messy and unconventional clothing = open to new things. Cleavage and expensive clothes = narcissism in women.
  5. You trust doctors more when they wear the white coat. You like musicians’ music more when they dress the way you expect them to. By the same token, what you wear affects how you act: when research subjects wore lab coats they acted more attentive and careful. So choose your clothes wisely when you need to perform at your best.

This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

Join over 135,000 readers. Get a free weekly update via email here.

Related posts:

An easy way for women to be more attractive to men and men to be more attractive to women

10 things science can teach us about being sexy as hell

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TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME psychology

Here’s How to Know Who Your Real Friends Are

Fackbook Acquires WhatsApp For $16 Billion
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Eric Barker writes Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

Look at your phone texting and calling patterns. Scientists are realizing they give powerful insights about relationships.

Via Sciencemag.org:

Just by analyzing the calling patterns, the researchers could accurately label two people as friends or nonfriends more than 95% of the time. But the results, published online today in theProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that the mobile phone data were better at predicting friendship than the subjects themselves. Thirty-two pairs of subjects switched from calling each other acquaintances to friends in the traditionally gathered survey data. These are most likely new relationships that formed during the course of the study, say the researchers, and they left a clear signal in the mobile phone data. Friends call each other far more often than acquaintances do when they are off-campus and during weekends. The pattern is so distinct that the researchers spotted budding friendships in the phone data months before the people themselves called themselves friends.

There’s another great article in the WSJ by Robert Lee Hotz about how scientists are using phone data to study our behavior — and learning more than they ever thought they could:

…at MIT, scientists who tracked student cellphones during the latest presidential election were able to deduce that two people were talking about politics, even though the researchers didn’t know the content of the conversation. By analyzing changes in movement and communication patterns, researchers could also detect flu symptoms before the students themselves realized they were getting sick.

“Phones can know,” said Dr. Pentland, director of MIT’s Human Dynamics Laboratory, who helped pioneer the research. “People can get this god’s-eye view of human behavior.”

Of course, companies are very interested in this data:

Cellphone providers are openly exploring other possibilities. By mining their calling records for social relationships among customers, several European telephone companies discovered that people were five times more likely to switch carriers if a friend had already switched, said Mr. Eagle, who works with the firms. The companies now selectively target people for special advertising based on friendships with people who dropped the service.

And some of the results are downright unnerving:

After analyzing more than 16 million records of call date, time and position, the researchers determined that, taken together, people’s movements appeared to follow a mathematical pattern. The scientists said that, with enough information about past movements, they could forecast someone’s future whereabouts with 93.6% accuracy.

The pattern held true whether people stayed close to home or traveled widely, and wasn’t affected by the phone user’s age or gender.

A few other interesting tidbits:

  1. Overall, our phones make us happier. (There’s even an app for that.)
  2. They may be making us more selfish, however. Our phones can fulfill our need for human contact, making us less inclined to go out of our way to help others.
  3. These devices can distract us so much we don’t notice the world around us — even if it contains unicycling clowns. (To be fair, people may actually like us better when we are distracted during a conversation.)
  4. We’ve become so addicted to our phones that two-thirds of users report hearing “phantom ringing.”
  5. We rely so much on these devices that a third of people under 30 can’t remember their home phone numbers — if they have one at all.
  6. 5% of relationships were ended by text message. People even get divorced via text. (iPhone users are more promiscuous, by the way.)
  7. By stripping away the emotional information in faces and intonation, text messaging might be simulating autism.
  8. That said, text message reminders have effectively encouraged saving, reduced smoking and increased voting.

This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

Join over 135,000 readers. Get a free weekly update via email here.

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How To Make Your Life Better By Sending Five Simple Emails

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done – 5 Expert Tips

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TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME psychology

These Books Can Teach You to Be the Best at Anything

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Eric Barker writes Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

After my post What does it take to become an expert at anything? a number of people have written, curious about where to learn more on the subject.

A few of the best sources I pulled from are below, with links and descriptions:

Bounce: Mozart, Federer, Picasso, Beckham, and the Science of Success

“Backed by cutting-edge scientific research and case studies, Syed shatters long-held myths about meritocracy, talent, performance, and the mind. He explains why some people thrive under pressure and others choke, and weighs the value of innate ability against that of practice, hard work, and will.”

Check it out here.

Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About Getting It Right When You Have To

“Dr. Sian Beilock, an expert on performance and brain science, reveals inChoke the astonishing new science of why we all too often blunder when the stakes are high. What happens in our brain and body when we experience the dreaded performance anxiety? And what are we doing differently when everything magically “clicks” into place and the perfect golf swing, tricky test problem, or high-pressure business pitch becomes easy?”

Check it out here.

Little Bets: How Breakthrough Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries

“Based on deep and extensive research, including more than 200 interviews with leading innovators, Sims discovered that productive, creative thinkers and doers—from Ludwig van Beethoven to Thomas Edison and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos—practice a key set of simple but ingenious experimental methods—such as failing quickly to learn fast, tapping into the genius of play, and engaging in highly immersed observation—that free their minds, opening them up to making unexpected connections and perceiving invaluable insights.”

Check it out here.

The Little Book of Talent: 52 Tips for Improving Your Skills

“It is an easy-to-use handbook of scientifically proven, field-tested methods to improve skills—your skills, your kids’ skills, your organization’s skills—in sports, music, art, math, and business. The product of five years of reporting from the world’s greatest talent hotbeds and interviews with successful master coaches, it distills the daunting complexity of skill development into 52 clear, concise directives.”

Check it out here.

Mindset: The New Psychology of Success

“World-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck, in decades of research on achievement and success, has discovered a truly groundbreaking idea–the power of our mindset. Dweck explains why it’s not just our abilities and talent that bring us success–but whether we approach them with a fixed or growth mindset.”

Check it out here.

Nine Things Successful People Do Differently

“Decades of research on achievement suggests people at the top of their game tend to reach their goals because of what they do—not because of who they are. In this short, provocative, and useful HBR Single, motivational psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson translates the psychological secrets of these winning human beings for your use. ”

Check it out here.

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

“Passionately argued, impressively researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiet shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so. Taking the reader on a journey from Dale Carnegie’s birthplace to Harvard Business School, from a Tony Robbins seminar to an evangelical megachurch, Susan Cain charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal in the twentieth century and explores its far-reaching effects.”

Check it out here.

Talent Is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers from Everybody Else

“According to distinguished journalist Geoff Colvin, both the hard work and natural talent camps are wrong. What really makes the difference is a highly specific kind of effort-“deliberate practice”-that few of us pursue when we’re practicing golf or piano or stockpicking. Based on scientific research, Talent is Overrated shares the secrets of extraordinary performance and shows how to apply these principles.”

Check it out here.

The Talent Code: Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How

“Drawing on cutting-edge neurology and firsthand research gathered on journeys to nine of the world’s talent hotbeds—from the baseball fields of the Caribbean to a classical-music academy in upstate New York—Coyle identifies the three key elements that will allow you to develop your gifts and optimize your performance in sports, art, music, math, or just about anything.”

Check it out here.

This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

Join over 135,000 readers. Get a free weekly update via email here.

Related posts:

How To Make Your Life Better By Sending Five Simple Emails

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done – 5 Expert Tips

New Harvard Research Reveals A Fun Way To Be More Successful

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

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