TIME social

Twitter Now Lets You Tag People in Photos – You Can Add 4 Photos to Each Tweet, Too

twitter photos
Twitter

The social network has added a new feature to let users tag up to 10 friends in photos. It's also launched a feature to let iPhone users upload multiple photos - up to four - in a Tweet and plans to bring the capability to the Android app and to Twitter.com

Twitter is getting a little more photo-happy, adding the ability to tag up to 10 Twitter users in an image.

If you’re not keen on the idea of being tagged in OPTs (other people’s tweets – feel free to use it in casual conversation), you’re able to toggle your tagability under your account settings. Tagging someone in an image doesn’t count against your 140-character message limit, either.

And finally, you can now add multiple images to a tweet – up to four at a time. The feature is only available on the iPhone right now, but it’ll roll out to the Android app and to Twitter.com in the not too distant future. Twitter points out that you’ll be able to view multiple-image tweets on any platform, though.

Photos just got more social [Twitter]

TIME video

30-Second Tech Trick: How to Take the Best Selfies

How to check your light, set up your shot and ultimately do what's in everyone's best interests. Here's the 30-second tech trick for taking better pictures of yourself

TIME Africa

Pistorius Vomits Upon Seeing Images of Dead Girlfriend During Murder Trial

Oscar Pistorius at the Pretoria High Court on March 13, 2014, in Pretoria, South Africa.
Oscar Pistorius at the Pretoria High Court on March 13, 2014, in Pretoria, South Africa. Getty Images

The double-amputee Olympian, on trial in South Africa for the murder of model Reeva Steenkamp in February 2013, vomited after gruesome images of her body shortly after he shot her were inadvertently shown in the courtroom

The murder trial of South African olympian Oscar Pistorius turned gruesome again Thursday, when images displayed of his former girlfriend shortly after her death prompted the double-amputee known as “Blade Runner” to vomit in court.

The photos of Reeva Steenkamp appeared briefly on a number of TV screens as part of the prosecution’s case, seemingly by accident as a police official was moving through various images, the Guardian reports. They shocked Steenkamp’s supporters in the courtroom and made Pistorius, who has frequently appeared anguished and sick during the trial, distraught once again.

Pistorius is facing murder charges and the possibility of life in prison if he is found guilty. Prosecutors say he murdered his girlfriend after a fight, but Pistorius says he killed her by accident by shooting his gun through a bathroom door at what he thought was an intruder.

[Guardian]

TIME video

30-Second Tech Trick: How to Take a Screenshot on Your iPhone

Whatever you're looking at on your iPhone's screen can be captured as an image to be shared with others. Here's how.

TIME

17 of History’s Most Rebellious Women

In honor of International Women’s Day, TIME looks at some unlikely revolutionaries, from Joan of Arc and Harriet Tubman to Russian punk-rockers.

TIME animals

Here’s An Otter Just Chowin’ Down On An Alligator

No big deal

Remember that very hungry snake we saw feasting on a crocodile earlier this week? Well, here’s an even hungrier animal putting that snake to shame. Florida’s Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge posted to its Facebook page a series of photos, taken in 2011, of an otter pouncing on an alligator and then just totally devouring him.

And here you thought otters were just cute and cuddly all the time.

TIME Venezuela

Venezuela Marks First Anniversary Of Chavez’s Death

While President Nicolas Maduro struggles to live up to his legacy

Supporters of the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez took to the streets across the country Wednesday to commemorate the anniversary of his death from cancer.

A planned military parade in the capital city of Caracas was set to demonstrate current president Nicolas Maduro’s ability to mobilize the population, reports Reuters, as a series of violent anti-government protests continue to undermine his leadership.

Chavez was immensely popular among the poorest members of Venezuela’s population, thanks to his anti-American rhetoric and generous spending on slum projects. Yet barely a year after his death, his successor has faced a series of challenges from the protests, which have resulted in a reported 18 deaths. Maduro has been blamed for not doing enough to overcome many of the country’s problems, including rampant crime and spiraling living costs.

However, Chavez’s cousin Guillermo Frias claimed that although Chavez “changed Venezuela forever,” he insisted that “Maduro is also a poor man, like us. He’s handling things fine. Perhaps he just needs a stronger hand.”

[Reuters]

TIME Environment

These are 11 of the Oldest Things in the World

All that lives must die—but some organisms get a little more time on this Earth than others. For nearly a decade, the photographer Rachel Sussman has been traveling around the world, capturing images of the oldest continuously living things in the world, part of an effort to “step outside our quotidian experience of time and start to consider a deeper timescale,” as she put it in a TED talk in 2010. Everything she has photographed for the project is at least 2,000 years old, if not much, much older. That includes something as unimaginably ancient as the Posidonia sea grass meadow, found in protected waters in the Mediterranean Sea, which may be 100,000 years old, and something comparatively younger, like baobab trees found in southern Africa. It is a record of survival, of those organisms—and they’re all plants, lichen or coral, as the oldest animals live less than 200 years—that beat the odds of genetics and simply lasted.

Sussman has a new photo book out that details her project, along with a foreword by the science writer Carl Zimmer. There’s a sense of wonder imbued in these photographs of organisms that seem to be a physical record of time, but there’s also a call to action. Many of these subjects of Sussman’s portraits are under threat from habitat loss or climate change or simple human idiocy. (Sussman has written movingly about the loss of the 3,500 year-old Senator tree in Orlando, destroyed in a fire that was almost certainly set on purpose.) “The oldest living things in the world are a record and celebration of our past, a call to action in the present and a barometer of the future,” Sussman has said—and the images that follow prove her out.

TIME Asia

North and South Korean Families Reunite

South Koreans crossed the border to meet family members they had not seen since the 1950-53 Korean war. The reunion may have been the last chance for many to see their loved ones.

TIME olympics

These Are The Most Unusual Pictures From Sochi

Sometimes the Winter Olympics can look a little odd.

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