TIME celebrity

These Photos Show Taylor Swift Experiencing the Full Range of Human Emotion at a Knicks Game

Euphoria! Shock! Confusion!

It’s been a busy week for Taylor Swift, but she managed to make time to attend a Knicks game at Madison Square Garden Wednesday evening with her bestie, supermodel Karlie Kloss. (Maybe it was actually part of her new job as New York City’s Tourism Ambassador. Unclear.)

What we do know is that Tay — who sat next to Ben Stiller and his son — really seemed to experience the full range of human emotion while attending the game, making for an emotionally rich game-watching experience. Take a look.

Euphoria:

Celebrities Attend The Chicago Bulls Vs New York Knicks Game - October 29, 2014
James Devaney—GC Images / Getty Images

Shock:

Celebrities Attend The Chicago Bulls Vs New York Knicks Game - October 29, 2014
James Devaney—GC Images / Getty Images

Confusion:

Celebrities Attend The Chicago Bulls Vs New York Knicks Game - October 29, 2014
James Devaney—GC Images / Getty Images

Melancholy:

Celebrities Attend The Chicago Bulls Vs New York Knicks Game - October 29, 2014
James Devaney—GC Images / Getty Images

Bemusement:

Celebrities Attend The Chicago Bulls Vs New York Knicks Game - October 29, 2014
James Devaney—GC Images / Getty Images

Hopefulness:

Chicago Bulls v New York Knicks
Alex Goodlett—Getty Images / Getty Images

And more euphoria:

Celebrities Attend The Chicago Bulls Vs New York Knicks Game - October 29, 2014
James Devaney—GC Images / Getty Images

 

TIME Bizarre

The 32 Most Surprising Photos of the Month

From the return of Kim Jong Un to spooky Halloween traditions, TIME shares the most outrageous and intriguing images from October 2014

TIME Internet

29 Colorful Instagrams That Perfectly Capture the Essence of Fall

So much foliage.

Isn’t there something so magical about fall, something that just makes you want to sip a pumpkin spice latte in a meadow? Though many regions are still a few weeks away from Peak Leaf, plenty of deep reds, bright yellows and vivid oranges have already popped up around the world. And, of course, dedicated photographers have made sure to document these changing colors on Instagram using the hashtag #foliage.

Here, a look at some of the best #foliage photos we’ve seen so far. (Note: we did not account for the fact that some of these photos are heavily filtered. Nature is incredible, yes, but keep in mind that sometimes nature is even more incredible when you really up the contrast.)

Beautiful day. #cemetery #foliage #newengland

A photo posted by @littlegreenghouls_ on

As much as I miss California, the East Coast sure does #fall right… #foliage #colors #MA

A photo posted by @kait_manighalam on

Fall series 2014 #fall #autumn #foliage #trees #Gettysburg #GettysburgCollege #campus #college

A photo posted by hakim mohandas amani williams (@drhakimwill) on

#fall #foliage #newengland

A photo posted by Chuck Amaru (@csamaru) on

Good bye #Aspen it's been #amazing I ❤️Aspen , till next time #AspenTrees #colorado

A photo posted by Art Abenoza (@artabenoza) on

You say #fall, I say #autumn. 🍁🍂

A photo posted by Laissez Fare (@laissezfare) on

Perfect fall day🍂🍃🍁 #fall #fallfoliage #leaves #trees #autumn #nature #foliage #landscape

A photo posted by Dorothee (@no9.dream) on

Stunnah! Took the afternoon to hike Mt. Agamenticus and boy is it gorgeous! 🍁👍🍂#foliage #hiking #yorkmaine #fall #207 #woohoo!

A photo posted by Seacoast 💙 NH + ME (@seacoasttourguide) on

I found it that way. Not that it matters.

A photo posted by Mariah (@caprimariah) on

Fall foliage

A photo posted by Halvard (@frequenttraveler) on

Fall Colors

A photo posted by Michael Bleggi (@able1707) on

www.jamespettitphotography.com Acadia Photography Workshop #acadia #maine #fall #jamespettitphotography #ANP #coastalmaine #foliage #nationalpark #seascape #bassharbor #lighthouse #birch #trail #ocean #downeast #jamespettitphotography From 1915 to 1933, the wealthy philanthropist John D. Rockefeller, Jr. financed, designed, and directed the construction of a network of carriage trails throughout the park. He sponsored the landscape architect Beatrix Farrand, with the nearby family summer home Reef Point Estate, to design the planting plans for the subtle carriage roads at the Park (c.1930).[9] The network encompassed over 50 miles (80 km) of gravel carriage trails, 17 granite bridges, and two gate lodges, almost all of which are still maintained and in use today. Cut granite stones placed along the edges of the carriage roads act as guard rails of sort and are locally known as "coping stones" to help visitors cope with the steep edges. They are also fondly called "Rockefeller's teeth".

A photo posted by James Pettit Photography (@jimpettit) on

Loved seeing all the beautiful #fallcolor in MN this weekend! 🐶🍁

A photo posted by Natalie LaBelle (@natlabs) on

#foliage

A photo posted by Krystal Elizabeth (@livelikeawarrior17) on

The colorful side of Autumn ❤️

A photo posted by Christina (@mrsberryde) on

Ricker Hill Orchard: Turner, ME.

A photo posted by Alexa King Photography (@alexakingphoto) on

Dogs love Autumn. #golden #retriever #fall #foliage #outdoors #color #dogsofIG

A photo posted by @reganmatthews on

1) Autumn Leaves – It was gorgeous hiking in the North Cascades today! #pnwscavengerhunt

A photo posted by Spenser (@brambleman) on

Looking up!

A photo posted by tanyalias (@tanyalias) on

 

TIME White House

13 of JFK’s Wedding Negatives Have Been Auctioned for $37,000

Wedding Of John F. Kennedy And Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy
John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Kennedy outside St. Mary's Church in Newport, R.I., after their wedding on Sept. 12, 1953 Charles F. McCormick—Boston Globe/Getty Images

The images, depicting the newlyweds and the wedding party, were reportedly taken by photographer Frank Ataman

Thirteen original negatives of photographs taken at John F. Kennedy’s wedding were auctioned off on Wednesday for a sum of $37,073.

Boston-based RR Auction said the negatives, which have probably never been published, were sold to a Las Vegas doctor who chose to remain anonymous.

The images show Kennedy and his new bride, Jacqueline Bouvier, cutting their wedding cake and leaving the church, and a couple of others show the entire wedding party posing outside, the Associated Press reported.

The wedding took place on Sept. 12, 1953, in Newport, R.I., and was attended by nearly 2,000 people. Kennedy was still in his first term as a U.S. Senator, and wouldn’t go on to become President until more than seven years later.

According to RR Auction, the images were taken by freelance photographer Frank Ataman, although the negatives were found in another photographer’s darkroom.

Other items related to the Kennedys sold on Wednesday included a holiday card signed by the couple just days before the President’s November 1963 assassination. It fetched $19,500.

[AP]

TIME Interview

Meet Harlem’s ‘Official’ Street Photographer

Khalik Allah, a 29-year-old filmmaker and photographer who documents the streets of Harlem at night, has been photographing the corner of 125th and Lexington since 2012; armed with little more than a manual camera and a few rolls of film.

Street photography can often be a daunting or awkward experience – especially when you’re trying to photograph people who might be skeptical of what you are doing and why. However, for this street artist, photography is an immersive experience where he has built hundreds of relationships with members of the community.

One of the methods Allah uses to gain access to the lives of so many people is to show them a book of his past photographs, a technique learned from one of his influencers, photographer Bruce Davidson.

“Carrying a book of 4×6 prints for people to see has given me entry [in the lives] of some of the most hardcore people in the world. They can relate to that,” Allah says. “That helped me build a tighter bond with the community.”

Once given permission, the Harlem-based photographer will often tell his subjects to picture something meaningful while posing for a portrait. “I’ll tell a person that I stop in the street to think about something that they went through in their life that was difficult and project that through their eyes,” says Allah, who describes himself as a spiritual photographer tasked with helping people heal through photography.

“I tell people that my camera is a healing mechanism,” Allah says. “Let me photograph it and take it away from you.”


Khalik Allah is street photographer based in Harlem, N.Y.

Adam Glanzman is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter @glanzpiece


 

TIME North Korea

How North Korea’s Government Wants You To See Kim Jong Un

The image of the Dear Leader is tightly controlled by North Korean government's Korean Central News Agency, which has fashioned a sunny disposition for the country's mysterious leader. Kim has dropped out of view in recent weeks as many speculate about his health.

TIME fun

Feel Good Friday: 14 Fun Photos to Start Your Weekend

From presidential selfies to human towers, here's a handful of photos to get your weekend started right

TIME How-To

Fixes for 5 Common Smartphone Photo Mistakes

Most of the time, today’s smartphones do a great job of capturing everyday moments in their default full automatic modes. However, there are times when adjusting your phone’s camera settings can make a huge difference. Check out these simple fixes to five of the most common photo mistakes and start taking better pictures.

1. Out of focus photos

face-detection-on-samsung-gs5-350px
Face detection option on the Galaxy S5 Samsung

When you don’t want the subject of your photo to be in the center of your image, your phone’s camera will often focus on the wrong spot. The fastest, easiest solution is to tap your subject on the screen to focus — an option that’s available on the iPhone and most Android phones. You can also press and hold on a spot to lock in focus and exposure and then move the phone to compose your shot. You can turn on face detection as well, and your phone will find and focus on the people in the scene.

2. Blurry fast-action/sports shots

When your subject is moving, like an athlete running down the field, movement can cause the image to blur. If you have an Android phone, like the HTC One M8 or the Samsung Galaxy S5, or Windows Phone, like the Nokia Lumia 1520, you can combat this by raising the ISO setting. With a higher ISO, the shutter speed can be faster, making it easier to freeze the action.

3. Dark faces in backlit and bright outdoor shots

In Auto mode, your camera tries to ensure that everything in your photo will be reasonably well lit. But when the person in the shot is back-lit or you’re shooting at a sunny beach or in a snowy setting, the background is much brighter than the people in your photo, so they can come out far too dark. For this problem, there are a few things you can do to make your photo turn out right.

Try setting your flash on so that it fires with each shot. In an outdoor scene, the flash can help light up faces even when the sun is shining. This is called a “fill flash.”

Another way to bring out details in all parts of a photo is to turn on HDR (high dynamic range). This mode takes overexposed and underexposed images and merges them together to bring out details in the light and dark areas of the photo. Most smartphones will have an HDR mode.

If neither of those options work, you can try manually adjusting the exposure to brighten or darken the overall photo. You’ll find this option on some smartphones, like the iPhone, HTC One M8, Samsung Galaxy S5 and Nokia Lumia 920, which let you manually adjust exposure.

4. Dark, grainy low light shots

Getting a good shot in low light usually requires lengthening the exposure, which leads to blurriness from you or your subject moving. Taking shots too quickly results in under-exposed images. There are a few things you can try, though.

Like with fast action shots, you can try bumping up the ISO setting, an option on some Android and Windows phones. The higher the ISO, the faster the camera sees the scene with the available light. So you can take photos faster, which reduces the blur caused by camera shake.

Low light is another shooting scenario where HDR mode can help. In this mode, the camera takes two or three shots at different exposures and merges them together to get detail in the brightest and darkest areas of the shot. Because the camera is taking a few shots, it’s important that nothing changes between each shot or the resulting image will be blurry. So reserve HDR mode for landscapes and group shots.

You’ll also want to turn on optical image stabilization, which is available on the iPhone 6 Plus and LG G3.

5. Cluttered backgrounds

When you’re focused on the subject of your photos, sometimes you don’t notice what’s going on in the background. Then, when you look at the actual picture, we see a ton of distracting detail that ruins the overall effect of the image.

A few smartphones let you blur the background or foreground of an image — or even select your focus after you’ve taken your shot.

Phones like the Nokia Lumia 1020 accomplish this manually by letting you select the aperture. Lower numbers equal a shallower depth of field – you can turn distracting backgrounds into fuzzy abstract patterns that make your subject in the foreground the focus of attention. The Lumia 920, 1020 and 1520 also have Nokia Refocus (see the demo below), which lets you refocus your shot after taking it, blurring the other areas of the photo.

The Google Camera app (preloaded on some phones), which runs on Android 4.4 KitKat phones, also lets you refocus your shot after you take it with a feature called Lens Blur, as does the Magic Focus feature on the LG G3. Samsung has a similar feature called “Selective Focus,” which lets you set what you want to be in focus and make the rest of your shot blurred before you take the shot.

This article was written by Suzanne Kantra and originally appeared on Techlicious.

More from Techlicious:

TIME Photos

Feel Good Friday: 14 Fun Photos to Start Your Weekend

From polar bear costumes to polar bear swims, here's a handful of photos to get your weekend started right

TIME remembrance

See What Manhattan Looked Like Before the World Trade Center

Photos from the LIFE collection depict Lower Manhattan in the decades before the Twin Towers became part of the New York City skyline

Just because it’s become a cliché doesn’t make it any less true: the world changed on 9/11. And nowhere was that change more profound or enduring than in New York City.

For some, the scale of the carnage in Lower Manhattan transformed all of New York, overnight, from a place they called home to a ruin they had to leave behind forever.

For countless others, the love we always had for New York only grew stronger after seeing the city so savagely attacked. Our connection to the town, and to other New Yorkers, suddenly had about it a sense of defiance, tempered by a kind of rough, unexpected tenderness: the metropolis that had always felt so huge and indomitable seemed, all of a sudden, painfully vulnerable. In need of protection. Our protection.

Here, we pay tribute to New York — specifically, to the storied landscape of Lower Manhattan, where 400 years ago New York was born — in photographs made in the decades before the Twin Towers anchored the foot of the island. Wall Street, Battery Park, the Brooklyn Bridge, Trinity Church, the vast, shimmering harbor — they’re all here: landmarks that, despite everything, retain their place in the collective imagination, captured by some of the finest photographers of the 20th century.

See more of LIFE’s collection of New York City photography here, at LIFE.com: Where New York Was Born

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