TIME celebrities

See the Stars at the TIME-People White House Correspondents Party

Laverne Cox, Alex Wagner and others came to the TIME-People party Friday the night before the White House Correspondents' Dinner

TIME Gadgets

See What’s Inside the Apple Watch

Apple's new device has a few surprises inside

What exactly is making the Apple Watch tick? The good folks over at iFixit have answered that burning question for us by taking apart one of Apple’s new devices. They discovered that the screen and battery are fairly easy to remove but the watch’s S1 integrated computer chip, which Apple has disclosed little information about, is harder to wrench loose. Below the chip, there are hints of new health features that Apple may yet implement in the watch if they receive regulatory approval. Check out the full breakdown of the Apple Watch in the pictures above.

TIME Behind the Photos

How Photographers Are Trying to Put a Face on Europe’s Migrant Crisis

"I wanted to show that behind each migrant there’s a person”

European leaders are grappling with what’s being called one of the worst migrant and refugee crises in two generations. On Thursday, in a hastily formed summit in Brussels called after an estimated 800 people died in a capsizing off Libya while en route to Europe, leaders pledged new support to cap the rising death toll in the Mediterranean. But aid organizations and humanitarian officials said Europe is still “lagging far behind” of what’s realistically needed to ease the tragedy.

The crisis along the Mediterranean’s coastlines, from Libya to Morocco and Greece to Italy, is not new. Photographers have worked over the last decade to raise awareness as conflict and poverty in the Middle East and Africa have displaced millions. Last June, one image crystallized the scale of this movement. Shot by Italian photographer Massimo Sestini aboard a helicopter taking part in Mare Nostrum, an Italian-led search and rescue operation largely funded by the European Union and abandoned late last year, it showed one boat with hundreds of people looking up, waving their arms. “You could see their desperation,” Sestini said last year. “And, concurrently, their happiness at being saved.”

The photograph, which TIME named one of the top 10 images of 2014, went on to win a World Press Photo award, but it told only one part of a much larger story.

“The only way to really tell the story is to spend time with them in their home countries, see how they live, learn why they leave and then just go with them on their way,” says Daniel Etter, a German photographer, who has documented migrants in northern Africa and across Europe. He called that “almost impossible” to do. Security risks, travel obstacles and financial barriers get in the way, leaving most photographers unable to build the kind of all-encompassing narrative that could help people understand the true nature of the crisis.

Some photographers have attempted to piece together the stories of migrants who risk their lives on these journeys. Alixandra Fazzina, a photographer with Noor, followed Somali migrants’ arduous trip across the Gulf of Aden in search of a better future in her book A Million Shillings, published in 2010. One in 20 who attempted the crossing lost their lives, their bodies washing up on Yemen’s shore.

She wanted to go deeper, she says, than the “small paragraph you find in a newspaper detailing the number of people that have died… I wanted to find out why they were making the journey. I wanted to find out why these people were willing to put their lives into the hands of smugglers and traffickers? Why would somebody do that?”

Olivier Jobard, a French photographer who followed a Cameroonian man’s trek to France, seeks similar answers. “What’s bothering me when we’re talking about immigration is that we often associate these people with ghosts and shadows,” he says. “They are not human in our minds.”

Italian photographer Alessandro Penso, who has been following migrants around Europe, focusing on hotspots like Greece, Italy and Malta, says he seeks moments of spontaneity to expose the humanity of his subjects.”There are simple gestures and habits in daily life that, as banal as they can seem to our eyes, hide the simple truth that we are all humans and vulnerable.”

Humanizing the people making these dangerous and harrowing journeys is important, Penso and his colleagues argue, especially when photography can lead to misconceptions. Cases in point are the widely published photographs of “hordes” of people scaling border fences in Melilla, a Spanish enclave on the edge of northern Morocco. “[When] people see these images,” says Santi Palacios, an Associated Press photographer who has taken such pictures, “they [think] we’ve been invaded.”

The people portrayed in these images are often seen shirtless and shouting, Jobard says, deliberately assuming a provocative stance. “They actually choose to behave like ‘wild animals’ in these situations—to impress or to scare people because it’s a real battle to get in [Melilla]. Of course, that also does them disservice.”

Once they’ve made it over the fence, he says, the contrast is striking. “They dress up, they take care of their appearances.” Last year, he shadowed a man named Hassan Adam from the Ivory Coast, who spent hours on one of these fences, alone. His friends had made it across to Melilla, successfully avoiding the police forces, but Adam was handcuffed, beaten and sent back to Morocco. Jobard tracked him down, months later, after he had finally made it across. “I told his story,” he says. “I wanted to show that behind each migrant there’s a person.”

For all of those who made it over the fence, or past border patrols or across the Mediterranean, there are untold thousands who lost their lives in the search for a new or better one. In October, Italian photographer Francesco Zizola dived 59 meters to photograph the wreckage of a boat that had carried some 500 people, and now rests at the bottom of the Mediterranean. He sought to convey the vastness of the tragedy that had occurred one year before, when 360 people lost their lives.

“I wanted to show to everybody that our comfortable, bourgeois homes could turn—as if in a nightmare—into that cabin with the red curtain, which I photographed inside the sunken ship,” he says. “That cabin is the tomb of our collective conscience and a memento of our indifference.”

Alice Gabriner and Mikko Takkunen edited this photo essay. With reporting by Lucia De Stefani, a contributor to TIME LightBox.

Andrew Katz is a News Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @katz. Olivier Laurent is the editor of TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @olivierclaurent.

TIME remembrance

15 Great TIME Cover Stories by Richard Corliss

He wrote dozens of cover stories in his 35 years at the magazine

In his 35 years at TIME, Richard Corliss—the influential film critic who died on Thursday at age 71—produced dozens of cover stories, from a look at the television show Dallas to a tribute to the late Robin Williams. Along the way, he turned to vegetarianism, yoga and, most of all, the movies. Here are 15 of our favorite TIME covers for Richard Corliss stories.

Read more about Richard Corliss’s life and work here

TIME medicine

How the Polio Vaccine Trials Relieved a Worried Nation

Between 1954 and 1955, the polio vaccine transitioned from a trial of 1.8 million to a regular feature of life for households across America

JONAS SALK
Alfred Eisenstaedt—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty ImagesDr. Jonas Salk examining test tube sample of polio virus used in making his polio vaccine, at Univ. of Pittsburgh.

On April 26, 1954, children at the Franklin Sherman Elementary School in McLean, Virginia, held their breaths as needles penetrated the skin of their upper arms. They were the first of nearly two million volunteers in a three-month trial of epidemiologist Jonas Salk’s inactivated polio vaccine, which would be deemed safe for general use just shy of one year later.

The day before the trials were deemed a success, in April 1955, LIFE published a series of photos of a nation preparing for wide distribution of the vaccine it desperately hoped would be approved. The National Polio Foundation had 27 million vaccine shots ready for release, to be administered to all first- and second-grade students and children who had received a placebo during the 1954 trial. Pharmaceutical companies, too, had chosen not to wait for the announcement to begin their own frantic manufacturing process.

During the early 1950s, polio cases in the U.S. had surged to nearly 60,000, with around one third rendering victims paralyzed. Given parents’ heightened fear for their children’s health in recent years, it didn’t take long for Salk to be hailed a hero:

Tributes ranged down from a citation from the President and a proposal that he be given a special Congressional Medal of Honor to offers of farm equipment. Newspapers in several cities were raising Salk funds and a U.S. senator introduced a bill to give him an annual stipend of $10,000. Salk, 40, who lives on a University of Pittsburgh research professor’s salary and hopes to increase the effectiveness of his vaccine from 80% to 100%, said he would take no money for himself but indicated it would be used for further research.

In the years since the vaccine’s development, polio has been all but eradicated throughout most of the world, save for a few countries where vaccination is not universally available and prevention continues to be a struggle.

Liz Ronk, who edited this gallery, is the Photo Editor for LIFE.com. Follow her on Twitter at @LizabethRonk.

TIME Music

Celebrate New Orleans Jazz Fest With These Photos of the 1940s Jazz Scene

A look back at the musicians who shaped New Orleans and the venues where they developed their singular sound

As the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival kicks off on Friday, thousands flock to the city to pay tribute to the birthplace of jazz and conjure visions of a colorful musical history. Long before Bourbon Street became a hub for tourists weighed down with plastic beads, musicians advertised performances by playing in the backs of wagons, the details of upcoming shows hand-lettered on wooden signs. It didn’t matter whether the venue was a basement club or a neighbor’s living room. The music that emerged from New Orleans had an unmistakeable sound, a confluence of styles that could only have come from the place where the Mississippi River empties out into the Gulf of Mexico.

LIFE’s photographers were there to capture the feeling that accompanied that sound and the people who were creating it. The magazine’s archives offer a veritable who’s who of New Orleans jazz, from Louis Armstrong to Fats Pichon to Bunk Johnson, to the men and women whose contributions are palpable though their names are lost to history.

Liz Ronk, who edited this gallery, is the Photo Editor for LIFE.com. Follow her on Twitter at @LizabethRonk.

TIME On Our Radar

See the World’s Most Impressive Opera Houses

“In the English-speaking world they say ‘Break a leg.’ But in Italy, they say, ‘In bocca al lupo,’ which means, ‘In the wolf’s mouth.’ Because when we singers face the audience from the stage of a traditional, horseshoe-shaped opera house, with its tiers of boxes and galleries, we feel that we could be in the jaws of some gigantic beast with multiple rows of teeth, hoping that it will treat us kindly.”

—Plácido Domingo, from his foreword to “Opera”

The architectural photographer David Leventi probably got a taste of this famous tenor’s words many times in the eight years he spent producing Opera.

For this project, Leventi shot more than 40 opera houses in almost 20 countries, from the tiny (Teatro di Villa Aldrovandi Mazzacorati, capacity: 80) to the mammoth (The Metropolitan Opera, capacity: 3,975). The work is being exhibited at Rick Wester Fine Art (with prints up to seven and a half feet wide) starting May 7 and is being released as a book by Damiani in June 2015.

David, who is the son of two architects, shot his first opera house while researching his family history on a trip to Romania. He is drawn to what he calls “the spectacle of opera. The combining of many art forms: architecture, acoustic design, costumes, stage design, voice, fabric, sound, music, etc.”

While there is always one more opera house he would like to photograph, Leventi selected these spaces “based on their interiors, history, or because they have interesting stories,” he says. “I wanted a mix of both new and old.”

The buildings he found are simply extraordinary. The Palais Garnier in Paris has a Marc Chagall-painted ceiling over 2,500 square feet in size. The Metropolitan Opera in New York used so much twenty-four-karat gold-leaf on the ceiling that a weekly quota had to be imposed during construction to avoid harming other businesses.

“I experience an almost religious feeling walking into a grand space such as an opera house,” says Leventi. And yet from this sumptuousness he creates an ordered typology in a way that links his work to artists such as Bernd and Hilla Becher.

Part of the way Leventi achieves that order is by repeatedly photographing from the stage, looking back out at the audience—just where the singer might stand.

Indeed, that is a key part of the project. David’s Romanian grandfather was an opera singer himself. While a prisoner-of-war in a Soviet camp from 1942-48, he would sing for officers and other detainees. But in the tumultuous years following his release and relocation to Israel, Leventi’s grandfather found his dream slipping beyond reach.

Leventi says “the idea of standing on center stage and being in all these opera houses where he could have performed if there wasn’t the war and all these other circumstances, Communism—I guess you can say I’m living out his dreams.”

David Leventi is a photographer based in New York City.

Myles Little is an associate photo editor at TIME.

TIME

See the Massive Monuments Silicon Valley Is Building

The tech world's crown jewels

On March 30, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced that the Menlo Park, Calif.—based company had finally moved into its newest quarters, a 433,555-sq.-ft. box with a parklike roof created by architect Frank Gehry. “The building itself is pretty simple and isn’t fancy,” Zuckerberg wrote on his Facebook page. That may be, but it is also carefully designed open space. The company is building on decades of data—and its own experience–showing how free-form connections among employees are important in generating new ideas. Earlier this year, Google submitted a plan to redevelop part of its Mountain View, Calif., campus into four futuristic hubs under sweeping glass canopies. Instead of immovable concrete buildings, the company wants to construct lightweight structures that can be easily reconfigured as it explores new businesses (think self-driving cars or medical technology). Similar megaprojects under way at Apple and Amazon point to a wider break with the past. Technology’s most powerful (and wealthy) companies are grappling with how to be environmentally responsible while recruiting and retaining workers and continuing to foster innovation. “They’re betting that if you’re in the right space, you’re going to work hard; you’re going to be happier,” says Margaret O’Mara, an associate professor at the University of Washington who has studied the rise of Silicon Valley. “This signals a different phase in their history.”


This appears in the April 20, 2015 issue of TIME.
TIME Crime

Witness Protests in Baltimore Over the Death of Freddie Gray

Protests erupted in Baltimore on Tuesday and continued Wednesday, as demonstrators demand answers on what happened to Freddie Gray, who died of a spine injury after he was arrested by police

TIME Great Places

See Photos of the Pristine Utah Desert in the 1940s

A look at the western landscape before the Interstate Highway System brought cars full of tourists

Utah’s national parks and monuments were established in the teens and 1920s, but it wasn’t until the mid-century construction of the Interstate Highway System that station wagons began to snake their way through the American West in droves. In 1947, when LIFE dispatched Loomis Dean to photograph the people and animals that called the desert home, it seemed there were still more sheep in the roads than cars.

Dean’s photos, never published in the magazine, capture the future tourist mecca with nary a track in the sand save for the sheep, the shepherds who herded them and the Native Americans who lived there. Though the images are in black and white, it’s hard not to see the rocks as red and the sky, stretching on forever, as blue. There is something quiet about the photos—you can see the wind in the hair of two children on a mule and the blinding sun on a man’s weathered face, but the noise of traffic and industry is miles away.

Liz Ronk, who edited this gallery, is the Photo Editor for LIFE.com. Follow her on Twitter at @LizabethRonk.

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