TIME Football

NFL Reinstates Vikings Player Adrian Peterson

Minnesota Vikings' Adrian Peterson arrives for a hearing in New York City on Dec. 2, 2014.
Seth Wenig—AP Minnesota Vikings' Adrian Peterson arrives for a hearing in New York City on Dec. 2, 2014.

He's "highly unlikely" to be suspended again upon his reinstatement

Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson has been reinstated from the commissioner’s exempt list, the NFL announced Thursday.

Peterson may participate in all team activities, beginning Friday. He told ESPN.com on Tuesday that he was unsure whether he would participate in the Vikings’ offseason workouts.

“We look forward to Adrian re-joining the Vikings,” the team said in a statement.

Commissioner Roger Goodell informed Peterson “that he is expected to fulfill his remaining obligations to the authorities in Minnesota and Texas, as well as the additional commitments Peterson made during his April 7 meeting with the commissioner regarding maintaining an ongoing program of counseling and treatment as recommended by medical advisors,” the NFL said.

Peterson was indicted on child abuse charges in Texas in September for allegedly hitting his four-year-old son with a switch. After the indictment, he was placed on the exempt list and missed the final 15 games of the season. He pleaded no contest to a count of misdemeanor reckless assault in November and was sentenced to probation.

Peterson was still paid while on the exempt list but was suspended indefinitely without pay after his plea. Peterson’s appeal of the suspension was denied by an NFL-appointed arbitrator in December but a federal judge overturned the suspension in February. After the suspension was overturned, Peterson was placed back on the exempt list.

Peterson met with commissioner Roger Goodell last week to discuss his reinstatement.

The NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport reported last week that Peterson is “highly unlikely” to be suspended again under the NFL’s revised domestic violence policy after his reinstatement.

There has been much speculation this offseason as to whether Peterson will play for the Vikings next season. General manager Rick Spielman and owner Mark Wilf have said they would like Peterson back with the team. Peterson’s agent, Ben Dogra, reportedly had a “heated exchange” with Vikings executive Rob Brzezinski at the NFL combine in February. Dogra also said in March that he doesn’t “think it’s in [Peterson’s] best interests” to remain in Minnesota.

Peterson is under contract for three more seasons.

This article originally appeared on SI.com.

MONEY Sports

Why NFL Players Are So Likely to Declare Bankruptcy

Former Tampa Bay Buccaneers defensive tackle Warren Sapp wipes his face as he is inducted into the team's Ring of Honor during half time in an NFL football game against the Miami Dolphins Monday, Nov. 11, 2013, in Tampa, Fla.
Brian Blanco—AP Former Tampa Bay Buccaneers defensive tackle Warren Sapp wipes his face as he is inducted into the team's Ring of Honor during half time in an NFL football game against the Miami Dolphins Monday, Nov. 11, 2013, in Tampa, Fla.

Retirement is supposed to represent one's golden years. But for former NFL players—who are typically out of the game by age 30—retirement is often accompanied by a slew of problems.

According to a new study in the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), former NFL players go broke at an alarmingly high rate considering how much money they make as pro athletes.

The median NFL player is in the league for six years and during that time earns $3.2 million in 2000 dollars—more than a typical college graduate makes in a lifetime, noted this Quartz post. And yet, nearly 16% of the players included in the study—everyone drafted from 1996 to 2003—filed for bankruptcy within 12 years of retirement.

A 2009 report from Sports Illustrated found that “78% of former NFL players have gone bankrupt or are under financial stress because of joblessness or divorce” after they’d been retired only two years. Some of the stories of pro athletes losing their fortunes, chronicled in the ESPN documentary “Broke” and elsewhere, are astonishing. Warren Sapp, the seven-time Pro Bowler and Hall of Fame defensive tackle, earned $82 million during a 13-year career that ended in 2007. By the spring of 2012, however, he filed for bankruptcy, even though he was still pulling in $116,000 per month at the time as a TV analyst.

What is it about so many professional athletes—and football players in particular—that causes them to go broke in swift and dramatic fashion, despite their lofty salaries? Here are some the key factors–several of which can potentially screw up the retirement plans of anyone, not just a pro athlete.

NFL careers (and peak earning years) are short. The average annual salaries and career lengths for NFL players are smaller than their counterparts in other big-time sports. A 2013 study showed that the average (as opposed to the median noted above) NFL player earned $1.9 million per year and was in the league for 3.5 years. Both are much lower than the averages in Major League Baseball ($3.2 million annually, 5.6-year career) and the National Basketball Association ($5.15 million, 4.8-year career).

Not only do NFL players tend to earn less overall, their careers are over much more quickly. The typical NFLer is out of the game and done with his peak earning years well before he’s even turned 30. This is when the typical worker’s earning potential is just taking off.

They ignore sound investing advice. “If they are forward-looking and patient, they should save a large fraction of their income to provide for when they retire from the NFL,” the NBER study explains. But many NFL players are neither forward-looking nor patient, and they don’t save much, if anything. That goes even for players with good careers, per the study: “Having played for a long time and having been a successful and well-paid player does not provide much protection against the risk of going bankrupt.”

In the opening anecdote of the Sports Illustrated story, Raghib (Rocket) Ismail, the Notre Dame superstar who played in the CFL and NFL and earned as much as $4.5 million per year, recalled how impervious he was to financial advice early on in his career. “I once had a meeting with J.P. Morgan,” he said, “and it was literally like listening to Charlie Brown’s teacher.”

They get bad advice and make bad decisions. Ismail blew money on a wide range of sketchy investments, including a religious movie, a music label, and various high-risk restaurant and retail endeavors. Many players have sued their advisors after allegedly being scammed out of millions. In one suit filed in 2013, a group of 16 former and current NFL players claimed they were collectively bilked for more than $50 million based on the actions of an advisor who had allegedly invested the money in an illegal casino.

“Regulated or not, shady advisors have made quite a mark on the NFL financial scene,” the authors of the 2014 book Is There Life After Football? Surviving the NFL wrote. “Before closer scrutiny was instituted, at least 78 players lost more than $42 million between 1999 and 2002 because they trusted money to agents and financial advisors with questionable backgrounds.”

More recently, seven-time Pro Bowler Dwight Freeney sued Bank of America for $20 million, because a former adviser from the bank supposedly defrauded him by (illegally) wiring millions of dollars out of Freeney’s account. In another recent case, it is a former NFL player who is himself being accused of operating a sketchy investing scheme. In early April, the SEC filed a federal fraud complaint against former NFL player Will Allen and a business associate, who together allegedly ran a Ponzi scheme, using money from some investors to pay off others. The operation was supposed to be loaning money to athletes who were short of cash, but the suit claims roughly $7 million raised from investors was used instead for personal expenses of Allen and his associate.

They get used to a certain lifestyle. Warren Sapp reportedly had 240 pairs of collectible sneakers, including 213 sets of Air Jordans, which wound up selling for more than $6,000 at auction. Former standout wide receiver Andre Rison famously blew $1 million on jewelry and routinely walked around clubs with tens of thousands of dollars in cash in his pockets, he recalled in the “Broke” documentary. Troubled cornerback Adam “Pacman” Jones has said that he once dropped $1 million in a single weekend in Las Vegas.

Extravagant spending is ingrained in NFL culture, insiders say. “Around the locker room, players’ cars, clothes, houses and ‘bling’ are constantly scrutinized. If they’re not up to par, they’re ridiculed,” former Green Bay Packers’ George E. Koonce, Jr. and his fellow authors explained in Is There Life After Football? “Players don’t see their bills or keep track of their payments. They’re in the dark about taxes. They lose touch with their own money.”

Once they retire and the millions stop flowing into their bank accounts, many players find it impossible to dramatically shift gears and adapt to life on a limited fixed income. It’s all the more difficult because they’re still relatively young and aren’t anywhere near ready to embrace the sensible, low-key, downsized lifestyle of the typical 70-year-old retiree.

They’re often crippled, mentally and physically. The consensus is that of all the major pro sports, football takes the largest toll on the minds and bodies of its combatants—making it exceptionally difficult to make a living once their (short) athletic careers are over. Studies show that players suffer concussions at disturbingly high rates, and that the frequent brain injuries of players cause a wide range of neurological problems down the road. The high level of former NFL players committing suicide (Junior Seau among others) has been tied to concussions in football games as well.

Even if players retain their cognitive skills, they often live with chronic pain in knees, hips, and joints. Debilitating pain, debilitating brain disease, or both obviously hamper one’s ability to make a living outside of football.

UPDATE: An earlier version of this story included widely disseminated information regarding the likelihood of lower life expectancy among former pro football players. Harvard researchers working on a multi-year project with the NFL concerning the medical risks of playing football say the information is outdated and inaccurate. The NFL disputes the data indicating that its players have shorter life expectancies as well, pointing to a 2012 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health study in which researchers “found the players in our study had a much lower rate of death overall compared to men in the general population. This means that, on average, NFL players are actually living longer than men in the general population.”

The same study also found that NFL “players may be at a higher risk of death associated with Alzheimer’s and other impairments of the brain and nervous system than the general U.S. population. These results are consistent with recent studies by other research institutions that suggest an increased risk of neurodegenerative disease among football players,” though the report noted that the “findings do not establish a direct cause-effect relationship between football-related concussions and death from these neurodegenerative disorders.”

TIME NFL

Autographed Jay Cutler Football Goes Unsold at Auction

Chicago Bears v Minnesota Vikings
Hannah Foslien—Getty Images Jay Cutler of the Chicago Bears speaks to the media after the game against the Minnesota Vikings on Dec.28, 2014 at TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, MN.

Somebody stepped in days later to buy the ball for his son for $100

A football signed by Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler went unsold at a charity auction last month.

Not a single person bid on the white autographed ball auctioned on behalf of the Anti-Cruelty Society, the Chicago Tribune reports. But an unnamed buyer ultimately purchased the ball this week for $100 as a gift for his Bears fan son.

Sports blogs are seizing on the unsold ball as a symbol of the struggling quarterback’s declining status, though the Tribune notes that most of the items at the auction were not sports related and the attendees weren’t much of a “football crowd.”

[Chicago Tribune]

TIME Football

NFL Hires First Full-Time Female Official

Sarah Thomas at a preseason game between the Oakland Raiders and the New Orleans Saints in New Orleans on Aug. 16, 2013 .
Stacy Revere—Getty Images Sarah Thomas at a preseason game between the Oakland Raiders and the New Orleans Saints in New Orleans on Aug. 16, 2013 .

She began her officiating career in high school

The NFL has hired its first time full-time female official, reports the Baltimore Sun’s Aaron Wilson.

Sarah Thomas, a native of Mississippi who began her officiating career in high school, officiated games before leaving to continue her career in pharmaceutical sales.

She was then contacted by Gerald Austin, who was a coordinator of football officials for Conference USA. Thomas started working for the conference in 2007 and became the first woman to officiate a bowl game in 2009.

She then joined the NFL’s Officiating Development Program, worked some New Orleans Saints‘ training camps, and also officiated a NFL preseason game last August.

Thomas told the NFL Network last year that she doesn’t feel like a pioneer and did not face any resistance from others while in the development program.

Read more: BURKE & FARRAR: SI’s top 64 prospects in the 2015 NFL draft

“I set out to do this and get involved in officiating not having any idea that there were not any females officiating football” she said. “Being a former basketball player, you saw female officiating all the time, so no I don’t feel like a pioneer.”

In 2012, Shannon Eastin who was hired as a non-union official during the 2012 lockout by referees, was the first woman to officiate a regular season game in a contest between the St. Louis Rams and Detroit Lions.

This article originally appeared on SI.com.

 

TIME Late Greats

Remembering Chuck Bednarik, the NFL’s Iron Man

Chuck Bednarik, of the Philadelphia Eagles.
AP Chuck Bednarik, of the Philadelphia Eagles.

Playing the full 60 minutes on offense and defense, the Philadelphia Eagles bruiser helped secure one of pro football's most thrilling title games

I’ll bet Chuck Bednarik sneered at the glitzy name the National Football League pinned on its championship game in 1967: the Super Bowl. To Bednarik, the Philadelphia Eagles star from 1949 to 1962, a football game was not a piece of crockery deigned by Andy Warhol. It was trench warfare every Sunday afternoon, in the Iron Age of professional football. And Bednarik, who died Saturday at 89 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, was the NFL’s Iron Man.

No. 60 was also the 60-Minute Man, often playing both offense (center) and defense (linebacker) for an entire game—including the title skirmish against Vince Lombardi’s legendary Green Bay Packers, on Dec. 26, 1960, which brought the Eagles their most satisfying championship, and their last to date. More than a half-century later, Philly fans of advanced age remember that game as the pinnacle of civic pride, the Billy Penn’s hat of sporting events, and a testament to the city’s working-class grit as exemplified by “Concrete Charlie” Bednarik.

The son of a Bethlehem, Pa., steelworker from Slovakia, Charles Philip Bednarik had a body built for the game—6 ft., 2 in., 235 lb., back when that was mastodon-size—and the requisite remorseless dedication. A two-way star at Bethlehem’s Liberty High School, Chuck enlisted in the Army Air Force and spent the war flying 30 combat missions over Germany as a B-24 waist-gunner. Back home, he played four seasons for the University of Pennsylvania in its brief college-football glory and finished third in the Heisman Trophy vote. In 1949 he became the Eagles’ first draft pick and made All-Pro in eight of his 14 seasons. As much punishment as he dished out, Bednarik could take even more: he missed only three games in his pro career.

With the blue eyes and brutal demeanor of actor Charles Bronson, another rock-solid, coal-country son of Eastern Europeans, Bednarik personified the Eagles as dominant enforcers. Fans saw the players not as faraway star athletes but as guys doing a tough job with honor—in a way, our cops—and for not much money. Signed by the Eagles for a $10,000 salary and a $3,000 bonus, Bednarik never made more than $27,000 a year. The “Concrete Charlie” nickname didn’t refer to his remorseless blocking and tackling; he had to take an off-season job selling concrete to make ends meet.

No question, though, that Bednarik was an artist of legitimate violence: no dirty plays, just the brick-wall force of an immovable object. The words on his plaque in the Pro Football Hall of Fame—”rugged, durable, bulldozing blocker … a bone-jarring tackler”—are almost an understatement, especially to anyone who has seen footage of the November 1960 game in which he leveled Frank Gifford, the Hollywood-handsome running back for the New York Giants, knocking him out of the sport for a year and a half.

A famous Sports Illustrated photo shows Bednarik seeming to exult over the prostrate Gifford. Fifty years later, Bednarik denied the charge—while emphasizing his team’s proletarian underdog status. “I wasn’t gloating over him,” he said. “I had no idea he was there. It was the most important play and tackle in my life. They were from the big city. The glamor boys. The guys who got written up in all the magazines. But I thought we were the better team.” Class resentment aside, that tackle secured a win against the Giants and propelled the Eagles to their Boxing Day title game.

It happens that 1960 was a crucial year for pro football. On the 23rd ballot, the NFL elected a compromise candidate, Pete Rozelle, as commissioner. Moving the league offices from Philadelphia to New York, Rozelle established franchises in Dallas and Minneapolis. The NFL launched this expansion to ward off its feisty rival, the American Football League, which began operations that fall. Six years later, when the NFL swallowed the AFL, creating the Super Bowl, it was well on its way to becoming America’s sport and a multi-zillion-dollar behemoth.

On the day after Christmas in 1960, though, the Big Game was only so big. It was not played in some balmy city with two weeks of walk-up hype; the team with the best division record served as host. The Eastern Division–winning Eagles didn’t have their own stadium; they were tenants at Penn’s Franklin Field. (Bednarik played all his home games, college and pro, in the same place.) Since Franklin Field had no lights, the match started at noon, so that a sudden-death overtime game, like the one two years before between the Baltimore Colts and the New York Giants, would not be called on account of darkness.

Fans had bought all 67,325 seats for the Eagles-Packers contest, yet the game was blacked out on local TV. You had to drive to New Jersey to watch it. Or you could do what I did as a teenage Philly sports fan: take a train to the stadium and buy a ticket from a scalper. The official price was $8; outside the gates, I paid $6. It was a long time ago.

The Packers would become the most successful franchise of the ’60s, winning five championships, including the first two Super Bowls. But in 1960, quarterback Bart Starr, halfback Paul Hornung and fullback Jim Taylor were figures of promise, not legend. Still, the 8-4 Packers were significant favorites over the 10-2 Eagles. Philly’s squad might have been found at a Germantown garage sale: 12 of the 22 starters were castoffs from other teams. And their wins seemed feats of green magic. In six of their games they were behind entering the fourth quarter; they won six by less than a touchdown. How could their luck hold against the surging Pack?

Playing on a field with some frozen patches and a few puddles where snow had melted, Green Bay penetrated the Philadelphia red zone four times but mustered only six points, because Lombardi, as he later acknowledged, was too greedy for touchdowns. At the start of the fourth quarter, the Eagles trailed 13-10. Ted Dean, one of the team’s three black players, returned a kickoff 58 yards. Later he took a handoff from quarterback Norm Van Brocklin for five yards and the go-ahead score.

In the game’s last minute, the Packers had advanced to the Eagles’ 22-yard line. Starr lobbed a short pass to Taylor, with nothing between him and the end zone—and victory—but Concrete Charlie. Bednarik wrestled Taylor down at the 10 and sat on him as the final seconds ticked away mercilessly. Eagles 17, Packers 13. “You can get up now, Taylor,” Bednarik finally growled. “This damn game’s over.”

A Sports Illustrated photo, taken moments later, shows mud-caked No. 60 with a rare smile as he shakes Starr’s hand and wraps his other paw around the much smaller, defeated Taylor. It never got better for the Iron Man. And for many Philly fans, like this one, it never got as good.

Even in retirement, Bednarik held true to his truculence, criticizing modern pro athletes as “pussyfooters” who “suck air after five plays” and “couldn’t tackle my wife Emma.” He also dismissed the few two-way stars, like Deion Sanders and Troy Brown because, as wide receivers and defensive backs, they weren’t jolted by hard contact on every play, as he had been back in the day.

We should be grateful that the steelworker’s son didn’t soften in his later years; he never tired of being Chuck Bednarik. That’s why his fitting eulogy should be the cartoon that Rob Tornoe drew of Concrete Charlie’s final play: bulldozing his way into Heaven by ripping open the Pearly Gates. For the Iron Man, this damn game is never over.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: March 19

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Instead of fighting about the Iran nuclear talks, Congress and the White House should be planning smart sanctions in case a deal falls through.

By Elizabeth Rosenberg and Richard Nephew in Roll Call

2. DARPA thinks it has a solution to Ebola — and lots of other infectious diseases.

By Alexis C. Madrigal at Fusion

3. A stand-out rookie’s retirement after one year in the NFL over fears of brain injury should be a wake-up call for all of football.

By Ben Kercheval in Bleacher Report

4. When patients are urged to get involved in their course of treatment, they’re more confident and satisfied with their care.

By Anna Gorman in Kaiser Health News

5. We don’t need “diversity” on television. We need television to reflect the world around us.

By Shonda Rhimes in Medium

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Football

Leah Still’s Doctors Believe She May Be Cancer-Free

Devon Still’s daughter, Leah, may be cancer-free, the Cincinnati Bengals defensive lineman said on Instagram Tuesday.

“We still have to wait for her MRI and bone biopsy results later this week,” Still wrote. “But the doctors feel very optimistic about them because of the results from today.”

Leah was diagnosed with Stage 4 neuroblastoma on June 2 and was given a 50/50 chance to survive. The Bengals cut still from their active roster but added him to the practice squad so that he could keep his health insurance and help pay for Leah’s treatments. The team began selling replicas of Still’s No. 75 jersey and donating the proceeds to pediatric cancer research.

Still was later added to the active roster and made 19 tackles in 12 games.

The pair announced in January that they had written a children’s book to help kids undergoing cancer treatments.

This article originally appeared on SI.com

TIME NFL

Chris Borland Is the New Model NFL Player

San Francisco 49ers v New York Giants
Michael Zagaris—Getty Images Chris Borland #50 of the San Francisco 49ers tackles Odell Beckham Jr.of the New York Giants during the game at Metlife Stadium on November 16, 2014 in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

The 49ers linebacker, who just finished an excellent rookie year and was looking at possible NFL stardom, retires in fear of brain injuries. Is this the new football blueprint?

Chris Borland had at least five more lucrative years in him, maybe more. This was going to be his peak earning period. But he decided the rest of his life was worth more.

Borland, a San Francisco 49ers linebacker, just finished a productive rookie year, and was set to take on a bigger role with the team after fellow linebacker Patrick Willis, 30, announced his retirement last week. Willis, bothered by foot injuries, surprised many by leaving the game in his prime. But at least he had a prime. Borland, 24, is also retiring, sacrificing millions to preserve his brain.

It’s a newsworthy decision, but not all that shocking, given the rationale behind it. The brain science becomes more daunting year-by-year: by playing NFL football, you’re risking the quality of your life. A Borland was going to come along at some point: a promising player quitting, before he really gets started.

Is this a bit of a nightmare for the NFL? Sure. The league keeps losing PR battles; Borland’s retirement condemns the game. Yes, four NFL players age 30 or younger have retired during the past week. But don’t expect a flood of players to hand in their helmets. A decade ago, we weren’t even talking about the long-term dangers of concussions. A decade later, a young player staves off the damage. A decade from now? There will be other Borlands. Enough to cripple the league? Doubtful. Many, many decades from now? That’s another story. Fewer young kids are playing tackle football. The trends aren’t good.

Borland, who according to ESPN Stats & Information led the NFL in tackles from Weeks 7-15, when he filled in for Willis as a starter, did the research. He thought he sustained a concussion in training camp, but played through it, because he felt like that’s what he’d have to do to make the team. He called on concussion researchers to get the facts. Borland’s retired, but let’s see if he actually stays on the sidelines. At 24, he can always change his mind. If he follows through on his plan to go back to school and chase a career in sports management, and has a happy, successful life without football … Chris Borland might be the model NFL player, after playing a single season in the NFL.

TIME Football

San Francisco Linebacker Chris Borland to Retire Due to Safety Concerns

San Francisco 49ers v Oakland Raiders
Thearon W. Henderson—Getty Images Latavius Murray of the Oakland Raiders is tackled by Chris Borland of the San Francisco 49ers O.co Coliseum in Oakland, Calif., on Dec. 7, 2014

San Francisco 49ers linebacker Chris Borland told Outside the Lines on Monday that he is retiring due to concerns over “the long-term effects of repetitive head trauma.”

According to ESPN, the 24-year-old told the 49ers of his decision on Friday. Borland said he first began to think about the possibility of retiring early during training camp last season. The rookie said he thinks he sustained a concussion, but played through it, partly because he wanted to make the team.

From ESPN:

He said he made his decision after consulting with family members, concussion researchers, friends and current and former teammates, and studying what is known about the relationship between football and neurodegenerative disease.

“I just honestly want to do what’s best for my health,” Borland told “Outside the Lines.” “From what I’ve researched and what I’ve experienced, I don’t think it’s worth the risk.”

Last week, linebacker Patrick Willis retired because he thought the injuries he had sustained while playing football would keep him from playing at an “elite” level and he was worried about the quality of his life after football. Borland told ESPN that his former teammate’s decision did not play a role in his retirement.

In a statement on Monday, 49ers general manager Trent Baalke said Borland’s decision was unexpected.

“While unexpected, we certainly respect Chris’ decision,” said Baalke. “From speaking with Chris, it was evident that he had put a great deal of thought into this decision. He was a consummate professional from day one and a very well respected member of our team and community. Chris is a determined young man that overcame long odds in his journey to the NFL and we are confident he will use the same approach to become very successful in his future endeavors. We will always consider him a 49er and wish him all the best.”

Borland told ESPN that he plans to go back to school to pursue a career in sports management. Borland has a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Wisconsin.

ESPN notes that Borland is the fourth NFL player under the age of 30 to decide to retire in the past week.

This article originally appeared on SI.com

TIME NFL

Tim Tebow Works Out for Eagles, Leaves Without Signing

ESPN The Party - Arrivals
Robin Marchant—Getty Images for ESPN Former NFL player/broadcaster Tim Tebow attends ESPN the Party on Jan. 30, 2015 in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Tebow hasn't played in the NFL since 2012

Tim Tebow worked out with the Philadelphia Eagles on Monday, but the team will not sign him, reports ESPN’s Adam Schefter.

Schefter first reported Tebow’s workout, which the Eagles later confirmed to the Philadelphia Daily News’ Les Bowen.

Tebow, 28 in August, last played in the NFL in 2012 as a member of the New York Jets. That season, he appeared in 12 games (two starts) and went 6-of-8 for 39 yards. He also rushed 32 times for 102 yards.

Tebow signed with the New England Patriots in June 2013 but was released two months later.

Though Tebow has begun a broadcasting career with ESPN, SEC Network and ABC’s Good Morning America, he reportedly maintained hopes of resuming his NFL career. Earlier this month, a report from The Boston Globe indicated Tebow was considering participating in the NFL’s veteran combine on March 22. The report said Tebow has worked out “diligently” with renowned quarterback coach Tom House in Los Angeles over the last two years.

The Eagles have been busy this offseason, most noticeably trading away running back LeSean McCoy, signing former Dallas Cowboys running back DeMarco Murray and sending quarterback Nick Foles to the St. Louis Rams in exchange for quarterback Sam Bradford.

The Eagles also re-signed quarterback Mark Sanchez, who spent 2014 with the team after five years with the New York Jets, where he was Tebow’s teammate in 2012.

This article originally appeared on SI.com.

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