TIME Hong Kong

Global Support Pours In for Hong Kong Democracy Protests

AUSTRALIA-HONGKONG-CHINA-POLITICS-DEMOCRACY
Notes from supporters of the thousands of protesters who paralyzed parts of Hong Kong to demand greater democracy from Beijing are seen in Sydney on Sept. 29, 2014 Peter Parks—AFP/Getty Images

Rallies in the U.S., Australia, Taiwan, Europe and elsewhere have been held to express solidarity

As tens of thousands of protestors flooded the streets of Hong Kong over the weekend, their struggle for democracy captured the imaginations of supporters across the world.

The Wall Street Journal reported that a group called the Hong Kong Overseas Alliance organized protests Saturday in various cities to show their solidarity with the Occupy Central movement — now being dubbed the Umbrella Revolution because of the ubiquitous umbrellas being used by protesters to shield themselves from police pepper spray.

Demonstrations were held by the group in New York City, which saw 200 people march on the Chinese consulate. Smaller protests were held in Vancouver and Los Angeles.

Another group, calling itself United for Democracy: Global Solidarity With Hong Kong, conducted a rally in London on Saturday that drew over 400 people. The protesters, mainly Hong Kong citizens and students, marched to the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office in the city’s plush Mayfair district, and tied yellow ribbons on the building’s railings.

The yellow ribbon has been adopted as the symbol of Hong Kong’s struggle for democracy, and has inspired a movement in Australia called the Yellow Ribbon Campaign. The campaign reportedly collected 500 signatures from 12 Australian universities for a petition of support.

“My heart sinks, as my brother and sister are participating in Occupy movement. I am worried for their safety,” organizer Chrisann Palm, a Brisbane-based Hong Kong citizen who teaches at Queensland University of Technology, told the Journal.

According to Global Solidarity’s social-media accounts, there were rallies in Perth, Canberra, Sydney and Melbourne on Monday, as well as in Kuala Lumpur and Paris. Demonstrations are planned for Dublin, Seattle, Auckland, Copenhagen and Stockholm on Oct. 1.

A petition urging support for Hong Kong’s push for democracy has also made its way onto the White House public petitions site. “We hereby strongly appeal to the U.S. government to make it clear to the Beijing authorities that any effort to crackdown peaceful demonstrations by force will be strongly opposed and severely punished,” said the petition, which has already reached more than 183,000 signatures in response to its goal of 100,000 by Oct. 4.

Meanwhile Mashable reported that a group in Ferguson — the Missouri town where the shooting of black teenager Michael Brown sparked protests and police crackdowns — held up signs in Chinese to express their solidarity with Hong Kong demonstrators.

Closer to home, solidarity protests have been convened in Taiwan’s capital Taipei, with the Straits Times reporting that a group of protesters led by student activist Chen Wei-ting demanded that their President condemn the situation in Hong Kong and cease all dealings with the Chinese government. Pro-democracy protesters also reportedly crowded a Hong Kong trade office in Taiwan, and briefly scuffled with police.

TIME Crime

NYPD Confrontation With Pregnant Woman is Latest Police Video to Go Viral

The recording of an NYPD officer shoving a pregnant woman to the ground belly first is part of a shift in the relationship between the public and police

It was another disturbing video of a heated police encounter: As New York Police Department officers attempted to arrest a suspect, a pregnant woman is taken down by one of them, her swollen stomach hitting the pavement. And like an increasing number of police incidents, it was recorded by bystanders and widely shared on social media.

This one began early in the morning on Sept. 20 in the Sunset Park section of Brooklyn, when police tried to arrest 17-year-old Jhohan Lemos for carrying a knife. The footage shows his mother, Sandra Amezquita, trying to intervene, then getting shoved to the ground belly first by an NYPD officer and later given a summons for disorderly conduct.

“The first thing I thought was they killed my baby and they’re going to kill my wife,” Ronel Lemos, Amezquita’s husband, told The New York Daily News.

Amezquita filed an excessive force complaint, prompting an investigation by the NYPD’s Internal Affairs Bureau. Her lawyer, Sanford Rubenstein, said in a news conference Wednesday that Amezquita was suffering from vaginal bleeding.

The significance of the footage goes far beyond the borders of this Brooklyn neighborhood. The video from Sunset Park is the latest in a string of recorded confrontations between the police and the public that have fundamentally changed the relationship between the two.

Since a bystander captured Los Angeles Police Department officers assaulting Rodney King on a camcorder in 1991, ever-more-accessible recording devices have added layers of eyes and evidence to encounters with law enforcement that were once unthinkable. The fatal shooting of Oscar Grant by Oakland police in 2009 was documented by commuters at the train station where it happened. The death of Eric Garner during an arrest on Staten Island, N.Y. launched a national debate on the use of force by police after cell phone video of the confrontation went viral. And in the tense aftermath of Michael Brown’s shooting death in Ferguson, Mo., an organization called We Copwatch has provided citizens with cameras to document the actions of local police.

“The police are often the only people at a scene without cameras,” says John DeCarlo, a professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

That, too, is changing. Dozens of police departments are now testing or considering adopting body-worn cameras for officers. Police in Ferguson are now using cameras and the NYPD is testing two types of officer recording devices. Law enforcement agencies in Miami Beach, Washington, D.C., and Colorado Springs all plan to start wearing cameras by October.

The effect of all this surveillance can make it seem like the police are increasingly heavy-handed, but the numbers say otherwise. “There may be fewer incidents of abuse of force nowadays than there had been during the 1960s and ‘70s and earlier than that, but because we see them more commonly now because of the advent of cameras, people think they’re going up,” says DeCarlo.

Earlier this month, New York City Police Commissioner Bill Bratton released statistics showing that only 2% of the 400,000 arrests last year involved use of force by officers, a decrease of 8.5% from 20 years ago. The figures have been challenged by city council members who questioned the way the police department defined use of force, but the drop mirrors a similar decline in departments around the nation. In 2008, the most recent year for which statistics are available, 1.4% of people who had contact with police reported that an officer had used force or threatened to do so, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, down from 1.5% in 2002 and 1.6% in 2005.

But there is no doubt that recordings can elevate local incidents into national issues. And for many of the people behind the cameras, that’s just the point. The video of Amezquita was released by El Grito de Sunset Park, a community watch group. Its leader, Dennis Flores, has his own history with the NYPD: After filming police arresting a teenager in the neighborhood in 2002, Flores says the cops destroyed his camera, assaulted and arrested him. He says he later received a six-figure settlement that allowed him to form the group and buy dozens of cameras for neighborhood citizens to record officer incidents. One of those cameras, he says, was used to film Saturday’s altercation.

“We don’t interfere or obstruct,” Flores says. “We’re just trying to help prevent abuse. Citizens now with their cell phones are able to document and upload these videos for all the world to see. They’re balancing power.”

TIME Environment

See Thousands March for Climate Change

400,000 people took to the streets of New York City Sunday to participate in the People's Climate March, which attracted celebrities like Edward Norton, and leaders like UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon

TIME Scotland

We Went to a Scottish Bar to Watch Scotland’s Vote

What better way to watch the vote than with a glass of whisky in a rowdy Scottish bar?

Scotland wasn’t the only country watching the vote for independence Thursday night. St. Andrews Restaurant & Bar in New York City had its own crowd of Scottish expats, tourists, Americans, and more watching the television and waiting to see if Scotland was going to become independent or not.

The night might have ended with a “No,” but it didn’t drown out the shouts of “Yes!” that rang through the bar (with a ferocity no less than a Scotland/England soccer game) each time a voting result was revealed. TIME spent the evening there and filmed the reactions and opinions of the many “yes voters” and “no voters” present.

TIME iPhone 6

See the World Await and Celebrate Apple’s iPhone 6

It is a big day for Apple and iPhone enthusiasts. Many waited in line for days before doors opened on Friday, allowing them to buy the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

TIME Music

R&B Singer August Alsina Collapsed During His New York Show

106 & Park LIVE
Recording artist August Alsina visits BET studio on September 15, 2014 in New York City. Bennett Raglin—BET/Getty

There's no word yet on the "No Love" singer's condition

R&B singer August Alsina collapsed and fell off the stage during a Monday night concert at Manhattan’s Irving Plaza, E! News reports.

In disturbing fan videos, security personnel are seen gesturing for someone to cut the music and then rushing toward Alsina — BET’s best new artist of the year — after he tumbles into a stunned crowd.

Security brought Alsina backstage, and paramedics later loaded him into an ambulance. The singer was alert enough to wave to fans from the stretcher, TMZ says.

The reasons for the 22-year-old’s collapse, as well as his current condition, are still unknown, E! News says.

The show was the third of four concerts in Alsina’s Testimony Live tour. The last concert is scheduled for Sept. 21 in Kansas.

Just hours before his ill-fated performance, Alsina released the video for “No Love (Remix)” — a duet with rap idol Nicki Minaj.

TIME fashion

Watch an Entire New York Fashion Week Show in 1 Minute

Filmed on an iPhone using Hyperlapse

At Jenny Packham’s show on Sept. 9 during New York Fashion Week, the lights were dazzling, the dresses elegant and the models calm and collected. However, the process that goes into it all moves at a breakneck pace.

TIME takes you behind the scenes of the making of the show — from setup to takedown. Watch the runway construction, with its meticulous lighting, and the backstage insanity as models go through makeup, hair and dress. Then, after the last walk, see it all deconstructed as quickly as it was built. The show was filmed on an iPhone using Hyperlapse, a new time-lapse app from Instagram. When all is said and done, you’ll see the whole show in a single minute.

TIME People

Madoff Son Andrew Wills More Than $15 Million to His Fiancée and Family

Ruth Madoff; Morley Safer, Andrew Madoff
This Oct. 6, 2011 file photo from video provided by CBS, Andrew Madoff, son of disgraced financier, Bernard Madoff, talks to “60 Minutes” correspondent Morley Safer in New York. AP

But his will does not mention his mother, Bernard Madoff's wife

Andrew Madoff, the son of convicted fraudster Bernard Madoff, has left a will giving his children, estranged wife and his fiancée more than $15 million in properties, after his death from lymphoma earlier this month, reports Bloomberg.

Madoff’s willed holdings include about $11 million in “personal property,” plus about $4.5 million in real estate, Bloomberg says. The will was written in July and filed on Thursday in Surrogate’s Court in Manhattan.

Madoff, who died at 48 years old and was never charged with involvement in his father’s fraudulent financial empire, left all of his tangible property to his two daughters, Emily and Anne, Bloomberg reports.

One-third of his estate has been left to his estranged wife, Deborah West, while the remaining has been willed to his fiancée, Catherine Hooper, in the form of $50,000 payments each month for the rest of her life, says the New York Daily News.

Ruth Madoff, his mother, is not included in the will, Bloomberg says.

Madoff and his older brother, Mark, who committed suicide in 2010, worked on the trading desk of Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities LLC. Their father, Bernard Madoff, handled client investments.

In December 2008, the two brothers alerted federal authorities to their father’s dubious investment practices, and in March 2009, the elder Madoff was sentenced to 150 years in federal prison for engineering a vast Ponzi scheme that financially wounded thousands of people and organizations, with total paper loses of about $65 billion and cash losses near $17 billion, the New York Times says.

No charges were filed against either of Madoff’s sons, who denied knowing about the scheme until their father confessed to them, and who both cut all ties with him after his sentencing.

TIME remembrance

See What Manhattan Looked Like Before the World Trade Center

Photos from the LIFE collection depict Lower Manhattan in the decades before the Twin Towers became part of the New York City skyline

Just because it’s become a cliché doesn’t make it any less true: the world changed on 9/11. And nowhere was that change more profound or enduring than in New York City.

For some, the scale of the carnage in Lower Manhattan transformed all of New York, overnight, from a place they called home to a ruin they had to leave behind forever.

For countless others, the love we always had for New York only grew stronger after seeing the city so savagely attacked. Our connection to the town, and to other New Yorkers, suddenly had about it a sense of defiance, tempered by a kind of rough, unexpected tenderness: the metropolis that had always felt so huge and indomitable seemed, all of a sudden, painfully vulnerable. In need of protection. Our protection.

Here, we pay tribute to New York — specifically, to the storied landscape of Lower Manhattan, where 400 years ago New York was born — in photographs made in the decades before the Twin Towers anchored the foot of the island. Wall Street, Battery Park, the Brooklyn Bridge, Trinity Church, the vast, shimmering harbor — they’re all here: landmarks that, despite everything, retain their place in the collective imagination, captured by some of the finest photographers of the 20th century.

See more of LIFE’s collection of New York City photography here, at LIFE.com: Where New York Was Born

TIME celebrities

Shia LaBeouf Pleads Guilty to Disorderly Conduct

Actor Shia LaBeouf leaves Midtown Community Court after being arrested the previous day for yelling obscenities at the Broadway show "Cabaret," June 27, 2014, in New York.
Actor Shia LaBeouf leaves Midtown Community Court after being arrested the previous day for yelling obscenities at the Broadway show "Cabaret," June 27, 2014, in New York. John Minchillo—AP

The actor was arrested in June after interrupting a performance of Cabaret

Actor Shia LaBeouf pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct on Wednesday following the ruckus he created during a performance of Cabaret on Broadway in June .

LaBeouf has been ordered by the court to undergo three months of treatment. If all goes well and the 28-year-old actor does not get arrested again, the charges will be dismissed, ABC News reports. His charges reportedly included misdemeanor trespassing and other non-criminal violations including disorderly conduct.

According to the Associated Press, LaBeouf has been voluntarily undergoing treatment for alcoholism since the incident on June 24. That night, LaBeouf reportedly interrupted the performance and yelled obscenities as he was escorted out–one of several troubling incidents involving the Transformers star in 2014.

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