TIME republicans

Mississippi GOP Won’t Hear Challenge to Cochran

Mississippi Senate McDaniel
Supporters of state Sen. Chris McDaniel of Ellisville, Miss., who sought to unseat the incumbent U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran in the Republican primary, wave their signs and flags during a news conference by his attorneys and advisers in Jackson, Miss., on Wednesday, July 16, 2014. Rogelio V. Solis—AP

The Mississippi Republican Party rejects Chris McDaniel's request to overturn his GOP runoff loss to U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran, adding that he should file his complaint at court

(JACKSON, Miss.) — Mississippi’s Republican Party on Wednesday refused to hear challenger Chris McDaniel’s effort to overturn his June 24 GOP runoff loss to U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran. The party said McDaniel would do better taking his challenge to court.

In a letter to McDaniel’s lawyer, state Republican Party Chairman Joe Nosef wrote that a court is needed to “protect the rights of the voters as well as both candidates.”

Nosef wrote that under state Republican Party bylaws, seven days’ notice has to be given before the executive committee can meet. If the notice went out Wednesday, he wrote, the committee couldn’t convene until Aug. 13, only one day before the deadline for McDaniel to file his complaint with a court.

Nosef wrote that the committee would have to determine procedures, decide whether McDaniel had challenged in time, order investigations by county committees, hear “potentially dozens of witnesses,” examine evidence and vote in one day.

“Obviously it is not possible for our committee of 52 volunteers to attempt to engage in such an exercise in a prudent manner in one day,” Nosef wrote. “In fact, given the extraordinary relief requests of overturning a United States Senate primary in which over 360,000 Mississippians cast votes, the only way to ensure the integrity of the election process and provide a prudent review of this matter is in a court of law.”

McDaniel, a state senator from Ellisville whose campaign was backed by the tea party, asked the party on Monday to declare him its nominee, saying Cochran’s 7,667-vote victory in the runoff was due to Democratic voters who illegally cast runoff ballots for the six-term incumbent.

“Chris McDaniel is very disappointed he will not have the opportunity to present his election challenge before the state Executive Committee, especially in light of the fact that we delivered a physical copy of the challenge to all fifty-two members of the committee,” McDaniel lawyer Mitch Tyner said in a statement. “The party was the perfect venue in which to hear the challenge since it was responsible for the election, but we will move forward with a judicial review as provided for under Mississippi code.”

Tyner and a spokesman for McDaniel didn’t respond to emails and telephone calls seeking further comment on McDaniel’s next move.

Cochran spokesman Jordan Russell continued to downplay McDaniel’s challenge.

“We were surprised by this decision, but whether Chris McDaniel’s ridiculous challenge is heard by the State Executive Committee or a court, we are confident it will be rejected,” Russell wrote in an email.

Nosef did not answer his cellphone or immediately respond to a text message requesting comment.

Referring the issue to court also allows members of the GOP’s executive committee, many of whom have ties to Cochran, to avoid ruling on McDaniel’s challenge. McDaniel supporters have criticized Nosef and even called for his resignation, saying he has favored Cochran despite his claim of neutrality.

McDaniel could file suit in any county where he feels illegal voting occurred. The state Supreme Court will then appoint a special judge to hear the challenge.

There’s no deadline to challenge in Mississippi, but state law urges judges to decide primary challenges before general election ballots are printed. State law says sample ballots must be given to local election officials by Sept. 10, which is 55 days before the Nov. 4 general election. That squeezes the timeline for a lawsuit and a new primary runoff. State law says a court could order a new primary even after the general election. The Nov. 4 ballot will also include Democratic former U.S. Rep. Travis Childers and the Reform Party’s Shawn O’Hara.

Any court challenge could lead to a lengthy trial, because McDaniel’s claims cite multiple counties. While Mississippi courts have ordered some new local elections, no court has overturned or ordered a new statewide election in at least the past six decades, according to records reviewed by The Associated Press.

TIME abortion

Alabama Judge Rules Abortion Clinic Law Unconstitutional

Just a few days after a court in Mississippi struck down a similar law

An Alabama judge ruled Monday that a law requiring doctors who perform abortions in the state’s five clinics to have admitting privileges at local hospitals is unconstitutional, as it imposes an “impermissible undue burden” that amounts to total prohibition of abortions.

“The evidence compellingly demonstrates that the requirement would have the striking result of closing three of Alabama’s five abortion clinics,” U.S. District Court Judge Myron Thompson wrote in his decision. “Indeed, the court is convinced that, if this requirement would not, in the face of all the evidence in the record, constitute an impermissible undue burden, then almost no regulation, short of those imposing an outright prohibition on abortion, would.”

Supporters of the law, called the “Women’s Health and Safety Act” in Alabama, say abortion doctors need to have admitting privileges at local hospitals in case a patient has medical complications after an abortion. “By striking down the Alabama law that required abortionists to have admitting privileges to nearby hospitals, U.S. District Court Judge Myron Thompson is propping up incompetent, dangerous abortionists at the expense of the health and safety of the women in Alabama,” Kristan Hawkins, president of Students for Life of America, said in a statement. “It is a basic necessity to ensure the safety of women who are seeking abortions and to make sure their doctors are following standard medical procedures. To do anything otherwise would be to the detriment of women in the state.”

But the judge agreed with the plaintiffs, who were represented by lawyers for Planned Parenthood and the ACLU, that these laws have no basis in medicine—they’re opposed by the American Medical Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists—and make obtaining an abortion unnecessarily difficult. “This ruling will ensure that women in Alabama have access to safe, legal abortion,” Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards said in a statement. “And Planned Parenthood will continue to fight for our patients, because a woman’s ability to make personal medical decisions should not depend on where she lives.”

The 5th Circuit of Appeals struck down a similar law in Mississippi last week. “Pre-viability, a woman has the constitutional right to end her pregnancy by abortion,” Judge E. Grady Jolly wrote in his ruling, adding that the law requiring doctors to have admitting privileges “effectively extinguishes that right within Mississippi’s borders.” That court could only declare the law unconstitutional as it applies to Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the last remaining abortion clinic in Mississippi, and could not strike down the entire law, because it had been upheld by a 5th Circuit court in Texas.

 

TIME corruption

America’s Most Corrupt State Is Standing Up for Itself

LSU v Mississippi
Detailed view of the exterior of Vaught-Hemingway Stadium on the Ole Miss campus. Stacy Revere—Getty Images

Officials argue a recent report doesn’t take into account recent anti-corruption efforts

fortunelogo-blue
This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

The entire world must contend with corruption. It costs honest citizens thousands of dollars per year and saps trust in public and private institutions.

We’ve all experienced corruption on at least a small scale at some point in our lives, but actually measuring it is difficult. Recently, Fortune covered a study by two public policy researchers—Cheol Liu of the City University of Hong Kong and John L. Mikesell of Indiana University—who looked the rate at which public employees in each of the 50 U.S. states had been convicted on federal corruption charges from 1976 to 2008 to determine which state was the most corrupt in the union.

Their conclusion? Mississippi, The Hospitality State, has not been all that hospitable to its citizens over the past 30-plus years, according to the study. The state had the highest ratio of public workers who were censured for misuse of public funds and other charges.

The researchers looked at the hard numbers—federal convictions—to control for differences in spending on law enforcement and the rigor of state corruption laws.

While these numbers don’t lie, Mississippi officials were none too pleased to top this list. As the state’s top corruption fighter, Mississippi State Auditor Stacey Pickering argued in an interview with Fortune that the study relied on old data and didn’t take into account the state’s anti-corruption efforts.

“This is dated material that goes back to 1976 until 2008, the year I was sworn into office,” said Pickering.

For the rest of the story, please visit Fortune.com.

TIME Heart Disease

Mississippi Men Learn About Heart Disease — At the Barber

172251811
John Sigler—Getty Images

Barbershops may be the new doctor's office, at least in Mississippi where African American men are learning about high blood pressure...while they get their hair cut

Barber shops and hair salons are great community hubs where residents gather for both grooming and gossip. So public health experts in the Mississippi Delta have decided to exploit these social meccas to connect with groups that don’t often see health care providers, including African American men.

Heart disease and stroke, for example, disproportionately affect this population of men, partly due to genetics, and partly due to lifestyle behaviors. But in places like the Mississippi Delta region, these men also do not get regular heart disease screenings. They do, however, go to barbershops for trims and to catch up on community news. So the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is funding a barbershop initiative called Brothers (Barbers Reaching Out to Help Educate Routine Screenings) located throughout the Mississippi Delta, where heart disease and stroke are the second and fourth leading causes of death in black men.

The Mississippi Department of Health spent a year recruiting and training barber shop workers on how to read a blood pressure screening, and discuss risk factors. During appointments, barbers talk to their clients about heart health, take their blood pressure, and refer them to a physician if they need further counseling. Recruitment was, and continues to be a challenge since some of the barbers were on board with the benefits of educating their clients, but worried about whether the program would hurt their business.

So far, thought, the barbers are being pretty persuasive. The project, which involves 14 barbershops that have so far served 686 men, just released its first set of data. Only 35% of the customers said that they had a doctor and 57% did not have health insurance. Among the men who received blood pressure readings, 48.5% had prehypertension, and 36.4% had high blood pressure. The findings, published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease, shows that the program provides care to men who need it, as well as gives public health care workers a better idea of how prevalent heart disease is in the region, and how many patients are in need of medical care. The next step for the researchers is to create a community health worker network that could introduce these men to the health care system and help them navigate more regular screenings and better treatment of their condition.

Shifting health care from the clinic to the community isn’t a new idea; in some areas, health screenings and education are conducted in churches. But the faithful are a select group, and the study’s lead author says it’s important to bring services to hard-to-reach populations, such as young black men, to where they are. “We realized in our standard community health screenings–which were happening in churches–that we were not reaching adult black men,” says lead study author Vincent Mendy, an epidemiologist at the Mississippi State Department of Health. “We think the best way to reach them is through barbershops.” The program is part of a partnership between the CDC and the Mississippi State Department of Health, and is funded through September 2015.

Mendy is hopeful that the program will reach more men and bring them into treatment, since a similar 2011 initiative in Texas, funded by the National Institutes of Health, found that barbers helped to lower blood pressure in a population of African American men by 20%. Based on this growing body of research, the CDC is considering relying on community health workers to help improve the health of minority groups that have a disproportionate risk of disease and death in the U.S. — but are often outside of the health care system. Barbershops aren’t clinics, but they do seem to be a good place to get health messages across.

TIME Aids

Girl ‘Cured’ of HIV Has Relapsed

Dr. Hannah Gay, a pediatric HIV specialist at the University of Mississippi on March 3, 2013.
Dr. Hannah Gay, a pediatric HIV specialist at the University of Mississippi on March 3, 2013. Jay Ferchaud—University of Mississippi Medical Center/AP

"Certainly, this is a disappointing turn of events"

A 4-year-old girl believed to have been cured of HIV showed detectable levels of the virus, federal officials said Thursday in a blow to anti-HIV efforts.

The Mississippi girl had been off of antiretroviral therapy for more than two years, and doctors believed that she could serve as a model for eradicating HIV in babies born with the virus.

But on Thursday, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said that researchers had found detectable HIV levels in the girl this month.

“Certainly, this is a disappointing turn of events for this young child, the medical staff involved in the child’s care and the HIV/AIDS research community,” Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in a statement.

The girl was born with HIV, and doctors administered anti-AIDS therapy nearly immediately after her birth and continued with the treatment for months. After the girl and her mother missed several treatment appointments, doctors found that the girl was still HIV-free — leading them to believe that the early treatment may have successfully eliminated the virus. Still, experts say they knew a relapse was a possibility.

Since HIV was detected in the girl this month, doctors have resumed treatment. But despite her relapse, researchers say her case still provides a valuable understanding of early HIV treatment.

“The case of the Mississippi child indicates that early antiretroviral treatment in this HIV-infected infant did not completely eliminate the reservoir of HIV-infected cells that was established upon infection but may have considerably limited its development and averted the need for antiretroviral medication over a considerable period,” Fauci said in a statement. “Now we must direct our attention to understanding why that is and determining whether the period of sustained remission in the absence of therapy can be prolonged even further.”

TIME sexuality

Dear White Gays: Stop Stealing Black Female Culture

You are not a black woman, and you do not get to claim either blackness or womanhood. There is a clear line between appreciation and appropriation

I need some of you to cut it the hell out. Maybe, for some of you, it’s a presumed mutual appreciation for Beyoncé and weaves that has you thinking that I’m going to be amused by you approaching me in your best “Shanequa from around the way” voice. I don’t know. What I do know is that I don’t care how well you can quote Madea, who told you that your booty was getting bigger than hers, how cute you think it is to call yourself a strong black woman, who taught you to twerk, how funny you think it is to call yourself Quita or Keisha or for which black male you’ve been bottoming — you are not a black woman, and you do not get to claim either blackness or womanhood. It is not yours. It is not for you.

Let me explain.

Black people can’t have anything. Any of these things include, but aren’t limited to: a general sense of physical safety, comfort with law enforcement, adequate funding and appreciation for black spaces like schools and neighborhoods, appropriate venues for our voices to be heard about criticism of issues without our race going on trial because of it, and solid voting rights (cc: Chris McDaniel).

And then, when you thought this pillaging couldn’t get any worse, extracurricular black activities get snatched up, too: our music, our dances, our slang, our clothing, our hairstyles. All of these things are rounded up, whitewashed and repackaged for your consumption. But here’s the shade — the non-black people who get to enjoy all of the fun things about blackness will never have to experience the ugliness of the black experience, systemic racism and the dangers of simply living while black. Though I suppose there’s some thrill in this “rolling with the homies” philosophy some adopt, white people are not racially oppressed in the United States of America.

White people are not racially oppressed in the United States of America.

White people are not racially oppressed in the United States of America.

Nothing about whiteness will get a white person in trouble the way blackness can get a black person shot down in his tracks. These are just facts. It’s not entirely the fault of white people. It’s not as if you can help being born white in America, any more than I can help being born black in America.

The truth is that America is a country that operates on systems of racism in which we all participate, whether consciously or unconsciously, to our benefit or to our detriment, and that system allows white people to succeed. This system also creates barriers so that minorities, such as black people, have a much harder time being able to do things like vote and get houses and not have to deal with racists and stuff. You know. Casual.

But while you’re gasping at the heat and the steam of the strong truth tea I just spilled,what’s even worse about all of this, if you thought things could get even crappier, is the fact that all of this is exponentially worse for black women. A culture of racism is bad enough, but pairing it with patriarchal structures that intend to undermine women’s advancement is like double-fisting bleach and acid rain.

At the end of the day, if you are a white male, gay or not, you retain so much privilege. What is extremely unfairly denied you because of your sexuality could float back to you, if no one knew that you preferred the romantic and sexual company of men over women. (You know what I’m talking about. Those “anonymous” torsos on Grindr, Jack’d and Adam4Adam, show very familiar heterosexual faces to the public.) The difference is that the black women with whom you think you align so well, whose language you use and stereotypical mannerisms you adopt, cannot hide their blackness and womanhood to protect themselves the way that you can hide your homosexuality. We have no place to hide, or means to do it even if we desired them.

In all of the ways that your gender and race give you so much, in those exact same ways, our gender and race work against our prosperity. To claim that you’re a minority woman just for the sake of laughs, and to say that the things allowed her or the things enjoyed by her are done better by you isn’t cute or funny. First of all, it’s aggravating as hell. Second, it’s damaging and perpetuating of yet another set of aggressions against us.

All of this being said, you should not have to stop liking the things you like. This is not an attempt to try to suck the fun out of your life. Appreciating a culture and appropriating one are very, very different things, with a much thicker line than some people think, if you use all of the three seconds it takes to be considerate before you open your mouth. If you love some of the same things that some black women love, by all means, you and your black girlfriends go ahead and rock the hell out. Regardless of what our privileges and lack of privileges are, regardless of the laws and rhetoric that have attempted to divide us, we are equal, even though we aren’t the same, and that is okay. Claiming our identity for what’s sweet without ever having to taste its sour is not. Breathing fire behind ugly stereotypes that reduce black females to loud caricatures for you to emulate isn’t, either.

So, you aren’t a strong black woman, or a ghetto girl, or any of that other foolery that some of you with trash Vine accounts try to be. It’s okay. You don’t have to be. No one asked you to be. You weren’t ever meant to be. What you can be, however, is part of the solution.

Check your privilege. Try to strengthen the people around you.

Sierra Mannie is a rising senior majoring in Classics and English at the University of Mississippi. She is a regular contributor to the Opinion section of the school’s student newspaper, The Daily Mississippian, where this article originally appeared.

TIME 2014 Election

McDaniel Campaign Begins Legal Challenge in Mississippi GOP Primary

McDaniel delivers a concession speech in Hattiesburg
Tea Party candidate Chris McDaniel delivers a speech to supporters in Hattiesburg, Miss. on June 24, 2014. Jonathan Bachman—Reuters

The Tea Party challenger says a write-in campaign is not off the table

This year’s most hotly contested Republican primary elections entered a new round of controversy Thursday morning, when the Tea Party challenger attempting to unseat incumbent Senator Thad Cochran officially initiated a challenge to the results of a runoff last week.

Insurgent candidate Chris McDaniel Thursday sent a “Notice of Intent to Challenge” to the Cochran campaign, the first step in an attempt to invalidate the election by revealing voting irregularities. Early next week the McDaniel campaign will file its official challenge with the state Republican Party, which oversees the primary election, McDaniel spokesman Noel Fritsch told TIME. A legal challenge in the courts will follow, Fritsch says.

“Most important in this challenge is the integrity of the election process. That’s what this is really all about,” Fritsch said. “What you have here are multiple criminal allegations, criminal misconduct.”

Cochran won a runoff against his more conservative challenger by about 6,700 votes, in part by appealing to moderates and Democrats, who were legally allowed to vote in the Republican runoff in Mississippi if they did not vote in the June 3 Democratic primary. McDaniel alleges that a significant number of Cochran votes came from Democrats who had violated that rule.

The McDaniel campaign has thus far found more than 4,900 votes it calls into question, Fritsch says. The campaign has not yet received access to records in 31 counties or to 19,000 absentee ballots, Fritsch says.

A Cochran campaign spokesman, Jordan Russell, told TIME he could not confirm the campaign had received the notice from McDaniel but called the challenge “baseless.”

“It’s not going anywhere. There’s no evidence of any wrongdoing,” Russell told TIME. “Frankly, it’s a publicity stunt, an attempt to help him to retire his campaign debt.”

Conservative activists were outraged by Cochran’s narrow victory, won with the support of Democrats after McDaniel bested the long-time Senator in the June 3 primary (neither man won more than 50% of the vote, automatically triggering the runoff). Some in conservative circles have called for McDaniel, a firebrand State Senator and former conservative radio host, to mount a write-in campaign, which may not be legally feasible under Mississippi law. A write-in effort would be good news for Democrat Travis Childers, a former congressman from Mississippi who under normal circumstances would face extremely long odds against a Republican in the deeply conservative state.

“We’ve got thousands and thousands of people telling us to do that” Fritsch said when asked if McDaniel would consider a write-in effort. “Oh no. We’re not taking any actions off the table right now.”

-With reporting from Zeke Miller

TIME 2014 Election

Last Minute Fundraising Helped Save Thad Cochran

The outlook was not bright for Sen. Thad Cochran on June 3, when he failed to win the majority vote he needed in Mississippi’s primary to secure a spot in November’s general election. Instead, he faced a runoff election on Tuesday to Tea Party challenger and State Senator, Chris McDaniel.

The race quickly became a reflection of the larger divide between establishment Republicans and Tea Party newcomers, as the GOP—still recovering from House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s defeat by Tea Party-backed Dave Brat—rallied immediately to help fill Cochran’s campaign coffers, which were hurting after the June 3 primary.

In the three weeks leading to the runoff, the GOP led a full-force fundraising effort, making it possible for Cochran to continue running television ads, and launch the large-scale get out the vote campaign that ultimately won him the race.

Chief among the GOP’s fundraising efforts was a June 10 event held by the National Republican Senatorial Committee, which raised $820,000. Among the event’s donors were Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, Sen. Lindsey Graham, and Sen. Orrin Hatch, all of whom had faced Tea Party challengers in the past. Each senator donated to Cochran’s campaign committee, Citizens For Cochran, through leadership PACs of their own. Some Republicans, like Sen. Roger Wicker, even ran phone campaigns themselves.

In all, Sen. Cochran’s campaign committee leveraged its incumbent advantage, raising almost a million dollars in its final weeks, and about 2.5 million more than did Sen. McDaniel’s committee, Friends of Chris McDaniel, overall.

But the funds didn’t stop there.

Cochran also received significant contributions in the form of independent expenditures, money that organizations can spend to advocate specifically for or against a candidate, but that must be made without that candidate’s involvement.

The Chamber of Commerce, for example, spent $700,000 in Cochran’s favor, and the group Main Street Advocacy spent $100,000.

TIME 2014 Election

Tea Party Activists Eye Mississippi Write-in Campaign After Shocking Loss

McDaniel
Chris McDaniel addresses his supporters after falling behind in a heated GOP primary runoff election against incumbent U.S. Senator Thad Cochran on Tuesday June 24, 2014 at the Lake Terrace Convention Center in Hattiesburg, Miss. George Clark—AP

Chris McDaniel was defiant in defeat, but hasn't signaled he'll mount a long-shot write-in bid

Tea Party activists in Mississippi and beyond urged state Sen. Chris McDaniel to mount a write-in campaign against Republican Sen. Thad Cochran on Wednesday, following McDaniel’s stunning defeat in a primary runoff vote Tuesday.

“When the Republican Establishment acts like Democrats, what is the point of supporting them?” Tea Party Nation President Judson Phillips wrote in an email to supporters Wednesday morning. “Every McDaniel supporter in Mississippi from DeSoto County in the North to Biloxi in the South should stand up today and tell Chris McDaniel that if he runs as a write-in candidate in November, they will support him.”

McDaniel lost in a runoff to the six-term incumbent Cochran by only about 6,000 votes, amounting to less than 2% of the total count. Many of those who pushed Cochran over the top were either Republicans who’d been unmoved to vote in the initial June 3 primary (in which McDaniel narrowly won but failed to secure the 50% needed to prevent a runoff), or Democrats who were inspired to vote for Cochran to prevent a Tea Party victory for McDaniel.

Turnout in Tuesday’s runoff was higher than in Round One, with about 55,000 more ballots cast, many of them by Democrats for Cochran. McDaniel supporters felt robbed; as their candidate took the stage at his election night watch party, the crowd chanted “Write Chris in!”

“There is something a bit strange, there is something a bit unusual about a Republican primary that’s decided by liberal Democrats,” McDaniel said, clearly incensed. “Before this race ends, we have to be absolutely certain that the Republican primary was won by Republican voters.”

Aside from those comments, McDaniel has offered no indication that he intends to mount a write-in candidacy.

Just hours after the race was called for Cochran, a Facebook page entitled “Write-in campaign for Chris Mcdaniel” appeared online. Conservatives vented outrage on Twitter and echoed calls for a write-in campaign.

Any such effort would be a long shot, to say the least, for the McDaniel camp, but victory in the upcoming general election may not be the only goal they have in mind. The Cochran-McDaniel primary was more than a mere nominating contest, it was a proxy battle in the broader ideological war over the future of the GOP, and the conservative wing of the party is outraged. If a McDaniel write-in campaign gained enough steam, it could imperil Cochran’s otherwise easy path back to Washington, emboldening the state’s marginalized Democrats and making for an interesting three-way general election.

At least one man is thoroughly enjoying the family feud still underway in Mississippi and the prospect of a write-in McDaniel campaign.

“Clearly there was some sloppiness to say the least, and probably some failures to comply with the law,” Mississippi State Democratic Party chairman Rickey Cole told Breitbart. “I listened to some of McDaniel’s speech, and in a race this close I’m sure there are irregularities that ought to be looked into.”

TIME 2014 Election

Conservatives Fume After Mississippi Defeat

McDaniel
Chris McDaniel victory pins are placed near other Tea Party items for sale outside his election night headquarters on June 24, 2014 at the Lake Terrace Convention Center in Hattiesburg, Miss. George Clark—AP

Tea Party left wondering what went wrong

By nearly all accounts, they should have had their victory. Conventional wisdom had left Sen. Thad Cochran for dead after a close June 3 primary sent him into Tuesday’s runoff against former conservative radio host Chris McDaniel. The challenger was supposed to have an easy lift after winning more votes than Cochran in Round 1. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s surprise defeat by conservative upstart Dave Brat days later only reinforced that perception.

But Cochran, unbowed, expanded the electorate, bringing in Democratic voters and defeating McDaniel to almost certainly secure a seventh term in office. The results left establishment Republicans celebrating, having also beaten back Tea Party challengers in Oklahoma and upstate New York. As McDaniel refused to concede in a fiery speech decrying that “the conservative movement took a backseat to liberal Democrats in the state of Mississippi,” conservatives and Tea Party activists were left wondering where they went wrong—and seething at their defeat. The results show the success of a sweeping tide of establishment push-back following high profile upsets in Republican primaries in 2010 and 2012.

The Mississippi race pitted the National Republican Senatorial Committee, former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour’s political machine, and outside groups like the Chamber of Commerce and American Crossroads against a conservative barrage from the Club for Growth and Tea Party organizations. The NRSC, Senate Republicans’ campaign arm, spent roughly $500,000 on get-out-the-vote operations for the runoff alone, with 45 NRSC staff and volunteers knocking on 50,000 doors from the initial primary until the runoff, an official said.

“If Republicans are going to act like Democrats, then what’s the use in getting all gung-ho about getting Republicans in there,” Sarah Palin said on Fox News late Tuesday.

Amy Kremer, the former chair of the Tea Party Express, wrote on Twitter that the “GOP is done.”

“What just went down in Mississippi, with the GOP establishment despicably playing the race card against its own base in the U.S. Senate run-off, is a point of no return moment for conservatives in the party,” influential Iowa conservative radio host Steve Deace said in a Facebook post, referring to Cochran’s courtship of black Democrats. “This is a Hemlock Society victory, with the GOP establishment essentially signing its own suicide pact. It’s unforgivable, really, and it should be. I’m going to make everyone that comes to Iowa running for president and wants my support go on the record about this. It’s a line in the sand moment. You cannot align yourself with people who treat you this way. Anybody that thinks otherwise is never going to fight the system if we elect them. These tactics in perhaps the most conservative state in the union are heinous and ought to be condemned without equivocation. If a candidate isn’t going to condemn these sorts of tactics used against us, they will not stand up for us once elected.”

And conservative activist Daniel Horowitz called Cochran’s pursuit of Democratic votes in a Republican primary “treachery.”

“Campaigning openly for Democrat votes in a GOP primary using issues and arguments contrary to the party platform is one thing,” Horowitz wrote on Breitbart. “But the fact that they played the race card and ran mailers and robo calls in African American areas accusing their own party of being racist is downright despicable.

“How much longer can a party survive when its leadership is inexorably against the ethos of its base?” Horowitz added.

In a statement Wednesday morning, Club for Growth President Chris Chocola put the defeat in the context of the group’s 10-year struggle to bring the GOP closer to conservative principles. “We are proud of the effort we made in Mississippi’s Senate race and we congratulate the winner,” he said. “We expect that Senator Cochran and others gained a new appreciation of voter frustration about the threats to economic freedom and national solvency. In light of our experience of the last ten years, we move forward even more confidently than we did the day after the 2004 Pennsylvania primary.”

Conservative political consultant Keith Appell cautioned against interpreting Tuesday’s results as a knockout punch against the Tea Party, blaming McDaniel’s failure to win the required 50% of the vote in the initial primary on a blogger who incited outrage—and sympathy for the incumbent—by strangely filming inside the nursing home housing Cochran’s ailing wife.

“Interpreting this as some kind of ‘Empire Strikes Back’ moment is an overreach,” Appell told TIME. “It’s a golden opportunity blown, to be sure, but it underscores how even a good candidate isn’t enough—he or she still has to have a competent campaign. Republican leaders and their establishment backers dodged a bullet but there is still a deep and active discontent among the grassroots and it will only continue to manifest until the leadership reconnects with its base.

“Conservatives and Tea Party activists have to take the long view, the big picture is that they’re really winning,” Appell added.

RedState founder Erick Erickson wrote that he does not back the third-party approach advocated by some. “I’m just not sure what the Republican Party really stands for any more other than telling Obama no and telling our own corporate interests yes,” he said.

“As grassroots activists feel further and further removed and alienated from the party, it will become harder and harder to win,” Erickson added. “The slaughter the GOP will inflict on the Democrats in November will be a bandaid of built in momentum. When the GOP inevitably caves on repealing Obamacare, opting instead to reform it in favor of their donors’ interests, we may just see an irreparable split. Then, and even worse, if party leaders and party base voters cannot reconcile themselves to a common candidate in 2016, God help us.”

Correction: The original version of this story misstated how many terms Thad Cochran has been in the Senate.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 45,247 other followers