TIME World

These Maps Show Which Countries Are the Happiest

Costa Rica is number one, according to the Happy Planet Index

If you’re looking for a change of scenery and considering moving to a new country, you may want to consider Costa Rica. According to the Happy Planet Index (HPI), it’s the happiest country on Earth, followed by Vietnam, Colombia and Belize.

These maps, created by MoveHub, show the happiness level of each country across the globe. The HPI is calculated using “global data on life expectancy, experienced well-being and Ecological Footprint.” It’s an “efficiency measure,” ranking countries on “how many long and happy lives they produce per unit of environmental input.”

Check it out:

Happines Index Around the World

As you might have noticed, some of the world’s high-income nations have considerably low happiness ratings, and that’s because many of those countries have high ecological footprints. Also, as MoveHub points out, “the data does not take into account internal inequality measures and human rights issues tied to some countries which are high up in the rankings.” So keep that in mind as you browse the maps. Still, though, we do believe that Costa Rica seems really, really nice.

Read next: The U.S. Is No Longer the Most Popular Country in the World

TIME

This Map Shows How Big Your Football Team’s Fanbase Really Is

Cowboys fans are EVERYWHERE

Football fandom may seem obvious — Titans fans live in Tennessee, Seahawks fans live in Seattle — but as this interactive map from Twitter shows, the geographic makeup of NFL loyalties is actually pretty complicated.

To create this map, analysts determined which NFL team has the most Twitter followers in each county across the nation. Some of results make perfect sense, but other aspects of the map are pretty surprising. The Cowboys, for example, not only dominate Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Arkansas, but have pockets of fans just about everywhere.

There are several different ways to compare and contrast fan bases — so if you’re watching a football game right now, we recommend waiting till halftime to play around with the map.

 

TIME

This 1 Extension Makes Google Chrome Even More Awesome

Inside The Google Chromebook Store
The logo of Google Inc. Chrome is displayed at a Currys and PC World 2 in 1 store, operated by Dixons Retail Plc, on Tottenham Court Road in London, U.K., on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2011. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

One small tweak to Google Maps, one giant time-suck for mankind

The Google Maps team has just torpedoed the productivity of Chrome users with the launch of “Earth View,” a new browser extension that displays a random and beautiful satellite image of the earth’s surface each time the user opens a new tab.

It’s not exactly groundbreaking technology — in fact, it just a marries two existing technologies from Chrome and Google Earth. But the sheer variety of terrains on display, from the schematic street-view of downtown Chicago to a frozen mountain range in Antarctica, makes opening a new tab an oddly hypnotic experience and opening dozens of tabs nearly irresistible.

The app launched with little fanfare on October 14, rapidly climbing the ranks of most downloaded Chrome extensions with more than 50,000 users to date.

You can download the extension for yourself here.

TIME Pop Culture

This Map Shows That Disney World Has Grown Like Crazy

Disney Map
From the Oct. 18, 1971, issue of TIME TIME

The theme park opened on Oct. 1, 1971

A few decades ago, it was incredible to imagine a theme park surpassing the size and scope of California’s Disneyland — but Walt Disney World, which opened on this day, Oct. 1, in 1971, did. “‘World’ is right,” TIME marveled in the Oct. 18 issue of that year, alongside a map of the new attraction. “The latest Disney enterprise, four years in the building, includes a spotlessly clean amusement area, two enormous and elaborate hotels with marinas and beaches, two championship-caliber golf courses, lavishly landscaped lakes and a futuristic transportation network linking everything.”

The article went on to praise the “futuristic unisex jumpsuits” worn by workers, the $4.25 roast beef dinner at Cinderella Castle and the skill of the lawyers who worked to make Disney World “in effect a city-state” with near complete control of what goes on on its property.

So we can only imagine how much ooh-ing and aw-ing there would have been if those writers in 1971 had gotten a load of this modern map of Disney World:

Disney

Roll over to zoom; on mobile, click.

Everything included in the original map fits into the upper right-hand corner. Though the basic layout of the Magic Kingdom is unchanged, the resort — that’s Epcot, Animal Kingdom and rest of the whole shebang — now covers an area about the same size as San Francisco, by Today.com‘s count. But the craziest thing of all on that up-to-date map isn’t a new addition to the park; it’s that there’s still so much empty space into which it could still expand.

Read the 1971 article about the theme park’s opening, here in TIME’s archives: Pixie Dust Over Florida

TIME Innovation

Ultra High-Resolution Satellite to Snap Better Photos for Maps

worldview-3 satellite sensor
The WorldView-3 satellite sensor will launch August 13 to capture high-resolution photos DigitalGlobe

The sensor can capture features as small as roughly a foot in size

One of my favorite features of Google Maps (aside from the killer turn-by-turn directions with lane assist) are the included satellite images. It’s both fun and useful to see the world from a bird’s eye view. The only downside: old government restrictions on just how good those satellite photos could be added unnecessary pixelation and blurring.

But as technology has changed and improved, so too have the rules. In June, the feds updated their satellite privacy requirements to allow for far more detailed aerial photos. On August 13, DigitalGlobe will launch its WorldView-3 Satellite Sensor to take full advantage, allowing the company to capture features as small as 31 centimeters (just over 12 inches).

The new satellite will be capable of collecting “key features such as manholes and mailboxes,” the company explains.

The WorldView-3 will bring higher resolution satellite photos to Google and Microsoft, both of whom rely on DigitalGlobe for images. Best of all, it shouldn’t take long to see those new images – according to DigitalGlobe, the new satellite is capable of capturing 680,000 square kilometers of photos per day. That would allow the satellite to capture detailed shots of the entire United States in just over two weeks.

To learn more about the next-gen WorldView-3 satellite and the technology behind it, you can visit the Satellite Image Corporation website.

This article was written by Fox Van Allen and originally appeared on Techlicious.

More from Techlicious:

TIME World

17 Maps That Will Change How You See the World

Or at least answer burning global questions, such as "Which country has the hairiest men?"

1. The map that will scare most coffee snobs.

More info via Euromonitor International

2. The map that proves how much Bhutan loves archery.

Earl Andrew / Wikipedia

More info here

3. The map that pinpoints the hairiest populations.

Undress 006 / Wikipedia

More info via Undress 006 on Wikipedia

4. The map that shows Asia prefers spirits to beer.


More info via ChartsBin

5. The map that says people in the Philippines feel the most loved.

More info via the Washington Post

6. The map that suggests more divorce lawyers should move to Spain.

More info via imgur

7. The map that proves you’re driving on the wrong side of the street (or not).


More info via ChartsBin

8. The map that reveals the “black holes” of Internet censorship.

Reporters Without Borders

More info via Reporters Without Borders on Ads of the World

9. The map that calls out Russia’s strange claims to fame.

More info via DogHouseDiaries

10. The map that suggests where people should get active. (Looking at you, Argentina and Saudi Arabia.)


More info via Chartsbin

11. The map shows America is a world leader…in incarceration rates.

More info via Jan Van der Weijst at Business Insider

12. The map that reveals France is the most popular country to visit

More info via Movehub

13. …but America has the most photographed city (New York).

More info via Sightsmap

14. The map that tracks countries’, um, endowments.


More info via Target Map

15. The map that tracks which countries offer maternity leave.

More info via World Policy Forum

16. The map that quantifies how much Scandinavia loves heavy metal.

More info via depo on The Wire

17. And the map quantifies how much everyone loves Beyoncé.


More info via CartoDB on TIME

TIME Maps

19 Awesomely Revealing U.S. Maps You Won’t Find in a Textbook

Including Craigslist missed connections, lake-monster sightings, and states nobody can remember. (Sorry, Minnesota!)

1. The map that suggests everyone in Wisconsin is drunk right now.

More info via Flowing Data

2. As is everyone in Oregon.

More info via VinePair

3. The map that reveals every state’s top porn search.

More info here

4. The map that proves you’ve probably been to Pizza Hut.

More info here

5. The map that proves you’ve definitely been to Wal-Mart.

More info here

6. And McDonald’s.

More info here

7. The map that’s trying to prove…something.

More info via I Love Charts

8. The map that suggests Oklahoma singles should attend the state fair.

More info via Andrew Sullivan

9. The map that shows where you’re most likely to get struck by lightning.

Screen Shot 2014-02-28 at 12.03.59 PM

PHOTOS: The Beauty of Lightning
More info here

10. The map that quantifies Florida’s undying love for Rick Ross.

More info here

11. The map that shows Americans can’t agree on how to pronounce crayon

More info here

12. …or mayonnaise.

More info here

13. The map that will make you feel poor.

More info via Movoto

14. The map that will make Alaskans feel lonely.

More info here

15. The map that quantifies the invasion of cows.

More info here

16. The map that highlights lake-monster sightings.

More info via Atlas Obscura

17. The map that confirms the spread of Smith.

More info via National Geographic

18. The map that proves there are no Oakland As fans.

More info here

19. And the map that will school a lot of you on state geography (or not).

More info here

TIME Food & Drink

These Are the Most Popular Starbucks Drinks Across the U.S.

Quartz

People in Portland really love eggnog lattes, apparently

The United States is a nation of enthusiastic coffee drinkers, and this map created by Quartz reveals what types of Starbucks coffee drinks are most popular throughout the country.

The map is based on data from hundreds of millions of Starbucks transactions across the U.S. Though the most popular beverages across the board were basic brewed coffee and lattes, certain cities showed an affinity for more specific, unique drinks. (We’re looking at you, Memphis and Portland.)

Quartz also noticed a sort of “cold-hot axis,” meaning that typically warm states like Florida, Texas, New Mexico and Hawaii order more iced coffee than hot coffee overall. Another divide that’s a bit harder to explain is dark vs. light. Cities like Chicago and Philadelphia opt for light roasts, whereas cities like Boston and Seattle go dark.

Other conclusions: people from southern California really love their Frappuccinos, and people from Seattle (Starbucks’ home city) are really into espresso.

TIME Companies

This Video Shows Why Google Is Buying a Satellite Company for $500 Million

Google is buying near real-time satellite imaging company Skybox Imaging for $500 million in cash, it announced Tuesday.

Google says Skybox, which claims to have built the world’s smallest high-resolution imaging satellite, will help Google improve its Maps product. “Skybox’s satellites will help keep Google Maps accurate with up-to-date imagery,” Google said in a press release announcing the deal. “Over time, we also hope that Skybox’s team and technology will be able to help improve Internet access and disaster relief — areas Google has long been interested in.”

The demonstration video above shows what Skybox’s satellites are capable of doing.

Google has made significant investments in aerial projects over the last year, from buying the drone company Titan Aerospace to experimenting with balloons to deliver Internet access in remote areas — it’s also possible that Google could use Skybox’s satellite technology to expand global Internet access as well.

In a blog post of its own, Skybox said it was “thrilled” to be bought out by Google and make hundreds of millions of dollars in the process. “We have built an incredible team and empowered them to push the state­-of­-the-­art in imaging to new heights. The time is right to join a company who can challenge us to think even bigger and bolder, and who can support us in accelerating our ambitious vision,” the company wrote.

The terms of the deal are subject to approval from federal regulators in the U.S.

TIME

Charting Audacity: D-Day Maps From TIME Magazine

D-Day maps conjure an era when huge forces were on the move, or were stuck in brutal stalemate, all over the globe

One of the most striking features of World War II-era TIME magazines — aside from their marvelous ads — is the prevalence of elaborate illustrations, often bordering on the beautiful. Visually compelling, rich in detail, these graphics — and especially the maps, like those shown here — don’t merely convey data; all these years later, they immediately conjure a singular period in history, when enormous forces were on the move, or were stuck in brutal stalemate, all over the globe.

For film buffs, these maps might conjure the opening sequence from the greatest American wartime movie of them all, Casablanca, with its black-and-white globe spinning away beneath a harsh, nasal, newsreel-toned voiceover. For others, the maps might bring to mind old textbooks from a long-forgotten history class. But whatever associations they spark today, it’s worth recalling that when they were first published, 70 years ago, they were vital, immediate records of an epic military operation that not only was fresh in every TIME reader’s mind, but was still underway, and still costing lives, on the roads and in the fields and villages of Normandy and beyond.

[WATCH: 'Behind the Picture: Robert Capa's D-Day']

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