TIME yahoo

Yahoo Surrendered to Google In This One Big Area

Yahoo's Headquarters In Sunnyvale, California
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images A sign is posted in front of the Yahoo! headquarters on May 23, 2014 in Sunnyvale, California.

Another Yahoo product is shutting down

Yahoo is shuttering Yahoo Maps after eight years in action, the company announced Thursday.

“We made this decision to better align resources to Yahoo’s priorities as our business has evolved since we first launched Yahoo Maps eight years ago,” said Yahoo Chief Architect Amotz Maimon in a blog post.

Yahoo isn’t killing off its mapping technology entirely, though. Maimon said Yahoo would still use Yahoo Maps “in the context of Yahoo search and on several other Yahoo properties including Flickr.”

The demise of Yahoo Maps comes amid increasing competition in the digital mapping space. Google Maps has long been the dominant offering, while Apple continues to bake new functionality into its own mapping service. Meanwhile, Nokia is reportedly looking to sell its mapping division, HERE.

TIME Google

Finally, You Can Get Your Google Maps Directions Anytime

Google Maps Returns To Apple's iPhone
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images

No wireless connection needed

You know those annoying moments when your phone goes offline and you can’t get directions to where you’re going? And it’s always at the least opportune moments?

Good news: That will soon be a thing of the past.

On Thursday, Google announced at its annual developers in San Francisco that turn-by-turn directions would soon be available — even without a data connection. All you have to do is save the route while you’re connected and the directions will be there when you need them.

Also, because GPS doesn’t need LTE coverage, it can still track where you are on your route and estimate the time remaining for your trip.

That will be especially game-changing in communities where fast, reliable wireless infrastructure is spotty. It’s one of many offline improvements Google announced at this year’s conference, including saving search results in Chrome and videos from YouTube.

TIME Apple

The Worst Thing About the iPhone Is About to Be Fixed

Apple Unveils iPhone 6
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images Apple CEO Tim Cook shows off the new iPhone 6 and the Apple Watch during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on September 9, 2014 in Cupertino, California.

It's huge for public transportation users

Your iPhone is about to get way more useful for navigating around big cities.

Apple’s upcoming iOS 9 update will add public transportation data to the default Maps app, according to 9to5Mac. The company will reportedly unveil bus, subway and train directions within the app at the Worldwide Developers Conference in June.

This is the first time Apple’s Maps app will include public transit data since the company stopped using Google’s mapping data in 2012. Apple was reportedly planning on including the new features in iOS 8, but pulled them at the last minute because of personnel and data issues.

Sources also told 9to5Mac that Apple is making progress with an indoor mapping project to help users find their way inside large buildings and landmarks. However, it’s unclear when that will be released.

TIME Companies

Your iPhone’s Maps Are About to Get Way Better

Apple's World Wide Developers Conference Begins In San Francisco
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images Apple Senior VP of iPhone Software Scott Forstall demonstrates the new map application featured on iOS 6 during the keynote address during the 2012 Apple WWDC keynote address at the Moscone Center on June 11, 2012 in San Francisco, California.

Apple just bought a GPS mapping company

Apple just bought a global positioning system company in a move that could help boost the tech giant’s maps software and other location-based technology.

Apple is paying an undisclosed amount to acquire Bay Area mapping company Coherent Navigation. The deal was first reported by MacRumors on Sunday, and later confirmed by The New York Times. The company Apple is picking up brings GPS technology that is more precise than many of its consumer-grade counterparts.

In typical fashion, Apple was less than forthcoming with regard to the motivation behind the acquisition. An Apple spokesperson told the Times in an e-mailed statement that the company “buys smaller technology companies from time to time, and we generally do not discuss our purpose or plans.”

Apple bought mapping service Placebase in 2009, taking the first steps toward building its own mapping technology. However, Apple’s mapping technology still lags behind rivals like Google. Three years ago, Apple CEO Tim Cook even directed customers frustrated with errors in an updated version of Apple’s Maps app to try rival service Google Maps.

Location-based technology is in high demand in Silicon Valley, as evidenced by recent reports that ride-sharing startup Uber has bid roughly $3 billion for Nokia’s digital mapping business, called Here.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

 

TIME India

India Bans al-Jazeera for 5 Days for Showing ‘Incorrect’ Maps of Kashmir

Protesters Demand Freedom For Jailed Journalists In Cairo
Adam Berry—Getty Images A logo is seen at the Al Jazeera bureau in Berlin on Feb. 27, 2014

Three wars have been fought between India and Pakistan over the historically contentious territory

Al-Jazeera English has had its broadcasts in India suspended for five days after the Indian government ruled that the Qatar-based international news channel had previously shown maps that misrepresented the disputed border region of Kashmir.

A blue screen reading, “As instructed by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, this channel will not be available,” greeted al-Jazeera’s Indian viewers on Wednesday, Agence France-Presse reported.

An official told AFP the ban was ordered earlier this month after the channel was found to have used maps showing sections of Kashmir as part of neighboring Pakistan and China. “The ban has been imposed for five days and it was done on instructions of an inter-ministerial committee, who took cognizance of an incorrect map of India in which the channel showed parts of Kashmir in Pakistan and China,” he said.

The depiction of Kashmir, a historically contentious territory claimed by both India and Pakistan, is a highly sensitive issue for the oft-feuding South Asian neighbors.

The Surveyor General of India, to whom the matter was subsequently referred, found that the channel also failed to show the Indian islands of Andaman and Lakshadweep, the Times of India reported.

Al-Jazeera English issued a statement in response to the ban, condemning what it deemed “censorship” by the New Delhi government.

According to the statement, the suspension of its broadcast concerns maps of Pakistan used in 2013 and 2014 that did not demarcate the part of Kashmir under Pakistani control (Pakistan-occupied Kashmir or PoK) as a separate territory. Once notified by Indian authorities, the channel said it ensured all maps from Sept. 22, 2014, onward used dotted lines and unique shading for the disputed portions.

“This ban is a disproportionate response to an issue that we fixed promptly after it was pointed out,” said Al Antsey, Managing Director of al-Jazeera English. “It needlessly deprives Indian viewers of our global news and programs.”

Representatives from the channel have reportedly reached out to India’s Ministry of Information and Broadcasting to resolve the issue.

TIME apps

These Are the 10 Best Apps for People Who Commute

Holiday Travel Gets Underway Ahead Of Thanksgiving Weekend
Win McNamee—Getty Images Traffic converges on highway I-495 South just west of the nation's capital on one of the busiest travel days of the year November 23, 2011 in McLean, Virginia.

To win the rat race, you’ll need a smartphone as your co-pilot

Putting in an honest day’s work can be challenging enough, so commuting shouldn’t make it any harder. But between freak snow storms, soul-crushing traffic, and off-schedule public transit, the daily migration to and from the office can be enough to make a person “work from home.”

Whether you drive, ride, walk, or do a mixture of all three, these ten smartphone apps will help you get to the office (and more importantly, back home) on time and in good spirits.

Driving…

MotionX GPS Drive

Lauded by gear-heads and techies alike, this GPS app does it all, from providing turn-by-turn voice guidance to giving you quick access to nearby pit stops like coffee shops and gas stations. Clear maps, speed limit readouts and lane-assist visuals make it a must-have weapon for any road warrior.

MotionX GPS Drive is available for $.99 on the App Store.

Triplog

There are few work tasks more mundane — or important — than logging your mileage. Triplog takes the sting out of it by automatically starting when your phone is plugged in and you’re moving faster than five miles per hour. With comprehensive tracking reports that are IRS compliant, Triplog lets drivers focus on the road — not on the paper trail — ahead.

Triplog is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

ETA

You have places to be, and ETA is all about getting you there. Use this app to tag your usual haunts (home, work, the gym, your favorite bar), and it automatically calculates the length of time required to get there. If you happen to be in some random locale, tapping on your hotspot will give you driving directions in a pinch. ETA even works if you choose to walk, rather than drive. Just swipe right, and ETA toggles between steering and strolling.

ETA is available for $.99 on the App Store.

Waze

Google’s crowdsourced traffic app, Waze, has been making waves lately, with police requesting that the search giant remove the program’s cop-flagging capabilities. But even if Google does that, this app is a favorite among drivers because it shows real-time traffic and road information. With everything from expected-time-of-arrival to reported gas prices (as well as maps and directions, of course), Waze is basically a smart car in a handset, supercharging commutes for weary drivers.

Waze is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

Walking…

Citymapper

An Apple app of the year for two years running, this trip planner will get you where you want to go by stitching together public transit, bike sharing, ride sharing and walking information into one place. Only available in certain cities (so check the link before you download), the app gives you multiple options for getting to and fro, but the cool part for walkers is how it calculates walking time and calories. Sure, walking apps do that too, but they can’t help you out if you bail on the journey halfway through.

Citymapper is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

Walk with Map My Walk

If you’re looking to get a workout in on your way to work, this well-trodden walking app is the way to go. Calculating everything from calories burned and speed to elevation and duration, Map My Walk lets you save your information or even integrate it into Apple’s Health app. And if you’ve got co-workers who are also hoofing it, you can share your fitness activity with them through links to social networks such as Facebook and Twitter.

Walk with Map My Walk is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

Transit

What’s another public transport app doing in the “walking” section? Well, with Transit, it’s all about getting to your destination. So if you’re walking and you suddenly realize that you’ll be late, pull up this app and check out all your nearby options for alternate modes of transportation. Showing nearby departures from various subway and bus lines, as well as how long it will take to hail an Uber, the easy-to-read app will give you a fresh look at your commuting options.

Transit is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

Riding…

Moovit

If getting there is half the fun — forget that — Moovit only cares about getting you there. This no-nonsense trip planner uses real arrival times to map out a route through public transport, sending updates and push notifications when there are delays. The app also offers real-time buss tracking powered by other users, helping commuters in more than 60 cities from Albany to Wichita.

Moovit is available for free on the App Store, Google Play, and for Windows Phone.

Things

Got time to relax on your ride home? Of course you don’t — you’ve got stuff to do, and Things will help you keep them top of mind. A high-powered to-do list app, this isn’t your average box-checking organizer. Part of a suite of programs designed to keep you on task across your computers, Things pulls up a new list each day. It also lets you tag your items, categorize them any way you please, schedule them for later dates, and group them by project. Dive into it on mass transit to not only extend your day, but be ready for the next one, too.

Things is available for $9.99 on the App Store.

Watchup

If you feel like you have no time to stay current with the news, this personalized video feed is your new companion for your morning and evening commute. Just tell Watchup what kind of news you’re interested in (entertainment, sports, tech, and others) and what time you’d like your newscast ready. Then, using the latest news videos on the web, Watchup will cobble together a program from multiple outlets like Fox News, The Street, the Wall Street Journal, and others.

Watchup is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

TIME World

These Maps Show Which Countries Are the Happiest

Costa Rica is number one, according to the Happy Planet Index

If you’re looking for a change of scenery and considering moving to a new country, you may want to consider Costa Rica. According to the Happy Planet Index (HPI), it’s the happiest country on Earth, followed by Vietnam, Colombia and Belize.

These maps, created by MoveHub, show the happiness level of each country across the globe. The HPI is calculated using “global data on life expectancy, experienced well-being and Ecological Footprint.” It’s an “efficiency measure,” ranking countries on “how many long and happy lives they produce per unit of environmental input.”

Check it out:

Happines Index Around the World

As you might have noticed, some of the world’s high-income nations have considerably low happiness ratings, and that’s because many of those countries have high ecological footprints. Also, as MoveHub points out, “the data does not take into account internal inequality measures and human rights issues tied to some countries which are high up in the rankings.” So keep that in mind as you browse the maps. Still, though, we do believe that Costa Rica seems really, really nice.

Read next: The U.S. Is No Longer the Most Popular Country in the World

TIME

This Map Shows How Big Your Football Team’s Fanbase Really Is

Cowboys fans are EVERYWHERE

Football fandom may seem obvious — Titans fans live in Tennessee, Seahawks fans live in Seattle — but as this interactive map from Twitter shows, the geographic makeup of NFL loyalties is actually pretty complicated.

To create this map, analysts determined which NFL team has the most Twitter followers in each county across the nation. Some of results make perfect sense, but other aspects of the map are pretty surprising. The Cowboys, for example, not only dominate Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Arkansas, but have pockets of fans just about everywhere.

There are several different ways to compare and contrast fan bases — so if you’re watching a football game right now, we recommend waiting till halftime to play around with the map.

 

TIME

This 1 Extension Makes Google Chrome Even More Awesome

Inside The Google Chromebook Store
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images The logo of Google Inc. Chrome is displayed at a Currys and PC World 2 in 1 store, operated by Dixons Retail Plc, on Tottenham Court Road in London, U.K., on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2011.

One small tweak to Google Maps, one giant time-suck for mankind

The Google Maps team has just torpedoed the productivity of Chrome users with the launch of “Earth View,” a new browser extension that displays a random and beautiful satellite image of the earth’s surface each time the user opens a new tab.

It’s not exactly groundbreaking technology — in fact, it just a marries two existing technologies from Chrome and Google Earth. But the sheer variety of terrains on display, from the schematic street-view of downtown Chicago to a frozen mountain range in Antarctica, makes opening a new tab an oddly hypnotic experience and opening dozens of tabs nearly irresistible.

The app launched with little fanfare on October 14, rapidly climbing the ranks of most downloaded Chrome extensions with more than 50,000 users to date.

You can download the extension for yourself here.

TIME Pop Culture

This Map Shows That Disney World Has Grown Like Crazy

Disney Map
TIME From the Oct. 18, 1971, issue of TIME

The theme park opened on Oct. 1, 1971

A few decades ago, it was incredible to imagine a theme park surpassing the size and scope of California’s Disneyland — but Walt Disney World, which opened on this day, Oct. 1, in 1971, did. “‘World’ is right,” TIME marveled in the Oct. 18 issue of that year, alongside a map of the new attraction. “The latest Disney enterprise, four years in the building, includes a spotlessly clean amusement area, two enormous and elaborate hotels with marinas and beaches, two championship-caliber golf courses, lavishly landscaped lakes and a futuristic transportation network linking everything.”

The article went on to praise the “futuristic unisex jumpsuits” worn by workers, the $4.25 roast beef dinner at Cinderella Castle and the skill of the lawyers who worked to make Disney World “in effect a city-state” with near complete control of what goes on on its property.

So we can only imagine how much ooh-ing and aw-ing there would have been if those writers in 1971 had gotten a load of this modern map of Disney World:

Disney

Roll over to zoom; on mobile, click.

Everything included in the original map fits into the upper right-hand corner. Though the basic layout of the Magic Kingdom is unchanged, the resort — that’s Epcot, Animal Kingdom and rest of the whole shebang — now covers an area about the same size as San Francisco, by Today.com‘s count. But the craziest thing of all on that up-to-date map isn’t a new addition to the park; it’s that there’s still so much empty space into which it could still expand.

Read the 1971 article about the theme park’s opening, here in TIME’s archives: Pixie Dust Over Florida

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