TIME advice

9 Tips for Launching a Successful Kickstarter Campaign

woman at computer
Getty Images

Determine your fulfillment beforehand

This article originally appeared on Levo.com.

Kickstarter, and other similar crowd-funding platforms, is an incredibly innovative tool to fund your business. I find this is particularly true for women, for whom early stage funding is notoriously more difficult to find. But like all great tools, you should know how to use them wisely. Here’s a little bit of what I learned in my experience:

1. Know what your goal is.

Make sure you’re clear about why you’re doing this–is it to test a new product line? To get the word out? To pre-fund production? This will help keep you accountable throughout the whole process and minimize distractions (there will be many, trust me!).

2. Tell a compelling story.

Investing in a great video is an absolute must! People will decide within the first 10 seconds whether they’re going to watch the rest of your video, let alone consider contributing to your campaign and/or sharing it with their friends. Spend a lot of time perfecting your pitch–keep it short (3-4 minutes), informative, funny, and engaging. You can fill in all the other details on the rest of the project page, but make sure you sell your audience right off the bat with a great video.

3. Set a goal that makes sense for you.

Don’t be tempted by setting a big, sexy fundraising target. Start by figuring out the absolute leastamount of money you need. For example, if you’re manufacturing a product, make sure you know what your factory order minimum is, how much the materials costs, etc. Make sure to add in extras like shipping and packaging, which can be easy to overlook. Once you have your minimum number, I would recommend staying at or around this number; it’s best to be conservative and blow your goal out of the water because if you don’t hit your goal you don’t get any of your funds.

4. Select your rewards wisely.

Create rewards that are exclusively available for your backers. This can be a discount on a product or an entirely unique product that won’t be available after the campaign. These people are taking a big risk in backing you–make sure you treat them well.

5. Timing can be everything.

Think about if your product has any seasonal association because that could mean the difference between success and failure. This past summer The Coolest Cooler became the most funded Kickstarter of all time, raising over $13 million. But this was his second attempt; his first campaign fell short of its $125K goal. So what changed? One big difference: his first attempt launched in November, whereas his second attempt launched in July, when beach-going customers were more likely to be in the cooler shopping mentality.

(MORE: These Two Women May Have Just Fixed Our Phone Obsession)

6. Determine your fulfillment beforehand.

I spent months before the campaign creating the sample for my dress. What I thought would take me two months ended up taking almost 6 months, as I endlessly tweaked the fit and fabric, as well as tested several manufacturers. Doing this beforehand allowed me to set a realistic, but relatively quick turnaround time for my customers. The last thing you want to do is disappoint the very people that made it all happen by rushing through the fulfillment process once the campaign is funded.

7. Keep up your momentum.

Typically, you get a surge of support in the first week and a surge in the final days with a big drop in activity in the middle. So you have to strategize beforehand about how you’re going to survive those dead middle weeks and hit your targets by the end. This takes good planning by making sure you have blog posts, press, events, and backers, lined up to help keep your momentum going.

8. Kickstarter should be the last step, not the first.

If you think you can just post your project on Kickstarter and it will just fund itself, you’re in for a rude awakening. You must spend several months beforehand building your tribe of believers that want your product and support what you’re doing. I started my business a year and a half before launching on Kickstarter. Not only did I have a small base of customers, but I had relationships with numerous petite bloggers. It was because I had these longstanding relationships that I had an extensive list of people to email on day 1 of my project. I know for a fact I couldn’t have succeeded without these longstanding relationships.

9. Last but not least: make sure you’re making a great product!

This may seem super obvious, but for any business to work, it comes down to having a great product. Make sure you’re making an amazing product that’s solving a real problem. Ask yourself: “Would my customer’s life be better with this product?” The answer should be a resounding “YES!” before you hit that launch button.

Best of luck–it’s a fun, crazy and rewarding journey.

(MORE: 5 Lessons I’ve Learned from ‘Veronica Mars’)

TIME Web

Kickstarter Passed Half a Billion Dollars in Pledges in 2014

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Exchanging money digitally PM Images—Getty Images

More than 3.3 million people pledged $529 million total

Kickstarter had its biggest year yet in 2014. The crowdfunding website saw more than 3.3 million people pledge $529 million to various projects over the course of the year, up from 3 million people pledging $480 million in 2013.

Like past years, 2014 brought a slew of highly memorable crowdfunding projects. The Coolest Cooler, a high-tech icebox that plays music in addition to storing drinks, earned $13.2 million in pledges last summer and became the most-funded project in Kickstarter history. In July, Levar Burton’s campaign to resurrect Reading Rainbow generated more than $5 million in pledges and became the first Kickstarter project to gain 100,000 backers.

Other highly successful projects included Neil Young’s high-fidelity digital music player Pono ($6.2 million in pledges), the Micro 3D printer ($3.4 million) and a pair of wireless earbuds that can store music and track your vital signs ($3.4 million).

Since Kickstarter only doles out money if projects reach their initial funding goals, that full $529 million wasn’t paid out to project starters. However, more than 22,000 projects were successfully funded in 2014, the most ever in a single year. Music was the most popular category for campaigns, with about 4,000 projects being successfully funded. However, technology attracted the most pledged dollars, as backers offered up $125 million to fund various gadgets. Here’s a breakdown of how many pledged dollars each category attracted:

image (2)

This year Kickstarter also shed some light on when projects are most likely to be funded. Wednesdays are the most popular day for pledging money to projects, while Sundays are the least popular. During a single given day, the most pledges occur around 1 PM, indicating that people may be browsing Kickstarter during work more often than they do at home.

Check out more stats at Kickstarter’s “Year in Review” presentation.

TIME privacy

Julian Assange Is Crowdfunding a Life-Size Statue of Himself Because Of Course He Is

Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange Makes A Statement After Six Months Residing At The Ecuadorian Embassy
Wikileaks founder Julian Assange speaks from the Ecuadorian Embassy on December 20, 2012 in London, England. Peter Macdiarmid—Getty Images

The WikiLeaks founder wants to get his face out of the Ecuadorian embassy

Julian Assange has been stuck in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London for two and a half years, and the WikiLeaks founder apparently has a lot of time on his hands.

Assange is using the whistle-blowing website’s official Twitter account to fuel a funding drive for a life-size bronze public “monument to courage” featuring himself, Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden, the Independent reports. The Italian sculptor Davide Dormino will stick bronze depictions of the trio on chairs with another empty seat beside them—that’s for the public, who can join the whistleblowers.

Some £100,000 is needed for the project, while just £19,360 has been raised on Kickstarter so far. The Kickstarter page says that the the statue “is not a simple homage to individuals, but to courage and to the importance of freedom of speech and information.”

Assange is wanted for questioning in Sweden over sex offense allegations, which he has denied. He fears that if he leaves that embassy, he’ll be extradited to the U.S. after his organization published classified military and diplomatic documents.

[The Independent]

TIME Gaming

Blood-Sucking Video Game Pulled From Kickstarter

The game would have extracted blood when you lose a point

A video game that sucks players’ blood has been pulled from Kickstarter for unspecified reasons.

“Blood Sport” is a project designed to “raise the stakes” of gaming, so that whenever a player gets hit in the video game, they lose blood in real life. Instead of the normal “rumble” that indicates an avatar has suffered a blow, Blood Sport players would be hooked up intravenously to their consul, so that blood could be taken out of their arteries.

“All we’re doing is hacking a pre-existing blood collection machine to take your gaming experience to the next level,” the creators wrote on their Kickstarter page. The technology is equipped with a feature that determines how much blood a player can lose without passing out.

The gaming technology could be used to stage “blood donation gaming events,” they said.

The Kickstarter was suspended Monday, for unspecified reasons. It had already raised almost $4,000 of its $250,000 goal.

TIME movies

Joan Didion Documentary Reaches Funding Goal Within One Day

The American Theatre Wing's 2012 Annual Gala
Joan Didion attends The American Theatre Wing's 2012 Annual Gala at The Plaza Hotel on September 24, 2012 in New York City. Jemal Countess—Getty Images

“We’re making it because no one else, incredibly, has”

In the preface to Slouching Towards Bethlehem, Joan Didion’s collection of essays from the 1960s, the author speaks to her primary strength as a journalist. “My only advantage as a reporter is that I am so physically small, so temperamentally unobtrusive, and so neurotically inarticulate that people tend to forget that my presence runs counter to their best interests.” Perhaps some of her subjects would agree, but the vast majority of American readers and writers — including the people who give out the National Book Award and the National Medal of Arts and Humanities — would beg to differ. Joan Didion’s work has been squarely within our best interests for half a century. Now, her story will be shared in a documentary.

And it turns out that Kickstarter, the same platform that gave us such lowbrow projects as the infamous potato salad, can provide much more value than mayonnaise and Yukon Golds. The project reached its funding goal of $80,000 before the end of its first day and has already exceeded that amount by nearly $20,000. Its 1,500-and-counting backers will receive rewards like Didion’s recipe book, and, for the high-rollers, a pair from her famed collection of sunglasses.

Driven by Didion’s nephew, filmmaker Griffin Dunne, We Tell Ourselves Stories In Order to Live will weave together archival photographs, Didion’s words, and interviews with those who know her and whose work she’s inspired. It will cover both her writing career, which began as a staff writer at Vogue in the 1950s, and her personal life, which saw the devastating losses, in quick succession, of her husband and daughter.

Participating in the project, Didion has already allowed the team to capture nearly 60 hours of footage. She’ll also select the passages from her essays and novels to read aloud for the film. Between Didion’s involvement and the reverence Dunne has for his aunt, the film may be more a celebration than a balanced account.

But a celebration is most definitely due. And there’s at least one good reason to believe We Tell Ourselves Stories will neither sugarcoat nor edit out the unsavory bits: Didion’s already written it all down anyway. “Everything that has happened to Joan,” explains Dunne in the Kickstarter video, “Joan has written about.” Hopefully those experiences will resonate as strongly on the screen as they do on the page.

MONEY the photo bank

I Raised $1,500 On Kickstarter—Then Gave It All Away

It took 31 days for Santa Fe–based photographer Matthew Chase-Daniel to raise $1,500 via Kickstarter. In addition to the money that came through the website, people handed him singles, a lump sum of $150, even a jar of pennies. They thrust cash at him when they saw him around town, at the post office or the market. Then, once Chase-Daniel had amassed all the funds, for 24 days starting in late August, he gave it all away, at a rate of 40 to 50 one-dollar bills a day.

Now, if you happened to read MONEY reporter Jacob Davidson‘s article earlier this week, “Kickstarter Backers Are Investors, and It’s Time They Got Used To It,” you may be tempted to write off the whole thing as another potential Kickstarter scam. How dare someone in the art world solicit donations when he didn’t even appear to need the money—not like, say, the L’ouvre, the Musée d’Orsay (as reported by the New York Times this week) or even the curatorial program for Portland’s Newspace Center for Photography. Heck, he didn’t even keep it! Take a breath. Chase-Daniel did exactly what he promised his backers: “If you give a dollar, I will smile when I hear about it. Then I’ll give the money away.”

The $1,500 that he raised was for an art installation entitled “Dollar Distribution” for the “Economologies” series exhibited in Axle Contemporary, a 1970 aluminum stepvan custom retrofitted as a mobile art gallery. After meeting and surpassing his goal (even after Kickstarter and Amazon Payments took their cuts), Chase-Daniel made a trip downtown:

I went to the bank and withdrew the money, all as 1-dollar bills. I wasn’t clear how much space that would take. I brought a zippered duffel bag into the bank. It turns out 1,500 bills can be quite compact. 1,000 of them were handed to me fresh from the vault, in a nice brick: 10 banded bundles of 100 ones, sealed in a plastic bag, straight from the Federal Reserve in El Paso. That brick has power. Holding it made me a little giddy and giggly.

Then, he took the brick of bills to Axle Contemporary, where he proceeded to use them to carpet the floor of the stepvan. Chase-Daniel put the final touch on the piece by installing a sheet of glass over the back door, after which he drove the gallery-cum-vault around town, parking in random locations to show the pile of money to interested passersby. (By sheer coincidence, the Axle Contemporary stepvan is not so dissimilar to a Brink’s truck—the distinction becoming even less so with its new cargo.)

Following the viewing, the artist dismantled the piece and distributed it around town. He tossed, slipped, hid, tucked, folded, crumpled, rolled, floated, and buried dollar bills in locations around Santa Fe for anyone to find. Sometimes they were “discarded” haphazardly, sometimes they were strategically placed.

Chase-Daniel recounted the impetus for the project—he was driving into town in 2013 when the breeze blew a dollar bill past his windshield. As he continued, a rolling tumbleweed of bills drifted across the road. The knee-jerk reaction of the drivers around him was to brake and swerve:

It doesn’t matter if you are rich or poor, the sight of cash blowing down the road gets attention and provokes reactions and thoughts and reflection of all sorts, positive, negative, joyous, angry, liberated, stressed-out. I decided I wanted to replicate my experience for others, to spark associations and reactions in others by simply leaving some cash around Santa Fe for others to happen upon by chance.

The Kickstarter approach came later. “Since my idea was to distribute the money randomly to a large ‘crowd,’ crowdsourced funding seemed like the logical way to raise the money,” said Chase-Daniel, who made no money from the project nor gave any credit to contributors.

In some ways, Chase-Daniels’ “Dollar Distribution” is similar to Jody Servon’s “I ____ a dollar” installation. Both used money they had been given (for Servon it came from a grant) to create their installations and then disseminate the money again, circulating it to a new group of people. Chase-Daniels makes a further distinction between his project and the illustrious @HiddenCash, this summer’s social media treasure hunt:

From what I understand of @HiddenCash, people are given clues and then search for the cash and are rewarded for their intelligence, problem-solving and determination. ‘Dollar Distribution’ gives money out to anyone, without discrimination. It is found by rich and poor, intelligent or not, with no warning or even knowledge of the project by the vast majority of ‘participants.’

What Matthew Chase-Daniels hopes will result from the project is that people will experience a visceral reaction to the surprise of discovering a dollar bill at some unexpected point in their day, in the same way he did while driving last year. He likens it to “a feeling of joy or luckiness or good fortune” that comes with finding even such a small denomination as a penny on the sidewalk.

Chase-Daniels tried to remain unobserved while distributing the dollars, but he also felt compelled to document some of the placements photographically. Those photos (which he shared on social media) were—for the most part—cropped too tightly to clue anyone in to a specific location, but they did help to spread the word about the project. That led some people to respond by sharing photos of the bills they had found.

While Chase-Daniels didn’t plan out where he would “drop” the dollars, he did happen upon some locations—a Brink’s truck, a one-dollar table at a yard sale, a book on Dada art in the library—that were too perfect to resist. Over time, he began refining the compositions of the photographs as well as the placement of the money. Chase-Daniels is compiling the images and writing about the project in a book that will be out later this year.

Chase-Daniels emphasized that the most important part of the piece was the distribution of the money; the installation and the photos, he said, “are almost incidental.” If, as he noted, “the money IS the project,” then the 1,500 people that happened upon one of the lucky bills each acquired a limited edition intaglio print—valued at exactly one dollar.

This is part of The Photo Bank, a section of Money.com dedicated to conceptually-driven photography. From images that document the broader economy to ones that explore more personal concerns like paying for college, travel, retirement, advancing your career, or even buying groceries, The Photo Bank will showcase a spectrum of the best work being produced by emerging and established artists. Submissions are encouraged and should be sent to Sarina Finkelstein, Online Photo Editor for Money.com:sarina.finkelstein@timeinc.com.

More from The Photo Bank:
FREE MONEY! (If You _ _ _ _ It)
Looking at ‘Rich and Poor,’ 37 Years Later
When the DynaTAC Brick Phone Was Must-Have Technology
Inside the ‘Pay What You Want’ Marketplace

 

TIME viral

Man Who Hates Nickelback Starts Campaign to Make Sure Band Doesn’t Play in London

NETHERLANDS-PHILIPPINES-WEATHER-TYPHOON-NICKELBACK
Members of Canadian rock band Nickelback BAS CZERWINSKI/AFP—Getty Images

‘Don’t Let Nickel Back’ is the name of the London campaign.

Correction appended, October 7, 2014

Nickelback doesn’t have any shows scheduled in London right now, and if one man gets his way, the much-maligned band will never have any shows in London again.

Inspired by a recent Tilt campaign, that brought the Foo Fighters to Charlottesville, VA for a previously unscheduled gig, Craig Mandell has created a Tilt crowd-funding campaign to prevent Nickelback from returning to his city.

The campaign, titled “Don’t Let Nickel Back,” hopes to discourage the Canadian band from playing in London through a barrage of emails. For every $1 donated to the cause, Mandell will send one email to Nickelback. A $5 donation gets you a “slightly more forceful email” while a $50 contribution “will result in an email to Nickleback with an attached mp3 of Nickelback’s music. This way, the band will hear their own music, and likely retire immediately, thereby ensuring the success of our campaign.”

“Just imagine, thousands – perhaps tens of thousands of music lovers – all not witnessing an exclusive concert by Nickelback in London,” wrote Mandell. “It will be glorious.”

Mandell states on the page that the campaign is not for his own profit. “All proceeds will go to charity,” the site says. “Or perhaps therapy for those who’ve been affected by the band.”

(h/t NME)

The original version of this story misidentified the crowd-funding platform. It was Tilt.

TIME Video Games

Good News: Pillars of Eternity Makers Just Delayed the Game

Obsidian

The crowdfunded roleplaying game that generated over $4 million gets a minor bump from late 2014 to early 2015.

Pillars of Eternity, one of the handful of crowdfunded games notable for blowing the ceiling off its asking price, has been delayed (briefly) until early next year. It was due at the end of this one, but apparently feedback from the beta test period prompted the studio to hold back a few more months.

“Since the very beginning of this project we promised our fans and ourselves that we would release this game only when we knew it would be absolutely ready for the best experience possible. We’re very close to that point, but not quite there yet,” wrote Obsidian CEO Feargus Urquhart on publisher Paradox Interactive’s forums. “The feedback we have received through our playtest process has been invaluable to us. We are coming into the home stretch but are pushing the release out just a bit to make sure we honor that promise we made originally.”

The game–a roleplaying adventure in the vein of Baldur’s Gate, targeting Linux, OS X and Windows PCs–was originally projected to arrive in spring 2014 (the Kickstarter page lists “April 2014″ for funder rewards), but was delayed last February to “winter 2014.” It’s starter budget was a million bucks, but Obsidian managed to quadruple that by the time the funding campaign wrapped in October 2012.

I usually feel a little relieved when I see a studio announce that some game’s been delayed. Not always. Sometimes you have debacles where a studio’s quietly dragging its feet, running out of money, still fumbling around with an inchoate project and dragging heels down spiraling tubes.

But when it comes to self-starter projects like this one (Obsidian didn’t sign on with Paradox to publish until March 2014), you want the studio’s full faith and credit behind whatever it winds up stamping “finished.” I couldn’t have been happier to see stuff like Dying Light, Batman: Arkham Knight and The Witcher 3 bumped to next year. Take your time, I want to tell every publisher and studio lead. These things are too important to screw up. We’ll wait.

MONEY Investing

Kickstarter Backers Are Investors, and It’s Time They Got Used To It

iStock

Many Kickstarter users still don't quite understand what they're getting into, or why the site is predicated on risk.

It’s been a rough September for Kickstarter. After a three-week period during which two major projects—each of which had raised more than $500,000 on the site—failed spectacularly, the crowdfunding platform has begun to look a little less like a harmless way for underdog visionaries to fund their passion projects and a little more like a casino. It hasn’t helped that a handful of Kickstarter scams and con men were exposed in recent months.

Recently, Kickstarter appeared to respond to the bad press by revising its terms of service. The new document does a better job of laying out the responsibilities creators have to their backers. No scamming, do your best, try to make it up to people if you fail, and so on. But that move likely won’t fix the deeper problem: That most of the site’s users believe that their donations entitle them to some kind of tangible reward, be it a smart watch or a bamboo beer koozie. In reality, nothing of the sort is guaranteed. That’s because Kickstarter backers aren’t customers making a purchase. They’re investors. And like all investments, Kickstarter projects have a chance of going bust.

To an extent, the confusion is understandable. Kickstarter calls itself “a new way to fund creative projects,” which sounds a lot more innocuous than “Craigslist for angel investing” — even though the latter may be closer to the truth. Backers generally have limited information about the people they are supporting. And once a project is funded, they’re on their own when it comes to enforcing contracts with a creators — to the extent that such contracts even exist. In the event that a scammer takes everyone’s money and runs, Kickstarter won’t offer a refund or even chip in for legal fees. But at least in those cases there’s a clear basis for taking legal action (fraud); when money is squandered in a more conventional way — through bad business decisions — funders have no recourse at all.

However, before anyone deletes their Kickstarter app or swears off crowdfunding for good, it’s worth pointing out that you may have staked your retirement on a similar system: The stock market. Equity ownership, after all, comes with startlingly few guarantees. If Tim Cook decides tomorrow to spend all of Apple’s capital on a strategic Cheetos reserve, there’s really not much the average investor (without a controlling stake in the company) can do about it other than sell off the stock. Sure, the stock market does have additional important protections: greater transparency; legally empowered and (theoretically) independent boards of directors; dedicated regulators and watchdogs, and more. But in both cases investors take on a large amount of risk.

Does that make Kickstarter a bad deal? Not at all. In fact, the risky nature of Kickstarter is arguably the very thing that makes it worth using. Project creators offer something to backers — even if it’s just early access to their product — as a reward for taking a chance on a risky idea.

But it’s important to remember why the maker of that sweet felt iPhone case is giving you priority treatment: Things could all go south. And if they do, you’re the one who’ll take the hit.

TIME Video Games

Neal Stephenson Sheathes Crowdfunded Swordfighting Game for Good

Speculative fiction writer Neal Stephenson's ambitious history-minded swordfighting simulation will go no further than crowdfunded prototype, says the author.

So long, Clang. You were a very, very expensive curiosity, in part because your lead proponent is something of a literary treasure.

The crowdfunded project to develop an ultra-realistic motion control driven sword fighting simulation, which originally generated over half a million in funding but ran out of money in September 2013, has been officially shelved — it sounds like for good.

In a “final update” to Clang‘s Kickstarter site, Stephenson writes that he’s decided to “cut the cord, and announce the termination of CLANG.” He says he delayed announcing the end sooner because of “new ideas and opportunities” that were happening, and that he says “may ultimately wind up in some of the same places we wanted to take CLANG.”

But he says as far as Clang-the-Kickstarter-project is concerned, it’s over. He expresses regret that it couldn’t continue further, but makes it clear he believes it delivered on its promise, though assuming much of the blame for its inability to continue.

Last year, Subutai Corporation delivered the CLANG prototype and the other donor rewards as promised. The prototype was technically innovative, but it wasn’t very fun to play.

Stephenson, author of speculative fiction novels like Snow Crash, Cryptonomicon and Anathem, launched Clang in 2012 as a project he hoped would “revolutionize sword fighting video games.” Stephenson is a self-described “swordsmanship geek,” though I’m not entirely sure what that means. I can’t find anything about him actually hefting blades or suiting up to fence with sabers, foils or épées, but he often talks about sword history (at least in the many interviews I’ve read over the years), for instance admiring the way a show like Game of Thrones is careful to represent aspects of swordsmanship realistically.

Here’s Stephenson’s original pitch for the game:

Clang sounds like a classic example, by Stephenson’s own admission, of someone relatively un-versed in the insanely byzantine complexities of game design (and bringing a concept to fruition), but very well-versed in the history of sword fighting, over-obsessing about the latter and not enough over the former. As he says of the reasons that ultimately led to Clang‘s termination:

Some of these [reasons] were beyond our control. Others are my responsibility in that I probably focused too much on historical accuracy and not enough on making it sufficiently fun to attract additional investment.

The debate from here out, I suspect, is going to be over whether Stephenson and his cohorts delivered the goods. The promise made on Clang‘s Kickstarter page, somewhat buried in the print, does seem fairly unambiguous: “The next step is to build a functional proof of concept in the form of an exciting prototype we can share with you and use to achieve our next level of funding.” Anything subsequent to that prototype would have required additional funding, writes Stephenson — funding beyond the project’s original Kickstarted $526,125, that is.

I’m not sure anyone’s verified whether Stephenson and Subutai delivered their prototype or donor rewards to backers as claimed (it doesn’t seem that anyone’s yet written about their experience with the prototype). Stephenson says he’s issued $700 in refunds to “around two dozen CLANG backers” who’ve asked for their money back. He adds that the financial burdens on members of the design team, as well as himself, have been substantial, above and beyond the money spent from the Kickstarter pool:

Members of the team made large personal contributions of time and money to the project before, during, and after the Kickstarter phase. Some members, when all is said and done, absorbed significant financial losses. I am one of them; that has been my way of taking responsibility for this.

There are no further formal plans to return backers’ money (or at least no obvious ones). Stephenson ends his final update by offering a link to sign up for a list to receive updates about future projects, but cautions those projects may or may not come to anything. The reactions to the announcement, restricted to backers, have been mixed, from folks chiming in to express their support for Stephenson and satisfaction with the project, to others asking for their money back.

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