TIME celebrity

After Drake Totally Airballed a 3-Pointer, Nothing Was the Same

He was on his worst behavior on the court

Over the weekend, Drake was warming up with the University of Kentucky’s basketball team, because he’s a big basketball fan and the Wildcats are one of his favorite teams. Sadly, though, Drizzy’s participation indicated that he should probably stay beside the court, where he can safely lint-roll his pants, instead of on the court. Because when he attempted to go for a three-point shot, this is what happened:

Oh man. Aiiiirbaaaallll.

Here’s another angle which really captures the hopelessness:

Oh, Drake. Maybe you should just stick to doing Drake things like rapping and manufacturing lint rollers.

TIME 2014 Election

On the Road with Rand Paul

Can he fix what ails the GOP?

The tattooed and pierced longhairs never showed up to see Senator Rand Paul speak with students at the University of South Carolina in Columbia last month. Those in attendance drew instead from the preppy set, with brushed bangs, blue blazers and proper hemlines, some wearing sunglasses on neck straps like jock jewelry. They mostly hailed from college Republican circles, and the room where they gathered, a wood-stained memorial to the state’s old power structure, was named for the politician who led the fight to protect school segregation in the 1960s.

You could call them activists, even rebels in their way. But this was not a gathering of losers and outcasts. Paul knew this. And that was the whole point…

Read the full story here.

TIME 2014 Election

Democratic Group Goes Dark in Key Senate Race

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes
Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes in Lexington, Ky., on Monday, Oct. 13, 2014. Pablo Alcala—AP/The Lexington Herald-Leader

The DSCC is not airing TV ads in Kentucky, where Alison Lundergan Grimes in campaigning to unseat Mitch McConnell

The Democratic candidate in one of the most closely-watched Senate races in the country is entering the homestretch of her campaign without TV advertising support from a key party group.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee is not airing TV ads in Kentucky, a DSCC official confirmed, where Alison Lundergan Grimes in campaigning to unseat Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

“The DSCC has now spent more than $2 million in Kentucky and continues to make targeted investments in the ground game while monitoring the race for future investments,” the DSCC official said. The committee, Senate Democrats’ campaign arm, could still announce a TV ad buy in the future.

The DSCC, which has outraised its Republican counterpart group, is on the air in many other competitive states, including Arkansas, Georgia, North Carolina and South Dakota, as the party fights to keep its Senate majority.

McConnell is leading Grimes by about three points, according to a Real Clear Politics average of polling data.

TIME 2014 Election

McConnell Slams Democratic Opponent for Staying Mum on Obama Vote

Alison Lundergan Grimes won't say if she voted for the president in 2008 and 2012

In a new ad released Monday, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell blasts his Democratic opponent Alison Lundergan Grimes for declining to answer questions on whether or not she voted for President Barack Obama in 2008 or 2012.

The Kentucky Courier-Journal editorial board posed the question four times to Grimes during an interview Oct. 9, but she repeatedly dodged it. The Democratic candidate replied that she was a “Clinton Democrat,” that “this election isn’t about the President,” and that she respects “the sanctity of the ballot box—and I know the members of this editorial board do as well.”

Grimes’ maneuvering has been heavily criticized. The ad uses footage of NBC Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd, speaking on MSNBC Friday. “I think she disqualified herself,” he said. “Can Kentuckians expect her to cast a tough vote on anything? Is she ever going to answer a tough question on anything?”

With President Obama’s approval rating hovering around 30% in Kentucky according to NBC News/Marist and CNN polls published last month, Grimes has sought to distance herself from Obama both in ads and on the trail.

Grimes, meanwhile, touted an endorsement from former Kentucky Democratic Senator Wendell Ford in a new ad. Ford worked to portray Grimes as someone who would reach across the aisle when in office:

“When I was in the Senate, Democrats and Republicans worked together,” he says. “Mitch McConnell doesn’t understand the problems, he’s just been against everything. He’s Mr. No… Alison can work with both sides.”

 

 

 

 

TIME 2014 elections

Kentucky Democrat Takes Shots at Mitch McConnell and Obama in New Ad

"I'm not Barack Obama," says gun-toting senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes, before lecturing Republican opponent on how to hold a firearm

Kentucky Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes shows off her skeet shooting skills in a new ad distancing herself from President Barack Obama.

“I’m not Barack Obama,” says Grimes, decked out with earplugs, a shooting vest and yellow tinted glasses, and holding a semi-automatic Remington rifle. “I disagree with him on guns, coal and the EPA.”

Grimes also blasts her National Rifle Association-approved opponent, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, for awkwardly holding a gun earlier this year at the Conservative Political Action Conference.

“And Mitch, that’s not how you hold a gun,” says Grimes. Her campaign confirmed that the firearm used in the ad is owned by the Democrat.

The ad follows a tradition popularized by Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), who famously shot a hole through cap-and-trade legislation in a 2010 campaign ad. Republicans have also picked up on gun imagery this year. Alaska Republican Senate candidate Dan Sullivan shot a television in protest of special interest advertising and Iowa’s Joni Ernst shot a target in protest of Obamacare.

McConnell is up by 5 points in the race, according to polling data compiled by Real Clear Politics.

Update at 12:05 p.m. on September 16

The McConnell campaign responds with a new ad.

TIME celebrity

Even Taylor Swift Loved This Video of Frat Bros Performing ‘Shake It Off’

The lip dub video was good enough to earn them all an invite to one of her concerts next year

A casual one hundred million people have watched Taylor Swift’s music video for her newest single “Shake It Off” since it debuted last month. The infuriately catchy song has been in everybody’s head — including, we now know, a group of fraternity brothers at Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky.

The Delta Sigma Phi brothers performed a spirited and well-choreographed lip dub video that shows them ducking in and out of their fraternity’s houses many rooms. They dance, they sing, they play instruments and give off a vibe that very much suggests forget the haters. A link in the YouTube description also encourages viewers to donate to a fundraising campaign for a Transylvania alum suffering from lymphoma.

The video is so good that T-Swift herself caught wind of it and promised to invite the bros to one of her shows:

Although if Taylor had been a hater and said mean things about the video, we’re sure these dudes would have taken her advice and shaken it off.

 

MONEY Food & Drink

WATCH: Why Bourbon is a Billion Dollar Business

After a generation of slowed bourbon whiskey consumption a billion dollar bourbon boom is upon us and distilleries around Kentucky are stacked with millions of barrels.

TIME Education

University President Cuts $90K From Salary So Campus Employees Can Make Living Wage

"This is not a publicity stunt"

An interim university president decided to forego $90,000 of his salary so that his school’s lowest-paid employees could earn a living wage.

Raymond Burse, who’s been Kentucky State University’s sitting president for 12 months while its board looks for a successor, wasn’t pleased to hear that some of the college’s workers were earning a minimum wage of $7.25 an hour, even though many consider $10.25 as a living wage.

Burse had served as president of KSU from 1982-89, and then was a top executive at General Electric for 27 years. He told Kentucky.com that his decision to forego some of his typically-$349,869 salary wasn’t a difficult decision.

“My whole thing is I don’t need to work,” Burse said. “This is not a hobby, but in terms of the people who do the hard work and heavy lifting, they are at the lower pay scale.”

Burse will now be paid $259,745 for the year.

“This is not a publicity stunt,” he said. “You don’t give up $90,000 for publicity. I did this for the people.”

[Kentucky.com]

 

TIME Campaign Finance

If Campaign Ads Told the Truth, They Would Sound Like This

Meet "Honest Gil", a satirical candidate in Kentucky's senate race

Ever wonder what politicians would say if they had to always speak the unvarnished truth?

Meet Gil Fulbright, (Or Phil Gulbright. Or Bill Fulbright. Or Phillip Mimouf-Wifarts. You’ll understand once you’ve watched the ad).

“Honest Gil” is a satirical candidate for the U.S. Senate in the Kentucky race between Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and his Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes. Gil plans to rent a campaign bus, take out billboard and TV ads and show up at campaign events in order to make a spectacle of what is poised to be the most expensive Senate election in American history.

Fulbright will be the face of Represent.Us, a non-partisan movement claiming 450,000 supporters that wants to pass campaign finance and anti-corruption laws to limit the influence of money on Washington. With 26 days left in its Indiegogo campaign to raise money for Fulbright’s shenanigans, the group has already busted through its fundraising goal of $20,000.

The effort is reminiscent of the Mayday PAC, Lawrence Lessig’s new crowd-funded cannibal Super PAC to destroy all Super PACs.

Whatever your position on campaign finance, Fulbright’s commercial is at the very least a funny/tragically spot-on commentary on the state of political discourse in the U.S.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser