TIME Software

How to Fix iOS 8’s Most Annoying Features

Whether you’ve got a new iPhone 6 or you’re happy holding on to your iPhone 5 or 5S, Apple’s mobile operating system update iOS 8 is great. There are a ton of useful new features like family sharing, swipe-to-respond notifications and the data-aggregating health app. But not everything about the update is sunshine and gumdrops – there are some annoying new features, too.

Thankfully, many of these annoyances are just new default settings. You can switch a lot of these defaults back to the way they were in iOS 7, and without much effort. Here are five of the most common complaints people have with Apple’s mobile operating system update, and the five best ways to fix or work around them.

Turn Off Handoffs

If you have an Apple iPad, iPod Touch or MacBook that uses your Apple ID, you may start to automatically get phone calls on all these devices. You can easily turn this off on some or all of them if you choose. Just enter into each individual gadget’s Settings menu, tap FaceTime and then turn off iPhone Cellular Calls.

Hide Recent Contacts

Personally, I like the upper row of friends and family pictures that come up when I double tap my home button. It provides easy access to your Favorites and those you’ve contacted recently. But if you don’t want people snooping on whom you’ve been calling and texting recently or you prefer the old iOS 7 version without those circular pictures, you can shut it off from the Settings menu. Just tap Mail, Contacts, Calendars, then tap Show in App Switcher (under Contacts). Turn off both toggles.

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Apple

Deleting Your Photos No Longer Actually Deletes Them

The Photos app in iOS 8 now comes with a Recently Deleted folder, which houses the snapshots you’ve chosen to delete for 30 days before they’re completely deleted from your device. This is nice to save you from accidentally deleting important photos, but terrible if there’s a photo you want deleted completely and immediately. Once you delete a snapshot from your main folder, be sure you also go into the Recently Deleted folder to select it and then delete it for good.

Stop Voice and Video Messages from Self Destructing

Sending and receiving short audio messages via iMessage is a lot of fun, but due to file size restraints, those items are quickly auto-deleted from your phone. You can change this to save those messages indefinitely by default if you’d like. Enter your phone’s Settings, tap Messages and then tap Settings. Tap Keep Messages, then change the Audio Messages and Video Expiration time to never.

But before you do, I’d urge you to strongly consider signing up for free cloud storage from a secondary provider to iCloud. I like the 30 GB free allotment currently offered by Microsoft OneDrive. It’s the best way to keep all that media, plus your own personal photos and videos, saved indefinitely without needing to pay for more iCloud storage or pay more for a phone with a larger drive.

Turn Off Predictive Text

I found the new Predictive Text feature to be a lot of fun in the first few hours of iOS 8, but its novelty wore off quickly when it proved more distracting than useful. Thankfully, it’s easily turned off. Enter your settings app, tap General, then tap Keyboard. Toggle Predictive off, and the deed is done.

This article was written by Fox Van Allen and originally appeared on Techlicious.

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TIME Apple

Apple iOS 8 Users Complain About Wi-Fi and Battery Problems

Apple iPhone 6/6 Plus Launch in Japan
A customer looks at the new iPhone 6 Plus at the launch of the new Apple iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus at the Apple store on Sept. 19, 2014 in Tokyo. Chris McGrath—Getty Images

Some iPhone and iPad users gripe about sluggish Wi-Fi and dwindling battery life post-update

Apple users might want to think again if they haven’t already downloaded the iOS 8 upgrade.

People have taken to Twitter and Apple forums to complain that their phones have been experiencing sluggish Wi-Fi and dwindling battery life, post-update.

If this is proof of a genuine issue with the latest iteration of Apple’s operating system, it would be ironic considering that the update boasts features that identify apps that are the biggest battery sucks.

Apple did not reply immediately for comment. But here are some disappointed Apple users airing their gripes on Twitter:

Anyone confused by iOS 8 can also read TIME’s tips and tricks guide to the new system.

TIME How-To

iOS 8 Guide: 10 Cool Tips and Tricks

Whether you just picked up an iPhone 6 or you're looking to squeeze a little life out of an older iPhone, here's a handful of tricks to try once you're using iOS 8.

Say “Hey Siri” for No-Touch Assistance

If your phone is plugged in, you can get Siri to do your bidding just by saying, “Hey Siri.”

You’ll need to enable the feature first by going to Settings > General > Siri and then toggling the Allow “Hey Siri” switch.

Again, your phone has to be plugged in for this to work, but it could be useful when paired with a car charger or while you’re at your desk.

Find Battery-Sucking Apps

Battery being run down too fast? It’s most likely an app or two that are sapping an inordinate amount of juice. You can check which ones are causing the most trouble by going to Settings > General > Usage > Battery Usage.

You’ll see a list of the apps that have used the most battery over the past 24 hours, with the option to check which ones have been the top drainers over a longer period of time as well.

Adjust Brightness in Photos

When you’re taking a photo and you tap the screen to adjust the camera’s focus, you can now also adjust the brightness. Just tap the screen as you’re taking a photo, then swipe up to make the image brighter or down to make the image darker.

Use the Camera Timer

The camera also has a timer function. Tap the little clock icon in the top menu when you’re taking a photo and it’ll let you choose between a three- or ten-second delay before firing off some snaps.

Get Notified of Email Thread Replies

If you want to keep an eye on an important email thread, you can enable notifications to pop up every time someone adds a new email message to the thread. Click on the little flag icon in the lower left corner of an email message, choose Notify Me… and then Notify Me again. Step through the same process to remove yourself from future notifications once you’ve had enough.

Minimize an Email You’re Writing

If you’re in the middle of typing an email message to someone and you realize you need to reference some information from a previous email elsewhere in your inbox, you can swipe down on the message you’re writing to minimize it to the bottom of the screen. Once you’re ready to write some more, tap the message to expand it again.

Track Your Phone’s Final Location Before the Battery Dies

You’ve misplaced your phone — or worse, it’s been stolen — and the battery is surely dead. You can find out its last known location by heading into Settings > iCloud > Find My iPhone and then toggling Send Last Location on.

Minimize the QuickType Feature

If you find the keyboard’s new QuickType word-guessing feature more annoying than useful, you can minimize it by swiping down from the top of the QuickType bar. If you find that you miss the feature, swipe back up and it’ll re-assume its perch atop your keyboard.

Quickly Send an Audio Recording, Photo or Video in a Text Message

When chatting back and forth in the Messages app, hold down the microphone icon in the lower-right corner to begin recording an audio message. When it’s ready, tap the arrow above it to send it or tap the X to delete it. To send a photo or video instead, hold down the camera icon in the lower-left corner and tap the top icon to snap a photo or the right-hand icon to record a video. Note that these features require that your recipient has an iPhone as well, although you’ll be able to send photos and videos (but not audio) to non-iPhone owners by tapping the camera icon in the lower-left corner and then following a couple additional steps.

Reply to a Text Message Without Leaving Your Current App

When you receive a text message up at the top of your screen, pull down on it to access a quick-reply box. Type your reply, hit Send and go back to what you were doing — all without leaving your current app.

TIME Software

iOS 8 Release Guide

Apple

It’s Wednesday, September 17. Happy iOS 8 Day, everyone. Here’s what to expect.

When will iOS 8 be available?

Apple never sets a hard-and-fast time on when it’ll start rolling out the update, but it’s historically started rolling new iOS versions out around 1pm Eastern time. Some years, I’ve gotten the update right away; some years, it’s taken until around 3pm or so. I can’t ever remember getting it before 1pm, though.

How do I get it?

If you do nothing, you’ll eventually get a pop-up message on your phone saying that the new software is available. You can check manually in a couple ways, though.

First, from your phone, open the Settings app, select General and then Software Update. Your phone will check with Apple’s servers to see if the update is ready for you. Again, just because it’s 1pm doesn’t mean you’ll get the update right away. Be patient.

Second, connect your phone to your computer, open iTunes on your computer, and the first heading under your phone’s page in iTunes contains information about which version of iOS it’s running. Click the “Check for Update” button every once in a while to see if the new software is available for you. I actually find this method to work better than trying to get the update directly from my phone. Your mileage may vary, but give it a try if you’re near a computer when the update starts rolling out.

Will it work on my phone?

iOS 8 is compatible with the iPhone 4S and up. It’ll also be available for the iPad 2 and up, all iPad Mini models, and the fifth-generation iPod Touch.

What should I do while I’m waiting?

If you’re going the iTunes route, make sure you have the latest version (click Help, then Check for Updates). And make sure your phone has enough storage space to accommodate the new software. You’ll want to clear out five gigabytes or more if you’re updating straight from your phone, just to be on the safe side. Here’s a guide with information about how you can do that. If you’re updating from iTunes, you won’t need to have nearly as much space free.

You’ll also want the latest version of iOS 7 — version 7.1.2 — in order to quickly upgrade to iOS 8. Use the steps in the “How do I get it?” section above to make sure you’re running the latest version.

What’s new in iOS 8?

There’s a new photo album and quicker, easier photo editing; there are enhanced voice and video messages; there’s a revamped keyboard that predicts which word you’re going to type next; there’s a new health and fitness app; there’s a cloud-based hard drive; there’s app- and book-sharing between family members; there are enhanced notifications and a few other bells and whistles thrown in.

Apple’s iOS 8 site is here; we have an iOS feature guide here.

Do I need to download iOS 8 right away?

No. In fact, it could be argued that it’s a good idea to wait until the first update to iOS 8 hits — usually a couple weeks later — for all the kinks to get worked out. If you don’t install iOS 8 right away, your phone will still work just fine. Sometimes it’s best to wait at least a day or two to see what people are saying about the update online. Are they complaining about shorter battery life? Are apps crashing more often? Does the interface seem sluggish? If so, it might be a good idea to hold off for a while until everything gets smoothed out.

TIME Apple

9 Awesome New Camera Features in iOS 8

Apple Worldwide Developers Conference
Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces IOS 8 in the Moscone Center in San Francisco, California, USA, June 2, 2014. John G. Mabanglo—EPA

A pretty good point-and-shoot camera just got better

fortunelogo-blue
This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

Gathered from around the Web. Some of these improvements made it into Apple’s WWDC keynote last week. Many did not.

– Permanent backup. Every photo and video you take is stored forever in the cloud – for a price. See The great photo shoebox in the sky.
– Exposure control. Slide your finger up and down to set the exposure. See Yahoo Tech.
– Photo editing. Crop, straighten, rotate, adjust light and color in the app. See iClarified.

Click here to see the rest of the list.

TIME Advertising

Apple Dares You To Burn the ‘Chicken Fat’ in Latest iPhone Ad

Ahead of the launch of its own health tracking software in iOS 8, Apple is plugging the iPhone’s capabilities as a fitness companion. In a new commercial, a variety of iPhone 5s owners make use of various wellness apps already available for the device, such as the Nike+ Running app, a golfing app that measures an athlete’s swing and a pedometer app.

The goofy song featured in the spot is “Chicken Fat” by Robert Preston. It was originally recorded as part of President John F. Kennedy’s fitness program and sent to schools around the country to rouse kids into exercising, according to CNET.

Apple’s own health software, called HealthKit, arrives as part of iOS 8 this fall.

TIME Apple

See Ya, Safari: Chrome for iPhone Is About to Get Faster

Good news for people using Google Chrome on iPhone and iPad: Apple is effectively lifting the speed limits on third-party browsers in iOS 8, allowing all of them to enjoy the same performance as Safari.

Currently, Safari uses a performance-boosting JavaScript engine called Nitro to render web pages. Other browsers, such as Chrome, haven’t been allowed to use this engine in the past, making them slower. That’s going to change in iOS 8, according to 9to5Mac. Even if you don’t use Safari, you may notice a bump in other apps that have built-in browsing functions, such as Facebook and Twitter.

Realistically, the policy change will produce just a modest uptick in performance. (I’ve used Chrome in iOS for years, and can’t say it’s ever felt sluggish.) Still, it’s nice to see Apple open up a bit, on this front as well as others.

iOS 8 is coming this fall.

[9to5Mac]

TIME Wearables

iOS 8 Has the Ingredients for a Pretty Good Apple Watch

Apple didn’t announce an iWatch at its Worldwide Developers Conference on Monday, nor was it expected to.

But what happened instead was just as intriguing: With iOS 8, Apple quietly laid the groundwork for what could be a great wearable platform, adding the raw ingredients to compete with Google, Samsung and others.

One of the big new features in iOS 8 is interactive notifications, which allow users to directly respond to e-mails, calendar appointments and social media posts without going into the app itself.

Yes, it’s one of several features that Apple “borrowed” from Android, and this may not be a coincidence given that actionable notifications are the centerpiece of Google’s own wearable platform, Android Wear. Instead of just seeing static notifications on your wrist, Android Wear will let you respond to them while leaving your phone in your pocket. Without a similar system in iOS, Apple would have been at a big disadvantage.

Interactive notifications aren’t the only smartwatch-friendly feature in iOS 8. Apple is beefing up Siri with streaming voice (so you can confirm what you’re saying as you talk), support for more languages and the ability to activate voice commands by saying “Hey, Siri.”

Siri will also be able to control home automation setups through HomeKit, which makes a lot of sense for a wearable device. You don’t want to have to dig out your phone or tablet just to tweak the thermostat or turn down the lights.

And of course, there’s Health and HealthKit, which will allow users to keep track of all their fitness tracking applications. Wouldn’t it make sense to keep an eye on these stats while exercising, without having to strap an iPhone onto your shoulder?

I’ll cheerfully admit that the case for an iWatch isn’t airtight. There are still tough hardware problems to solve, including battery efficiency, fashionability (for both men and women) and pricing, and I can still pick out some things I’d like to see on the software side (such as third-party app support in Siri).

But Apple’s never been known to tick every feature box at once. Instead, the company tends to take its time building up from a foundation. In hindsight, that’s exactly what Apple did as it built up iOS on the iPhone, before launching the iPad a few years later. With iOS 8, it’s a lot easier to believe that an iWatch is coming next.

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