TIME Internet

This Website Will Turn Your Tweets Into Beautiful, Ridiculous Poems

Twitter Says 23 Million of Its Users Are Not Actually Bots
A user scrolls through a Twitter feed. Bloomberg via Getty Images

Shall I compare thy Twitter feed to a summer's day?

Some people already seem to think tweeting is an art form — and a new website wants to take your 140-character quips and turn them into real, bona fide poetry.

This wonderful tool, called Poetweet, will simply scan your tweets and turn them into one of three poetic forms: either a sonnet, a rondel or an indriso. All you do is plug in your Twitter handle, choose the form you prefer and then sit back and wait for magical, poetic glory to emerge.

I tested it out with my personal Twitter account and got some interesting results. It’s not the best poem, necessarily, but my co-workers seem to think it captures my essence pretty well:

American Listicle
by Samantha Grossman

Same
PLAY BY THE RULES
Of human emotion at a Knicks game
One shiba who smiles about bubbles

I was on the edge of my seat!
First place at Mean Girls trivia
10/10 would eat
Have been posted on Facebook. via

Including two run-by fruitings.
Stop saying “screenshotted”
You’re missing important things

And Darth’s head!
For Ebola in New York City. Welp.
Offering laptop batteries instead?

Try it for yourself here, but don’t expect to feel like the next Wordsworth.

MONEY Internet

Want a New Broadband Provider? Google Expands Its High-Speed Internet to 4 More Cities

Google’s newly announced Fiber cities are already territory served by the likes of AT&T and Time Warner Cable.

TIME China

See China’s Internet Dilemma in One Screen Grab

Can the country really hope for entrepreneurial innovation while restricting Internet access?

Chinese state media today announced a plan to lure more “entrepreneurial” expatriates to China. The goal is to get people into startups and promote innovation, according to a site-leading story Wednesday on the English-language edition of the China Daily.

Running just below that article, though, was a piece headlined “VPN Providers Must Obey Rules.” VPN (virtual private network) providers are the companies that help people jump over China’s Great Firewall. In recent weeks, the government has targeted several such firms, slowing or stopping their services altogether.

The thing is, the “innovative” foreign entrepreneurs China seeks will almost certainly want unfettered access to the Internet. You know, crazy stuff like Twitter, Facebook and YouTube (all of which are banned in China). What’s a startup-loving Communist Party official to do?

TIME Internet

Google Fiber Expands Into Southeastern U.S.

Plans for Portland, San Antonio and other cities also in the pipeline

Google’s high-speed broadband service will soon be available to consumers in four metropolitan areas in the Southeastern U.S.

The company announced Tuesday that Google Fiber will soon be available in Atlanta, Charlotte, Nashville and Raleigh-Durham. Since the expansion encompasses the surrounding areas of these metropolitan hubs, Google says it’s technically expanding into 18 new cities total.

Google launched Google Fiber nearly three years ago in Kansas City and has since expanded the service to Austin, Texas and Provo, Utah. Google Fiber offers download and upload speeds of up to one gigabit per second, which the company says is 100 times faster than basic broad speeds, for $70 per month.

The service has mostly been viewed as a way to shame traditional ISPs into boosting their own broadband speeds. A speedier Internet benefits Google because it allows people to execute search queries faster, which lets Google serve users more ads.

Google didn’t offer a timetable for when customers can start buying Google Fiber in the new cities. It has also tapped Phoenix, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Antonio and San Jose as five additional cities where Google Fiber may be rolled out in the future.

TIME

Turkey Censors Facebook Pages That ‘Insult’ the Prophet Muhammad

Turkish islamists protest Charlie Hebdo in Istanbul
Turkish islamist protestors hold placards in front of Fatih Mosque during a rally against the French magazine 'Charlie Hebdo' over the publiction of a depiction of the Prophet Muhammad in Istanbul, on Jan 25, 2015. Sedat Suna—EPA

The court also threatened to block access to Facebook as a whole

(ANKARA, Turkey) — Turkey’s state-run news agency says a court has ordered authorities to block access in the country to Facebook pages that “insult” the Prophet Muhammad, in the latest move to censor the Internet.

The Anadolu Agency says a court in Ankara issued the order late Sunday. The court also threatened to block access to Facebook as a whole, if its order isn’t implemented.

The decision comes days after another court ruling to ban access in Turkey to web pages featuring the controversial cover of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo depicting the prophet.

Last year, Turkey closed down access to YouTube and Twitter after a series of leaked recordings suggested corruption by people close to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Turkey’s highest court later overturned the ban.

TIME Internet

This Video Sums Up How Our Behavior on Social Media Is Super Creepy

After watching it, you may become an anti-social networker

This new video produced by Relationship Science (a networking tool for business professionals) aims to show Internet users how interactions on social networks such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn are extra awkward when they occur in the real world.

For example, actress and Internet prankster Jena Kingsley spoofs new Twitter follower notifications by walking up to a random New Yorker and saying, “Ma’am. Hi, I just want to let you know that I’m following you. Just like, [to] give you an alert. You don’t have to do anything. Just know it! And enjoy it! …Just like, do whatever, and I’ll just watch. Is that creepy?”

INTERACTIVE: How Much Time Have You Wasted on Facebook?

Read next: Investors Are Putting Millions Into ‘Tinder For Elitists’

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Gadgets

How To Boost Your Wi-Fi With a Range Extender

phone
Getty Images

Here's how to get your Wi-Fi network to finally cover your whole house

I love the Wi-Fi service available in my home. I have my laptop, my smartphone and my tablet hooked up to it so I can surf the web from anywhere in the house. Well, almost anywhere.

The Wi-Fi gear is installed towards the back of my place. The further I go towards the front of the house, the worse the signal. If I try to do much more than check email in my front room, it takes forever. Streaming YouTube or Netflix is out of the question.

Fortunately, this is why they make wireless Wi-Fi range extenders. These are small boxes that can extend the range of your Wi-Fi signal by boosting it and retransmitting it.

What to buy

When looking for a wireless Wi-Fi range extender of your own, you don’t need to buy from the same manufacturer as your Wi-Fi box (though it doesn’t hurt, either.) The features you are looking for are easy set up, matching frequency band (2.4 and/or 5Ghz) and a signal-strength indicator.

Two-button set up

If you aren’t especially tech-savvy, you’ll want to stay away from extenders that require you to fiddle around with their internal settings through a web browser. Watch out for any product that comes with a CD or software.

The easiest set up is if both your Wi-Fi box and the expander have WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup). Pushing the WPS buttons on both your Wi-Fi box and your extender at the same time allows the systems to talk to each other and take care of the setup without you having to muck around with the settings.

Match the frequency

Is your Wi-Fi box running on a 2.4 or 5Ghz band? Make sure the extender matches. If you have a choice, boosting a 2.4Gz signal will go further, but boosting the short-range 5Ghz signal will be stronger. Dual-band extenders cover both.

Signal strength indicator

How do you know where to put your extender for the best signal boost? Too close to your Wi-Fi box and you won’t get the best coverage. Go too far and the weakened signal won’t do you any good. Look for extenders that give an indication of signal strength so you can find just the right spot.

Our recommendation

Netgear’s WN2500RP Dual Band Wi-Fi Range Extender ($54 on Amazon) has all the bells and whistles we covered here. We particularly like the LED lights that give you a great indicator of the signal strength.

That’s all there is to it. With a repeater in place, you can be streaming music in your garage or checking Facebook on the porch in no time. But what if an extender can’t get the Wi-Fi to the room you want? Then it’s time to consider a wired alternative.

Wired extender alternatives

1. If your home has been wired for cable, you may have a coax (cat 5) jack in your home’s Wi-Fi dead zone that you can use to extend your coverage. A coax adapter creates a wired connection from your router box to the are where you need coverage without having to run a cable.

It’s as simple as plugging one adapter into a coax jack next to your existing router and using an Ethernet cable to connect them. Then plug the second adapter into a coax jack in the area where you need Wi-Fi coverage and use an Ethernet cable to connect the adapter to the included, second Wi-Fi router. You should get the same speeds as your current W-Fi network and higher speeds than a Wi-Fi repeater will provide.

If this sounds like the option for you, we recommend the Actiontec Dual-Band Wireless Network Extender and Ethernet Over Coax Adapter Kit ($149.99 on Amazon).

2. A powerline adapter creates a wired connection from your router box to the room you need it without having to run a cable between the two areas. It does this by using the existing electrical system already built into your house.

It’s as simple as plugging one adapter into a power outlet next to your router and using an Ethernet cable to connect them. Then plug the second adapter into an electrical socket in the room where you need it and plug another Ethernet cable from that one into whatever computer, game console or smart TV requires an internet connection. Pair the two adapters by pressing the buttons on the front of them and you’re good to go.

A powerline adapter will likely provide a faster internet connection than a Wi-Fi repeater, though it will depend on how your house is wired. It’s ideal if you’re only trying to connect one device that has an ethernet port.

If this sounds like the option for you, we recommend the TP-LINK TL-PA4010KIT AV500 Nano Powerline Adapter Starter Kit ($40 on Amazon). It is small, powerful, secure and has an energy-saving mode. You can buy extra adapters if you want a signal in more than one room.

This article originally appeared on Techlicious.

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TIME Software

It Might Finally Be Time to Say Goodbye to Internet Explorer

Internet Explorer
The logo of Microsoft Corp.'s Internet Explorer 9 is displayed on a computer monitor in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, March 15, 2011. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Microsoft has unveiled 'Spartan,' a new browser for Windows 10

You’ve had a good 20-year run, Internet Explorer. But your days are probably numbered.

News of your potential demise started as whispers late last year when reports emerged that Microsoft was working on a wholly new Internet browser. They gained momentum about a week later with a leak detailing some of this mystery browser’s features. And they finally solidified Wednesday when Microsoft made it all official, unveiling for the first time “Spartan,” which could become one of the company’s only browsers not called “Internet Explorer” in two decades.

Microsoft hasn’t started digging your grave just yet. For now, you’ll have to share hard drive space with your lean, more stylish cousin once Windows 10 arrives sometime this year. And there’s always the chance your makers might give Spartan an IE designation before that.

But that seems unlikely. The whole point here is that you’re boring, washed up, old news.

Sure, you’ve still got nearly 60% of the global market share for browsers. But that’s peanuts compared to the world-dominating numbers you put up before Apple’s Safari, Google’s Chrome and Mozilla’s Firefox started nipping at your heels. And because Windows Phone has flatlined, you’ve barely made a blip on mobile, where most people are using the web these days.

But the biggest problem you face, Internet Explorer, is that you carry 20 years of brand baggage—and it’s not good. You’ve developed a reputation, however unfair, as slow and unwieldy. We’re long past the point where a makeover and a bigger number alongside your name can turn you into the prettiest browser at the ball. If you weren’t packaged along with Windows—long your biggest and most controversial advantage—there’s no telling how far your figures might fall.

Microsoft needs something fresh, something new. It needs Spartan.

Besides marking a fresh start, what does Spartan do that you don’t? It’s leaner, faster, designed with mobile in mind. Close integration with Cortana, Microsoft’s voice-activated assistant, means it will bring users relevant information like flight delays without even having to visit an airline’s website. Spartan’s note-taking mode turns the web into a canvas, letting users scribble notes on live websites and send off them to colleagues or friends. Spartan could even be made available for non-Windows platforms like Android and iOS, helping it gain market share on mobile, which is clearly the future.

How much longer you’ll be around, IE, depends on Spartan’s success. Perhaps your new rival won’t be as good as Chrome or Firefox, and Microsoft will shy away from it. Maybe having two baked-in browser options will confuse Windows 10 users, and they’ll stick with you out of habit. Or maybe Microsoft will call Spartan “Internet Explorer 12″ after all. But if Microsoft does decide to pull the plug on you, IE, despair not: 20 long years of service qualifies you for a dignified retirement.

TIME

Here Are the Movies and TV Shows Leaving Netflix in February

MSDBARE EC037
'Batman Returns' is one of the movies leaving Netflix in Feb. 2015. Warner Brothers

You've still got ten days to watch all those Bond movies

Netflix has announced its list of movies and TV due to disappear from its streaming service in February, and some of them will be badly missed.

A slew of Batman and James Bond movies won’t be renewed, according to the Hollywood Reporter, and a number of BBC television classics like Fawlty Towers and Blackadder are out, too.

But every end is a new beginning, and Netflix will be adding titles next month as well. The company never rules out movies returning to its streaming services either.

Leaving Feb. 1

Blackadder: Seasons 1-­4
A View to a Kill
Airheads
Apocalypse Now
Apocalypse Now Redux
Babes in Toyland
Batman & Robin
Batman Forever
Batman Returns
Cocoon: The Return
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels
Down Periscope
Fawlty Towers: Seasons 1­-2
For Your Eyes Only
From Russia with Love
Goldfinger
Hotel Babylon: Seasons 1-­4
Jane Eyre
Live and Let Die
Mad Max
MASH
MI­5: Seasons 1­-10
Nacho Libre
Never Say Never Again
Red Dwarf: Seasons 1­-9

Revenge
School Daze
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Movie
The Juror
Wishmaster
Zodiac

Leaving Feb. 2

Jem and the Holograms: S1-­3
My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic: S1­-4
Pound Puppies: S1-­3
Transformers Prime: S1-­3
Transformers: Rescue Bots

Leaving Feb. 5

Arbitrage

Leaving Feb. 23

Dredd

Leaving Feb. 28

Ali
Monkey Trouble
Panic Room

[THR]

Read next: Here’s What’s Coming to Netflix in February

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

MONEY state of the union

What Every Consumer Should Know Before Watching the State of the Union

State of the Union address 2014
Jonathan Ernst—Reuters

A sneak peek at what Obama’s State of the Union ideas could mean for your wallet.

This year, President Obama broke with tradition and started previewing his State of the Union proposals in the two weeks before the big event. He went to Tennessee to talk about community college, to Iowa to talk about broadband, to the Federal Trade Commission to talk about identity theft, and even to LinkedIn, where his senior adviser published his plan about paid time off.

As a result, we already have a pretty good idea of what we’re going to hear Tuesday night—and what it actually means. Here’s MONEY’s take on Obama’s proposals.

1) Obama wants to raise taxes on the rich and give credits to the less-rich; Republicans say, “Yeah, right.”

On Saturday, the White House announced a proposal to raise the capital gains tax from 25% to 28% and close what’s sometimes called the “trust fund loophole.” Obama wants to use the revenue to create a $500 tax credit for families with two working spouses; expand the credits available to families with children; expand the education tax credit for college students; and force businesses without retirement plans to automatically enroll workers in IRAs. Republicans have said this plan is a nonstarter.

While political observers agree that these ideas stand little chance of becoming law, consider this Obama’s opening argument in the coming debate about tax code reform. Read more >>

2) Obama’s broadband plan might just fix the internet.

Think of it as the internet’s “public option.” Some cities, like Chattanooga, Tenn., have much faster internet than the rest of us. That’s because municipalities have built their own broadband networks to compete with internet providers like Comcast and Time Warner Cable, driving prices down and speeds up.

So why won’t your town do the same? Because it’s often illegal—19 states have laws preventing municipalities from creating their own networks. Obama plans to ask the Federal Communications Commission to override these laws. We don’t yet know if the FCC has the authority to do that, but if it does, Obama’s plan could change the way Americans access the internet. Read more >>

3) You already have identity fraud protection tools that are better than the ones Obama proposed.

Obama’s plans to fight identity theft aren’t nearly as ambitious. First, he’ll call on Congress to pass a new law requiring companies to tell you within 30 days if your personal data is exposed. Second, he’ll call on banks and financial institutions to give you access to your credit score for free.

But that won’t do much to protect your money. Most states already have even stricter laws about security breach notifications, and by the time an identity thief has tanked your credit score, it’s way too late. Instead, you’re better off with the tools you already have: chip-and-signature credit cards and free credit reports. Here’s what you can do today to beef up your fraud protection. Read more >>

4) President Obama will push for paid sick leave and paid maternity leave—but look to your city hall instead.

The United States lags behind the rest of the world when it comes to paid time off: 88% of American workers have no paid family leave, 39% have no paid sick leave, and 15% don’t even have unpaid leave. Obama wants to change that, starting with the Healthy Families Act, a bill that would let workers earn up to seven days of paid sick leave. He also wants to sign a memorandum giving federal workers at least six weeks of paid leave after a child is born.

But listen for more details about his third idea, to help states and towns start their own sick leave programs. Local government has been leading the way on this issue: California, New Jersey, and Rhode Island offer paid family leave, and more than a dozen cities have started offering paid sick days. Change seems more likely at the local level, so what specifically does Obama want the federal government to do? Read more >>

5) There’s not much hope for the free community college plan—but that’s okay.

Obama wants to offer free community college to about 9 million students every year. If you think that sounds great, don’t get too excited. Experts say the plan is dead on arrival—it’s too expensive, Republicans will never support it, and community colleges wouldn’t even be prepared for the influx of students. But there are already a ton of ways to take community college classes for free, or close to it. Read more >>

6) Lower mortgage insurance premiums will save homeowners money. But will that really help the housing market?

The Federal Housing Administration plans to lower government mortgage insurance premiums from 1.35% of the loan amount to .85%. That translates to a savings of about $900 a year. The hope is that will encourage more Americans—especially first-time buyers—to enter the housing market. But there are other reasons why this demographic hasn’t started shopping yet. Plus, Republicans are afraid the change could put more homeowners at risk of default. Read more >>

7) Book your trip to Cuba today.

Here’s the rare foreign policy issue with implications for your spring break: Pack your bags for Havana! While the announcement wasn’t part of Obama’s State of the Union “spoiler” tour, Obama is sure to talk about his decision to reestablish diplomatic ties with Cuba—and new travel rules went into effect on Friday.

Starting January 16, you no longer need a special government license to travel to Cuba, and neither do airlines or travel agents. Since the rules have been loosened, prices are expected to fall—but make your plans before demand picks up. Read more >>

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