TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: December 15

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. To head off surging antimicrobial resistance — which could claim 10 million lives a year by 2050 — we need new drugs and better rules for using the ones we have.

By Fergus Walsh at BBC Health

2. Russia has squandered its soft power.

By Joseph S. Nye in the Journal of Turkish Weekly

3. A resurfaced idea from decades ago could finally unlock nuclear power’s potential to fight climate change.

By Josh Freed in the Brookings Essay

4. To take advantage of the power of diaspora communities to spur development at home, host nations must avoid a ‘one size fits all’ approach.

By by Jacob Townsend and Zdena Middernacht at The World Bank

5. The great recession is over but young and minority Americans are worse off than before.

By Matt Connoly in Mic

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

This Japanese Animated Flip Book Has Permanently Bent Our Minds

Beautiful Japanese animation comes to life with a quick flip of your thumb

lost-at-e-minor_logo

This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Are you in the middle of Christmas shopping? Not exactly sure what to buy your kid cousins? Here’s a good, entertaining gift they’ll enjoy. An old-fashion flip book! With a quick flip of your thumb, you can see the beautiful Japanese animation come to life and start moving off the page.

With negative space and secret chambers, the book’s artist, Mou Hitotsu, reveals magical stories in motion. Check out the video for a unique storytelling technique!

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: December 12

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Eel drones are the future of undersea warfare.

By Patrick Tucker in Defense One

2. This interactive map points the way to breaking gridlock in Washington and reconnecting Americans to the policy conversation.

By the Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative

3. Fear of terrorism has radically changed America’s public spaces.

By Susan Silberberg in The Conversation

4. By dividing Muslims, ISIS might be sowing the seeds of its own destruction.

By Mark Mardell in BBC

5. Yesterday, the FCC boosted access to free, high-quality internet at America’s public libraries, opening the door to digital opportunity for all.

By Reed Hundt in the Aspen Idea

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: December 11

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. A rule in the Affordable Care Act could make hospitals safer.

By Mike Corones at Reuters

2. As U.S. influence in the Middle East wanes, the United Arab Emirates is stepping up.

By Steven A. Cook in the Octavian Report

3. How do you extend banking services to an industry that’s illegal under federal law? Colorado’s answer is a credit union for pot growers and sellers.

By David Migoya in the Denver Post

4. A simple step — lighting pathways to latrines and latrines themselves in rural areas — can improve safety for women and girls.

By Dr. Michelle Hynes and Dr. Michelle Dynes at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

5. The International Olympic Committee vote to protect gay athletes is an important first step, but more work remains.

By Laura Clise in the Advocate

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

These Illuminating Photos of Dancers Will Blow Your Mind

Singapore-based photographer Tan Ngiap Heng has always been transfixed by dance

lost-at-e-minor_logo

This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

For Singapore-based photographer Tan Ngiap Heng, who has always been transfixed by dance and calls it a “lifelong obsession,” the exploration of the different dimensions of the dancing body has occupied his personal work for years.

In the ethereal Light Signature series, for instance, dancers with LED lights attached to their bodies leave behind light trails in long-exposure shots, embodying one-of-a-kind signatures or calligraphy that only they could have executed. It’s a fascinating meditation on life through dance. These works are part of Tan’s solo exhibition, Body of Work, which just started running this week at the ION Art Gallery.

(Via Ionorchard)

TIME apps

Microsoft Just Solved the Biggest Headache in Business

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Jeremy Lim — Getty Images / Flickr RF

Office Lens scans and saves contact information

Microsoft has an updated app that can scan and save business cards to your phone, letting you sweep your unruly stacks of business cards into the trash.

The new “business card” feature was released in an updated version of the Office Lens app for Windows Phone. Snap a photo of any business card, and the app will automatically crop the image down to the relevant text, format it for legibility and save it to OneNote, a Microsoft document management app.

Users can then search the text by keyword or automatically upload contacts to their phone — though you’ll still have to trash the paper business cards manually.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: December 10

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. The cheap oil American consumers are enjoying might be the result of an existential battle between Saudi Arabia and ISIS.

By James R. Rogers in First Things

2. Turns out the busts of the first dot-com era were great ideas.

By Robert McMillan in Wired

3. The return of American manufacturing and a skilled population hungry for jobs is reviving the Rust Belt.

By Joel Kotkin & Richey Piiparinen in the Daily Beast

4. Climate change might transform coal, oil, and gas reserves into financially-troubled stranded assets.

By Andrew Freedman in Mashable

5. A nonprofit boarding school for girls in Afghanistan is working to upend education there.

By Susan Daugherty in National Geographic

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Artificial Skin, Packed With Sensors, Mimics Sensations of the Real Thing

Though more research is needed

A new form of artificial skin, threaded with a network of artificial sensors, could recreate the sense of touch for people wearing prosthetic limbs, researchers revealed on Tuesday.

Researchers in Korea and the U.S. have developed a new form of ultra-thin sensors that can pick up sensations of heat, pressure and moisture, MIT Technology Review reports. The sensors are malleable enough to be woven into a thin layer of polymer. The breakthrough, researchers say, came when they packed the skin with enough sensors, up to 400 per square millimeter, to recreate the sensations of human touch.

“If you have these sensors at high resolution across the finger, you can give the same tactile touch that the normal hand would convey to the brain,” said contributing researcher Roozbeh Ghaffari.

Still, they cautioned that the skin was still several breakthroughs away from becoming a commercial product. Most crucially, scientists need to puzzle out better ways of wiring the skin into the wearer’s nervous system, so that no feeling is lost as the skin transmits its finely tuned signals to the brain.

Read more at MIT Technology Review.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: December 9

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Foreign policy isn’t public relations. The value of releasing the torture report outweighs the risks.

By Daniel Larison in the American Conservative

2. Innovation in design — not technology — might be the key to disrupting industries.

By Todd Olson in Medium

3. The simple notion of community potlucks is working to rebuild the torn fabric of Ferguson.

By Shereen Marisol Meraji at National Public Radio

4. A new poverty alleviation strategy is built on feedback and direction from the actual beneficiaries — putting people at the center of policy.

By Molly M. Scott in RealClearPolicy

5. Women are uniquely positioned to understand the impact of climate change around the world. They must have a seat at the table to set global policy.

By Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka in the Aspen Journal of Ideas

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: December 8

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. A new crowdfunded software tool for reporting sexual assault can reduce stigma and protect survivors.

By Shafaq Hasan in Nonprofit Quarterly

2. Millions of discarded laptop batteries could light homes in the developing world.

By David Talbot in the MIT Technology Review

3. A long overdue transparency plan for clinical trials will finally open results to the medical community and the public.

By Julia Belluz in Vox

4. Without role models or a road map through the upper ranks, women are leaving the tech industry at the mid-career point in droves.

By Sue Gardner in the Los Angeles Times

5. A new plan to drop strips of prairie into cropland helps preserve soil and battle climate change.

By Dylan Roth in Iowa State Daily

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

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