TIME Hungary

The Government of Hungary Is Going to Pay Its Young People Just to Live There

Revellers attend a concert by Hungarian metal band "Tankcsapda" during Budapest's one-week, round-the-clock Sziget ('Island') music festival
© Laszlo Balogh / Reuters—REUTERS Revellers attend a concert by Hungarian metal band "Tankcsapda" during Budapest's one-week, round-the-clock Sziget ('Island') music festival on an island in the Danube river August 10, 2009.

It's a bid to stem a brain drain that saw 31,500 Hungarians leave the country last year

The Hungarian government is so concerned about the number of young Hungarians leaving the country that it is offering to fly them home and pay them to stay.

“Come home, young person!” is a new program aimed at persuading Hungarians living abroad to return to their home country. A Hungarian government event in London on June 28 to promote the program touted its promise of a free return flight, a 100,000 forint monthly allowance (about $350) for a year, and the possibility of a job close to family, Hungary Today reports.

Szabolcs Pakozdi, managing director of Hungary’s job placement office, stressed to the audience that participants were not obligated to work in the country for a specific period of time.

The Hungarian Central Statistics Office estimates that 31,500 Hungarians left the country in 2014, a 46% increase over 2013, Reuters reports. In total, there are thought to be 350,000 Hungarians working abroad, most of them young singles. Many profess to be uncomfortable with the country’s abrupt political shift to the right under Prime Minister Viktor Orban.

In response, former street artist Gergo Kovacs ran a successful crowdfunding campaign the first week of July to put up enormous posters around the country. “If you come to Hungary,” read one, “Could you please bring a sane Prime Minister?”

TIME Race

Flo Rida, Emmitt Smith Back Out of Miss USA

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Vincent Sandoval—WireImage/Getty Images Rapper Flo Rida attends the 2015 BET Awards on June 28, 2015 in Los Angeles, Calif.

Donald Trump must be feeling pretty lonely right about now

Shortly after co-hosts Cheryl Burke and Thomas Roberts pulled out of the Miss USA pageant following Donald Trump’s offensive comments about Mexican immigrants, Miss USA performer Flo Rida and pageant judge Emmitt Smith have reportedly followed suit on Wednesday by bowing out of their duties as well.

Flo Rida had been scheduled to perform at the upcoming Miss USA pageant, scheduled to take place on July 12 in Baton Rouge, La, but decided to withdraw, reports the Associated Press. The “GDFR” musician had been scheduled to headline the event alongside “The Voice” winner Craig Wayne Boyd, “Somebody” singer Natalie La Rose and reggaeton artist J. Balvin, all of whom had dropped out prior to Flo Rida’s announcement.

Football star Emmitt Smith has also dropped out from his duties as Miss USA judge. In a press release issued last month, the former Dallas Cowboys running back had been named one of fives judges including HGTV “Property Brothers” personality Jonathan Scott, country crooner Jessie James Decker, E! News anchor Terrence Jenkins and former Miss Universe winner Zuleyka Rivera. Of those five names, only Decker’s remains listed as a telecast judge on the Miss USA website.

A spokesperson for the pageant could not confirm the news about the event’s judges and performers.

And Trump’s derogatory comments about Mexican immigrants has hurt more than just his Miss USA/Miss Universe pageant organization. In a statement released Wednesday, Macy’s announced its decision to end its business relationship with Trump, a move which follows NBC’s decision earlier this week to cut its ties with the real estate developer and his Miss USA/Miss Universe pageants.

“We are disappointed and distressed by recent remarks about immigrants from Mexico. We do not believe the disparaging characterizations portray an accurate picture of the many Mexicans, Mexican Americans and Latinos who have made so many valuable contributions to the success of our nation,” Macy’s said. “In light of statements made by Donald Trump, which are inconsistent with Macy’s values, we have decided to discontinue our business relationship with Mr. Trump and will phase-out the Trump menswear collection, which has been sold at Macy’s since 2004.”

Trump reacted to the news by releasing his own statement, declaring the end of the business agreement was his decision.

“I have decided to terminate my relationship with Macy’s because of the pressure being put on them by outside sources. While selling Trump ties and shirts at Macy’s is a small business in terms of dollar volume, my principles are far more important and therefore much more valuable. I have never been happy about the fact that the ties and shirts are made in China, and should I start a new product line somewhere in the future, I would insist that they are made in America.”

Miss USA/Miss Universe pageant president Paula Shugart told EW that the Miss USA pageant will proceed as scheduled for July 12, and that plans are being made to live stream the event online. Under her direction, the organization has also begun talks with prospective broadcasters. “We’re doing many, many different things at once,” Shugart said. “I kind of liken it to when the Golden Globes aired during the writer’s strike [in 2008]. Obviously, they couldn’t do their typical Golden Globes show, but that event went on and it was different the year of the strike. That’s kind of the approach I’m taking to this.

This article originally appeared on EW.com

TIME society

Justice Scalia Is Right—California Isn’t the Real West

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Zocalo Public Square is a not-for-profit Ideas Exchange that blends live events and humanities journalism.

But with immigration flatlining and the climate drying up, it may soon be

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was on the wrong side of most Californians, and history, in his cranky dissent to last week’s landmark ruling legalizing same-sex marriage across the nation.

But, much as we might hate to admit it, Scalia was right when, in the same dissent, he argued that California isn’t part of the American West. And in so doing, he raised—almost certainly unwittingly—an important question about California’s future.

Scalia made his point via a swipe at his colleagues for being unrepresentative of the United States as a whole (and thus being foolish to impose their views on marriage equality on the entire country). After noting that all nine justices attended Harvard or Yale law schools and that only one grew up in the Midwest, he wrote: “Not a single Southwesterner or even, to tell the truth, a genuine Westerner.” But what about Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is from Sacramento? Scalia’s answer came parenthetically in the next line: “California does not count.”

The words “California does not count” prompted an array of California pundits and leaders to fly off the handle, and challenge the justice. How dare he disrespect California? Of course we count! “Antonin Scalia Doesn’t Heart California—or Get Us, Either,” said an LA Times headline.

Kamala Harris, California’s Attorney General and leading candidate for U.S. Senate, coolly countered Scalia—an old-school “originalist” who thinks the U.S. Constitution should be read as it was in 1789—with a line from old-school rapper Ice T: “Don’t hate the playa, hate the game.” You should know that Ice T’s line was inspired by one from Gandhi’s 1927 autobiography (“Hate the sin not the sinner”) and St. Augustine’s 424 A.D. letter (“with love for mankind and hatred of sins”), so Harris out-originalist-ed the originalist Supreme Court justice by more than 1,300 years. Snap.

Despite all the California retorts, Scalia’s fundamental point went unchallenged, perhaps because it is so clearly correct: California doesn’t fit in the American West. Or anywhere else, for that matter.

Indeed, the best book ever written about California—Carey McWilliams’ California: The Great Exception, published in 1949 and never out of print—is about precisely this reality. California is singular, among Western U.S. states, in how it was settled so early and grew so quickly. Our Western neighbors have always been slower, more plodding, less populous places. And so California became a ragtag giant among much smaller states in the West, defined by our sudden and explosive changes in culture, economy, and demographics.

“One cannot, as yet, properly place California in the American scheme of things,” wrote McWilliams, adding: “To understand this tiger all rules must be laid to one side. All the copybook maxims must be forgotten. California is no ordinary state; it is an anomaly, a freak, the great exception among the American states.”

Sixty-six years after those words were published, California is still an exception in many ways—we’re the only state to break ground on high-speed rail, we’re responsible for half of the country’s venture capital, and no one is as crazy about direct democracy as we are. Some, like the economist Bill Watkins at California Lutheran University, predict that coastal California will become even more exceptional, an ever-more-glittery playground for the global super rich, with the rest of California being populated by the working-class people who serve them.

But there is another possibility—that our state (or at least everything except the other-worldly Bay Area)—continues to change in ways that make us more closely resemble other Western states.

The crucial shift in this direction has been that California is no longer a state of arrival, a destination for the world. Immigration is flat. Over the last generation, more people have been leaving California for other states than have been moving here from the rest of the country. The high cost of living has been the prime force for driving out mostly lower-income folks.

Those outflows have given us more in common with neighboring states like Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Oregon—in two ways.

First, those states, having received so many Californians seeking more affordable housing, have effectively been colonized by us, and are beginning to vote and eat more like California. All four now have In-N-Out Burger outlets, as does Texas, another big destination for exiting Californians. And as we made huge hikes in tuition and limited enrollment in our public universities, more California high school graduates are heading to public universities in neighboring states. (I’ve seen see this phenomenon firsthand since I teach at Arizona State University).

Second, those of us left behind in California are also more Western—because we are more likely to have grown up here. In previous generations, California was populated by people from Asia, Latin America, and the American Midwest and South. But in today’s California, the majority is homegrown—born and raised in California—and the newer arrivals are more likely to be from Las Vegas than Little Rock.

This more-homegrown California is also becoming much older—and less dynamic. We remain more ethnically and racially diverse than other Western states, but there are signs that our diversity lead is narrowing. While out-migration from California slowed somewhat during the recession, it’s likely to pick up as our economy comes back and California becomes even more expensive.

It’s not just demography making us more Western; drought has a role too. We’re becoming a drier place, with dustier landscaping that resembles Arizona and Nevada. Last year, we finally regulated groundwater, as other Western states have been doing for years.

Of course, these trends could all change. But if they persist, and California continues to Westernize, it will pose questions for our state and our country. The fact that California was so exceptional often accelerated change nationwide. As the historian H.W. Brands has noted, the American dream was of slow, tedious Poor Richard’s Almanac-style growth until California became a state—and gave us a new, faster dream of rapidly accumulated wealth. Will it be good for us, and for America (Happy Birthday, by the way), if we become just another Western state?

For now, you are right, Justice Scalia. California doesn’t really count as Western. But time has a way of changing the meaning of many things, including marriage and our messy state.

Joe Mathews is California & innovation editor for Zócalo Public Square, for which he writes the Connecting California column.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Education

My Immigrant Students Don’t Test Well—But They’re Learning

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Zocalo Public Square is a not-for-profit Ideas Exchange that blends live events and humanities journalism.

In this high school classroom, resilience is as important as textbooks

My mother immigrated to the United States when she was 16, in May of 1943. Though she didn’t know English when she arrived, she claims that by the fall she was able to read Silas Marner. I am sure that this is not true, but she graduated and went on to get a doctorate in psychology. Despite narrowly escaping annihilation in the Holocaust, she arrived in this country with a suitcase of virtual advantages: her parents were Viennese doctors; she had already learned a second language, having lived the war years in Bolivia; and she had read hundreds of books.

I have spent the past 20 years teaching immigrant high schoolers, many of those years in California, where 23 percent of K-12 students are English learners. Though there are some young immigrants, like my mother, who arrive in this country with a strong academic foundation, the vast majority of them do not. They come mostly from rural communities in Mexico and Central America and their schooling is rudimentary at best; few have read one book, never mind many.

When we talk about educating immigrant students, we focus almost entirely on teaching them English, but for many students the needs run deeper. In 2012, I taught at the Fremont High School Newcomers Program in the Fruitvale neighborhood of East Oakland. My students there were Mayans from Guatemala, who had had so little formal schooling we needed to teach some of them the alphabet. But they were not empty-handed. They also brought with them hope, resilience, and an ability to rely on their community that was rare in their adopted neighborhoods.

The idea for newcomer high schools and programs within regular high schools took off in the 1970s because this focused instruction proved so effective at helping students integrate linguistically and culturally. Since 2000, though, their numbers have fallen by at least half because of postrecession budget cuts and difficulty conforming to the testing requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act.

Fremont High School had a 15-foot-high, barbed-wire fence, a security guard, and seven full-time security officers patrolling the grounds. The fence and guards were not there to keep people out, but rather to keep the students in. The buildings were dilapidated and covered with graffiti. The windows were barred, as were the doors, the lockers banged up and dented. There was rarely toilet paper in the bathrooms, and if there was, it was strewn all over the floor. After lunch, the halls and patios were covered with paper plates and half-eaten pizzas, apple cores, and purposefully squished oranges; the air was filled with cursing and the ubiquitous odor of marijuana. When it was windy, napkins flew about, keeping low like the ghosts of birds who had died a violent death.

The Newcomers Program, in contrast, is a sheltered environment, where immigrant teens study the basic subjects in English and take intensive English classes. Here students form a community, sharing curse words and traditional dances, as well as their problems. When one student was beaten so badly that he was hospitalized just a few weeks after he arrived in Oakland, the students supported him. I was struck by his maturity and lack of anger: “They thought that if they hurt me, they would be strong, but they are not strong,” he said.

My students had strong emotional survival skills, but they didn’t know that there were planets or that the Earth revolved around the sun. They did not know that the world was divided into continents or that it was round. They did not think it was flat, either. They had simply never thought about what the Earth was beyond where they were from. They did not know the difference between a city and a state and a country. They knew they were in California, but they didn’t quite understand the difference between California and Oakland and the United States.

So in the Newcomers Program, we all started from the beginning. I began my class with the Big Bang and continued on to the creation of the solar system and Earth, to Pangaea and tectonic plates and the seven continents and dinosaurs and the evolution of Homo sapiens. That took months. There were so many gaps in their knowledge that I kept finding I had to go back farther. Once when I said, “Save a tree. Don’t waste paper,” they asked me, “What do trees have to do with paper?” So I went all the way back to the beginning to show them how paper was made and to teach them about deforestation in the Amazon. They had never heard of the Amazon, so I had to backtrack again.

I felt as though I was always backtracking, though I understood that what we were really doing was moving slowly forward, building not only on what I taught them but also on the strength of what they had brought with them. Like my mother, they had survived violence and carried unique advantages. They know that they are strong—like the young man who was beaten so badly—for they have traveled through Mexico on the top of the train called La Bestia; they have been robbed by coyotes and crossed the desert on foot; they have brought with them their looms to weave huipiles so that they will never forget the past even as they are making their future.

My students made tremendous progress, but this progress looked like failure on the standardized tests: Their academic abilities were still far below grade-level and all tests are in English, which they have not yet mastered. By the time they are seniors, they most certainly will not be able to read Silas Marner. My most gifted Mam-speaking student is now in 11th grade, and is taking Algebra II in a regular high school class. The young man who was beaten up in his early days in Oakland is also on track to graduate, but many students have dropped out to have babies and work. Yet, this is not necessarily a failure. They have learned to speak English and how to read and write. They know that the universe began with a Big Bang and that paper comes from trees.

Over the past 20 years there has been a constant debate about how to educate immigrants, and most of this debate has focused on the acquisition of English: what proficiency in English is, how long it should take a student to reach it, and whether total immersion, bilingual education, or sheltered classes taught in English works best. Recently there has been an emphasis on cultural awareness and how to integrate this into the curriculum. All of these things are certainly part of the equation, but I have learned that there is no algorithm, no one ideal way to address all the needs of all English learners.

Because newcomers bring with them a great variety of skills and come from such diverse academic and cultural backgrounds, programs must be flexible. We cannot serve these students if we let ourselves be controlled by state and federal edicts or by the data accumulated by standardized tests and scientific studies. We must meet students where they are, keeping in mind what they have brought with them. There should be more vocational programs for students who are not on a college track and partnerships so that students can take hands-on courses in such fields as health technology, mechanics, and carpentry. When schools provide newcomers with the extra support they need and a safe, nurturing, and rigorous academic community, they will make progress. This progress will not necessarily be evident in the data, but it will be evident to them. This progress will be the foundation for a new generation of Americans.

Anne Raeff teaches English learners at East Palo Alto Academy. Her novel Clara Mondschein’s Melancholia came out in 2001 and she has just completed a memoir. She wrote this for “Reimagining California,” a partnership of the California Endowment and Zócalo Public Square.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME History

The Civil War Was Won by Immigrant Soldiers

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Zocalo Public Square is a not-for-profit Ideas Exchange that blends live events and humanities journalism.

One in four Union fighters was foreign-born

In the summer of 1861, an American diplomat in Turin, Italy, looked out the window of the U.S. legation to see hundreds of young men forming a sprawling line. Some wore red shirts, emblematic of the Garibaldini who, during their campaign in southern Italy, were known for pointing one finger in the air and shouting l’Italia Unità! (Italy United!). Now they wanted to volunteer to take up arms for l’America Unità!

Meanwhile, immigrants already in the United States responded to the call to arms in extraordinary numbers. In 1860, about 13% of the U.S. population was born overseas—roughly what it is today. One in every four members of the Union armed forces was an immigrant, some 543,000 of the more than 2 million Union soldiers by recent estimates. Another 18% had at least one foreign-born parent. Together, immigrants and the sons of immigrants made up about 43% of the U.S. armed forces.

America’s foreign legions gave the North an incalculable advantage. It could never have won without them. And yet the role of immigrant soldiers has been ignored in the narrative of a brothers’ war fought on American soil, by American soldiers, over issues that were uniquely American in origin.

In the 1860s, Confederate diplomats and supporters abroad were eager to inform Europeans that the North was actively recruiting their sons to serve as cannon fodder. In one pamphlet, Confederate envoy Edwin De Leon informed French readers that the Puritan North had built its army “in large part of foreign mercenaries” made up of “the refuse of the old world.”

Embarrassed Northerners claimed the Confederacy exaggerated how many foreign recruits made up the U.S. armed forces—pointing to immigrant bounty jumpers who enlisted to collect the money given to new recruits, deserted, and then re-enlisted. The underlying premise was that foreigners were not inspired by patriotic principle and, except for money, had no motive to fight and die for a nation not their own.

It was not true. Immigrants tended to be young and male, but they enlisted above their quota. Many immigrants left jobs to fight for the Union, enlisting before the draft—and the bounties—were even introduced. They volunteered, fought, and sacrificed far beyond what might be expected of strangers in a strange land.

Historians have done an excellent job of retrieving the voices of native-born, English-speaking soldiers. But the voices of the foreign legions remain silent—thanks to the paucity of records in the archives, the language barriers posed to historians, and, perhaps, a lingering bias that keeps foreigners out of “our” civil war.

Why did they fight? What were they fighting for? Recruitment posters in the New York Historical Society provide hints at the answers. One poster reads: Patrioti Italiani! Honvedek! Amis de la liberté! Deutsche Freiheits Kaempfer! (Italian patriots! Hungarians! Friends of liberty! German freedom fighters!) Then, in English, it urges “250 able-bodied men . . . Patriots of all nations” to fight for their “adopted country.”

One immigrant mother gave testimony in 1863 to an antislavery convention as to why her 17-year-old son was fighting for the Union. “I am from Germany where my brothers all fought against the Government and tried to make us free, but were unsuccessful,” she said. “We foreigners know the preciousness of that great, noble gift a great deal better than you, because you never were in slavery, but we are born in it.”

Following the failed Revolution of 1848, thousands of young Germans fled to America. They took up arms in what they saw as yet another battle in the revolutionary struggle against the forces of aristocracy and slavery. “It isn’t a war where two powers fight to win a piece of land,” one German enlistee wrote to his family. “Instead it’s about freedom or slavery, and you can well imagine, dear mother, I support the cause of freedom with all my might.”

In another letter written to his family in Europe, a German soldier gave a pithy explanation of the war: “I don’t have the space or the time to explain all about the cause, only this much: the states that are rebelling are slave states, and they want slavery to be expanded, but the northern states are against this, and so it is civil war!”

So it was civil war, but for many foreign-born soldiers and citizens, this was much more than America’s war. It was an epic contest for the future of free labor against slavery, for equal opportunity against privilege and aristocracy, for freedom of thought and expression against oppressive government, and for democratic self-government against dynastic rule. Foreigners joined the war to wage the same battles that had been lost in the Old World. Theirs was the cause not only of America, but of all nations.

Don H. Doyle is the author of The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War. He is McCausland Professor of History at the University of South Carolina. Follow him on Facebook. He wrote this for What It Means to Be American, a national conversation hosted by the Smithsonian and Zócalo Public Square.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME France

Chaos at French Port as Migrants Continue to Storm Trucks Headed for the U.K.

A strike has shut the port, causing long tailbacks of vehicles that migrants are trying to board, at times forcibly

In chaotic scenes over the past week, hundreds of migrants in the northern French port of Calais have been trying to jump onto trucks bound for the U.K.

The migrants, most of whom had fled war, persecution and poverty in the Middle East and Africa, took advantage of a strike by French MyFerryLink workers on Tuesday. The striking workers forced the port and the Channel Tunnel, which links France to the U.K., to close, causing long tailbacks of trucks on highways around Calais.

Footage shows migrants desperately trying to board the vehicles, sometimes jumping onto moving trucks, breaking locks or attempting to hold onto the underside of the carriages.

“Drivers were unable to open their windows or leave their vehicles for fear of either being threatened or would-be stowaways getting on board,” Don Armour, the Freight Transport Association’s international manager, told the Guardian.

There are believed to be about 3,000 migrants living in a squalid makeshift camp near Calais. They are determined to reach the U.K., where they say they’ll have the chance of a better life.

On Wednesday, British Prime Minister David Cameron called the scenes in Calais “totally unacceptable” and vowed to work more closely with French authorities. U.K. ministers are considering sending extra border-control officials, sniffer-dog teams and equipment to strengthen fences around the port and rail crossings.

But several of the city’s politicians have accused the British government of not doing enough to calm the situation. Philippe Mignonet, the deputy mayor of Calais, said the city had been “sacrificed” by the British and Europe, reports the Guardian.

The chaos in Calais comes as European Union leaders struggle to decide what to do with huge waves of migrants entering Europe via risky sea journeys across the Mediterranean.

At heated talks in Brussels on Thursday night, E.U. leaders agreed to relocate 40,000 migrants who have arrived in Italy and Greece, plus a further 20,000 currently in camps outside the E.U., to member states over the next two years, reports the BBC.

But there would not be mandatory quotas for taking in refugees, the leaders said.

 

TIME White House

Watch a Mashup of President Obama Getting Heckled

"As a general rule, I am just fine with a few hecklers—but not when I’m up in the house"

President Obama is no stranger to hecklers.

But, every man has his limits. Watch the video above to see how the Commander-in-Chief has responded to various interruptions throughout his two terms in office.

One key takeaway: You can heckle him all you want, but when you’re an invited guest to the White House, too much heckling can get you thrown out.

As Obama said after being heckled at a recent event at 1600 Pennsylvania: “I am just fine with a few hecklers—but not when I’m up in the house. You know what I mean? You know, my attitude is if you’re eating the hors d’oeuvres—you know what I’m saying?”

 

TIME White House

Obama Shames Immigration Heckler at LGBT Pride Event

"Listen, you’re in my house," he told the heckler

The crowd that attends the annual White House reception celebrating LGBT Pride Month is generally a welcoming one. That was largely the case on Wednesday for President Obama, save for a rowdy heckler.

Before Obama could get into his speech, he was interrupted by an attendee screaming, “No more deportations.” The President said he’s generally “just fine” with a few hecklers, but that when you’re in his home, you should play by his rules.

“Shame on you,” Obama told the person, who was eventually escorted out by security. “You shouldn’t be doing this.”

The President later joked, as the heckler continued: “You know, my attitude is if you’re eating the hors d’oeuvres, you know what I’m saying…” Vice President Joe Biden, who was standing beside him, offered a quick “I do.”

Obama added, “And drinking the booze…”

After the heckler was escorted out, the event carried on. The President, however, was interrupted again later on in his speech. “The transsexuals love you,” an audience member shouted after Obama acknowledged the hardships faced by the transgender community.

To that, he replied, “Well, that’s the kind of heckling I can always accept.”

Check out a clip of the scene at C-Span.

TIME Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders Calls for Broader End to Deportations

Democratic Presidential candidate and U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) greets supporters during a visit to his Iowa campaign headquarters on June 13, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa.
Scott Olson—2015 Getty Images Democratic Presidential candidate and U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) greets supporters during a visit to his Iowa campaign headquarters on June 13, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa.

White House hopeful says he would expand protections to include parents of those in the United States illegally.

Democratic White House hopeful Bernie Sanders on Friday called for ending deportations for not just the children who were brought to the United States as young children but also their parents who are in the country illegally. It was an effort to outflank Sanders’ chief rival for the Democrats’ leading contender for President, Hillary Clinton.

Speaking to Latino elected and appointed officials in Las Vegas, the Vermont Senator delivered a rousing sermon about economic populism and social justice a day after Clinton offered remarks to the same crowd. While there were fewer reporters crowded on the press riser, Sanders still drew a full ballroom on the glitzy Vegas Strip and brought the crowd to its feet several times.

“Brothers and sisters, there is a lot of work to be done,” said Sanders, a political Independent who caucuses with the Democrats. “But when we stand up to those people on top whose greed has done so much damage to this country … there is no limit to what this great country can accomplish.”

Sanders said he backs President Barack Obama’s policy that spared some younger immigrants in the country illegally deportation. It was particularly helpful to children whose parents were brought them to the country as children, occasionally known as Dreamers.

Sanders he would expand the program to “parents of citizens, parents of legal permanent residents and parents of Dreamers.”

“We cannot and we should not be talking about sweeping up millions of men, women and children, many of whom have been in this country for years,” Sanders said to applause. He said splitting up families—leaving children in the United States while parents or cousins were sent home—was against the country’s values.

Sanders, for sure, is running behind Clinton in polling and fundraising. But he has been workmanlike in building a campaign. His slow-and-steady approach has captured the imagination of Democrats’ most liberal corners, who are skeptical if not hostile to a second Clinton being President.

Sanders has been tapping into that sentiment, all the while avoiding any direct criticism of the former Secretary of State and Senator. Clinton remains the party’s favorite candidate and has a far larger political machine behind her.

“American kids who deserve the right to be in the country they know as home,” said Sanders, whose father came to the United States from Poland. “We are a nation of immigrants. That is, in fact, the strength of America.”

As Sanders made his way toward the exit, conference participants rushed toward him, cell phones held overhead to snap pictures and arms stretched out to shake his hand. He may not win the Democrats’ nomination but he certainly spoke to the party’s base.

TIME Money

Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan Donate $5 Million for Undocumented Immigrant Scholarships

Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg attend the Breakthrough Prize Awards Ceremony in Mountain View, Calif. on Nov. 9, 2014.
Kimberly White—Getty Images for Breakthrough Prize Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg attend the Breakthrough Prize Awards Ceremony in Mountain View, Calif. on Nov. 9, 2014.

“America was founded as a nation of immigrants”

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan have announced they’re donating $5 million to a scholarship fund to help undocumented immigrants in the U.S. attend college.

In a Facebook post, Zuckerberg said he made the donation to the fund, called TheDream.US, to allow hundreds of young immigrants the chance to receive a legal education.

“America was founded as a nation of immigrants,” wrote Zuckerberg. “We ought to welcome smart and hardworking young people from every nation, and to help everyone in our society achieve their full potential. If we help more young immigrants climb the ladder to new opportunities, then our country will make greater progress.”

Zuckerberg’s investment will create a scholarship fund to enable over 400 immigrants in the San Francisco Bay Area the opportunity to attend college. “Over the coming years, our hope is to prepare hundreds of students to graduate with associate or bachelor’s degrees so they can build meaningful new careers,” he wrote.

Per The Huffington Post:

TheDream.US provides up to $25,000 for four-year colleges or up to $12,500 for associate’s degrees. To be eligible forTheDream.US scholarships, Dreamers must have the ability to stay in the U.S. under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, called DACA, or Temporary Protected Status.

Zuckerberg became directly involved in immigration reform in 2013 when he co-founded FWD.US, an organization that boasts it is “mobilizing the tech community in support of policies that keep the American Dream achievable in the 21st century, starting with comprehensive immigration reform.”

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

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