MONEY home prices

The World’s 10 Most Expensive Houses—and Who Owns Them

Feast your eyes on some of the priciest homes on the planet.

The owners of the world’s most luxurious houses can be a mysterious bunch. We all know who owns Buckingham Palace, but does anyone recognize the name Tim Blixseth? Or know the Indian billionaire who built a 27-story apartment building just for himself? We’re guessing not.

Well, the mystery ends here. Using information provided by CompareCamp.com, we’ve got a rundown of the world’s 10 most expensive houses—modern castles, really—and the people lucky enough, and rich enough, to own them.

 

  • 7 Upper Phillimore Gardens

    Location: London
    Value: $128 million
    Details: This 10-bedroom prep school turned mansion has an underground swimming pool, a sauna, gym, cinema, and even a panic room. That’s all in addition to an interior covered in marble, gold, and priceless artworks.
    Owner: Olena Pinchuk—daughter of Leonid Kuchma, Ukraine’s second president. She is known for being the founder of the ANTIAIDS Foundation and a friend of Elton John.

  • Kensington Palace Gardens

    Location: London
    Value: $140 million
    Details: Located on London’s Billionaires Row, the already tricked-out pad will soon add an underground extension with a tennis court, health center, and auto museum.
    Owner: Roman Abramovich—a Russian billionaire and owner of the private investment firm Millhouse LLC. He’s probably best known in the West as the owner of the English Premier League’s Chelsea Football Club.

  • Seven The Pinnacle

    Yellowstone Club near Big Sky, Montana.
    Erik Petersen—AP Photo/Bozeman Daily Chronicle

    Location: Big Sky, Montana
    Value: $155 million
    Details: The largest property in the Yellowstone Club, a private ski and golf community for the mega-rich, the house has heated floors, multiple pools, a gym, a wine cellar, and even its own ski lift.
    Owners: Edra and Tim Blixseth—Real estate developer and timber baron Tim Blixseth cofounded the Yellowstone Club, but the club’s bankruptcy, a divorce, and other troubles have seriously reduced his wealth in recent years.

  • Hearst Castle

    Indoor Pool at Hearst Castle, designed in style of Roman baths.
    Doug Steakley—Getty Images/Lonely Planet Images

    Location: San Simeon, California
    Value: $191 million
    Details: The 27-bedroom castle, used in the movie The Godfather, has hosted John and Jackie Kennedy, Clark Gable, Winston Churchill, and other famous figures.
    Owners: William Randolph Hearst’s trustees—The castle, built by the country’s first newspaper magnate, is now a heritage and tourist site and part of the California Park System.

  • Ellison Estate

    Location: Woodside, California
    Value: $200 million
    Details: Less a house than a compound, this 23-acre property is home to 10 buildings, a man-man lake, koi pond, tea house, and bath house.
    Owner: Larry Ellison—Co-founder of Oracle and the third-richest man in the world in 2013, according to Forbes.

  • 18-19 Kensington Palace Gardens

    Location: London
    Value: $222 million
    Details: Another property on Billionaires Row, 18-19 sits alongside the home of Prince William and Kate Middleton. This particular residence has 12 bedrooms, Turkish baths, an indoor pool, and parking for 20 cars.
    Owner: Lakshmi Mittal—The head of Arcelor Mittal, the world’s largest steel manufacturer, and, according to Forbes, one of the 100 richest men in India.

  • Four Fairfield Pond

    Location: Sagaponack, New York
    Value: $248.5 million
    Details: This 29-bedroom home sits on 63 acres and has its own power plant. Inside, there are 39 bathrooms, a basketball court, bowling alley, squash courts, tennis courts, three swimming pools, and a 91-foot long dining room.
    Owner: Ira Rennert—Owner the Renco Group, a holding company with investments in auto manufacturing and smelting. He also has holdings in metals and mining.

     

  • Villa Leopolda

    Villefranche-sur-Mer, south-eastern France, the villa of Leopolda, property of the widow of businessman Edmond Safra, Lilly Safra.
    Eric Estrade—AFP/Getty Images

    Location: Cote D’Azure, France
    Value: $750 million
    Details: This 50-acre estate includes “a commercial sized green house, a swimming pool and pool house, an outdoor kitchen, helipad, and a guest house larger than the mansions of most millionaires,” according to Variety. The house was famously used as a set in the 1955 Hitchcock classic To Catch a Thief.
    Owner: Lily Safra—A Brazilian philanthropist and widow of Lebanese banker William Safra. Her husband died when another one of the couple’s homes burned down, apparently due to arson.

  • Antilia

    India, Maharashtra, Mumbai, Kemp's Corner, Antilia aka the Ambani building on Altamont Road.
    Alex Robinson/AWL Images Ltd.—Getty Images

    Location: Mumbai, India
    Value: $1 billion
    Details: The Antilia isn’t even really a home in the traditional sense. This 27-story, 400,000-square-foot building has six underground parking floors, three helicopter pads, and requires a 600-person staff just to maintain it.
    Owner: Mukesh Ambani—India’s richest man, with a net worth of $23.6 billion, according to Forbes. Ambani made his money running Reliance Industries, an energy and materials company.

  • Buckingham Palace

    Buckingham Palace
    FCL Photography—Alamy

    Location: London
    Value: $1.55 billion
    Details: Technically still a house, but certainly not for sale, the Queen’s residence was valued at roughly $1.5 billion by the Nationwide Building Society in 2012. The property holds 775 rooms, including 19 state rooms, 52 bedrooms, 188 staff rooms, 92 offices, and 78 bathrooms.
    Owner: The British Sovereign—Currently Queen Elizabeth II, who has ruled since February 6, 1952.

    See CompareCamp.com’s full graphic, including more images of these home, here

    Read next: 4 Things Millionaires Have in Common, Backed by Research

MONEY buying a home

Why Firemen Are More Likely to Own a Home than Economists

Firefighters
Many public service workers such as firemen own their homes. Michael Dwyer—Alamy

A new study shows which professions are most- and least- likely to be homeowners. The results may surprise you.

What do firemen, police officers, and farmers have in common? They’re all more likely to own homes today than economists, jewelers, and accountants.

These are the results from a newly released study, done by Ancestry.com, looking at the relationship between profession and home ownership today and over time. The website teamed up with the University of Minnesota Population Center to analyze Census data between 1900 and 2012, creating a century-spanning log to show how ownership changed over the decades.

Looking at the most recent 2012 data, the research found that 79% of policemen and detectives own a home, yet only 64% of economists do. Farmers (81%) and firemen (84%) are in the top ten professions most likely to own a house, ranked above jobs like accountants (76%), and far higher than members of the armed forces (33%). Nationwide, the data shows 64% of the population owns their home.

Another surprising finding: the stereotype of the starving artist isn’t necessarily reflected in the data—at least for some industries. It turns out 63% percent of artists and art teachers own homes, as well as 62% of musicians and music teachers, 63% of authors, and 57% of entertainers. It’s not all roses for the artistic class, though. Just 37% of actors and actresses own a house, and that number sinks to 23% for dancers and dance teachers.

Toddy Godfrey, a senior executive at Ancestry.com, points out that there are both high and lower income professions on the most-likely-to own list, suggesting there isn’t a direct relationship between high wages and ownership. Typically lucrative professions like optometry tend to own, but so do lower-paid trade and public service workers.

“You look at some of the jobs on the top of the list, and they’re clientele based, or teachers, or others who are community rooted,” says Godfrey. He speculates that professions most likely to own “have a long-term connection to the community they live in.” That reasoning may also explain why tradesmen tend to buy instead of rent. Godfrey guesses many of these workers are tied to regional manufacturing, and therefore are more likely to set down roots.

Another trend the data suggests is that temporary and highly mobile workers tend to avoid homeownership. That could explain why so few military service members own houses, as they can be redeployed elsewhere and may choose to move once their service ends.

Finally, Godfrey highlights the fact that while ownership took a hit in the bust, the majority of Americans own their home. That’s up from 32% in 1900, though most of the growth happened pre-1960. “Maybe it’s come down a point in the last few years, but it’s held pretty steady at two thirds,” says Godfrey.That trend has been pretty constant.”

Top 10 Professions for Home Ownership in 2012

1. Optometrists: 90%

2. Toolmakers and Die Makers/Setters: 88%

3. Dentists: 87%

4. Power Station Operators: 87%

5. Forgemen and Hammermen: 84%

6. Inspectors: 84%

7. Firemen: 84%

8. Locomotive Engineers: 84%

9. Airplane Pilots and Navigators: 83%

10. Farmers: 81%

Bottom 10 Professions for Home Ownership in 2012

1. Dancers and Dance Teachers: 23%

2. Motion Picture Projectionists: 27%

3. Waiters and Waitresses: 27%

4. Counter and Fountain Workers: 28%

5. Members of the Armed Forces: 33%

6. Service Workers (except private households): 34%

7. Bartenders: 35%

8. Housekeepers and Cleaners: 35%

9. Cashiers: 36%

10. Cooks (except private households): 36%

MONEY Face to Face

Here’s What to Say When a Nosy Friend Asks How Much Your House Cost

what to say when someone asks how much your house cost
mattjeacock—Getty Images

Keep these three responses in your back pocket to get you off the hook.

More than 3 million homes have been sold in the U.S. so far in 2014, according to the National Association of Realtors. And if you’re among those who recently purchased, you’re likely still celebrating and decorating your new digs.

Before you’ll have even hung pictures on the walls, however, you’ll surely have to deal with this awkward question from some prying family member, friend or neighbor: “How much did you pay for this place?”

People pose the question for different reasons. For example, it may be that your friends from the city are thinking of moving to the suburbs, and want to get a sense of what they could get for their money, says clinical psychologist and financial coach Eric Dammann.

Or it may simply be good old-fashioned competition.

“A lot of times nosy questions have to do with low self-esteem and how we measure up,” says Dammann. “From childhood on, we’re always comparing ourselves to other people. In adulthood, one of the ways to compare ourselves is money.” In such cases, sharing numbers may heighten tension and envy between friends.

Assuming the person who’s asking is someone you know—as opposed to a nosy neighbor over the hedgerow—you probably have a sense of what’s motivating the question, and whether you feel comfortable answering. If you don’t feel comfortable, you shouldn’t feel pressured to divulge. Here are three ways you can avoid revealing what you paid, without leaving the person feeling dissed:

USE YOUR SPOUSE FOR BACKUP: “Jim and I decided that we wouldn’t talk about the price.”

One option is to use a non-disclosure pact with your partner as an excuse, says Laurie Puhn, a professional couples mediator and author of Instant Persuasion: How to Change Your Words to Change Your Life. This takes a bit of the pressure off you, laying some of the blame instead on your partner (who is hopefully not present in the moment). Also, your unified front will seem more impenetrable to a pushy pal.

“You don’t want to come off as dishonest,” says Puhn. “So discuss in advance with your husband or wife what you’re going to tell other people, and in the moment, use your partner as an ally.”

KEEP IT LIGHT: “How much did we pay? More than I would have liked!”

A joke can do double duty, diffusing tension and tacitly conveying that you’d prefer not to respond. While this response is more subtle, “most people will pick up on the cue,” says Dammann.

Still, since it’s not direct, you might want to change the subject quickly.

An easy way is to use your joke as a jumping off point for a conversation about the real estate market. For example, “I just read that the price of existing homes year-over-year has been on the rise for 30 consecutive months. Can you believe that? And there’s so much competition in our little town—our realtor was telling us about a house that got four offers after the first open house!”

TELL THE TRUTH: “I’m sorry, I’m not really comfortable talking about the cost.”

If your friend really presses you, you don’t need to be dodgy. Just be honest. This comes off as authentic, since you’re talking about your feelings. And you’re putting the questioner in a bind—by pushing for a response, he or she knows that he will be making you even more uncomfortable since you’ve already said so.

Keep in mind that if your friend really wants to know what you paid, there are other ways of finding out, since real estate transaction information becomes public record. But that doesn’t mean you need to discuss the cost. “Just because you’re asked a question doesn’t mean you have to answer it,” says Puhn.

MONEY Millennials

10 Places Millennials Are Moving For Bigger Paychecks

140918_CAR_MillennialsMove_NewOrleans
With 5.1% unemployment and low-priced homes, New Orleans is a top town for millennials. John Coletti—Getty Images

Over the past five years, Gen Yers have decamped for some surprisingly pricey cities in search of a higher-paying job.

Millennials are on the hunt for high-paying jobs, and they’re moving to some unexpected places to find them, according to a new report out today.

Bruised by the rough post-recession job market, Gen-Yers are moving from lower-cost cities to places with a higher cost of living but more plentiful and lucrative jobs, a RealtyTrac analysis of Census data from 2007 through 2013 found.

“Millennials are attracted to markets with good job prospects and low unemployment, but that tend to have higher rental rates and high home-price appreciation,” says Daren Blomquist, vice president of RealtyTrac. “It’s a tradeoff.”

In the 10 U.S. counties with the biggest increase in millennials, the average unemployment rate is 5.2%, well below the national average of 6.1%. The average household income is $62,496, vs. $51,058 nationally. The median home price is $406,800 (nearly double the U.S. median of $222,900), while a three-bedroom apartment rents for $1,619 a month on average, just over the national average of $1,550.

Riding the robust job market in the D.C. area, two counties in Northern Virginia with unemployment rates below 3.7% top the list. But not all places that the 69-million-strong millennial generation are flocking to are expensive. New Orleans, where the median home price is $140,000, edged out San Francisco, where tech jobs may be plentiful but the median home price is nearly $1 million.

New Orleans, where the unemployment rate is 5.1%, is a transportation center with one of the busiest and largest ports in the world, as well as tons of jobs related to the local oil refineries. Denver, Nashville, and Portland, Ore., all top 10 areas, offer median home prices below $300,000 and a diversity of jobs in technology, health care, and education.

Perhaps the most surprising millennial magnet: Clarksville, Tenn, the fifth largest city in the state behind Nashville, Memphis, Knoxville, and Chattanooga. Forty five miles north of Nashville, it benefits from spillover from that city’s strong job market, but Clarksville also has its own industrial base, plus nearby Ft. Campbell and Austin Peay State University. The unemployment rate: 4.7%.

Here are RealtyTrac’s top 10 destinations for millennials on the move:

Rank County State Metro Area % Increase in Millennial Population, 2007-2013 Milennials % of Total Population, 2013 Median Home Price, April 2014 Average Monthly Apartment Rent (3 beds), 2014
1 Arlington County Va. Washington, DC 82% 39% $505,000 $1,996
2 Alexandria City Va. Washington, DC 81% 34% $465,000 $1,966
3 Orleans Parish La. New Orleans 71% 30% $140,000 $1,190
4 San Francisco County Calif. San Francisco 68% 32% $950,000 $2,657
5 Denver County Colo. Denver 57% 33% $270,000 $1,409
6 Montgomery County Tenn. Clarksville 46% 31% $128,000 $1,016
7 Hudson County N.J. New York 44% 31% $330,000 $1,643
8 New York County N.Y. New York 43% 32% $850,000 $1,852
9 Multnomah County Ore. Portland 41% 28% $270,000 $1,359
10 Davidson County Tenn. Nashville 37% 29% $160,000 $1,131
MONEY home prices

Slowing Price Gains Reveal Little Exuberance for Homes

140826_REA_HousePricesSlow
Dimitri Vervitsiotis—Getty Images

Looking ahead, the rate of home price growth may slow even further, especially if mortgage rates increase.

While housing prices continue to rise, the rate of that growth nationally slowed in June, according to a leading gauge of the real estate market.

The S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices showed that home prices throughout the country increased 6.2% since last year. Meanwhile, separate indexes that track 10 and 20 large U.S. cities showed gains of 8.1% during the same time period.

Though decent, those gains were a far cry from the double-digit growth in home prices late last year. Moreover, all three indexes showed deceleration from the prior month, and every city measured experienced lower year-over-year price growth.

“Home price gains continue to ease as they have since last fall,” said David Blitzer, chairman of the index committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices. “For the first time since February 2008, all cities showed lower annual rates than the previous month. Other housing indicators — starts, existing home sales and builders’ sentiment — are positive. Taken together, these point to a more normal housing sector.”

Blitzer also cautioned that an increase in interest rates, which Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen hinted at last week, may mean further deceleration if they lead to higher mortgage rates.

“Bargain basement mortgage rates won’t continue forever,” he said. “Recent improvements in the labor markets and comments from Fed chair Janet Yellen and others hint that interest rates could rise as soon as the first quarter of 2015. Rising mortgage rates won’t send housing into a tailspin, but will further dampen price gains.”

To be sure, home prices are still going up across the board. All cities reported higher prices for the third consecutive month, and price growth in markets such as Dallas and Denver has continued unabated.

Nationally, average home prices in June are back to Spring, 2005 levels. But city composites are still roughly 17% down from their peak prices in June/July of 2006.

MONEY Housing Market

POLL: What’s the Best Thing About Where You Live?

There are probably lots of great things about your town. But if you had to pick just one, what would it be?

 

MONEY home prices

These Places Have the Best Housing Bargains in the Country

Scioto River and Columbus, Ohio skyline at dusk.
Columbus, Ohio, skyline at dusk. VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm—Getty Images

As the market tries to adjust to a post-recession world, there are plenty of deals to be had. But there are also plenty of markets where housing is more unaffordable than ever.

With housing price growth slowing down nationwide, and a gradually improving economy, many Americans who’ve been waiting to make a decision on a home are wondering if it’s time to buy or sell.

Here’s some data that might help with those decisions: A new study by RealtyTrac determined which housing markets are more and less affordable relative to their historical averages. The real estate data firm computed the numbers by determining what percentage of an area’s median income would be needed to make payments on a median-priced home in over 1,000 counties, and then compared that to the county’s historical price-to-income ratio over the past 14 years.

So which areas are looking like a bargain? RealtyTrac identified 66 counties with a combined population of 16 million (about 5% of the total survey area’s population) where home prices are lower than historical averages and the unemployment rate was 5% or lower—well below the national unemployment rate of about 6.2%.

This, according to RealtyTrac, is the best way to measure affordability because many markets with cheap housing don’t have quality jobs to offer to new residents. Some undiscovered markets are “undiscovered for good reason because their economies are struggling,” says Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. “A good example of that is Detroit. Affordability alone isn’t an indication that a market is a good one to buy in or invest in.”

The study found Columbus, Ohio; Oklahoma City; Tulsa; Akron, Ohio; Omaha; Greenville, S.C.; and Des Moines, Iowa, are among the markets with an advantageous combination of employment and affordable housing.

Courtesy of RealtyTrac

Why is housing in these areas undervalued? Basically, the overall real estate market is still recovering from the recession, and prices have yet to adjust in certain markets as investors are slow to discover lesser-known areas with strong economic growth. This pro-buyer environment might not last much longer, though. Blomquist says there’s been an uptick of institutional investor purchasing in Columbus, which means prices are set to rise in the near future.

There’s good news for prospective sellers as well. Prices in over one-third of the counties surveyed are less affordable than their historical averages, suggesting homes there may be over-valued. These cities include San Francisco; Portland, Oregon; Austin; San Antonio; Houston; and Atlanta.

Courtesy of RealtyTrac

Should sellers jump at the high prices? If you’re a homeowner in one of these markets, a lot of things are going your way. As prices rise, institutional investors are rushing to invest in these markets, inflating values even further. But there’s also a lack of supply because builders are still reluctant to start new construction.

“It’s a sellers market still [in these areas] because you have a combination of strong demand from this new breed of buyers and low supply because builders are very hesitant,” says Blomquist. “If you’re a seller, you’re not competing against too many others and you have a long liner of buyers.”

However, he cautions that for sellers looking to buy another home in the same market, less affordable home prices may be a double-edged sword. “The catch-22 is if you’re trying to buy too — if that’s the case, then it’s not a great market to buy in.”

MONEY mortgages

WATCH: How You Can Benefit from Easier Mortgages

Mortgage loans are easier to get now. Here's how you can take advantage of it.

MONEY home prices

America’s ‘Gayborhoods’ Are a Lot More Expensive, a Lot Less Gay

Castro Street in San Francisco is decorated in rainbow flags and balloons for Gay Pride month.
Castro Street in San Francisco. Cammie Toloui—Alamy

What becomes of a trendy gay neighborhood when housing prices soar and straight people move in?

As gay acceptance has risen over the years, gay people have increasingly moved away from historically gay neighborhoods, such as the Castro in San Francisco and Chicago’s Boystown. Simultaneously, more and more straight individuals and couples have felt comfortable enough to move into these neighborhoods. As a result, many gay neighborhoods—call them “gayborhoods”—aren’t nearly as gay as they used to be.

That’s the gist of a new book called There Goes the Gayborhood? by Amin Ghaziani, an associate professor of sociology at the University of British Columbia. His research traces the changing face of gay neighborhoods and explores the implications of these shifts in cities around the U.S.

For instance, from 2000 to 2012, the number of same-sex couple households increased in nearly every neighborhood in Seattle, with one glaring exception: Capitol Hill, described as the “center of the city’s gay and counterculture communities,” according to Wikipedia, experienced a 23% decrease in same-sex households over the same time span, the Seattle Times noted.

“This isn’t unique to Seattle,” Ghaziani explained. As gays have moved far beyond gayborhoods to other parts of cities and into small towns and the suburbs, a “straightening” has taken place in neighborhoods like Capitol Hill.

Much of Ghaziani’s research is based on Chicago’s Boystown, where he lived for nearly a decade, and where the idea for the book was born. “My friends and I began to notice changes in the character and composition of the neighborhood,” he said to the Chicago Tribune “We’d notice more straight couples holding hands and more baby strollers. That became a symbol. Oftentimes a sex store would close and a nail salon would open in its place.”

The shifting demographics must be viewed as a sign of growing acceptance—that of straight people in traditionally gay neighborhoods, and of gay people throughout the land. Still, many of the sources quoted in Ghaziani’s book worry that the blurred lines could mean that much of what makes a gayborhood special will disappear. In an op-ed he wrote recently, Ghaziani quoted Dick Dadey, who was the executive director of Empire State Pride Agenda in the 1990s, explaining, “there is a portion of our community that wants to be separatist, to have a queer culture.” Still, Dadey said, “most of us want to be treated like everyone is,” and, “we want to be the neighbors next door, not the lesbian or gay couple next door.”

Then there are the financial implications of all of these shifts. “It’s impossible to discuss gay neighborhoods without considering economic factors like rent and housing prices,” Ghaziani said in an email to MONEY. He pointed out some data from Trulia in the book showing that several traditionally gay neighborhoods, like West Hollywood and New York’s West Village, are extremely expensive places to live.

Meanwhile, according to 2013 report from Trulia, prices in urban U.S. neighborhoods have been increasing at a faster pace than the suburbs, and prices soared in gay-friendly city neighborhoods in particular:

Neighborhoods where same-sex male couples account for more than 1% of all households (that’s three times the national average) had price increases, on average, of 13.8%. In neighborhoods where same-sex female couples account for more than 1% of all households, prices increased by 16.5% – more than one-and-a-half times the national increase.

These numbers are backed up by other research, such as that highlighted earlier this year by Richard Florida, the celebrated urban theorist and author of The Rise of the Creative Class. In a City Lab post, Florida summed up recent research indicating “a connection between gay neighborhoods and some of the markers of gentrification,” and that “neighborhoods that began the decade with larger concentrations of gay men saw greater income growth, and, especially in the Northeast, greater population growth as well.”

Ghaziani writes, “I don’t think gayborhoods are dying.” But Florida doesn’t sound quite as convinced, writing, “As these areas of the city continue to change, potentially pricing out some of the gay couples who moved in decades ago, gayborhoods could just as easily become a thing of the past.”

MONEY Millennials

The 15 Most Affordable Cities for Millennials

Greeting Card from Augusta, Georgia. ca. 1943
Universal Images Group (Lake County Discovery Museum)—Alamy

Finding an affordable place to live is one of the biggest challenges for millennials. This list should make it easier.

Last week, we told you about the 15 most expensive cities for millennials to live in based on a recent study by RealtyTrac. This week, we bring you the other side of the story: the 15 areas that are the most affordable, and the most attractive, to young people.

To quickly review how this list came to be, RealtyTrac ranked counties with at least 100,000 people by the percentage of median income one needs to spend in order to make a median housing payment or pay an average rent bill on a three-bedroom property. To make sure these cities are actually places young people would want to live, the company only included areas where millennials make up at least 24% of the population, and where the percentage of millennials has increased over the past six years.

So which area wins the most-affordable crown? It depends if you’re renting or buying. As is often the case, renting is significantly more expensive than making payments on purchased property. The best county for buyers—Richmond County, Georgia, which includes the city of Augusta—will cost an owner 10% less of their median income than if they were renting in Bossier Parish, Louisiana, the most affordable area for leasing.

For renters, Bossier Parish, home to Bossier City, will cost about 20% of the area’s median income. Average rent on a three-bedroom is a paltry $943. There aren’t as many familiar names on this list as its less affordable cousin, but some relatively major cities do make an appearance. Dane County, ranked ninth, includes Madison, Wisconsin; a beautiful city that also houses one of the nation’s top universities. Franklin County, home to to Columbus, Ohio, also offers a great city for millennials to live. Minneapolis, Minnesota’s Hennepin County even squeaks in at number 14.

Those willing to purchase a home are going to see a very different ranking. While Baltimore and Philadelphia are some of the least affordable places to rent, they’re actually one of the more affordable cities for buyers. Philadelphia County and Baltimore City rank 5th and 6th respectively, and payments will cost buyers around 14% of their area’s median income. Other highlights are Milwaukee, Minnesota, which comes in 9th, and Columbus’s Franklin County, which makes another, more highly ranked appearance.

Want the whole list? Here it is:

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