TIME viral

Groom Sweeps Bride Off Her Feet Only to Drop Her Seconds Later

Don't worry: they were both okay and successfully married each other

Well, this is definitely one way to make an entrance. At a recent wedding in Arizona, the groom, apparently overcome with lots of romantic feels, decided to scoop up his bride as they made their way into the reception. He begins running as the bride proudly raises her bouquet into the air, the guests whooping in delight. Everything seems great until … boom. He takes a tumble — a serious tumble — and they both crash into the pavement.

But don’t worry. The bride, Julia Magdaleno, told ABC News that the fall looks a lot worse than it really was. They suffered some minor cuts and bruises and were a bit sore the next day, but otherwise, everything was okay. In fact, the bride thought the whole thing was hilarious. Though perhaps not as hilarious as this other memorable wedding mishap:

 

TIME Marriage

Millennial Brides Don’t Want to Wear White

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A pink bride holding a pink bouquet MIXA—Getty Images/MIXA

A new poll sheds light on some generational differences in our views on wedding traditions--including who pays for the party

White weddings might soon be a thing of the past, because almost half of Americans (46%) disagree with the expectation that brides should wear white.

A new Harris Poll shows that wearing white is just one of a few wedding traditions that’s changing in an increasingly frugal climate. 46% of millennials now think that the bride’s family shouldn’t have to pay for the wedding, and only 56% think the groom’s family should pay for the rehearsal dinner. But millennials care about engagement rings more than older people do: 43% of millennials say they care about having an expensive ring, but only 21% of people over 68 think the engagement ring needs to be expensive. (Probably because older people know that a fancy ring isn’t the main ingredient of a long, successful marriage.)

Other traditions are hard to shake. Three quarters of respondents of all ages said bridal showers should be women-only, and 84% say that the bride’s father should still walk her down the aisle. 70% said the groom should ask the bride’s parents before proposing.

Even more surprising: 51% (and 47% of millennials) think the bride and groom should “wait” to have sex until after the wedding. This one sounds slightly dubious — are half of engaged couples in sexless relationships? Not likely.

 

 

 

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