TIME LGBT

See Some of the First Same-Sex Marriages in States That Didn’t Previously Recognize Them

The Supreme Court on Friday struck down the ban on same-sex marriages in all 50 states. These images show some of the first gay marriages Friday in states like Texas, Nebraska and Georgia, where same-sex marriages previously weren't recognized

TIME Crime

3 People Indicted in College Student Death in Georgia Jail

Mathew Ajibade's body was found in restraints at a country jail in Georgia

(SAVANNAH, Ga.) — A grand jury has indicted has indicted three people in the death of a 21-year-old college student whose body was found in restraints at a county jail in Savannah, Georgia.

Two of those indicted are ex-jail employees and one was a contract health worker.

Indictments returned Wednesday charge all three with involuntary manslaughter.

Mathew Ajibade died Jan. 1 after he was booked at the Chatham County jail on a domestic violence charge. His body was strapped in a restraining chair in an isolation cell. Ajibade’s death certificate says the coroner ruled his death a homicide caused by blunt-force trauma.

Sheriff Al St. Lawrence last month fired nine deputies in connection with Ajibade’s death. The Georgia Bureau of Investigation was called in, but its findings have not been made public.

TIME georgia

Escaped Tiger From Georgia Zoo Kills Man and Is Put Down

White tiger georgia tbilisi
Reuters A white tiger, that had escaped from its enclosure during flooding, lies on the stretchers after it was killed by police in Tbilisi, Georgia, June 17, 2015.

Flooding in the country of Georgia that began last Saturday has killed at least 12 people

A tiger that escaped from a zoo in Tbilisi, Georgia during extreme flooding was shot and killed Wednesday after it took the life of relief worker.

“The tiger is liquidated,” interior ministry spokeswoman Nino Giorgobiani told the Washington Post.

The tiger had escaped captivity over the weekend along with a slew of other zoo animals. Before the attack, zoo officials had said that the tiger, along with eight lions and seven other tigers, had been found dead, according to the Guardian.

Flooding in Georgia began last Saturday and has killed at least 12 people, including three zoo workers.

[Washington Post]

 

TIME Television

First Transgender Contestant to Appear on the U.S. Version of Big Brother

"I'm the Beyoncé of my life story"

The American version of Big Brother will welcome its first transgender “houseguest” on the upcoming 17th season, following in the footsteps of its British cousin.

Transgender contestant Nadia Almada won the fifth season of the U.K. show and now Audrey Middleton, a digital media consultant from a small town in Georgia, will aim to repeat that feat on the American version, Variety reports.

Born Adam, the 25-year-old Middleton applied to be on the show on the CBS website as a loyal “superfan” and was open about her transgender identity in her application.

In her bio on CBS, she says that she “loves to get dressed up and look fabulous head-to-toe, but also isn’t afraid to get dirty.” She also says that she enjoys “fabulous hair, lashes, makeup,” and is “the Beyoncé of her life story.”

Middleton plans on discussing her transition throughout the show and on the premiere episode of the season, Variety says. “I think there’s a chance I could be a misunderstood hero, but I’m going to be a hero,” she said in her introduction video.

[Variety]

TIME animals

See the Zoo Animals That Escaped in Georgia

Hippos and bears, among other animals, escaped from a Tbilisi zoo this weekend after heavy flooding. At least a dozen people, and several animals, have died in the floods

TIME Behind the Photos

Southern Rites: The Heartbreaking Story of Justin Patterson’s Death

In HBO's Southern Rites, photographer Gillian Laub goes to Mount Vernon, Ga., a racially divided town

When Gillian Laub started photographing the racially divided town of Mount Vernon, Ga. — with its segregated homecomings and proms — she stumbled onto the story of Justin Patterson, a 22-year-old black man who was killed, on Jan. 29, 2011, by Norman Neesmith, a 62-year-old white man.

Patterson’s story, which further divided Mount Vernon, is the subject of Southern Rites, a HBO documentary premiering on May 18.

Dedee Clarke, Justin’s mother, spoke to TIME.

Gillian LaubSha’von, Justin and Santa, 2012

“When I got the call, it was around 3.45 in the morning and my youngest son, Sha’von, said that Justin had been shot and he was dead… For a long time, Sha’von wouldn’t talk about it, he would only tell me things in bits and pieces. It wasn’t until 2013 that he told me the whole story. I think that the thing that bothered him the most was that the gun was actually aimed at him. Justin looked back, saw that and pushed Sha’von out of the way and took the shot himself. It’s something I don’t think he’ll really recover from. He just has to learn to live with it. It’s a day-by-day process, but I don’t think anybody can ever be the same.

The first time I met Gillian was in 2010. My youngest son, Sha’von, was attending the prom that year, and she was photographing it. I thought the work she was doing was great. But I didn’t know that much about her, I just knew that the pictures that she was taking were important. I didn’t get to know her on a deeper level until my son, Justin, died.

[When Gillian shifted her focus to what had happened to Justin], I was, at first, a little reluctant. But I could just see her passion and drive as she talked to me and I knew at that point that she really cared. I was more relaxed around her and I began to open up. But I just remember saying that it wasn’t going to be pretty sight because I was just not in the right state of mind, and she understood that.

You have to feel some kind of compassion when you do this. And Gillian had that; she felt it. And because she felt it, I believed that shows in her work.

Of course, it was very difficult to see Norman Neesmith in Gillian’s film. I had always made it a point not to really look directly at him. And to see him up close and personal in the film, it was very hard. It was hard to watch some of the things that he said. It’s just hard to hear that he never really acknowledged that his daughter invited them into his home. I felt that he thought he was a victim. I don’t think he understands that Justin had a life. He had a daughter. And she will never have her father.

Gillian’s work makes me feel that my son’s death was not in vain. That’s the one thing that I can hope for. I’m hoping that it will help someone. It’s too late for my son, but maybe it can help somebody else.

I’m hoping it will help other mothers to see that you can still survive that kind of pain and. I’m a survivor because God says I am. Everything that I believe in is because of God. He’s the reason that I’m here because there’s no way I could have done any of this by myself. I felt like nobody really cared because the story wasn’t out. It was a while before it was even in a paper. To see it now and to know that people really care, it does make me feel supported. It definitely does. I’m thinking that everyone will have an idea of what happened. This is real life. These people are real people; they feel that pain continuously every day.

My goal here is for people to know and understand that there’s still, very much so, a lot of injustice in this world and something has to be done about it.”

Southern Rites by Gillian Laub premieres on HBO on May 18. A book, published by Damiani, will be released in June.

TIME Education

Rally Responding to American Flag Trampling Shuts Down Georgia University

Students walked on a flag last week to protest racism

A Georgia university shut down on Friday in preparation for a huge demonstration after a video of protesters trampling an American flag went viral.

Valdosta Police Chief Brian Childress told the Valdosta Daily Times that thousands of people who “just want to come down here and support the American flag” were expected to descend on Valdosta State University Friday afternoon.

The rally is a response to a video of students walking on a flag last Friday to protest racism, reported NBC affiliate WALB.com.

“After further discussions with local law enforcement and in the interest of the safety of our…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME Military

Air Force Security No Longer Banned From Saying ‘Have A Blessed Day’

The greeting was briefly changed to "have a nice day"

After a brief hiatus, Air Force security guards at a Georgia Air Force base can once again wish visitors a “blessed day” after a rule change stemming from a complaint was overturned Thursday.

Mikey Weinstein, CEO of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation, spoke with officials after receiving comments from 13 service personnel — nine of whom were practicing Christians. He convinced a commander to change the greeting to “have a nice day,” the Air Force Times reports.

News of the rule change at Robins Air Force Base quickly went viral, prompting officials to review the decision and eventually have it reversed.

“The Air Force takes any expressed concern over religious freedom very seriously … ‘have a blessed day’ as a greeting is consistent with Air Force standards and is not in violation of Air Force Instructions,” the Air Force said in a statement.

Weinstein said he plans to consult with lawyers to discern if any of his company’s clients wish to sue over the matter.

TIME Crime

Georgia Postpones 2 Executions Over ‘Cloudy’ Drugs

TIME.com stock photos Health Syringe Needle
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

Georgia's supply of lethal injection drug pentobarbital may have gone bad

Georgia indefinitely postponed two executions Tuesday to allow officials to analyze its current batch of lethal injection drugs, which “appeared cloudy” prior to an execution that had been scheduled Monday night.

The execution of Kelly Gissendaner, who would’ve been the first woman put to death in the state in 70 years, was called off by the Georgia Department of Corrections Monday night after the state discovered its supply of pentobarbital, a short-acting barbiturate, looked murky.

Georgia officials made the decision after consulting with a pharmacist, according to The New York Times, even though state officials said that its pentobarbital supply had been tested and was cleared for use.

MORE: Georgia Convict First to Be Executed After Botched Oklahoma Lethal Injection

The state then announced Tuesday that the executions of both Gissendaner and Brian Keith Terrell, who was set to die by lethal injection on March 10 for the 1992 murder of John Henry Watson, were indefinitely postponed. Gissendaner was convicted of arranging the 1997 murder of her husband, Douglas Gissendaner.

A number of states have had trouble carrying out executions due to problems obtaining drugs. A series of lawsuits from death row inmates who are challenging the constitutionality of states’ lethal injection protocols have also led to stays of execution nationwide.

MORE: Ohio Looks to Shield Lethal Injection Drugmakers

Like many states, Georgia has turned to compounding pharmacies, which are not under federal oversight, for their drug supplies while also passing a secrecy law that keeps participating pharmacies anonymous. Georgia has not released the name of its drug supplier, and it’s unclear when its current batch of pentobarbital was due to expire.

TIME Crime

Georgia Shooting Leaves 3 Dead, 2 Wounded, Questions Unanswered

Joey Terrell
Habersham County Sheriff's Department/AP Sheriff Joey Terrell of Habersham County, Ga.

The gunfight apparently pitted a former sheriff's deputy against the sheriff

Authorities were attempting to piece together Monday the sequence of events in a shooting incident in Georgia over the weekend that left three people dead and a sheriff and his deputy injured.

Habersham County Sheriff Joey Terrell and deputy William Zigan found a woman dead on Sunday while investigating a domestic disturbance at the Clarkesville home of former deputy Anthony Gianquinta, according to local news reports. The woman was later identified as Gianquinta’s ex-wife.

The officers fled the scene after a suspect, believed to be Gianquinta, shot and wounded both of them. When law enforcement officials returned to the scene later, Gianquinta and a third, unidentified man were both dead on the premises.

Both Terrell and Zigan were hospitalized at Northeast Georgia Medical Center and were said to be improving.

[NBC News]

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com