TIME Soccer

Abby Wambach Kissing Her Wife After Winning the World Cup Will Warm Your Heart

in the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Final at BC Place Stadium on July 5, 2015 in Vancouver, Canada.
Kevin C. Cox—Getty Images U.S. soccer player Abby Wambach embraces her wife Sarah Huffman at FIFA Women's World Cup final at BC Place Stadium, Vancouver, on July 5, 2015

She and her wife Sarah Huffman have been married since 2013

Among the many happy images to come out of the July 5 USA win over Japan in the women’s soccer World Cup final is that of Abby Wambach running to the sidelines to kiss her wife Sarah Huffman in celebration.

Wambach was playing in her fourth (and probably last) World Cup.

The two have been married since 2013, but that bond was not legally recognized in all 50 states until the Supreme Court ruling that legalized gay marriage on June 26.

It was an especially powerful moment for Wambach, 35, who holds the record for international goals but who many speculate will retire after a long, successful career.

She has been open about how devastating it would be to have to retire without a World Cup win and took emotional and physical risks to make the championship a reality.

“It’s like love,” she told the New York Times on July 5.

Twitter, at least, saw the moment as a dual victory, and all the sweeter for it, with many fans expressing their approval and realization of the moment’s symbolic importance.

TIME 2016 Election

Exclusive: Republicans in Early Nominating States See Opposition to Gay Rights Fizzle

GOP pollsters gauge attitudes about marriage and discrimination in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada

Republicans in the first four states to weigh in on the GOP presidential nomination are not standing lockstep against gay marriage and largely support measures that protect LGBT people from discrimination, according to a series of GOP polls obtained by TIME.

Those fast-shifting attitudes could offer an opportunity for the Republicans presidential contenders to moderate their stances and better position themselves for a head-to-head contest against the Democratic nominee in 2016. By and large, Americans have shifted toward acceptance of gays marrying, and most candidates reflected that view in reacting to last week’s Supreme Court ruling that expanded marriage to same-sex couples nationwide.

While a few candidates reacted with fiery statements—former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee called for civil disobedience and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker called for states to pass a constitutional amendment to undo the ruling—likely Republican primary voters greeted it with a collective shrug. In New Hampshire, 55% of likely Republican primary voters said they would accept the Supreme Court’s ruling as the law of the land. In Iowa and Nevada, 46% of Republicans said they agreed. Forty-one percent of Republicans in South Carolina, which is the most conservative of the first four states, said they could accept the court’s ruling.

Of course, that means the majority in three of the first four states remain opposed to same-sex marriage. But the acceptance is still a remarkable development, with roughly half of Republicans willing to move past the same question that drove scores of voters to cast ballots against gay marriage in recent elections. Nationally, the poll found 39% of Republicans support gay marriage and, when the question is asked differently, 43% of Republicans say same-sex couples should have the same rights as straight couples. Only 33% of Republicans in the national survey would back an amendment to the Constitution to ban same-sex marriages in the states.

That is perhaps why some Republicans did not react strongly to the Supreme Court ruling. “While we have differences, it is time for us to move forward together respectfully and as one people,” Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush said Americans should “love our neighbor and respect others, including those making lifetime commitments.” Added Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida: “While I disagree with this decision, we live in a republic and must abide by the law.” None embraced same-sex marriage.

The next question, which is less clear among the Republican hopefuls, is anti-discrimination legislation to finish what the Supreme Court started. While the court ruled that gays and lesbians have the right to wed, many Americans live in places where same-sex couples can face legalized discrimination when it comes to housing, employment or finances.

In Congress, moves are underway to introduce a comprehensive anti-discrimination bill in the coming weeks. According to the same polls, such protections are popular among Republicans—as long as there are provisions that Americans would not have to betray their religious convictions.

Nationally, 59% of Republican voters say there should be laws banning discrimination against gays and lesbians in employment, housing, credit, education and public accommodations, such as hotel stays or restaurant service. Among Republican millennials—young voters—that number reaches 79% support. Twenty-three percent of Republicans surveyed said they would be more likely to support a candidate who endorses a non-discrimination bill.

In the crucial first four states, a majority of Republican voters support anti-discrimination laws as long as there were provisions that would allow, say, a Southern Baptist Church to refuse to marry a same-sex couple. A broad anti-discrimination proposal would have the backing of 67% of New Hampshire Republicans and 61% in Nevada.

The poll results, which are set to be released on Friday, were provided early to TIME. The study was conducted by a panel of respected GOP pollsters who have advised presidential candidates and their campaigns: Alex Gage (Mitt Romney), Jan van Lohuizen (George W. Bush) and Adam Geller (Chris Christie), as well as House Republicans’ survey mavens Brock McCleary and Robert Jones. The poll was funded by Project Right Side, an organization founded by openly gay former Republican National Committee Chairman Ken Mehlman. The other sponsor was the American Unity Fund, a project backed by billionaire investor Paul Singer, who publicly supports gay rights. Billionaires Seth Klarman, a Republican donor, and Dan Loeb, a Democratic donor, are backers of the groups, as well.

The national survey interviewed 2,000 voters, including 798 Republicans or Republican-leaning voters. Separately, the pollsters also asked 500 registered voters in each of the early nominating states their opinion, including 205 likely Republicans in Iowa, 216 likely Republican in New Hampshire, 232 likely Republicans in South Carolina and 194 likely Republicans in Nevada. Results for the full sample have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 2.2 percentage points; it is 4.4 percentage points for the state-specific samples. The surveys were conducted June 9 to 17, in the lead-up to the June 26 ruling.

TIME Chris Christie

Christie Opposes Exemptions for Clerks Who Object to Same-Sex Marriage

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) holds a town hall meeting at the American Legion Dupuis Cross Post 15 July 2, 2015 in Ashland, New Hampshire.
Darren McCollester—2015 Getty Images New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) holds a town hall meeting at the American Legion Dupuis Cross Post 15 July 2, 2015 in Ashland, New Hampshire.

“You took the job and you took the oath."

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie broke with many in his party’s social conservative wing Wednesday, telling reporters that government employees who have objections to issuing same-sex marriage licenses should not be allowed to opt out.

While many conservatives have called for steps to protect government employees who have objections to Friday’s same-sex marriage ruling from the Supreme Court, Christie said those who work for the government should abide by their oaths.

“I think for folks who are in the government world, they kind of have to do their job, whether you agree with the law or you don’t,” Christie told reporters following a town hall at a lakeside home, noting there are laws that he enforces as governor that he disagrees with. “I’m sure there are individual circumstances that might merit some examination,” he added, “but none that come immediately to mind for me.”

Other Republican presidential candidates have stressed the importance of protecting religious freedom. Fellow GOP presidential candidate Bobby Jindal issued an executive order in May in an attempt to protect those who believe that same-sex unions should not be recognized. His executive counsel released a memo Monday arguing that state employees with objections should be protected.

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee took a similar line on Sunday: “If they have a conscientious objection, I think they should be excused.”

When asked about protection for clerks who object to providing same-sex marriage licenses, Christie implied that there could be specific accommodations made for religious exemptions on a case-by-case basis. But overall, he said those trying to opt out should rethink how they are doing their jobs.

“You took the job and you took the oath,” he said. “When you go back and re-read the oath it doesn’t give you an out. You have to do it.”

TIME celebrities

Cynthia Nixon: Don’t Get Complacent About LGBT Rights

The Sex and the City star argues that there's still work to be done

Cynthia Nixon, star of Sex in the City, wrote an op-ed in Variety urging LGBT activists to continue to fight for marriage equality.

Even though the Friday Supreme Court decision to legalize gay marriage in every state may seem like the ultimate victory, Nixon argued in the op-ed that the work is not done yet. The reason the LGBT movement has come so far is constant perseverance both in the face of adversity and after achieving community goals, she said.

“Equality proponents knew they were going to win, but didn’t take it for granted for a moment; they worked, they organized, leaving no stone unturned. And to have the vote come from the general population was absolutely game-changing,” the star wrote.

“The important thing to remember going forward, though, is no outcome is ever 100% assured. We have to keep organizing like our lives depend on it.”

Nixon has been active in the fight for marriage equality and married a woman herself in 2012. But she has also drawn controversy: in 2012 she came under fire for saying that “homosexuality can be a choice” and was for her in an interview with the New York Times Magazine. Other LGBT celebrities like Perez Hilton fired back that millions of people around the world were born gay.

[Variety]

TIME celebrity

George Takei Takes Down Donald Trump’s Definition of ‘Traditional Marriage’

George Takei at the 69th Annual Tony Awards in New York City on June 7, 2015.
Mark Sagliocco—Getty Images George Takei at the 69th Annual Tony Awards in New York City on June 7, 2015.

Takei and Trump took their marriage equality debate to a lunch table

Donald Trump likes to say he’s “for traditional marriage”—but George Takei thinks there are some holes in Trump’s argument.

The Star Trek actor and Trump worked together back in 2011 when Takei appeared on season 5 of The Celebrity Apprentice, and during a press conference for the show, Takei—an LGBT activist—challenged Trump to discuss marriage equality over lunch. And to Takei’s surprise, Trump took him up on the offer.

Takei went on MSNBC’s The Last Word to tell host Lawrence O’Donnell how that lunch went, and apparently, it involved Trump holding onto his opinion—but also recounting recently going to his friends’ gay wedding.

“He said, ‘You know what, George, I just came from a gay marriage,’” Takei said. “And he told me, ‘They are good friends of mine, it was a beautiful marriage. They’re wonderful friends.’ And I said, ‘Then why can’t you support marriage equality? You go to weddings of same-sex couples.’ And he said, ‘Well, I’m for traditional marriage.’”

Takei said they ultimately “agreed to disagree,” but he thinks Trump’s stance could change: “I think he’s a businessman,” Takei said. “I think he’s capable of saying anything that will be good for business or in whatever situation he should find himself in.” Plus, Takei is suspicious of Trump’s idea of what “traditional marriage” is—especially seeing as Trump has been married three times.

“That is not traditional,” Takei said. “And I approve of his three-time marriage, because you want to find the person that you love … I think Donald Trump’s interpretation of marriage is something that he really himself doesn’t really believe in.”

Watch the whole interview here.

This article originally appeared on EW.com

TIME relationships

Jimmy Kimmel Asked Little Kids What They Think About Gay Marriage

Hot debate for minds of all ages

Following the U.S. Supreme Court ruling to sanction marriage equality in all 50 states, Jimmy Kimmel turned to one important group to hear their thoughts on the subject: kids.

Responding to those who think explaining the change in marriage laws would be difficult, Kimmel sent a producer and cameraperson out into the field for a Jimmy Kimmel Live segment to find out what kids know about marriage equality. For the most part, the kids Live found had no problem understanding marriage in any form. But they certainly weren’t lacking for opinions on the institution of marriage itself.

Some think there’s a best time of day to marry, others are planning to wait until 30 before they wed, and one thinks it’s fiscally irresponsible to marry at all. But even if it’s not for them, all of the kids seem to agree on one thing: everyone should have the right to marry… as long as they’re old enough, of course.

This article originally appeared on EW.com

TIME Social Media

26 Million People Changed Their Facebook Profile Photo to Celebrate Gay Marriage

Drew Angerer— Bloomberg/Getty Images The White House stands illuminated in rainbow colored light at dusk in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, June 26, 2015.

Rainbows took over the social media platform

Did you notice a whole lot more rainbows in your Facebook feed over the weekend?

Well, you were looking at the handiwork of two Facebook interns – a piece of code that more than 26 million people took advantage of for Pride weekend. The rainbow filter was created by two interns at an internal hackathon the company last week, and it became so popular internally that the company asked them to refine the filter for public use, the company said in a statement Monday.

A number of celebrities jumped on board with the trend, including Elizabeth Banks, Leonardo DiCaprio, Andy Cohen, Anne Hathaway and E.L. James.

Arnold Schwarzenegger got in on the act as well, though one fan registered their disapproval, writing “What’s wrong with U [sic] Arnie? I have to unlike,” to which Schwarzenegger replied simply, “Hasta la vista.”

TIME Supreme Court

The Last Holdout Has Now Issued Gay Marriage Licenses

gay marriage Louisiana
Kathleen Flynn — The Times-Picayune /Landov A rally was held in reaction to the Supreme Court legalizing gay marriage in all 50 states by the Forum for Equality, the Human Rights Campaign and the ACLU in Jackson Square on June 26, 2015.

Louisiana, in which only 42% of residents approve of same-sex marriage, was the last to do so

The last state holding out on issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples after Friday’s historic Supreme Court ruling has relented.

Louisiana officials issued a marriage license to two men, Michael Robinson, 41, and Earl Benjamin, 39, in New Orleans, who are believed to be the first same-sex couple married in Louisiana, ABC News reported. The two have been together for 14 years.

The state’s attorney general, Buddy Caldwell, released a statement on Friday expressing disappointment in the ruling and stating that he “found nothing in today’s decision that makes the Court’s order effective immediately.” Echoing Caldwell’s sentiments, the Louisiana Clerks of Court Association advised parish and city clerks to wait 25 days, the period of time for states to file an appeal of the decision, before issuing licenses.

Jefferson Parish Clerk of Court John Geggenheimer disagreed. Geggenheimer told ABC News that the office’s attorney, after carefully examining the ruling, found that there was no reason for delay. Benjamin and Robinson then received the license in Jefferson Parish and were married in New Orleans—which is in neighboring Orleans Parish—in front of 40 friends and co-workers during lunchtime.

Although licenses were issued in Texas on Friday, the state’s attorney general Ken Paxton released a statement Sunday saying that county clerks and judges can refuse to issue same-sex marriage licenses if it opposes their religious beliefs. However, Paxton acknowledged that “any clerk who wishes to defend their religious objections and who chooses not to issue licenses may well face litigation and/or a fine.”

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, who is running for the Republican presidential nomination, said Sunday that the state would comply with the decision, which he has argued will erode religious liberty.

Louisiana voters overwhelmingly approved an amendment to the state constitution banning same-sex marriages in 2004. Only 42% of Louisiana residents support same-sex marriage, according to a 2015 poll by Louisiana State University, lagging far behind the national average of 57%.

[ABC News]

TIME LGBT

Ben & Jerry’s Just Renamed This Ice Cream Flavor in Honor of Gay Marriage

iDough-iDough-pint
Ben & Jerry's

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough has a new name

Ben & Jerry’s, a longstanding corporate champion of gay rights, is celebrating the Supreme Court’s ruling legalizing gay marriage throughout the U.S. by renaming one of its ice cream flavors. During the summer the chain will rename its Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough ice cream to “I Dough, I Dough” at participating stores. Proceeds from the ice cream sales will go to the Human Rights Campaign, a nonprofit that advocates for LGBT rights.

This is not the first time Ben & Jerry’s has been a vocal supporter of gay rights. In 1989 the company was the first major employer in Vermont to offer health insurance to same-sex partners of employees. More recently Ben & Jerry’s joined a petition of major businesses asking the Supreme Court to strike down same-sex marriage bans across the U.S.

TIME Gay Marriage

This Map Shows How Gay Marriage Spread Across the United States

People celebrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the ruling in favor of same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 in Washington, DC.
Mark Wilson—Getty Images People celebrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the ruling in favor of same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 in Washington, DC.

In a historic ruling Friday, the Supreme Court legalized gay marriage nationwide by declaring unconstitutional all state bans on same-sex marriage.

Click the map button below to watch how same-sex legislation has changed in the United States since Vermont legalized civil unions in 2000, followed closely by Massachusetts first legalizing same-sex marriage eleven years ago in 2004.

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com