TIME Apple

5 Things to Expect from Apple’s Watch Event

Apple is holding an event in San Francisco on Monday, March 9 at 10 a.m. PT, likely to deliver new details about its upcoming Watch. While Apple first unveiled the Apple Watch late last year, it left plenty unsaid. Here are five questions we still have about the Apple Watch that should be answered during Monday’s event:

What does it do?

We know the Apple Watch tells the time, syncs up with your iPhone, gives you directions and more. But the Apple Watch was unveiled well before third-party developers had time to make new apps for it. With the Watch’s release date drawing nearer, more developers should be ready to show off apps that add new functionality to the Apple Watch—like the ability to pay for sandwiches for example.

How much will it cost?

Apple says the entry-level Apple Watch Sport will start at $349. But we still don’t know anything about the cost of the other models, which could range from the somewhat affordable to the downright pricey (especially for the all-gold Apple Watch Edition). Expect Apple to put a clearer price tag on the Apple Watch come Monday.

(Read more: Hands-On With the Apple Watch)

When can we buy one?

At first, Apple only said the Apple Watch would be available sometime in “early 2015.” In late January, Apple CEO Tim Cook narrowed that window down to “April.” But there still isn’t a firm release date for the Apple Watch—expect Apple to give us one Monday, and then set your calendars accordingly.

How will we buy one?

The Apple Watch comes in three base models (Sport, Regular, Edition), two sizes (42mm and 38mm), six colors (from “stainless steel” to “18-karat yellow gold”), and six different kinds of bands, some with different colors of their own. While you might not be able to mix and match to your heart’s consent, that’s still a boatload more options than you get with anything else Apple sells.

All those customization options mean you might buy the Apple Watch differently than you buy an iPad or MacBook. Early rumors pointed to an in-store concierge experience, while Apple could produce some kind of interactive online tool to help you make the perfect Apple Watch.

How long will the battery last?

Battery life could make or break the Apple Watch — if the watch can’t make it through an average work day, it could very well be a flop. Cook has already said he expects people will have to charge the Apple Watch every night, and Apple is reportedly working on a “Power Reserve” mode.

But how will the battery hold up exactly? Apple might give us some better numbers on Monday, but it’ll take some real-world testing before we’re really sure how the Apple Watch does.

TIME Gadgets

You Won’t Get Your Hands on Apple’s Giant iPad Any Time Soon

Apple iPad Tablet Suppliers
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images Apple CEO Tim Cook holds the new iPad Air 2 during a special event on Oct. 16, 2014 in Cupertino, Calif.

Apple has reportedly told suppliers to delay until the second half of 2015

Bad news for those awaiting Apple’s rumored 12.9-inch iPad — you’ll have to wait even longer.

Apple has told suppliers to delay the iPad’s mass production from the first quarter of 2015 to the second half of the year, the Wall Street Journal reported Thursday, citing people familiar with the matter. Apple hasn’t officially announced the bigger iPad, which would be its largest ever, but several leaks from the supply chain have suggested since last fall that the “iPad Air Plus” or “iPad Pro” is in the works.

The delay will reportedly allow Apple more time to finalize the iPad’s design, which may include USB ports and better synchronization software as Apple tries to break into the fast-growing enterprise market.

Apple’s tablet sales have struggled lately, with 2014 marking the first year in which worldwide iPad shipments declined, according to a report by IDC. But it’s not just Apple: the global tablet market has seen a “massive deceleration” in growth as big-screen smartphones cannibalize tablet sales, IDC said. In other words, the number of tablets shipped worldwide is still going up—but less and less each year.

Here’s a closer look at IDC’s tablet market forecast:

iCharts

[WSJ]

TIME Gadgets

The Pebble Time Smartwatch Is a Massive Leap Forward

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Pebble Pebble Time

Hands-on with Pebble's new color smartwatch

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This post is in partnership with Trusted Reviews. The article below was originally published at TrustedReviews.com.

Sitting in the TrustedReviews office, I stared in amazement at the Kickstarter page for the Pebble Time as it rapidly soared past its funding goal in a matter of minutes. Now I’ve got to play with the Time, I understand why there was all that excitement – it’s a massive leap forward from the original Pebble smartwatch.

Watch our Pebble Time and Pebble Time Steel hands-on video

SEE ALSO: Pebble Time Steel hands-on

The big change is the more streamlined design, which actually reminds me a little of Swatch watches. It’s smaller and more elegant than the first Pebble and the more neutral look means it’s truly unisex. It’s also waterproof to 5ATM, so you take it in the shower and even go swimming with it.

It’s light as well. I strapped one around my wrist and it’s neither as cumbersome nor chunky as most Android Wear watches I’ve tried. It’s not really a watch you’d imagine someone sitting in a business meeting with, though. The plastic body gives it a more playful look, but Pebble now has the Pebble Time Steel to cover the more serious watch-wearing demographic.

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TrustedReviews

The 22mm silicone straps are surprisingly comfortable and use a new quick-release strap, so you can use other similarly sized straps to mix the looks up. At the moment, there’s not a massive amount of color options for the straps and watch bezels at launch. There’s red, white and black, but I did get to see one with a purple strap, so this may expand.

For a battery top-up, you still need a charger that magnetically connects to the left of the watch. No change there.

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TrustedReviews

Pebble has made the rather radical move, though, to swap its trademark monochrome display for a color one. Crucially it’s stuck with the same E Ink technology, so you still get good visibility and less drain on the same 5-7 days of battery life offered by the original and the Pebble Steel. I moved through the interface using the buttons on the side of the screen and had no problem viewing the screen. The true test will be taking it outside in the sunshine though.

The last big physical change lies around the back. When Pebble launched its latest Kickstarter campaign, it made some vague reference to connecting sensors to the back of the watch to add extra functionality. Now it’s confirmed that it will support smart straps, which can connect to what looks like charging pins to add heart-rate sensors or even support for NFC payments. Pebble’s opening the platform to developers, so it will be interesting to see whether there’s an appetite to make these smart straps and what interesting uses third-party companies will come up with.

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TrustedReviews

Before the Pebble Time was announced, Pebble’s CEO Eric Migicovsky spoke about the dramatic overhaul of the software. According to Pebble, user feedback suggested people were complaining of a constant stream of notifications, so now it’s come up with something that reduces that overload and only gives users information they need at that exact moment.

It sounds a lot like Android Wear and it works in a similar way. You still have all the smartphone companion features as normal, but now you’ll also be able to see what’s coming up in your day, whether that’s meetings or events. Unlike when you dismiss notifications in Android Wear, you can go back 24 hours on the Pebble, in case you missed an email from the previous day.

Pebble is also adding voice support, but it’ll only be used for recording voice memos and offering quick responses to texts or leaving a message when you’ve rejected a call.

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TrustedReviews

Early Verdict

If you compare the Pebble Time to the original Pebble, it’s like night and day. It’s better looking, it now has a colour screen and the new smart strap feature has the potential to make this the most versatile smartwatch around.

I’m beginning to see why Pebble has been able to fight off Android Wear and other rival platforms, because it’s listening to what its users want. And I think those loyal users are going to be very happy with what the second-generation Pebble has to offer.

For the original article, please go to TrustedReviews.com.

TIME innovations

Seizure-Detecting Smartwatch Could Save Lives

The Empatica Embrace can send seizure alerts

The Empatica Embrace has the features of many other smartwatches: it can, for instance, monitor your activity levels and sleep patterns by keeping an eye on your skin conductance levels. But it can also do something most watches don’t: send out an epilepsy alert.

Paired with a smartphone app, the Embrace can alert another person when the watch wearer is having an epileptic episode or any other kind of disruption in the sympathetic nervous system.

“Seizures can seriously hurt or even kill people,” says Rosalind Picard, a professor at the MIT Media Lab who helped develop the watch’s technology, “and we need an alert to intervene.”

The watch, designed by a Milan- and Cambridge-based team, uses stress levels combined with physical movement to detect epileptic attacks. The watch’s wearers may opt-in to have their anonymized data used for medical research.

The watch raised $596,000 on IndieGogo, more than five times its original goal.

Correction: The original version of this story incorrectly described a feature of the Empatica Embrace. It does not measure users’ heart rate.

TIME Apple watch

See How Your Favorite Apps Will Look on the Apple Watch

Apple Watch Apps WatchAware
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images The new Apple Watch is displayed during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on Sept. 9, 2014 in Cupertino, Calif.

Get a sneak peek before Apple dishes more Apple Watch info

Can’t wait to get your Apple Watch? A new website is making it easier to pass the time until the device’s April release.

WatchAware has rounded up mockups of over 20 Apple Watch apps, allowing you to get an interactive feel of how each app might look on the device. Most of the mockups are Apple fans’ best guesses at what the apps will look like, but others—like Twitter and Facebook—are the official app designs as shown during the Apple Watch’s unveiling last fall.

More information about the Apple Watch will likely be revealed during Apple’s March 9 event, which is expected to focus on how apps function on the device.

TIME Apple

This Is How Terrifying It Was to Pitch Steve Jobs a New Idea

Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivering a keynote address to the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco on June 6, 2011.
Paul Sakuma—AP Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivering a keynote address to the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco on June 6, 2011.

“Are you smart? Are you going to waste my time?”

“The first time we met he walked into the room, looked around, realized that I was new, walked up to me and asked (all in one breath), “Are you smart? Do you know what you are talking about? Are you going to waste my time?”

So begins Brett Bilbrey’s 715-word response to the question “What was it like to deliver a presentation to Steve Jobs?” on the crowd-sourced Q&A site Quora.

It’s a response that has drawn some attention—315,000 views, 4,800 upvotes—since it was posted last month because Bilbrey was not just any third-party developer pitching a new app. He was a prolific Apple inventor and a key team manager whose name appears on more than 50 patents and whose engineers developed, among other products, Apple TV and the Mac Mini. From 2008 until his retirement in February he headed the company’s top-secret Technology Advancement Group charged with developing forward-looking technology for products of which he cannot speak.

But he can talk about what it was like to deal with a notoriously difficult boss.

Steve was wicked smart,” he writes. “I was always amazed at how sharp he was and how quickly he could focus on what was important. I don’t know ANYONE that even comes close to how good he was at being able to do that.”

“Don’t just read the story,” says The Loop’s Jim Dalrymple. “Read the comments too.”

Follow Philip Elmer-DeWitt on Twitter at @philiped. Read his Apple AAPL coverage at fortune.com/ped or subscribe via his RSS feed.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

TIME Gadgets

How to Get Bluetooth to Actually Work

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What to do when you just can't get your tech to connect

Back in the mid-90s when Bluetooth launched, few us would have considered someday using our portable phones to play music through a miniature speaker on the other side of a room. Nowadays, laptops, smartphones and tablets use this wireless technology to connect to a vast range of devices — from speakers, keyboards and headsets to in-car entertainment systems, smart-home devices and personal fitness gadgets.

Or at least they’re meant to connect. The last time I tried to pair my iPhone 5S to a Beacon portable speaker, my phone simply did not “discover” the speaker. On the other hand, a friend’s Samsung Galaxy S4 instantly paired, pushing out sweet, sweet music in short order.

While the most recent updates to Bluetooth technology have added better pairing, increased range and lowest-ever power usage, you may still encounter the odd obstacle when getting set up.

Troubleshoot your Bluetooth connection with these tips and let us know how they work for you in the comments.

Make sure you’re in pairing mode

Many simpler devices such as headsets or portable speakers have one button for multiple functions. For example, my portable speaker has one button that you short-press to turn on it on or off, and long-press to activate its Bluetooth discovery mode.

Make sure you’ve correctly put your device in its pairing mode by reading its manual, suggests Mark Powell, executive director of the Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG), which oversees the development of the Bluetooth standard.

Charge up both the devices you’re trying to pair

“Some devices have smart power management that may turn off Bluetooth if the battery level is too low,” Powell says. If your phone isn’t pairing with that Bluetooth light bulb, make sure it’s got enough juice.

Power down likely interferers

Say that faithful Bluetooth speaker usually connects to your partner’s smartphone instead of yours. If you’re having trouble pairing your phone with the speaker, it could be because the speaker is trying to activate its usual connection. “Some older devices are very simple. They just try to connect with the last thing they paired with,” Powell says. If a Bluetooth device was previously paired with something else, turn off that other gadget.

Restart the connection

The old standby for problematic Macs and PCs works with reluctant Bluetooth connections, too. Sometimes the quickest solution is simply to turn Bluetooth off for both devices, then turn it on again for the devices to re-discover each other.

Place the devices right next to each other

“Pairing works best when the devices are next to each other,” Powell says. Once you’ve got the connection, Bluetooth is robust enough to transmit between devices that may be more than 30 feet apart, but the initial pairing can sometimes use a nudge.

Get away from the Wi-Fi router

Another potential obstacle to successful pairing is interference from devices that use the same spectrum, such as your Wi-Fi router. “Wi-Fi has been designed to cope with this, but it might not be a good idea to have your devices directly on top of the router,” Powell says.

And move away from a USB 3.0 port

“Interference from USB 3.0 is also possible,” Powell says. Newer laptops, for example, often have the higher-speed USB 3.0 port, so if the connection isn’t happening, try pairing your Bluetooth gadgets away from the computer.

Download a driver

In the computer world, a driver is a piece of software that lets two pieces of hardware communicate. If your PC or Mac refuses to pair with your new wireless keyboard (or other device), you may be missing the necessary driver. Head to the manufacturer’s website and find its Support section. There’s usually an area called “Downloads” or “Drivers” that should list the latest software updates, including drivers. Alternately, do a Google search for “driver” after your device’s model name.

Use the latest version of Bluetooth

Wireless speakers and headphones that support the latest Bluetooth 4.1 standard, which launched last December, are better at pairing, Powell says. Many currently available devices support Bluetooth 3.0, which launched in 2010, and you can still buy speakers that use 2007’s Bluetooth 2.1 standard. Though Bluetooth’s backward compatibility means that these devices should still be able to connect to smartphones, for example, newer versions of Bluetooth have steadily increased abilities such as longer-range connections and quicker pairing.

If you’re in the market for a new Bluetooth gadget, look for a sticker that says it supports Bluetooth 4.0 or newer. And if you can wait a bit, Bluetooth 4.2 was announced this December, so devices that support the update – with features including more secure connections and better pairing — should be available soon.

If pairing a fitness gadget, check that your phone is Bluetooth Smart Ready

In general, Bluetooth is backwards compatible: Bluetooth devices supporting the just-announced Bluetooth 4.2 standard should still be able to pair with devices using, say, the ancient Bluetooth 2.1, launched back in 2007.

The exceptions are gadgets that use a low-energy version called Bluetooth Smart, which works on a different protocol than older, or “Classic” Bluetooth devices. Bluetooth Smart devices are not backward compatible and won’t recognize (or pair with) older devices that support Classic Bluetooth. (For example, an old Sony Ericsson phone sporting Bluetooth 3.0 won’t be able to connect to a Bluetooth Smart device.)

However, if a device supports Bluetooth 4.0, it can potentially recognize both Bluetooth Smart and Classic. If it does, it’s officially labelled Bluetooth Smart Ready.

Gadgets that commonly use Bluetooth Smart include personal health gadgets such as fitness bands or heart-rate monitors. These gadgets will only pair with a smartphone or tablet that also uses Bluetooth Smart – or are Bluetooth Smart Ready.

iPhones running iOS 7 and newer should be Bluetooth Smart Ready as should Android phones running 4.3 or newer, Windows Phone 8.1 devices, and all BlackBerry 10 devices. Ensure your phone is running the latest version of its operating system – but if your device isn’t new enough to run relatively current software, you may not be able to pair it with that fitness band.

This article originally appeared on Techlicious.

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TIME Apple watch

The Apple Watch Might Actually Cost a Fortune

Some estimates are much higher than previously thought

Better start saving up if you want to buy an Apple Watch.

Investment firm Piper Jaffray estimated Monday that the entry-level Apple Watch (called “Apple Watch Sport”) might actually cost most people around $450 instead of the $349 that Apple has officially said—when you take into account customizable features like the watch case, data storage and wrist strap.

Apple hasn’t yet announced a price for the mid-range Apple Watch (called simply “Apple Watch”), which is stainless steel and features a sapphire crystal screen, but Piper Jaffray estimates it could start around $499 to $549 and go up to $650, again depending on customizable features.

The heaviest price speculation has been around the high-end, 18-karat gold Apple Watch (dubbed “Apple Watch Edition”). Analysts have previously estimated these watches could start around $4,999, but Piper Jaffray estimates they could actually cost around $7,500, taking into account luxury wrist straps made from precious metals.

Most of Apple Watch’s specifics—but not all—have remained unknown since the device was unveiled last September. More information about the gadget is expected to be revealed at Apple’s March 9 event, while the watch will go on sale in April.

 

TIME Apple watch

Tim Cook Just Revealed More Apple Watch Secrets

We're getting a clearer picture of all the device might do

The full range of Apple Watch features has remained unknown since the device’s unveiling last September. Now it seems CEO Tim Cook has dished out a few additional details.

The Apple CEO briefed Apple Store employees in Berlin regarding several specific Apple Watch apps, 9to5Mac reports. Apple is working with “some of the best hotels in the world”—including Starwood Hotels, which previously announced its Apple partnership—to allow Watch users to unlock room doors. Additionally, Apple Watch users will be able to order at food chains including Panera Bread.

Cook also reportedly said that third-party fitness apps will be available on the Apple Watch, which isn’t too surprising given the device’s emphasis on health tracking.

Apple’s March 9 event is expected to focus heavily on the Watch. Cook told the employees that Apple has already invited over 100 developers to design and test out Apple Watch apps, which may suggest that the wearable’s apps could be the star of the upcoming event.

The Apple Watch will be released in April.

[9to5Mac]

Read next: This Feature Could Save the Apple Watch

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