TIME Food & Drink

This Sriracha Stout Beer Is the Perfect Gift for the Special Hipster in Your Life

You can use it to wash down that Sriracha vodka you've been hoarding

Looking for something to put next to the Sriracha candy cane in your favorite hipster’s Christmas stocking?

Look no further than Oregon-based Rogue brewery’s newly available Sriracha stout, costing $13 a pop. It’s probably a great chaser for that Sriracha vodka you’ve been hoarding in your freezer.

Somewhere between gobbling down Sriracha donuts and lollipops, we should probably ask ourself if Sriracha has jumped the shark. But we’ll save that conversation for another day.

MONEY Food

Girl Scout Cookies Sales Are Going Online

Thin Mints, Samoas, and Trefoils will be just a click away, as Girl Scouts of America revolutionizes its perennial fundraiser.

TIME Food & Drink

4 Surprising Ways to Use Turkey Leftovers

turkey
Christina Holmes

From curry soup to delicious Reuben hash, F&W's Kay Chun offers up four great ways to use leftover Thanksgiving turkey

Turkey Curry Soup

This quick stew is rich and fragrant with curry, lime and herbs. It’s an excellent way to use leftover turkey.

In a saucepan, heat 2 tablespoons canola oil. Add 2 tablespoons Thai red curry paste and 4 cups kabocha squash (1 1/2-inch pieces) and cook over high heat, stirring, for 3 minutes. Add 1 cup unsweetened coconut milk, 1 tablespoon Asian fish sauce and 4 cups of water; bring to a boil. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes, until the squash is tender. Stir in 3 cups shredded roast turkey, 3 tablespoons lime juice and 1/2 cup chopped mixed cilantro and basil; season with salt and pepper.

Turkey Tonnato
Leftover turkey gets totally transformed when it’s topped with a creamy sauce made with yogurt, herbs and tuna.

In a food processor, combine one 6 1/2-ounce can drained tuna, 1/2 cup cooked chickpeas and 1/4 cup plain yogurt. With the machine on, drizzle in 1/2 cup olive oil. Transfer to a bowl; stir in 1/4 cup chopped capers and 1/2 cup chopped mixed tarragon, dill and chives; season with salt and pepper. Serve with roast turkey breast.

Turkey Reuben Hash
In this 25-minute hash, leftover turkey is combined with potatoes, sauerkraut and caraway for a fun play on a Reuben sandwich.

In a cast-iron skillet, heat 3 tablespoons olive oil. Add 1/2 small chopped onion and 1 coarsely grated peeled baking potato and cook over moderately high heat, stirring, for 8 minutes. Add 1 cup drained sauerkraut, 2 cups shredded roast turkey, 2 chopped scallions and 1/8 teaspoon caraway seeds. Cook until golden, 3 minutes.

Turkey-Stuffing Salad
This fresh, fun salad is a play on traditional Thanksgiving turkey and stuffing, combining turkey and croutons with celery, apple, fennel and parsley.

In a bowl, whisk 1 tablespoon each of Dijon mustard and lemon juice with 1/2 cup olive oil. Add 3 cups chopped roast turkey, 3 sliced celery ribs,1 sliced fennel bulb, 1 chopped crisp apple and 1 cup parsley. Season with salt and pepper; toss. Top with croutons.

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

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TIME advice

How to Make Thanksgiving Gravy

gravy
Getty Images

Rich and tasty, this silky-smooth sauce won’t overwhelm the bird or compete with other dishes on the table

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

Step 1

Get the recipe for Basic Gravy, then follow these step-by-step instructions.

Remove the vegetables and neck from the roasting pan; discard. Carefully strain the pan juices into a fat separator. Let stand 5 minutes, allowing the fat to rise to the top. Pour the juices into a large measuring cup, leaving the fat behind.

Step 2

Place the empty roasting pan across 2 burners over medium-high heat. Add the wine and cook, scraping up the brown bits stuck to the pan, for 1 minute.

Step 3

Pour the contents of the pan into the measuring cup of skimmed juices. Add enough chicken broth to make a total of 4 cups of liquid.

(MORE: How to Build a Healthier Thanksgiving Plate)

Step 4

Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Sprinkle with the flour to create a roux.

Step 5

Cook the roux, whisking frequently, until deep brown, 4 to 5 minutes. Keep in mind that the darker the roux, the richer the flavor.

(MORE: 100 Things to Be Thankful For This Year)

Step 6

Whisk in the 4 cups of liquid and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until thickened, 8 to 10 minutes.

Step 7

Season the gravy with ¾ teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Strain just before serving. (If you do it any earlier, a skin will form on the surface of the gravy.)

(MORE: Thanksgiving Games to Get the Whole Family Moving)

TIME Food

Calorie Counts Will Be Required More Places Than Ever Before Under New Rules

Nutritional Information Label
Fuse/Getty Images

FDA unveiling new guidelines

Regulators on Tuesday will announce new rules mandating that a wider array of businesses than ever before display calorie counts for their food, including chain restaurants, movie theaters and even vending machines.

The rules will be unveiled Tuesday by the Food and Drug Administration and will take effect in one year, the New York Times reports, amid a push to combat obesity in the U.S.

“This is one of the most important public health nutrition policies ever to be passed nationally,” said Margo Wootan, director of nutrition policy at the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

The rules will cover restaurants with 20 or more locations, amusement parks, vending machines and certain foods in grocery stores. And for the first time, alcoholic beverages will be included, too.

[NYT]

TIME Diet/Nutrition

A Tale of Two Turkeys: Wild vs. Supermarket

turkey
Getty Images

Which bird is better?

WSF logo small

Whether you like yours brined or unbrined, stuffed with cornbread or sausage, in drumstick or leftover-sandwich format, it all starts with the turkey. Today’s turkey-lover has two choices: The supermarket bird, an artificially giganticized product of careful breeding and industrial farming methods, and the wild turkey, which hasn’t evolved much since the first Thanksgiving. Here’s a quick visual guide to help you decide which is best for you:

a tale of two turkeys

This article originally appeared on World Science Festival.

TIME

This Homer Simpson Statue Made Out of Junk Food Is the Perfect Tribute to Homer Simpson

"Does this make me look fat?"

Some people get a statue, others an honorary plaque. For Homer Simpson, who has for nearly three decades shared with us his low-brow gastronomical obsessions, it doesn’t get any more fitting than a replica fashioned from junk food.

Mandatory.com constructed “The Essence of Homer,” complete with Duff Beer, from gummy bears, powdered doughnuts, licorice, marshmallows, saltwater taffy and pancakes. The video is part of a series called “Fast Food Formations” (they also constructed a football stadium out of Slim Jims and balogna sandwiches), the gluttonous messages of which the site counters with a donation to a charity that aims to end childhood hunger.

There’s no one who deserves his likeness made from doughnuts more than the man who sold his soul to the devil in exchange for a single frosted doughnut.

TIME Food

‘Food Chains’ Doc Sheds Light on America’s Farmworkers

Forest Whitaker narrates documentary produced by Fast Food Nation author Eric Schlosser and actress Eva Longoria

A new documentary about the farmworkers who pick America’s harvest was released Friday in selected markets.

“Food Chains,” produced by actress Eva Longoria and Fast Food Nation author Eric Schlosser, primarily tells the story of a labor dispute between tomato pickers in Immokalle, Florida, and the Publix supermarket chain. That dispute is the origin of the Fair Food Program, a voluntary initiative to raise wages and working conditions for farmworkers.

“What we bring with the Fair Food Program is not another model of corporate social responsibility, because the goal is not to make any corporation legit,” says farmworker and organizer Gerardo Chavez in the film. “The goal is to address human rights and labor rights that exist in the fields. The creation of the program comes directly from the participation of the workers in the program and the ideas of our community. That’s what we call worker-led social responsibility.”

TIME Food

Holiday Ham May Be Pricier Than Ever

A deadly virus killed millions of piglets.

Ham might take a bigger cut out of your budget this holiday season.

Prices have soared to a record high this fall ahead of the holidays—when half of total ham consumption occurs—after a devastating virus shrank the number of hogs slaughtered this year by more than five percent, Bloomberg reports.

The price has been pushed up further because farmers have fed their hogs more to fatten them up and make up for losses caused by the virus; while fatter pigs mean more meat, their hind legs can grow too large for the seven-pound spiral-cut, half hams popular during the holidays.

Read more at Bloomberg

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