TIME brazil

Sao Paulo Bans Foie Gras in Restaurants

Brazil Foie Gras Ban
M. Spencer Green—AP In this Aug. 9, 2006 file photo, a serving of salt-cured fresh foie gras with herbs is displayed at Chef Didier Durand's Cyrano's Bistrot and Wine Bar in Chicago.

Restaurants that don't abide by the new law will be fined

The Brazilian city Sao Paulo officially banned the production and sale of foie gras in restaurants on Friday.

Foie gras is a delicacy that’s made from the fatty liver of force-fed ducks and geese. The legislation was passed out of concern over the suffering the making of foie gras causes the animals.

“Foie gras is an appetizer for the wealthy. It does not benefit human health and to make it, the birds are submitted to a lot of suffering,” City Councilman Laercio Benko said, according to the Associated Press.

While animal rights advocates are pleased with the decision, some chefs in the city are reportedly upset, arguing that people shouldn’t be told how to eat.

The law will go into effect in 45 days so restaurants have time to adapt. Those that break the law will be fined.

Other countries have banned the production of foie gras, BBC reports, such as Germany, Italy and Argentina. In many of these places, however, it is not illegal for it to be sold.

TIME

McDonald’s Quarter Pounders Are About to Get Supersized

Courtesy of McDonald’s A Quarter Pounder.

The new burger could be out next month, report says

The McDonald’s iconic Quarter Pounder is reportedly about to get even bigger.

Citing a document that it reviewed, CNBC.com reported Friday that the chain will soon unveil a Quarter Pounder that weighs 4.25 ounces ahead of being cooked. The new product will also apparently have a new shape.

The current beef patty for a McDonald’s Quarter Pounder weighs 4 ounces before it’s cooked, and then goes down to 2.8 ounces after it has been prepared, CNBC said.

“As (CEO) Steve Easterbrook has shared, we’re always innovating around McDonald’s food, drinks and restaurant experience based on customers’ preferences, and that includes hotter food and reviewing cooking procedures, and we’ll share more details soon,” McDonald’s told CNBC in a statement.

The news website cited the document as saying that the move “improves the taste, texture and appearance of the burgers” because the “patties retain more moisture resulting in a juicier and more flavorful burger.” The move is a bid to help struggling sales, CNBC noted.

The new burger could be released as early as next month.

In other McDonald’s news, the fast food chain announced consumers are ordering more healthier Happy Meals, and it also recently added mozzarella sticks to its menu in Wisconsin as a test.

TIME Terminator

This Burger Chain’s Terminator Ad Is Actually Pretty Cool

The ads will appear on over 1,000 websites

Red Robin is partnering with Google to create a high-tech ad campaign worthy of the upcoming film Terminator Genisys.

Created by ad agency Vitro, the immersive video ad features a Red Robin representative that the viewer sees as a Terminator would. Creepily, the representative has a robotic arm, much to the surprise of her fellow diners.

Red Robin will have television spots and signs throughout its restaurants, Adweek reports. The ad is viewable on your smartphone, and it can be seen on a desktop, too.

The publication reports that the Terminator-inspired campaign is the burger chain’s biggest ad spend so far in 2015. The ads will reportedly be shown on over 1,000 websites.

Check out the video here:

TIME Diet/Nutrition

14 Most Dangerous Summer Foods

outdoor-table-food
Getty Images

Avoid leaving food out for more than four hours

Who doesn’t love picnics and barbecues? Thing is, if you don’t practice safe food preparation, outdoor eating can also set the stage for foodborne illness. Every year approximately 1 in 6 Americans gets sick, and 128,000 are hospitalized from foodborne diseases, according to the CDC. Among 31 known pathogens, most deaths occur from Salmonella, Toxoplasma, Listeria, and norovirus. “The rule of thumb is that no food should be left out for four total hours,” says Amy Goodson, RD, a dietitian at Ben Hogan Sports Medicine in Fort Worth, Texas. “This refers to not just four hours at a time, but four accumulated hours.” The following foods are most likely to ruin your good time.

Burgers

Undercooked meat puts you at risk for potentially life-threatening illness from a subtype of E. coli bacteria called O157:H7. An outbreak in 2014 linked to ground beef contaminated with this type of E. coli sickened 12 people from four different states. “Your risk largely depends on the number of cows making up your ground beef,” says Michael Schmidt, PhD, professor at the department of microbiology and immunology at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). “The greater the number of cows the greater chance of having something that was not intended to be in the meat.” Ground beef is riskier than specific cuts of meat that come from a single cow. Regardless, cook burgers or any beef to an internal temperature of at least 160 degrees to kill E. coli.

Sprouts

Topping your burger with a handful of raw sprouts could set the stage for food poisoning. Seeds and beans need warm and humid conditions to grow, which also happen to be ideal conditions for the growth of bacteria, including Salmonella, Listeria, and E. coli. Even homegrown sprouts grown under sanitary conditions can produce harmful bacteria because seeds have been known to be contaminated. “If you are putting sprouts in a salad or on a sandwich/burger, consider sautéing them first,” says Goodson. “Sprouts can easily harbor bacteria and when that is mixed with moisture, food poisoning risk multiplies.”

Caesar dressing

Eating a Caesar salad can make you sick if the dressing is made the traditional way—with raw eggs. (Store-bought bottled dressing is pasteurized; it’s homemade dressing you need to watch out for.) “Pay close attention to anything that could be made with raw or undercooked eggs, especially if they are not pasteurized,” says Lori Zanini, RD, a Los Angeles-based dietitian. The Food and Drug Administration recommends cooking eggs thoroughly and washing all equipment that comes in contact with eggs and your hands with hot soapy water.

Leafy green salads

Once you know the dressing’s safe, you also want to consider the lettuce itself—and the hygiene habits of the person who prepared it. A CDC report revealed that salad greens—such as lettuce, escarole, endive, spinach, cabbage, kale, arugula, and chard—caused 262 outbreaks involving 8,836 reported cases of foodborne illness between 1998 and 2008. There are a few ways greens can be contaminated: at the farm by manure or dirty water rinses; when a sick person preps a salad without washing their hands; and by cross-contamination at home (for example, by using the same cutting board for raw meat and salad prep, which spreads bacteria from meat to produce.) Wash greens before eating by placing them in a large colander and tossing them under your faucet, or by using a salad spinner.

Oysters

If a summertime trip to the shore always includes a stop at a raw oyster bar, consume with caution: Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus can both can be contracted by eating raw shellfish, especially oysters. In fact, the CDC reported a 52% increase in Vibrio poisonings between 2011 and 2013. Both of these bacteria cause diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain in healthy people. For people with liver disease, diabetes, cancer, stomach disorders, or any other condition that affects the immune system, Vibrio vulnificus is extremely dangerous: it can invade the bloodstream, causing a life-threatening illness. Half of all Vibrio vulnificus bloodstream infections are fatal.

Homemade ice cream

It sounds like a luscious treat, but homemade ice cream prepared with raw eggs could contain Salmonella, says Leigh Tracy, RD, dietitian at the Center for Endocrinology at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, MD. “The FDA recommends using a custard base or pasteurized eggs.” Cooking and pasteurization kills Salmonella. Store-bought ice cream can contain harmful bacteria as well, but it’s much more rare. In 2015, both Blue Bell Creameries of Texas and Jeni’s Ice Cream of Ohio produced ice cream contaminated with Listeria. The Blue Bell ice cream was linked to 10 illnesses, including three deaths. All that said, you generally shouldn’t worry about the safety of store-bought ice cream;Listeria is rarely found in the sweet stuff because it can’t grow at cold temperatures.

Melons

Cantaloupes have been linked to Listeria outbreaks, and watermelon can also cause problems. Listeria traced back to a North Carolina farm and another outbreak in Colorado sickened more than 140 people and resulted in 30 deaths. Unlike other germs, Listeria can grow in refrigerator-level temperatures. It has no smell or taste and only heat can kill it. But if heated food cools, the Listeria may grow again, according to the FDA. Since the germs live on the outside peel, rinse all melons under running water and scrub with a produce brush before eating or cutting the fruit, even if you peel it first. Cutting into the rind can spread bacteria from the outside of the fruit to the inside.

Chicken

Chicken is commonly contaminated with Salmonella and needs to be thoroughly cooked to kill the germs. A 2014 Consumer Reports analysis found that 97% of all chicken breasts, including organic, were contaminated with harmful bacteria. Use a food thermometer when cooking meats and chicken to ensure you’ve heated them to a safe temperature. Chicken should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees and held at between 140 and 145 degrees, says Goodson. “Plus, be careful of storage practices before it’s grilled,” she says. “For example, don’t put raw chicken or beef, even if wrapped in foil, above the salad or fruit bowl when you are transporting it to the BBQ or party, as fluids can drip and cross-contaminate other foods without you knowing.”

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are super healthy, and can be tossed into salads or sliced as a burger topping. But because they aren’t cooked (which generally kills bacteria) they have been linked to foodborne illness outbreaks. Cases of Salmonella poisoning in 2006 were traced to a packinghouse in Ohio. Overall, 190 people were sickened across 21 states before the source of the outbreak was discovered. Salmonella is found in the feces of animals or in some habitats including ponds as drainage ditches. “It is important to wash your tomatoes thoroughly under running water,” says Tracy. “Additionally, discard any bruised or spoiled tomatoes.”

Deviled Eggs

The risk of Salmonella is highest in deviled eggs when they’re not held at the right temperature (at or below 40 degrees Fahrenheit), says Goodson. Salmonella can live on both the inside and outside of eggs and the egg can still appear perfectly normal, according to the CDC. Deviled eggs are cooked, of course, which should kill any germs in the eggs. But because you combine a bunch of eggs together for the filling, and then it sits for hours at room temperature, bacteria can grow to dangerous levels if an egg is undercooked or contaminated after cooking. Buy eggs only from stores or other suppliers that keep them refrigerated at or below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and serve deviled eggs on ice at all times.

Macaroni salad

Staphylococcal aureus is type of bacteria found primarily on skin and hair, and can cause food poisoning when a person prepping a dish contaminates it and then fails to refrigerate it properly. It’s most common in foods that require handling, but no cooking—like macaroni salad. Some strains of Staphylococcal aureus are capable of producing a highly heat-stable protein toxin, and unlike some germs that can take up to two weeks to cause symptoms, S. aureus can make you sick within 6 hours and sometimes as little as 30 minutes. Any food that should be held either hot to cold, left in the danger zone (40 to 140 degrees F), puts you at risk for foodborne illness.

Leftovers

Leftovers should be handled properly as well. Once everyone has eaten, put the food in its appropriate hot or cold environment, says Goodson. “Food left out becomes a problem because it enters the temperature danger zone, between 40 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit.” Count how many hours the food has been left out overall. If it’s close to or over four hours, trash it, says Goodson. “Do this especially if the food was left out a good part of the day, and at the hottest part of the day, just get rid of it,” Goodson says. “Don’t take the risk of getting sick.”

Charred meats

Though most summer food hazards come from food poisoning germs, here’s one danger you may not have thought of: Grilling meats has been shown to form cancer-causing substances, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). Studies have also demonstrated that one of the possible cancer-causing substances could be reduced when the meat, poultry, or fish has been marinated for at least 30 minutes with a mixture of vinegar, lemon juice, or wine with herbs and spices. “Cooking the meat over a low flame as well as trimming off the fat and flipping it frequently can help reduce the formation of the cancer-causing substances,” says Tracy.

Potato salad

When you see potato salad on a picnic table, you can probably assume that it’s safe to eat, but there’s one instance in which it can become dangerous: when the potatoes are baked ahead of time and then stored in foil. Spores of Clostridium botulinum—the group of bacteria that causes botulism—can survive the potato-baking process. Leaving the cooked potatoes wrapped in foil at room temperature produces perfect conditions for those spores to germinate and grow, and release their deadly toxin. In 1994, an El Paso, Texas Greek restaurant kept baked potatoes at room temperature for several days before using them in a dip; 30 people contracted botulism. Botulism is exceedingly rare, but even still, you’re best off prepping potatoes the same day you plan on making them into a salad.

This article originally appeared on Health.com

More from Health.com:

Read next: The Best Way to Treat Food Poisoning

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TIME Nepal

Go Inside the Effort to Rebuild Nepal

As delegates from around the world gather in Kathmandu for an international conference on rebuilding Nepal, here's how the country's farmers are recovering from an earthquake that, two months ago, claimed thousands of lives

Two months ago, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake, centered in a mountainous region northwest of Kathmandu, devastated Nepal, shaking apart ancient temples, splitting roads, leveling homes and bridges, and setting off angry landslides and avalanches across the Himalayan nation.

The temblor, which struck shortly before noon local time on April 25, was felt in neighboring China and India, and even as far away as Pakistan. A series of panic-inducing aftershocks followed, and then, on May 12, the country was rattled by a magnitude 7.3 quake centered northeast of Kathmandu, near the country’s border with China.

In Nepal, the death toll from the two earthquakes stands at nearly 9,000, with over 22,000 people injured. (Deaths were also recorded in neighboring countries.) Hundreds of thousands of homes were destroyed or damaged. The country’s health infrastructure suffered a body blow. According to a recent government report, nearly 450 public heath facilities, including five hospitals, were completely destroyed. In what was already one of the region’s poorest countries, the earthquakes—the result of an ancient geological fault deep below Nepal—are estimated to have pushed an additional three percent of the population into poverty. That, according to the World Bank, means “as many as a million more poor people.”

As Nepal slowly rebuilds, among the most pressing challenges is supporting agriculture in a country were two-thirds of the population depends on farming. Rice is a staple food in Nepal—and for many rice-farming communities, the earthquakes “struck at the worst possible time,” according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). June is when the annual monsoon rains arrive in Nepal. And the weeks leading up to them are critical for farmers who must ensure that their rice saplings are in the ground before the rains hit. But as many half of all farming households in the country’s worst affected districts are estimated to have lost nearly all their stores of rice and other crops in the earthquakes.

The rice farmers of Samantar Village in Nepal’s Dhading district, whose struggle to plant their rice crop ahead of the monsoon is chronicled in this TIME video by Nehemiah Stark and Nick Wilson, were among those who lost their supplies in the April 25 quake. “The rice seeds in people’s houses were ruined,” Bakhat Bahadur Rai, local agricultural leader, says.“The houses fell down and the seeds became a part of the rubble.”

What followed was a race against time to secure new seeds for planting before the rains for a healthy harvest. Samantar was lucky. With the help of an Israeli NGO called Tevel b’Tzedek, the rice farmers of Samantar managed to get new supplies in early June, before the rains. Elsewhere in Nepal’s hardest hit areas, the FAO has distributed 40,000 five kilogram bags of rice seeds to farmers for the current planting season.

But much still remains to be done across Nepal, where the government puts the total cost of recovery and reconstruction at some $6.6 billion over five years. It is an enormous challenge, and one that Nepal can’t meet on its own—the estimated cost equates to roughly a third of the size of the country’s economy. To help with the effort, the government is hosting an international donors conference with delegates from the around the world, including the Indian and Chinese foreign ministers.

As the visiting delegates consider the challenges ahead, over in Samantar, attention is focused on this year’s rice crop. “I have a feeling that I will survive,” Phoolmaya Rai, a local rice farmer says, “if there’s not another earthquake.”

TIME Food

Here’s How Much Money Americans Are Losing From Trashed Food

Woman Collects Refundable Bottles In Brooklyn
Robert Nickelsberg—Getty Images

The wasted cash annoys nearly 80% of those surveyed

Americans may be more environmentally conscious and health food-oriented these days, but that isn’t preventing each person from trashing $640 worth of food, on average, each year, according to a USA Today report.

The newspaper cites data from the American Chemistry Council that show 76% of us dump leftovers almost every month, despite the popularity of leftovers for meals — apparently over half of us use them for new meals, such as lunch. The American Chemistry Council tabulated its results by surveying 1,000 people.

According to the publication:

The wasted money bugs 79%, and 45% are bothered because other people don’t have enough to eat, but just 15% say they’re bothered by the impact on the environment.

“For years we’ve been told to finish your plate, there are hungry people,” said Steve Russell, the vice president of plastics at ACC, in an interview with USA Today. “I just don’t think we’ve done a good enough job yet talking about the environmental impacts of food waste.”

TIME Environment

Americans Throw Away $640 Worth of Food Each Year

Environmental impacts of food waste aren't a great concern, a new survey shows

Americans toss $640 worth of food each year, according to a survey released Wednesday.

Though more than half of Americans say they reuse leftovers for new meals, 76% of the 1,000 adults surveyed say they throw away leftovers at least once a month; 53% say they do so once a week, the American Chemistry Council found.

All that wasted food makes Americans unhappy, but for different reasons. An overwhelming majority (79%) say they’re bothered by the wasted money spent on thrown-out food, 45% say they’re bothered because other people in the world are hungry and 15% say they’re concerned about the environment. The EPA says food waste makes up 20% of landfill content and releases the greenhouse gas methane as it rots.

“For years we’ve been told to finish your plate, there are hungry people,” Steve Russell, vice president of plastics at ACC, told USA Today. “I just don’t think we’ve done a good enough job yet talking about the environmental impacts of food waste.”

TIME Good Humor

Good Humor’s Iconic Ice Cream Trucks Are Making a Big Comeback

Good Humor Ice Cream Truck, Customers Talking To Driver.
Education Images—UIG via Getty Images A Good Humor ice cream truck.

The Unilever-owned brand will bring back a nostalgic look for a summer tour

Good Humor’s trucks will soon be hitting the road again after a decades-long hiatus, but the iconic ice cream brand’s fleet will be announcing its presence with tweets instead of clanging bells.

Nearly 40 years after sidelining its famous fleet, Good Humor is launching a “Welcome to Joyhood” sampling tour this summer that will see the classic version of the brand’s ice cream trucks making stops in New York City, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and Boston, according to Ad Age. Customers looking for an ice cream fix will be able to summon the classic Good Humor trucks by tweeting @GoodHumor. And, in another modern twist, the throwback trucks will be blasting pop music and rock songs instead of ringing their iconic chime bells.

The brand, which is owned by consumer goods giant Unilever, sold its classic fleet of white trucks in 1976 and switched its focus to grocery store sales amid rising gas prices. Independent contractors still sell Good Humor products, which include classics such as ice cream sandwiches and strawberry shortcake ice cream bars, from their own ice cream trucks.

This isn’t Good Humor’s first step toward a more modern feel. Earlier this year, one of the brand’s New York distributors decided to spice up the look of its own trucks by adding a flashy paint job and playing newer music. The distributor, Dover Group, also had its drivers swap out their classic Good Humor uniforms — all white with a black bow tie and white cap — for a more current look.

The attempts to pump life into the Good Humor brand come after three straight years of falling sales for the brand in grocery stores, Ad Age notes, citing numbers from market research firm Euromonitor International.

TIME Food

Here’s Why We’re Suddenly Consuming Less Coffee

Leading Coffee Supplier J.M. Smucker Co Raises Coffee Prices Nine Percent
Mario Tama—Getty Images In this Photo Illustration, a woman holds a cup of coffee on the street August 3, 2010 in New York City.

Consumption is dropping for the first time in years

Keurig Green Mountain’s K-Cups have gotten plenty of flak for being wasteful. In 2014, the company sold enough non-recyclable containers to circle the earth 10.5 times. The cups almost always end up in landfills. But Keurig machines might also be creating less waste, in a manner of speaking.

According to a biannual report on coffee released Friday by the USDA, coffee consumption is declining in the United States for the first time since 2009-2010. The reason? The rise of Keurig machines means fewer Americans are pouring their extra drip coffee down the drain.

According to the report, coffee consumption will drop in 2015-16 from 24 million 60kg bags to 23.7 million. While the decline is slight, it makes the United States the only top coffee-drinking country to see demand fall after steady growth.

Meanwhile, spending on coffee is up. Reuters reports that while Americans spent a record $11.9 billion on coffee in 2014, they’ll be spending $13.6 billion by 2016. Almost a quarter of American homes now own Keurig-style machines. But since the brewers generally only make one cup at a time, Americans who used to make a pot of drip coffee for themselves each morning no longer have to pour half their coffee down the drain. Says one roaster to Reuters: “We’re losing the sink as a consumer.”

TIME Food

Now You Can Eat Egg McMuffins All Day in More Places

150302_EM_McDonaldsWin
Kristoffer Tripplaar—Alamy

All day breakfasts first worked well in San Diego, Ca.

Hungover college students everywhere: rejoice!

McDonald’s has announced that it will continue to expand the number of restaurants that serve a limited breakfast menu all day long, according to a report in USA Today.

If you live in Mississippi and have trouble making it to the fast-food chain before the standard 10:30 a.m. cut-off time, you’re in luck. The firm has chosen 12 locations in Greenville and Greenwood, Miss., to launch the new menu on June 22. On the menu will be biscuit sandwiches such as the McMuffin, as well as, “hotcakes, sausage burritos, hash browns, Fruit ‘N Yogurt Parfait, and Fruit & Maple Oatmeal,” according to the report.

The move comes after the firm saw success with a similar effort in the San Diego area this spring. Following the trial in Mississippi, McDonald’s will continue to expand the experiment, moving it to locations in the Nashville area starting next month, the report said.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

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