TIME Diet/Nutrition

Zebra: The New Red Meat

Africa, Tanzania, Safari, Common Zebra in the Serengeti
Zebra in the Serengeti, Tanzania on Feb. 1, 2013. Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Hungry for something different? Zebra meat is now an option.

If you’re looking for the leanest source of animal protein, you can now add zebra meat to your diet. It has one-tenth the fat of beef (zebra has 0.5g per 100g), making it leaner than chicken, and 35 grams of protein per serving.

UK’s fitness food supplier Musclefood.com now provides zebra steaks from the haunches of South Africa’s Burchell’s zebra, the only zebra species that can be legally farmed for its meat. Zebra meat can also be sold in the U.S., say health officials, although it may still be hard to find. “Game meat, including zebra meat, can be sold [in the US] as long as the animal from which it is derived is not on the endangered species list,” an official with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) told TIME. “As with all foods regulated by FDA, it must be safe, wholesome, labeled in a manner that is truthful and not misleading, and fully compliant with the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and its supporting regulations.”

Like many high-protein meats, zebra is packed with zinc and omega 3 fatty-acids that contribute to muscle repair, maintaining the immune system and improving heart health. Penn State’s Penny M. Kris-Etherton, professor of nutrition, recently conducted a study examining heart benefits of lean beef, showing that along with an optimal lean-protein diet, lean meat may help reduce high blood pressure. And for the more adventurous eaters, there are a growing number of options, from bison sausage to ostrich patties and venison steaks. And now, zebra filets, presumably minus the stripes.

TIME Food

Fruit Recall Expands Across U.S. Over Listeria Concerns

Trader Joe's and CostCo are among the grocery stores pulling peaches, nectarines, plums and pluots

Grocery stores across the nation are pulling peaches, nectarines, plums and pluots off the shelves after a central California company issued a recall over concerns of a potential listeria contamination. The recall affects popular chains like Costco and Trader Joe’s.

Wawona Packing Co. announced the voluntary recall of fruit shipped between June 1 and July 12 after consulting with the Food and Drug Administration. The president of the company said in a statement that he is not aware of any illnesses caused by the produce so far, but that anyone with peaches, nectarines, plums or pluots recently purchased from those stores should throw it away.

“By taking the precautionary step of recalling product, we will minimize even the slightest risk to public health,” Brent Smittcamp wrote.

Listeria can cause flu-like symptoms including fever, headache, nausea and diarrhea and may be deadly to children and the elderly. It may also cause miscarriage or stillbirth in prgnant women.

Wawona Packing Co. shut down and cleaned their facilities after it discovered the contamination, and new tests are negative for any bacteria.

TIME Fast Food

CMO: Chipotle’s Successful Because It’s Been ‘Very Consistent’

Inside A Chipotle Restaurant Ahead of Earnings Figures
Employees prepare lunch orders at a Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurant at Madison Square Park in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

TIME spoke with Chipotle's chief marketing officer, Mark Crumpacker, about why Chipotle is wrapping up the competition

Chipotle, the food industry’s fastest-rising star, reported earnings Monday that far exceeded Wall Street’s expectations. Despite higher menu prices because of some food supply shortages, Chipotle’s burritos (from the bowl-sheathed varieties to the tortilla-ensconced specimens) and tacos (soft and hard) are flying off the counters. The company’s sales at locations open for at least a year bounced up 17 percent over the last year, an enviable figure for any restaurant. The company’s stock rose 12 percent on Tuesday with the announcement that in three months alone, Chipotle had revenues of over $1 billion. And Chipotle predicted it will open between 180 and 195 stores in 2014. (That’s at least one every 48 hours.)

Founded in 1993 with the opening of its first store in Denver, Colorado, Chipotle was one of the first chain restaurants to move to using naturally raised animals, which meant securing a meat supply that wasn’t — and still isn’t — fed hormones and antibiotics. It got an early boost from McDonald’s, which divested its assets in 2006 when Chipotle went public. Chipotle started serving naturally-raised pork in 2000 and naturally-raised chicken 2002 and continues to refine its food supply.

To find out more about what is making Chipotle so hot, we talked to the company’s chief marketing officer and right-hand man to CEO Steve Ells, Mark Crumpacker.

TIME: I have to ask, because it’s a question I ask myself whenever I go to Chipotle: When is the guacamole going to be free?

Mark Crumpacker: [Laughs] When it costs less than steak. Guacamole is incredibly expensive. I wish it were free because people love it. I think more than half of our orders include guacamole in one form or another.

T: Chipotle raised its menu prices this year, but in-store sales still increased 17 percent. Why are people so into Chipotle despite higher prices?

MC: I wish there were a super-simple answer for it. We haven’t changed a lot about what we’re doing. We’ve been very consistent with what we’ve done over the years. Chipotle doesn’t play the typical marketing game where we add new menu items and try to get people in with gimmicks like that. So I don’t think we’ve changed so much as consumer demand has changed. I have to wonder if maybe consumers aren’t catching up with us, in a way. Frankly, we’re just really positioned well to be where those folks want to go.

T: What are foodies demanding these days, and how does that line up with what Chipotle cooks?

MC: We see a trend toward people wanting higher-quality food. And it comes in a number of different flavors. Some people are interested in health, other people are interested in the impact of the food they eat on the environment. Generally speaking, across most of the different age segments we look at, we’ve seen an increase in people’s propensity to do that. If you’re going to do that, if you’re going to care a little bit more about where your food comes from, and you’re going to eat fast food, your choice is going to get limited pretty fast. There’s not a lot you can do, and Chipotle is quite well-known for having higher quality ingredients.

T: Who does Chipotle compete with? Do you compete with non-chain, mom and pop restaurants, or Taco Bell?

MC: A lot of people talk about doing the things we’re doing, but I don’t think there’s a competitor our scale that’s doing what we’re doing with regards to spending more on our ingredients. Our food costs are just higher than the other guys’ are. We’re spending more on them and there aren’t processed menu items. We do a lot of the cooking by hand in the restaurant. There’s not a lot of that going on [with other chains].

Having said that, we compete with everybody. Our customers definitely go to McDonald’s, some of them go to Taco Bell, they go to a lot of different restaurants.

T: McDonald’s was an early investor and divested its assets in 2006. In what ways did Chipotle overlap with McDonald’s, and then how have the two companies now become different entities?

MC: The companies were always very different entities. McDonald’s had a very hands-off relationship with Chipotle. They provided support where we wanted it and that was largely on real estate, logistics, supply chain issues initially. But it quickly become apparent that we were essentially heading in a different direction and there was really no influence on the food side in the experience we created in our restaurant.

T: Do you have a favorite menu item?

MC: I’m partial to the carnitas. In fact, I snuck out of a meeting today and had that. I visit all these farms and know where all the ingredients come from and that’s the one I’m most proud of. It’s delicious.

Of all the proteins we serve, the difference between commodity pork and naturally-raised pork is the most dramatic. If you’ve ever been to a confinement hog operation, it is absolutely terrifying. It’s brutal, it’s unpleasant for the animals and the people working there. And the difference between that and our hogs which are raised, even if they’re not totally outdoors‚ and just deeply bedded pens, is really, really dramatic. The alternative is very grim.

T: So it feels good to eat it, then?

MC: Yeah. I think if you’re going to eat meat, that’s a pretty good one to eat. Having been to the farms and seen all the animals, I feel best about that one.

T: Does Chipotle’s growth have something to do with the rise in popularity of Mexican cuisine? Would this have been possible 30 years ago?

MC: When Chipotle started 21 years ago, Mexican food in the United States was very, very different. It was a large plate with multiple items, usually something doused in red or green chili sauce and refried beans. Chipotle introduced to the masses the San Francisco-style burrito, which even frankly those San Francisco burritos were smothered in chili sauce. So I wonder how much it’s people more interested in Mexican food, as it is Chipotle introduced them to a different kind of cuisine altogether.

T: What is the most number of times you’ve eaten at Chipotle in one week?

MC: This is probably going to be embarrassing. I’d say five times. I’ve never eaten there every single day. But you know, if you work there and you’re in the restaurant, that’s what you’re going to eat. I know our crews eat our food every day.

T: Any complaints about getting sick of it?

MC: [Laughs] Well, you know, one of the things I learned about Chipotle, which fascinated me when I first started, you need to be very careful about what you order the first time at Chipotle because most people eat that same thing for like, the next decade.

T: What’s Chipotle going to be doing differently five years from now?

MC: Our menu has stayed the same, but underneath that menu we’re constantly striving to improve each individual ingredient. Each one of them is one its own trajectory. If you went through our 25 or so primary ingredients, each one would have a path for some distant goal of where we’d like to go with it. There’s a particular path for chicken, and then for beef and then for pork and all those veggies. We’re almost rid of any ingredients on our menu that are genetically modified. When I look out five years I suspect that the menu will be pretty much the same, but the ingredients underlying will continue to transform as we go.

T: Thanks.

MC: Thank you.

TIME Education

School Administrators: Kids Like Healthy Lunches Just Fine

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Female student carrying tray in cafeteria Tetra Images—Getty Images/Brand X

According to a new survey published in the Childhood Obesity journal

As the battle rages on over whether or not to scrap healthier options in public school lunch, a new survey suggests students actually like the nutritional meals they’re being offered. Well, at least they like it enough to keep from complaining to school administrators about it.

Last school year, administrators reported students started off complaining about the healthier take on lunch, after the USDA introduced new standards in 2012 that called for a reduction in sugar, sodium and fat in meals and the addition of more whole grains, vegetables, and fruit in an effort to confront childhood obesity.

But most had come around by the spring, they reported in a new study backed by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Now, around 70% of elementary school students “generally like the new lunch,” they said. Middle and high school administrators reported similar reactions, with 70% and 63% of students “generally” liking the new lunches, respectively.

Schools also report few drop-offs in school lunch participation with the advent of the new standards. About 64.6% of elementary schools said “about the same” number of students purchased school lunches last school year, compared to the year before.

“The updated meals standards are resulting in healthier meals for tens of millions of kids,” said Lindsey Turner, lead author of the first study, and co-investigator for Bridging the Gap, a research program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), which funded the study in a statement. “Our studies show that kids are okay with these changes, and that there have not been widespread challenges with kids not buying or eating the meals.”

Yet, according to the new survey to be published in an upcoming issue of the Childhood Obesity journal, high school students and students in rural schools have been more reluctant to accept the changes. About 25% of middle and high school administrators reported noticing “a little more” plate waste during the 2012-2013 school year, while 16% of middle schools and 20% of high schools reported noticing “much more” waste.

Administrators at rural schools also reported more plate waste and more complaints than their urban counterparts, which is troubling given the higher rates of obesity among youth in rural areas. But among poor urban youth, the researchers found higher rates of consumption and more meal purchases—suggesting those kids opting out of the school lunch program are those who can afford to eat elsewhere.

“It is possible that widespread implementation of national policy has been effective for improving the diets of socioeconomically disadvantaged children,” said the study’s authors, “but more research is needed to understand the effect of changes in the meal standards on children’s participation and dietary intake.”

There has been much debate over the Department of Agriculture’s updated school nutrition standards this year. In fact, Monday’s survey results stand in contrast to a recent USDA report that showed about 1 million fewer students chose to eat school meals every day during the 2012-2013 school year. The School Nutrition Association, a long time supporter of healthy options for kids, rolled back some of its support earlier this year due to the burden the standards place on already cash-strapped schools.

In May, House Republicans ok’d a spending bill that would allow schools to opt out of following the healthy school rules, which pump up the amount of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains served to kids at school while reducing fat, sugar, and sodium. But champions of the standards, including First Lady Michelle Obama, argue rolling back the standards would be a bad choice for kids.

In a statement Monday, the School Nutrition Association said the survey’s “perceptions about school meals do not reflect reality.”

“More kids aren’t buying lunches,” Diane Pratt-Heavner, spokesperson for the School Nutrition Association, tells TIME.

TIME global health

Photos: How Muslim Families Around the World Break the Ramadan Fast

From Istanbul to Sydney to Beijing, here's what Muslim families are eating to break the fast

TIME China

In China, McDonald’s, KFC and Pizza Hut Probe Expired-Meat Supply

Controversies over food safety are a fact of life in China

+ READ ARTICLE

Health officials have temporarily closed a Shanghai-based meat supplier after it was learned that the firm, which supplies products to major American fast-food restaurants throughout China, may have been selling expired chicken and beef.

Both McDonald’s and Yum! Brands — owner of KFC and Pizza Hut, with over 6,200 Chinese stores collectively — asked their restaurants on Sunday to abstain from selling meat provided by Shanghai Husi Food Co. after Dragon Television, a local news outfit, reported that the meat company’s employees were repackaging meat and extending its shelf life by a year. McDonald’s and Yum! have launched their own investigations.

Yum!’s sales have rebounded in recent months after a fit of bad publicity early last year, when a state television agency alleged that KFC — the largest restaurant chain in China — was selling chicken containing excessive amounts of antibiotics. Yum! insisted on the safety of its food and said it was working to improve its supply chain.

TIME Crime

Arrested Man Orders Pizza to Police Station, Gets in More Trouble

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Getty Images

He faces a slew of new charges for the stunt

A man in Kentucky who was arrested for shoplifting and public intoxication decided to pull a little prank — which totally ended up backfiring.

This jokester — 29-year-old Michael Harp — asked for permission to make a call on his cell phone and then used it to order five pizzas from Domino’s, WKYT reports. The pies arrived under the name of Officer Wilson, who had originally arrested Harp. They tracked the call to Harp pretty easily since, you know, he’d used his own cell phone.

Harp, however, denied the whole thing.

“I’m wrongfully accused on this here,” he told WKYT. “They’ve charged me with two felonies over this pizza deal because I had my phone inside the holding cell. There was about 10 people who probably used the phone, so it’s hard to say. Like I said, I never heard anyone say a word about Domino’s pizzas. Any of it.”

Still, he’s now facing additional charges including theft of identity, theft by deception and impersonating a police officer. Rough.

TIME Food & Drink

You Can Finally Start That Shrine to Yourself With This Selfie Toaster

Vermont Novelty Toaster

Eat Instagram for breakfast

For further evidence that selfie culture is turning from a form of self-expression into pure kitsch, we offer up the Vermont Novelty Toaster Corporation’s new selfie toaster. For only $75, you, too, can put your face on a piece of bread and then eat it for breakfast in the morning. It only takes a week to deliver!

“Yes, you don’t have to be famous or Jesus to have your face on toast,” company president Galen Dively says in the device’s press release. But you do have to pretty narcissistic to buy a toaster for the sole purpose of making your face appear more places!

It’s one thing to take a photo of yourself and Snapchat it to a friend in an earnest attempt at communicating something; it’s entirely another to stamp that face all over the world around you, turning your kitchen into a nightmarish temple to yourself.

With the help of CNC technology, making a custom-design toaster is cheaper than ever, so you can buy a toaster that prints just about anything, according to the company. They even take Bitcoins. Duh.

TIME Food & Drink

6 Food Industry Tricks You Don’t Know About

Apples
Arx0nt—Getty Images/Moment Open

Mind your menus!

The process of getting that apple on your plate sounds simple enough: farmer picks apple, apple gets loaded on a truck and shipped off to the grocery store where it lands in your cart. Well, not quite. In fact, your food goes through a lot to make it to you, from being treated with antibiotics to getting a chlorine bath and a wax coating. Many of these steps are no big deal (and we want to silence any fears you may have about them), but some are bad for your health and others huge money wasters.

Health.com: 30 Healthy Foods That Could Wreck Your Diet

Produce gets a wax coating
To prevent bruising, mold growth, and dehydration in storage, some fruit and veggies (apples, cucumbers) are coated with a drop or two of food-grade wax. Your body doesn’t digest them, and there’s no reason to avoid eating them, says Luke LaBorde, PhD, associate professor of food science at Penn State University. If you want to avoid waxed foods anyway, the FDA doesn’t require them to be labeled as such, so look for signs that say they’ve been coated (a suspicious shine is your first clue). To do so, don’t peel your produce-much of the fiber and phytonutrients are located in or just underneath the skin, says Joan Salge Blake, RD, nutrition professor at Boston University and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Instead, wash with a bit of soap and water.

Health.com: 26 Quick, Healthy Juice and Smoothie Recipes

Salmon is made pinker
The salmon you see at the fish counter almost always sports a bright pinkish-orange hue, but in fact, salmon is naturally a greyer shade. The swimmers take on their classic coloring in one of two ways: wild-caught salmon eat krill, while farm-raised salmon are fed pigment pellets. But don’t let that stop you from buying farmed fish. Though wild-caught salmon is technically better for you than farmed-it naturally contains half the fat, and is slightly higher in zinc, iron, and potassium-it’s three to four times pricier. “Whether farm-raised or wild, there are so many benefits of eating salmon, namely its rich source of omega 3 fatty acids that we don’t get enough of,” says Blake. Buy whatever is on sale and aim for two servings of fatty fish a week.

Health.com: 20 Healthy Salmon Recipes

Some oranges are dyed
Believe it or not, the dye Citrus Red No. 2 is sprayed on some Florida oranges early in the season to brighten their coloring. These oranges are usually used for juicing, but some end up on grocery store shelves. The dye is FDA-approved and used in small concentrations, but the Center for Science in the Public Interest warns this dye is related to health risks, including cancer, in lab animals. (It’s not allowed to be used on California oranges.) Bags of these oranges need to include a label that says color has been added. The dye still isn’t meant for eating, so don’t make candied orange peel or zest them for cooking.

Health.com: 12 Foods With More Vitamin C Than Oranges

Actually, tons of foods are dyed
Many foods are dyed to appear healthier or more appetizing. Caramel color, for example, is often added to wheat or pumpernickel breads to make them look like they contain more wheat than they do. The same colorant is used in some roast beef deli meats for a beefier look. Meanwhile, yellow dyes are added to pickles so the spears appear more vibrant. They dyes are usually safe to consume, but when you spot them on an ingredients label, take it as a sign that the food may also harbor other ingredients commonly found in highly processed foods, like added sodium and sugar, says New York City registered dietitian Marjorie Nolan Cohn, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Olive oil may be mixed with a cheaper variety
Extra virgin olive oil has come under fire for not actually being olive oil. Many bottles are mixed with cheaper oils like soybean or canola, according to Consumer Reports, and shipped to the United States where you pay a premium price. In addition to wasting your money, you’re also losing out on the heart-health perks of the monounsaturated fats you’d find in pure olive oil, says Cohn.

Chicken is given a bath
The journey a chicken takes from the farm to your kitchen table is not pretty. After slaughter, warm chickens need to be cooled down, so they’re placed in a big tank of cold water and a sanitizer, like chlorine, to control harmful bacteria and contamination, explains Don Schaffner, PhD, of the department of food science at Rutgers University. The FDA and USDA say this process is safe, Schaffner says, but you can avoid chickens that have been treated this way by choosing air-chilled poultry.

One not-so-healthy thing some manufacturers do to your chicken: inject saltwater into raw meat to enhance its flavor. Considering most Americans consume far more sodium than they should, you’ll want to read nutrition labels carefully-unaltered chicken contains 40 to 70 milligrams of sodium per 4-ounce serving, while injected chickens pack in 300 milligrams or more.

READ MORE: 12 Food-Industry Tricks That Undermine Clean Eating on Health.com

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