TIME Food & Drink

Watch This Evil Genius Use An Electric Screwdriver to Peel Apples Cause Nobody Got Time for That

If MacGyver had been a chef...

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It’s true, peeling apples can get really, really boring. But peeling apples with an electric screwdriver actually seems like more fun than not peeling apples at all.

Try this one at home, safely, the next time you’re peeling lots and lots and lots of apples.

TIME Food & Drink

9 Surprising Uses For Bacon in Honor of International Bacon Day

international bacon day 2014
Getty Images

A meaty round-up

August 30 is the 14th annual International Bacon Day, a holiday which should be celebrated by waking up, making yourself some nice sizzling strips of bacon and spending the day properly appreciating all things bacon. And I mean all things.

Here are 9 uses for the comfort food that take bacon fanaticism to a whole new level:

Air Freshener

Want to keep that delicious bacon smell lingering long after breakfast? Now you can, with bacon-scented air freshener.

Toothpaste

This bacon-flavored toothpaste allows you to “practice oral hygiene [and] satisfy cured meat cravings” at the same time, according to its website.

Prayer

The patron saint of bacon is believed to be St. Anthony the Abbot, who was a healer and used pork fat to treat skin diseases.

Landscaping

Who knew bacon could be so picturesque? Photographer Carl Warner is known for his photographs of food landscapes, and he once made a world entirely out of bacon.

Vodka

According to its website, Bakon Vodka is “Pure. Refreshing. Bacon.” It even has a list of recipes, including a BLT Martini.

Shaving Cream

Here’s some bacon shaving cream, for all the guys out there who want their faces to smell like bacon.

Perfume

But don’t worry girls, you can wear eau-de-bacon as well with this bacon perfume.

Lube

For couples who want to incorporate bacon in the bedroom, here’s some bacon lube that “is sure to have the bacon lover in your life squealing with pleasure.”

Coffin

And for the truly die-hard bacon fans out there, here is the bacon coffin you’ve all been waiting for.

TIME health

5 Things That Make You Overeat

bussiness-man-eating-alone
Businessman working on a laptop at breakfast table Getty Images

We eat solo about half of the time, according to a recent report. We dine alone 60% of the time at breakfast, 55% of the time at lunch, and up to 70% of the time when eating snacks. The solitary dining trend is due in part to on-the-go lifestyles, as well as the fact that nearly one third of households consist of just one person.

Whether you live alone or with your significant other or family, you may find yourself eating in a different way when you dine by yourself. Specifically, if you’re like many of my clients, you’re probably falling into some unhealthy eating traps. Here are five common dine-alone conundrums, along with practical ways to thwart them.

Health.com: 10 Weight Loss Mistakes Everyone Makes

Relying on processed convenience food

I’ve had numerous clients tell me that they don’t make meals from scratch when they dine alone, because they think, ‘why bother going to the trouble just for one person?’ As a result, they find themselves relying on frozen dinners or packaged products, and that quality difference can negatively affect your waistline. One recent study found that we burn about 50% more calories metabolizing whole foods versus processed foods. In other words, it’s not just about the total calories you consume; some prep and cooking time is a worthy investment, even for a solo meal. To keep it fresh, simple, and relatively fast, consider whipping up breakfast for dinner. You can sauté fresh veggies like tomatoes, onion, spinach, and mushrooms in low sodium organic veggie broth with garlic and herbs, and then pair it with either scrambled organic eggs or mashed white beans. Serve this over a small portion of healthy starch, such as quinoa or brown rice, and top with sliced avocado for healthy fat.

Health.com: 14 Ways to Cut Portions Without Feeling Hungry

Making too much

One of the biggest challenges many of my clients face when dining solo is making more than they need, which results in eating extra portions. I know it’s really a pain, or sometimes impossible, to make just a half cup of quinoa, for example. So if you cook more than you need for a single meal, keep a BPA-free storage container at the ready to stash your surplus in the fridge. And to check yourself, consider pulling out your measuring cups and spoons. Eating just 20% more than you need meal after meal can keep you about 20 pounds heavier–so while quality food rules, managing quantity is still key for weight control.

Eating while distracted

Eating alone often involves eating while doing something else–watching TV, checking email, reading, or surfing the web. And distracted eating is a major setup for overeating. When you aren’t paying attention, it’s easy to become disconnected from how much you’re eating, or how full you feel. And when you’re out of touch with the eating experience–not noticing the aromas, flavors, and textures because you’re multitasking–you’re more likely to feel unsatisfied, which can lead to post-meal snacking. I know it may feel awkward, but when dining alone, try to sit at a table and just eat. You may be surprised at how much more you enjoy your meal, and how much more satisfied you feel. In fact, many people have told me that establishing this habit resulted in getting excited about cooking again, so they could experiment with new recipes or seasonings.

Health.com: 10 Types of Hunger and How to Control Them

Gobbling too fast

Since dining alone isn’t social, you may be tempted to rush through a meal, in order to get onto your next task. But in addition to potentially triggering bloating and acid reflux, speed eating is a recipe for weight gain. One study of 3,000 people found that fast eaters were 84% more likely to be overweight. Set a goal to simply slow down; put your utensil or food down between bites, take a few breaths between forkfuls, and chew more thoroughly.

Mindless nibbling

Another common pitfall associated with eating solo is mindlessly nibbling, especially on snacks. One of my clients who often worked from home found herself grabbing whatever was within reach throughout the day, an apple from the fruit bowl, one of her son’s granola bars or hubby’s energy bars, a handful of jarred nuts…. If you’re in the same boat, the best remedy is to keep food out of your sightline, and schedule your meals and snacks. When this client began working from a desk rather than a kitchen stool, and set her cell phone alarm for a designated lunch and afternoon snack time, the extra noshing went away, and so did the excess pounds.

Health.com: A Slacker’s Guide to Losing Weight Without Trying

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

TIME Food & Drink

Kraft Recalls American Singles Cheese Slices

Beef to Tomato Send July 4 Food Cost to Record
Packages of Kraft Foods Group Inc. sliced American cheese sit on display for sale in a supermarket in Princeton, Illinois, July 2, 2014. Daniel Acker—Bloomberg/Getty Images

No customer illness has been reported

Kraft Foods Group voluntarily recalled nearly 8,000 cases of its American Singles cheese Friday because a supplier “did not store an ingredient used in this product in accordance with Kraft’s temperature standards,” according to a Kraft Foods press release. At total of 7,691 cases of the pasteurized cheese product have been recalled.

“Consumers who purchased any of these products should not eat them,” says the release, which advises people to return the slices to the store where they bought them. Kraft says it has no reports of sick customers and described the recall as a “precaution” to avoid premature spoiled food and related illness. All affected products have a “Best When Used By” date of either February 20, 2015 or February 21, 2015.

The cheese was produced at the company’s Springfield, MO manufacturing plant.

TIME Food & Drink

6 Refreshing Labor Day Cocktail Recipes

This post originally appeared on Refinery29.com.

You will most likely be headed out to a Labor Day barbecue of some sort this weekend (your small balcony equipped with grill counts, too), so it’s about time you start thinking about what to bring. While it’s just too easy to grab a case of beer and call it a day, we suggest you impress your friends and family with something a little more enticing than Miller Lite.

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Spiced rum cooler Smneedham—Getty Images

We’ve gathered six festive cocktail recipes from some of Chicago’s top mixologists that are guaranteed to liven up any party. Don’t worry about regretting that decision to skip bartending school, these libations are super simple to put together. In fact, navigating the weekend shoppers at the grocery store will prove to be more difficult.

Labor Day libations are only a click away.

(MORE: The 10 Best Rooftops In NYC)

  • A Quiet Smoke in the Woods

    Created by Mike Ryan, Sable Kitchen & Bar.

    2 oz. The Black Grouse
    .75 oz. Madeira
    .25 oz Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
    Two hard dashes Angostura bitters

    Stir and strain, serve up in a coupe glass. Garnish with a Luxardo cherry.

  • Clean Break

    Created by Benjamin Schiller, GT Fish & Oyster.

    2 oz. NOLET’S Silver Dry Gin
    .75 oz. Pimm’s No. 1
    .75 oz. Lemon Juice
    .75 oz. Simple Syrup
    3 Dashes Peychaud’s Bitters
    3 Cucumber Wheels
    2 Grapefruit Swaths

    Combine all, shake hard, double strain into a coupe.

  • The Royal Mile

    Created by Charles Joly, Aviary.

    1.5 oz. The Black Grouse
    .5 oz. Benedictine Liqueur
    .5 oz. Earl Grey Syrup
    .75 oz. Lemon Juice
    Egg White
    Rare Tea Cellars Bitters

    Combine all ingredients aside from bitters in a mixing glass and dry shake to combine ingredients. Add ice, shake, and strain into an old-fashioned glass with ice. Decoratively add bitters to top of cocktail.

    (MORE: Master the Grill This Weekend)

  • Dry Lime In The Coconut

    Created by Thomas Mooneyham of Henri and The Gage.

    1.5 oz. Brugal Extra Dry Rum
    1 oz. Ginger Syrup
    .75 oz. Fresh Lime Juice
    2 oz. Coconut LaCroix Sparkling Water

    Combine Brugal Extra Dry Rum, ginger syrup, and lime juice in a mixing glass, shake and strain into a Collins glass with ice. Top with Coconut LaCroix, quick stir, and garnish with a lime wedge.

  • Dry Rum Cooler

    Created by Pete Gugni of Scofflaw.

    1.5 oz. Brugal Extra Dry Rum
    .5 oz. Aperol
    1 oz. Fresh Lime Juice
    .75 oz. Simple Syrup
    Cucumber
    Tonic Water

    Muddle cucumber and add Brugal Extra Dry Rum, Aperol, fresh lime Juice, and simple syrup to mixing glass. Shake and strain into a Collins glass with ice. Top with tonic water, and garnish with fresh cucumber.

  • Highland Breeze

    Created by Lynn House, Blackbird.

    2 oz. The Black Grouse
    .5 oz. Fresh Lime Juice
    1 tsp. Fresh Grated Ginger
    2 tsp. Orange Marmalade
    1.5 oz. Tonic

    Combine lime, ginger, and marmalade in a mixing glass and stir until marmalade dissolves. Add The Black Grouse and ice, shake until well chilled. Double strain over fresh ice into a double old fashioned glass, top with tonic. Gently stir and garnish with a blood orange twist.

    (MORE: 19 Summer Cocktail Recipes to Perfect Now)

TIME Food & Drink

7 Recipes for the Ultimate Labor Day Menu

Shrimp skewers
Con Poulos
Con Poulos

This post originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

If you’re celebrating the last few days of summer with a backyard barbecue, let this no-fuss menu be your guide.

  • Eggplant Caviar

    This smoky, rich eggplant dip paired with a hefty helping of pumpernickel bread and diced vegetables will give your guests something to snack on while the main course cooks.

    Get the recipe.

  • Grilled Buttermilk Chicken

    To keep the meat from drying out, marinate the chicken in a flavorful buttermilk mixture overnight and toss on the grill 30 minutes before dinner time.

    Get the recipe.

    (MORE: 15 Traditional American Recipes)

  • Shrimp, Salmon, and Scallop Kebabs

    Pair your turf with these tasty skewers, which star three of the most popular fish in the sea: shrimp, salmon, and scallops.

    Get the recipe.

  • Tomato and Mozzarella Quesadillas With Basil

    Vegetarians and meat-lovers will covet this gooey quesadilla, layered with vine-ripe tomatoes, sliced mozzarella cheese, and a sprinkling of fresh basil.

    Get the recipe.

    (MORE: 20 Recipes for Fresh Summer Tomatoes)

  • Parsleyed Corn on the Cob

    Take this barbecue staple to new heights with melted butter and chopped parsley.

    Get the recipe.

  • Summer Squash Ribbons With Lemon and Parmesan

    Dress strips of squash with a simple, but delicious dressing of olive oil, lemon juice, and shaved Parmesan—no cooking necessary.

    Get the recipe.

  • Peach and Raspberry Parfait

    This dessert is neither plain nor time consuming: Simply sprinkle fresh summer fruit with sugar and let sit for 20 minutes to create the perfect no-fuss sauce for vanilla ice cream.
    Get the recipe.

    (MORE: 17 Great Summer Desserts)

MONEY online shopping

WATCH: Kickstarter Raises a Record $11 Million…for a Drink Cooler

The Coolest Cooler comes loaded with USB chargers, a cutting board and a Bluetooth speaker. It'll even cool your food and drinks!

TIME Food & Drink

Here’s How Ice Cream Will Look—and Taste—in the Future

Brace yourself for edible shells and 3-D printing.

As the old saying goes, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, right? Well, we’re pretty sure that doesn’t apply to ice cream. It’s already, by many accounts, the perfect food, so it certainly doesn’t need “fixing” per se, but we’re completely open to the idea that it could be made even better.

Here, a look at three current projects that are shaking up the ice cream world — and potentially altering the future of everybody’s favorite frozen treat.

  • Ice cream that’s been 3D printed

    When faced with an assignment to develop a new and innovative technology in 3D-printing, a group of MIT students decided to think a bit differently from their classmates.

    “Everyone else was printing composites and resins and none of that was very tasty,” says Kyle Hounsell, now a recent MIT graduate, who teamed with fellow students to think of some edible options for the project. Eventually, he and fellow students Donghyun Kim and Kristine Bunker decided they’d try to 3D-print ice cream — and it ended up working.

    The team took an ordinary off-the-shelf soft-serve ice cream machine and then attached it to a Solidoodle 3D printer.

    “The technology is called fused deposition modeling,” Hounsell explains. “Basically what you do is you put down the first layer of whatever you’re doing, be it plastic or ice cream or chocolate. You extrude your first layer from this nozzle — it’s sort of like if you had a hot glue gun and you put it down on a table and made a ring, and by the time you got around to the start, you’d move the head up a little bit and go around again. And the first ring you printed has solidified, so it’s more structurally stable, but when you go back around, you extrude new stuff which melts to it and becomes part of it.”

    That’s the process you’ll see in the video above. You might notice that the ice cream looks a bit runny, but that’s only because the team had to keep the machine’s door open to capture the video. To make sure the ice cream solidified, the students added a nozzle to sprays liquid nitrogen onto the freshly-printed layers.

    The next step, Hounsell says, is to file a patent and figure out what the future of 3D printed ice cream could hold.

    “Novelty would be a strong factor. I feel like you could just plop one of these down in a Target or something in a glass-walled freezer and sit there and watch,” he says. “Watching 3D printers work is mesmerizing. At least to me.”

  • Ice cream that’s made to order with liquid nitrogen

    A boy observes Smitten Ice Cream's Brrr machine in action. Toni Gauthier / Toni Bird Photography

    In the heart of San Francisco sits Smitten Ice Cream, where every batch of ice cream is made to order, on the spot, using a high-tech machine called Brrr. This apparatus, which took years to develop and patent, produces what Vogue called “arguably the freshest, if not the best, ice cream on earth.”

    The key ingredient? Liquid nitrogen.

    “The gist is that the faster you freeze ice cream, the smaller the ice crystals can be, and the smaller the ice crystals, the smoother the texture,” Smitten founder Robyn Sue Fisher says. “To freeze really fast, you freeze really cold. So liquid nitrogen, being negative 321 degrees Fahrenheit, really fits that bill.”

    Making ice cream this way means you can produce smooth, dense, tasty ice cream — and it also means you can cut out emulsifiers, preservatives and stabilizers, instead using fresh, local ingredients.

    “The whole impetus of me starting the company is just that I was getting kind of of grossed out by looking at the back of ice cream cartons and realizing how many ingredients were in the product that I couldn’t even pronounce,” Fisher says.

    Fisher admits that making ice cream with liquid nitrogen is nothing new — but other ice cream shops tend to do this with a basic kitchen mixer, and without a carefully engineered machine, it’s difficult to get the right texture every time. Plus, customers get to watch the machine in action as it churns their ice cream in a whirring, cloudy haze.

    For now, Smitten has four locations around the Bay Area. While Fisher doesn’t have plans to take over the world, if this ice cream is truly as delicious and fresh as it looks, you never know.

  • Ice cream served inside an edible shell

    WikiPearl ice cream balls WikiFoods

    These golf ball-sized ice cream spheres are designed to be easy to eat, but they’ve also got an eco-friendly purpose: eliminating wasteful food packaging. They’re called WikiPearls and they were developed by Harvard biomedical engineering professor David Edwards, who was inspired by foods like grapes and coconuts that essentially come with built-in packaging.

    But of course, this is still ice cream we’re talking about — so taste is a priority.

    “For a new food form to be really successful, it has to be really good and give benefits that people are looking for in food,” Edwards says. “So the packaging is a great thing but from a consumer point of view, it just needs to be really great.”

    The edible skins are made of natural food particles that are bound together with nutritive ions to form a soft skin that keeps the ice cream inside cold for several hours. You can throw them inside a Thermos and carry them with you throughout the day, popping them into your mouth when you need a snack. (Portion control, anyone?)

    For now, WikiPearls are sold at a little shop in Paris, but Edwards says they’ll soon be available in the U.S. at Cafe ArtScience opening in September in Cambridge, Mass. Flavors are fairly standard (mango ice cream with coconut skin, chocolate ice cream with hazelnut skin) but Edwards says some more eccentric flavors — like foie gras ice cream with an onion skin — are coming this fall.

    Frozen yogurt in WikiPearl form exists too, if you’re into that sort of thing. They’re a bit smaller — about the size of a grape — and can be found at a few Whole Foods locations around New England. (As we all know, though, frozen yogurt is great, but it can’t really replace the true star of the show.)

    While Edwards hopes that WikiPearls will one day be the new normal of ice cream, he’s also got plans to expand this technology into other culinary realms. He’s already created versions including cheese, fruits and vegetables — and while we’re not sure how receptive consumers will be to those, we do think the ice cream balls could be a hit.

TIME Food & Drink

All-Nutella Restaurant Coming to New York City

Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post—Getty Images

Sweet idea!

Attention Nutella fans: Book a ticket to Brooklyn and pack the pants with the stretchiest waistbands, because an all-Nutella restaurant is opening in Park Slope, Grub Street reports.

The menu for the soon-to-open aptly-named restaurant Nutelleria is filled with chocolate-nut spread-filled delights, including breakfast pizzas, crepes, croissants and a bacon-banana-Nutella waffle sandwich, that should give Mario Batali and Dominique Ansel a run for his money (unless they team up to serve Nutella-filled Cronuts).

The exact opening day for the restaurant run by self-described “Nutella enthusiasts” is still to be determined, but buzz is already building around the chocoholic’s dream spot, who may already be eying opening an additional location in Miami.

While Nutella freaks worldwide love the concept, Ferrero, the Italian company that makes Nutella, may not be a fan. In the past, the company has sent cease and desist letters to Nutella visionaries around the world, including Boloco, a New England chain that sold a Nutella-yogurt shake on the grounds that they “don’t endorse the use of Nutella or the Nutella brand in frozen beverages,” as well as the creator of World Nutella Day. Plus, the company has its own Nutella bar set up across the East River in Eataly and may not take a shine to the competition, even though there’s probably more than enough Nutella love to go around.

Don’t worry, there are always these Nutella alternatives.

MORE: There’s a $10 Secret Menu Item at Arby’s Called the Meat Mountain

MORE: Mozzarella Is the Best Pizza Cheese, According to Science

TIME Food & Drink

Texas Brewery Unveils 99-Pack of Beer

99 Pack Beer
Helms Workshop

The 7-foot-long monster is all yours for $99.99

Don’t mess with Texas, especially when it comes to beer.

Austin Beerworks has partnered with Helms Workshop to launch “the world’s first and only 99-pack” of its Peacemaker Anytime Ale.

Moving it will take a few friends because the 99-pack is over 7 ft long (2.13 m) and weighs 82 pounds (37 kg), according to the brewery. Inside the box are three rows of 33 cans of the pale ale, which, if you drank them all, would amount to over 15,000 calories.

“What started out as a joke became very real when we realized how much people love the idea of 99 beers for $99.99!” Austin Beerworks co-founder Michael Graham said in a press release.

A limited supply of 99-packs are expected to hit selected stores this week.

“Good luck and remember,” the 99-pack creators warn on the website, “lift with your legs, not your back.”

 

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