TIME Food & Drink

Saturday Will Be the Best Day Ever if You Love Pizza (But Only if You Live in Chicago)

Pizza
Getty Images

Domino's will offer $1 pies across the area to celebrate its 100th Chicago location

Great news: on Saturday, you can get a whole lot of Domino’s pizza for super-duper cheap. Sadly, though, this comes with a few caveats. First, this only applies if you will be in the Chicago area, and second, the deal only lasts from noon to 1:40 p.m.

The chain is offering one-topping medium pies for $1 to celebrate the grand opening of its 100th Chicago location, the Chicago Tribune reports. (That means each pizza costs 100 cents and the deal is available for just 100 minutes. Get it?) Oh, another caveat: there’s a limit of five per customer, but that feels pretty reasonable.

TIME Food & Drink

The Last Days of WD~50

One of the world’s most famous chefs prepares to close the doors on his landmark restaurant

“I’m just gonna go downstairs and put on my prom dress,” Wylie Dufresne says one afternoon in September at his restaurant on New York’s Lower East Side. He’s wearing a hoodie and he’s changing into a chef’s jacket. Nothing fancy, but there is an air of ceremony in the kitchen. After 11 years of service, wd~50 will close in November, ending an era for modern cuisine.

Over the last decade, Dufresne made a reputation for himself as the mad scientist of New York’s kitchens, putting out brain-teasing dishes like shrimp noodles (that’s noodles made from shrimp), cylindrical quail, fried hollandaise cubes and edible eggshells. Such inventions left some scratching their heads—why fix an egg that ain’t broken? But others embraced his creativity, and over time, his reputation congealed.

Tasting those shrimp noodles never came all that cheap. Today, the restaurant offers two tasting menus: 12 courses for $155, or five courses “from the vault” (a sort of greatest-hits selection) for $90.

And like so many New York stories, price is what has brought this institution to an end: a new building is being developed on the site. This development is driving Dufresne out of the address that gave his restaurant a name: 50 Clinton Street.

Dufresne was on the American avant-garde in using many of the chemical and mechanical innovations (see that WD-40 joke) that define “modernist cuisine” or “molecular gastronomy”—immersion circulators, sous vide precision cooking, foams and the rest. Such methods are often associated with the name Ferran Adrià, the chef behind the now-closed elBulli in Spain, which Dufresne says “blew the doors open” for imaginative cooking.

Dufresne’s enthusiasm for chemicals and high-tech gadgets came as many American chefs ran in the opposite direction, embracing the farm-to-table ethos of whole foods prepared simply. The laboratory of culinary magic tricks at wd~50 couldn’t have seemed more different.

When Dufresne perfected his condiment-frying technique, he thought it would be his big break: “You know, I can fry hollandaise, I can fry ketchup, I can fry mustard,” he says, “I thought, ‘This is gonna be my meal ticket.’ I bought a red and yellow phone because I thought McDonald’s would call, and it was just going to ring. And they were going to say, ‘Please come to us. Show us how we can fry our condiments. We’ll give you the key to the city, and Ronald McDonald will be at every one of your kids’ birthdays until they’re 28.’ Of course that didn’t happen.”

It is hard to think of any other top-tier chef who would get so excited at the prospect of partnering with the Golden Arches. But Dufresne has no qualms about mixing fancy thinking with mass production. He’s explored the idea of patenting some of his inventions. And he says he takes inspiration from the supermarket aisles. “Whether it be cereal technology or candy technology or snack technology, puff snacks,” he says, “I’m always curious to know how those things are made and how we can take that technology, those ingredients, and apply it to a stand-alone restaurant.”

As much as he seizes these methods himself, Dufresne does wish they didn’t have such a bad rap. He wants people to know that his selection of chemical ingredients is just as discriminating as his selection of the meat or fish he serves based on their source. He wishes scientists had done better PR for themselves in developing the new ingredients he uses.

And as much fun as these tricks are, Dufresne maintains that he owes much more to his mentor, culinary superpower Jean-Georges Vongerichten (who is a co-owner of wd~50), than anyone else. He praises Vongerichten’s dedication to lightening and simplifying traditional French cuisine. “For me,” he says, “it begins and ends with the French.”

For all Dufresne’s flash, he does stay true to this ethos. While his dishes are surprising, they’re seldom overwhelming. Take a hanger steak tartare he recently served accompanied by Asian pear, an amaro sauce and a scoop of Béarnaise ice cream. That last ingredient had the intrigue of invention: it didn’t even hint at melting until it was eaten. But the flavors were subtle, complicated only by the bitter sauce smeared on the plate. As Dufresne likes, there was nowhere to hide any imperfection.

Dufresne has flourished in this intersection of old and new. “Clarence Birdseye knew more about frozen foods in 1920 than you and I do today,” he says. That overlooked trust of the past shows in his kitchen’s enthusiasm for trying new techniques with ancient roots. On a recent visit, one line cook was stomping on plastic bags of dough with clean sneakers, a method for making udon noodles easier to form that Dufresne says Japanese housewives were doing centuries ago (sans the plastic or sneakers).

Most of the wd~50 has agreed to stay on until the restaurant closes in November. Malcolm Livingston II, the pastry chef, has a job lined up at Noma in Copenhagen, voted the world’s best restaurant. Dufresne says that he’s on the lookout for a new space and would be open to trying a new neighborhood, but nothing has stuck yet. In 2013, he opened Alder, which offers a more affordable but similarly playful menu, not far from the restaurant he’s now closing.

Dufresne has a lot of history on the Lower East Side, and especially at 50 Clinton Street. He met his wife, Food Network Magazine editor-in-chief Maile Carpenter, in the restaurant when she came to interview him about its opening when she was a food editor for Time Out New York.

Dufresne is a cookbook obsessive (he estimates he has about 1,400 or 1,500 at home) and he’s working on adding his own to the canon. It will be the story of wd~50, co-written with Lucky Peach editor Peter Meehan. “We’re trying to figure out how to capture 11 years, and we have a lot of dishes to choose from,” he says. “Some people might not have enough recipes for a book. We probably have too many.”

For now, though, Dufresne says he’s focused on the restaurant that bears his initials: “We’re gonna try and really make it very special to the very end, because it’s still special to us.”

Vongerichten, for his part, said he’ll mourn the passing of his student’s restaurant. “For those who have been lucky enough to eat there, [it] will never be forgotten.”

At 44, Dufresne is too young for his legacy to be complete. But the legacy of wd~50 will be its invitation to young chefs to think different, to ask why certain standards are followed and dare to break them.

“Our hope is that when it’s all said and done, we have left the industry a little bit better off,” he says. “Not that we found it in disrepair or anything like that, but that we’ve contributed to the body of knowledge…That we’re helping people understand things a little bit better, and that we’re making ourselves smarter, we’re making cooks smarter, we’re making diners smarter.”

TIME Food & Drink

10 Ideas for Portable Breakfast Recipes

Ten Ideas for Breakfast
Danny Kim—Real Simple

These healthy, homemade treats are ready to fuel your commute

This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

1. Peanut Butter Granola: Maple sugar sweetens old-fashioned rolled oats and roasted peanuts. Get the recipe.

2. Whole-Grain Banana Muffins: Grab-and-go muffins are made healthier with Greek yogurt and flax meal. Get the recipe.

(MORE: 11 Recipes That Prove Bacon Makes Everything Better)

3. Creamy Mango Smoothie: Could breakfast get any easier? This tropical-flavored drink is ready in just five minutes. Get the recipe.

4. Avocado Toast: Here’s a benefit to starting your day with toast topped by creamy avocado: The fruit is loaded with fiber plus cholesterol-lowering monounsaturated fats. Get the recipe.

(MORE: 9 Healthy Predinner Snacks)

5. Bacon-Cheddar Grits: When there’s no time to eat at home, grits (and the parfait on the next slide) can be transported easily: Pack them in a spillproof jelly jar or a reusable container with a tight-fitting lid. Get the recipe.

6. Almond Butter, Yogurt and Fruit Parfait: Not an almond butter fan? Swap in peanut butter. You can also use agave nectar in place of the honey. Get the recipe.

(MORE: Easy Halloween Cupcakes)

7. Single-Serving Sausage Stratas: You can vary the taste of these delicious little all-in-one breakfasts with the sausages you use. Get the recipe.

8. Open-Faced Egg and Tomato Baguette: Think of this as a whole new (and healthy) take on the breakfast sandwich. Get the recipe.

(MORE: 12 Easy Snacks for Kids)

9. Breakfast Burrito: Just wrap the egg-filled tortilla in foil straight from the pan and head out the door. So much better than hitting the fast-food drive-up. Get the recipe.

10. Spiced Oat and Pear Scones: Nutmeg gives golden scones a slightly spicy, slightly nutty flavor. Get the recipe.

(MORE: Which Halloween Candy is Healthier?)

TIME Food & Drink

Pizza Hut Korea’s Star-Shaped, Surf-and-Turf-Topped, Dessert-Stuffed-Crust Pizza Is Simply Too Much

Answering the age-old question: How much is too much?

There is such a thing as too much. And Pizza Hut Korea’s $32 “Star Edge Pizza” doesn’t just toe the line of excess, it slip-and-slides across it on the flavored cream cheese filling stuffed inside its crust.

The surf-and-turf pie is topped with shrimp, calamari, bacon, steak and sausage, but its turnover crust is comes jam-packed with either cranberry or cinnamon apple nut and cream cheese filling.

Why would they do such a thing? This actor in the Star Edge Pizza’s bizarre ad seems to have a pretty solid answer:

Pizza Hut Korea
TIME Food & Drink

7 Wines to Pair With Your Favorite Halloween Candy

Assortment of candy
Getty Images

Here's what to eat and drink on October 31

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

One of the worst parts about being an adult is that, unless you want a weird neighborhood reputation, you can’t go trick-or-treating anymore. But one of the best parts about being an adult is that you can buy as much candy as you want and don’t have to wait for your parents to meter it out to you. Not only that, but now you can also drink while you eat it. To help us choose appropriate wines, we enlisted Alpana Singh, owner of the Boarding House in Chicago, judge on Food Network’s Food Truck Faceoff and the youngest woman to ever become a master sommelier (she was 23). Here are her recommendations for what to pair with whatever your favorite candy might be (NO CANDY CORN).

1. Sour Patch Kids and 2012 Hogue Late Harvest Riesling, Washington State ($9):

A mouth-puckering Riesling with sweet and sour notes of green apples, apricots and honey make for a seamless match with Sour Patch Kids.

2. Laffy Taffy and 2013 Quady Electra Moscato, California ($11):

Be it banana, green apple, watermelon or strawberry taffy, this versatile, slightly sparkling dessert wine with flavors of apricots, honey and green apples is sure to out a smile on your face.

3. Butterfinger and Pellegrino Sweet Marsala, Italy ($13):

Marsala isn’t just for making chicken. Enjoy the sweet raisin flavors with notes of toffee and buttered nuts with the slight salty and nutty flavors of Butterfinger candy.

4. Nerds and Dr. L Sparkling Riesling, Germany ($13):

Nerds are inherently sour and then sweet which perfectly describes this sparkling wine. The bubbles also act as a palate cleanser to get you ready for your next bite.

5. Mr. Goodbar and Sandeman Tawny Port, Portugal ($15):

Milk chocolate and roasted peanut flavors meld beautifully with the caramel, raisin, toffee and nutty notes of this delightful Port.

6. Nestle Crunch and 2012 Dashe Late Harvest Zinfandel, Dry Creek Valley ($24):

Sweet raspberry and strawberry flavors really bring out the crunchy milk chocolate goodness.

7. Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and Emilio Lustau Solera Sherry, Spain ($37):

The raisin, caramel and almond flavors enhance the creamy peanut butter filling.

More from Food & Wine:

TIME Food & Drink

These Are America’s Best Coffee Cities

Coffee
Henglein and Steets—Getty Images/Cultura RF

Whether you’re looking for single-origin beans, personalized pour-overs, or carbonated iced coffee

When they took a train trip along the West Coast a few years ago, Stephanie Mantello and her husband got off at Portland on a mission.

It was for coffee.

“We sprinted off the train with only a 45-minute stop to get a coffee at Stumptown,” says the Sydney-based travel blogger. “It was well worth the potential of missing the train.”

Like many travelers, Mantello loves to try local java in a new place. And no surprise, Portland, OR—home of famed roaster Stumptown—was yet again in the running this year for the top city for coffee among Travel +Leisure readers. In the America’s Favorite Places survey, readers voted on the most magnetic features of major metro areas, from the quality of local coffee to the live-music scene.

Find out where to get your fix in the best coffee cities across the country—and make your opinions heard by voting in the America’s Favorite Places survey.

No. 1 Portland, OR

The Northwest city known for its latte-friendly (read: misty) weather won the coffee contest again this year—and not just forStumptown Coffee Roasters, which continues to expand beyond Oregon. Two lesser-known local favorites are in the city’s Central Eastside. One is Coava, a single-origin roaster whose beans are regulars at the Northwest Regional Barista Competition, and whose Zen-feeling Brew Bar shares space with a sustainable bamboo company. The other, micro-roaster Water Avenue Coffee, offers such barrel-aged coffees as Oak and Pinot Noir; one of the most popular menu items is a $1 sidecar shot of espresso.

No. 2 Seattle

The city that gave the world Starbucks fell to No. 2 again—perhaps because some T+L readers think only of the coffee giant when they come here. But Seattle, which also ranked well for bookstores and boutiques, supports plenty of smaller coffee operations (some even dubbed “nana-roasters”) that roast their own beans. Consider Slate Coffee Roasters in Ballard, or Convoy Coffee, a bike-powered coffee cart that does pour-overs, AeroPress, and iced coffee. If you can’t come to Seattle without visiting the mother ship, check out the Starbucks Reserve Roastery and Tasting Room, a 15,000-square-foot flagship that will offer small-batch roasts when it opens December 2014 in Capitol Hill.

No. 3 Providence, RI

The coffee culture in this state capital—populated by a lot of artists and geeks, according to T+L readers—runs deep. To understand one reason why sweet “coffee milk” is Rhode Island’s state drink, go toDave’s Coffee, which sells a high-quality espresso-based coffee syrup that locals often add to a glass of milk or use to lace their morning joe. Dave’s also does a cold-brew coffee on tap and boasts of having the state’s only Slayer machine—which helps baristas better control the temperature and pressure during espresso making. One of the best up-and-comer coffee places is in the Dean Hotel: Bolt Coffee Company, where the top order is a Chemex-made pot of coffee for two. And since nothing goes better with coffee than a little pastry, pick up some cookies from North Bakery, or scones and sticky buns from Seven Stars Bakery (Providence ranked at No. 1 for its baked goods).

No. 4 Albuquerque

The New Mexico city made the top five for its distinctive local flavor. Case in point: the New Mexico Piñon Coffee Company, offering blends made with local pine nuts, which fans say add a vaguely cocoa or hazelnut flavor. On Saturdays, the roaster offers a short coffee history class with a roasting demo and cupping. Ask Albuquerqueans for their other favorite local coffee drink, and they may send you to Golden Crown Panaderia, where you can indulge in the signature Coffee Milkshake with vanilla ice cream, chocolate syrup, and a generous dousing of espresso.

No. 5 Houston

This business hub is one of four cities designated as a green coffee exchange port on the New York Board of Trade. For a purist’s cup, check out Siphon Coffee, in Montrose, where your coffee is prepared using the vacuum process, which promises to extract the best flavor from the beans. While Siphon’s baristas may discourage cream or sugar, they do condone snacks (like breakfast tacos and empanadas) and trying your luck on the coffee bar’s Ms. Pac-Man and Frogger machine. To taste other local brews, go to Revival Market, which offers local cheeses, charcuterie, and coffee by Houston-based roaster Greenway. Another reason to stop in: Houston also scored near the top of the survey for its foodie-friendly specialty grocery stores.

Read the full list HERE.

More from Travel + Leisure:

TIME Food & Drink

Taco Bell’s New Menu Will Make Sriracha Fans Very Happy

Hot Sauce Controversy
Nick Ut—AP

The chain is testing some spicy new menu items

Hopefully you’re not on an all-carb diet, because you’re definitely going to want to hit up Taco Bell soon. The chain is now testing a new menu that incorporates a whole lot of Sriracha, the Washington Post reports.

Sadly, though, these spicy new items are only being tested in the Kansas City area, now through mid-November. Here’s what the menu includes:

  • Sriracha Beef Griller
  • Sriracha Taco and Taco Supreme
  • Sriracha Quesarito (this is a Quesarito, by the way)
  • Sriracha Nachos
  • Sriracha Quesarito Box
  • Sriracha Grande Scrambler

Diehard fans of the beloved rooster sauce might notice, however, that the condiment Taco Bell is using is more of a “Sriracha creme” sauce with a bit less heat, as one Redditor noted. In the meantime, if you’re not in the Kansas City area, you can just continue pouring Sriracha all over everything and get the same effect.

MONEY Food & Drink

Why Sales of Yet Another Traditional Breakfast Staple Are Tanking

141014_EM_Orange_1
Alamy

Sales of orange juice, once considered a must-have component of a healthy American breakfast, have hit a 16-year low.

In September, the Florida Department of Citrus announced it had paid Marvel Comics $1 million to redesign a superhero mascot who is powered by (you guessed it) orange juice. His name is Captain Citrus, and after helping the Avengers save the world, he says things like, “Just think, it all started with a glass of ORANGE JUICE!”

It’s a dorky attempt at boosting orange juice sales, but it’s hard to blame citrus growers for the effort. Clearly, the industry needs all the help it can get.

A year ago at this time, it was revealed that during the 2012-2013 season, orange juice sales in the U.S. had totaled 563.2 million gallons, the lowest level in the 15 years that such figures have been tabulated. In the year since, things have only gotten worse for folks in the business of producing and selling orange juice. Data released this week shows that Americans bought a new low of 525.1 million gallons of O.J. during the 12-month period that ended on September 27.

By some measure, orange juice sales have fallen 40% since the 1990s. Clearly, sales have suffered partially for the same reasons that cereal and milk sales have declined: Our fast-paced, on-the-go culture means that fewer people are eating a sit-down breakfast at home, or eating breakfast at all.

Orange juice has faced additional hurdles because coffee, energy drinks, and other beverages have gained market share as popular drinks for any time of the day, breakfast hours included. Also, one of orange juice’s biggest selling points—that it’s a brilliantly healthy way to start your day—has increasingly been called into question. A strong argument has been made that orange juice, packed as it naturally is with sugar, is no better for you than soda in terms of nutrition. As Businessweek reported late last year, a typical 8-ounce glass of O.J. contains “110 calories and 26 grams of carbohydrates—more than a pair of Oreos.”

The criticism has prompted members of the orange juice industrial complex to encourage consumers to drink smaller glasses of O.J. daily—a little is better than nothing at all—and more recently, to hope that a rebranded Captain Citrus just might save the day for citrus sellers. The new Captain Citrus, it must be noted, is as buff as Thor and Captain America, with six-pack abs and a bodybuilder physique. The problem is that, based on the way sales have been trending, consumers seem to associate orange juice with the image projected by the old Captain Citrus, best described as a “big, fat talking orange wearing a cape.”

Whereas the new Captain Citrus is drawn with a glowing orange on his muscular chest reminiscent of Iron Man, the vintage version has a large “C” in the center of his spherical body. Presumably, it stands for “Citrus,” not “calories.”

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