TIME Food & Drink

Chile Tries to Revive an Obscure Old Wine Grape

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Christoph Hetzmannseder—Moment Open/Getty Images

Pais grapes are known for their thin skins and some critics have likened the wines to French Beaujolais

This article originally appeared on Decanter.

Some of Chile’s biggest wine producers are working to revive the Pais grape that arrived in the country with Spanish colonizers but has since lost favor to more modern international varieties.

There are around 7,250 hectares of Pais planted in Chile, mostly in the country’s Maule and Bio Bio Valley regions. But, many wine lovers outside of the trade have probably never heard of it.

That is changing as producers develop a better understanding of how to work with the grape variety, also known as Mission.

‘It is a forgotten grape,’ said Patricio Tapia, a Regional Chair at this year’s Decanter World Wine Awards. ‘For decades, Pais was considered a minor grape only suitable for bulk wines, but now a small group of winemakers are taking Pais very seriously, producing fascinating and enchanting wines.’

Many Pais vines in Chile are more than 100 years old, and the variety is believed to have arrived in the country on Spanish colonial ships in the 16th Century.

Several hundred years later however, it is Carmenere that is considered Chile’s signature grape variety, alongside international favourites such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Merlot.

‘We do expect more single varietal Pais [on the market],’ said Tapia, who has just launched the first English language version of his annual guide to Chilean, Argentine and Uruguayan wines, named ‘Descorchados‘. It includes information on winemaking trends, based on interviews and tastings with 250 wineries, as well as top wines to try.

Concha y Toro, Chile’s largest wine firm, is planning to launch a Pais and Cinsault blend under its Marques de Casa Concha brand in October this year. Marcelo Papa, the winemaker who is overseeing the wine, said the firm has been researching different winemaking techniques with batches of Pais.

One large producer already selling a single varietal Pais is Torres, a Spanish wine company that owns around 400 hectares of vines in Chile.

Its recently launched Reserva de Pueblo Pais 2012 vintage beat two Chilean Carmenere wines and a Malbec to scoop a Regional Trophy at the 2014 Decanter World Wine Awards. The firm also makes a sparkling wine from Pais, Santa Digna Estelado Rosé.

‘Chilean winemaking had a 300-year history before the arrival of Cabernet Sauvignon,’ said Miguel Torres Maczassek, Torres’ general manager. The company buys Pais from around 25 growers.

Pais grapes are known for their thin skins and some critics have likened the wines to French Beaujolais. Tapia described the grape as good for light, easy-drinking reds.

Torres Maczassek said advances in winemaking technology have helped to improve Pais quality. ‘You have to take care of the winemaking process, it’s important to treat the grapes with a lot of respect,’ he said.

Many growers are small-scale, family businesses who earn little profit. Some have applied for Fairtrade certification and – perhaps unusually for a large producer buying in grapes – Torres Maczassek said he has encouraged growers to form trade associations.

‘It’s so they can have more of a voice. It’s actually easier for us to talk to them if they are just one organisation,’ he said.

He believes Pais’ profile is set to rise on the international stage, which should help Chile against its wine producing rivals. ‘Many critics and connoisseurs are talking about this, and that is the first step.

‘To really show a true personality in the future, Chile has to have a point of difference to other countries. These old varieties can help.’

More from Decanter:

TIME Food & Drink

Behold the Unhealthiest Meal You Can Eat at a Chain Restaurant

Red Robin
A.1. Peppercorn burger, Bottomless Steak Fries, and Monster Salted Caramel Milkshake is seen at a Red Robin restaurant in Foxboro, Massachusetts July 30, 2014. Dominick Reuter—Reuters

At 3,540 calories, this meal is not going to make your waistline happy

The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) has handed out their annual Xtreme Eating Awards to the fast food meals and chains that they deem the unhealthiest. After surveying over 200 chain restaurant menus for meals and combos that are especially high in calories, fat, sugar and salt, the winner of this year’s ignominious prize is a real monster. Specifically, Red Robin’s “monster-sized” A.1. peppercorn burger, served with “bottomless” fries and a “Monster” milkshake, which clocks in at a whopping 3,540 calories.

According to CSPI, it’s the “single unhealthiest” meal available at a chain restaurant, with 69 grams of saturated fat, 6,280 mg of sodium and an estimated almost three-quarters of a cup of added sugar. CSPI notes that to work off a meal of such, ahem, monstrous proportions, the average person would need to walk briskly for a full 12 hours, presumably not walking from one Red Robin to another. (One takeaway from this dubious distinction is that perhaps limiting one’s intake of foods preceded by the word “monster” should be step one towards healthy eating.)

Joining Red Robin in the winner’s circle for this ignoble prize is the Cheesecake Factory. While Red Robin won the top prize for its monster combo, the Cheesecake Factory earned itself three spots on the list. The popular chain’s Farfalle with Chicken and Roasted Garlic clocked in at 2,410 calories, which CSPI notes is “the calorie equivalent of a five-hour jog.” Also in the ranks are the Bruléed French Toast, which rang up 2,780 calories, and a Reese’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Cake Cheesecake that contained 1,500 calories. Yes, the cheesecake had almost one thousand fewer calories than the innocent sounding chicken and pasta dish. Luckily the restaurant has many “Skinnylicious” menu options that make it easier to make healthier choices.

Consumers can make healthier eating choices at chain restaurants as they increasingly add low calorie, low carb and weight watching friendly items to their menus. For example, at Red Robin you could swap french fries for steamed broccoli, but that’s a different type of monster entirely.

MORE: 11 Worst Fast Food Restaurants in America

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MONEY Fast Food

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TIME Food & Drink

You Can Now Get Tofu McNuggets at McDonald’s in Japan

Views Of FamilyMart Convenience Store And McDonald's Restaurant As Retailers Halt Chicken Sales From China Supplier
Yuriko Nakao / Bloomberg / Getty Images

Ingredients include "onions, soybeans, carrots and minced fish"

If the “chicken” in McDonald’s “chicken” nuggets freaks you out, head over to Japan to try the franchise’s newest snack: Tofu Shinjo Nuggets, which officially go on sale this Wednesday.

They don’t include any chicken — instead, they’re made from ingredients including onions, soybeans, carrots and minced fish, a McDonald’s spokesperson told the Wall Street Journal. They’ll also come with a ginger-flavored sauce.

“Because it isn’t meat, it tastes a bit different. It’s a bit softer,” the spokesperson said. “Calorie-wise, it is a bit lower than chicken as well.”

They basically look like little patties with some pale bits of vegetables mixed in. Check them out in this advertisement:

Apparently, McDonald’s had plans to begin selling this product well before the recent allegations that the chain had been using expired meat.

MONEY Food & Drink

The Market Says This Bag of Potato Chips Is Worth $49

Bag of potato chips
Fuat Kose—Getty Images

Some junk food is going for big bucks on the secondary market. How much would you shell out for your favorite snack?

Lay’s newest potato chip flavors, Bacon Mac & Cheese, Wasabi Ginger, Mango Salsa, and, yes, Cappuccino, hit stores today. These chips, which have already received myriad mixed reviews, are part of the company’s “Do Us a Flavor” contest. The winner will stick around, while the other three will eventually vanish from shelves.

If you can’t immediately track them down in your local store, however, don’t despair—just open a web browser. Last week, even before the chips officially went on sale, they were fairly easy to track down on the secondary market. On Friday, single bags were listed on eBay for a $11 a pop, plus $6 shipping (the suggested retail price is $4.29). Amazon also showed some options, including a four-pack of the Cappuccino chips for $24. And as the snacks become easier to find in retail stores, the rules of supply and demand should kick in, dropping prices.

Dig a little further into this snack food grey market, though, and you find plenty of options that won’t be popping up on shelves any time soon. One optimistic eBay seller lists a $49 bag of Lay’s Chicken & Waffles flavored chips, one of last year’s “Do Us a Flavor” contest runners-up, which has since been discontinued. You’ll also find other snack chip rarities, such as a $40 bag of Doritos Jacked Test Flavor 404, which one review described as tasting like “oniony vinegar” or “dry cat food,” and Pringles Pecan Pie, a seasonal special from the 2013 holidays, listed at $20.50 for two cans.

If chips aren’t your thing, you might be more interested in a $15 pack of Root Beer Float-flavored Oreos (a new variety that’s reportedly beginning to appear in stores), or $15 bottle of Coca-Cola Blak, a coffee-flavored cola put out of its misery way back in 2008. Marvin Nitta, editor of food review blog TheImpulsiveBuy.com, says that when the limited editon Lebron James Mix 6 Sprite soda came out earlier this year, he saw online sellers listing it for “four or five times the regular price.” (Currently, you can pick up a can on eBay for a cool $12.)

Eric Huang, who writes about snacks on his blog, Junkfoodguy.com, says he thinks the secondary snack food market is driven, in part, by companies’ recent attempts to try out more bold and attention-provoking flavors. Wacky flavors make the news, and adventurous eaters want to sample them, even if that means paying a premium. The fact that they’ll eventually vanish only makes them more enticing. In fact, Huang has his own “white whale”: a Doritos flavor called Wild White Nacho. He says he tried the chips once back in 2007, when they were briefly on the market as part of a contest, and “I’ve been searching ever since.”

International snacks are another thing that drive curious eaters to buy pre-owned junk food, says Huang. American foodies are understandably curious about foreign fare like Lay’s Lobster Hot Pot (3 bags for $25 on Amazon) or Canada’s uber-spicy Doritos Roulette (on eBay listed at $21 a bag).

There are some clear downsides to buying secondhand snacks. Between the mark-ups and shipping costs, you’ll pay more than you ever imagined for junk food. Many of the rarest discontinued products are well past their sell-by dates, though some food scientists say we shouldn’t get too worked up about that. There’s also the squashing and crumbling factor: Not surprisingly, many Amazon shoppers complained that their chips were nothing more than florescent orange dust by the time the snacks arrived on their doorsteps. Then there’s the unpredictability factor. Nitta recalls buying some fried chicken-flavor Doritos from a seller in Japan that were confiscated by customs because they contained an ingredient that’s illegal to bring into the country. Plus, he says, “in the back of my head, it makes me feel weird to buy food from some random person on the internet.”

If the groundswell of eaters chasing a product gets large enough, it can occasionally help put the items back on the market. Earlier this July Hostess announced the return of the Chocodile, a chocolate-covered Twinkie that was discontinued in the late 90s. In a statement, the company said the elusive snack had “inspired a black market following,” while NPR reported that the creme-filled sugar bombs have been listed on eBay for as much as $90 a box.

Still haven’t seen any flavor tempting enough to prompt you to buy some gently used junk food? Just wait: The winning submissions to “Do us a flavour,” the Canadian version of the Lay’s contest, will be announced in August.

MONEY Shopping

Why We Spend So Many of Our Dollars at Dollar Stores

99 cent sign
joeysworld.com—Alamy

And why the $8.5 billion Dollar Tree–Family Dollar deal is probably a sign that the dollar store's heyday is coming to an end

The dollar store has been one of the great success stories of the recession era, with chains such as Dollar Tree, Family Dollar, and Dollar General posting record sales figures, broad expansions, and soaring stock prices over the past half-dozen or so years. Now that Dollar Tree is purchasing Family Dollar for $8.5 billion, it appears as if the era of rampant dollar store growth is plateauing, even while many household finances remain pinched and dollar store shopping continues to be popular.

How did we get to the point where such a colossal merger would make sense? Here’s a look back at the recent evolution of the dollar store, with a particular focus on why many shoppers have come to view them as handy neighborhood general stores—and not just for cheap stuff.

The Great Recession destroyed shopper budgets. In the late ’00s, the housing bubble burst, the stock market crashed, and the jobs market took an ugly turn. All of the factors combined meant that the free-spending habits developed by consumers in the preceding years would have to be broken and replaced by new strategies to live cheaply. The much-heralded demise of conspicuous consumption spelled trouble for products like GM’s Hummer, but it also meant boom times for low-price retailers—dollar stores especially.

With little money to spend, especially if they’d cut up their credit cards as many had in a move to a cash-only existence, consumers stretched what few dollars they had at dollar stores. Consequently, dollar stores flourished. Dollar General doubled its store locations in the first decade of the millennium, for instance. According to one study, by 2011 there were more dollar stores than drugstores in the U.S.

Dollar stores pushed one-stop shopping. Shrinking American household budgets helped the rise of dollar stores. So did the broad campaign by dollar stores to push beyond the idea that they were good only for junky throwaway trinkets, off-brand canned goods, and anything else that had grown stale on the shelves of mainstream stores.

Among the goods shoppers started seeing more of at dollar stores are groceries, home decorating items, and even beer and wine. In some cases, dollar store offerings have been celebrated as surprisingly chic: A New York Times columnist wrote about his adventures decorating his apartment with dollar store purchases, while the 99-Cent Chef developed a following based on recipes that use ingredients purchased only at 99¢ Only stores. According to one survey from 2010, 18% of shoppers said that they were buying food and drinks for holiday parties at dollar stores.

Chances are, they were also buying wrapping paper and some stocking stuffers at dollar stores too. And that’s the point. When a shopper can buy fresh bread, produce, a gallon of milk, birthday cards, laundry detergent, shampoo, Christmas presents, and maybe a few bottles of cheap Chardonnay at the dollar store, there’s less need to hit the supermarket, liquor store, drugstore, or big box retailer. Dollar stores have been actively promoting themselves as one-stop shopping options with almost anything you need to buy—and with more locations and a smaller, easier, more manageable layout than, say, the nearest Walmart.

They’re not as cheap as you think. While there are undoubtedly some great bargains at dollar stores, shopping experts also advise against the purchasing of certain items there. Like, say, electronics and pots and pans. If you’re surprised that dollar stores even have such items, bear in mind that oftentimes, not everything in a dollar store is priced at $1. Dollar Tree has stuck to $1 pricing for everything in its stores, but Family Dollar and Dollar General don’t bother abiding by the $1 price rule. Among other items, the Dollar General website lists a Craig Android tablet for $78 more than $1.

Dollar stores employ the age-old strategy of drawing shoppers in with bargains and hoping that they grab some other (non-bargain) goods while they’re at it. A Family Dollar spokesperson told the New York Times columnist mentioned above that low-priced cleaning supplies were “almost like the gateway product” for dollar store shoppers. “It starts with cleaning goods,” he said, “and ends up with a bedspread.”

Or perhaps a tablet, or a bottle of wine—which will also cost more than a buck ($2.99 and up, usually, when available.) Shopping centers have been embracing dollar stores in their slight turn upscale because they’re able to attract slightly better-off clientele. But budget-conscious consumers must be careful: In many cases, dollar stores charger higher prices per unit than what’s to be found at Walmart, Target, or a warehouse club such as Costco. It’s just that dollar stores seem like bargains because the items are low quality or they come in exceptionally small sizes. Just last week, a controversy was stirred up when Dollar General offered a special on diapers in “all counts and sizes” that Walmart and Target failed to match, even though they have price matching policies. Why? Because Walmart and Target offer diapers in far bigger sizes than what’s available at dollar stores.

Speaking of Walmart and Target, they’ve slowly been rolling out a counteroffensive to dollar stores by way of smaller retail locations, often in the densely populated urban hubs where dollar stores are ubiquitous. Supermarkets have entered the battle too, with stores that are half the size of the usual grocery shop. The smaller size means these stores can easily fit in a strip mall or city block, making them a lot more convenient and practical for millions of shoppers.

So now we have a situation in which dollar stores do what Walmart and Target do best by stocking groceries, electronics, and a little bit of everything, and Walmart, Target, and grocery chains do what dollar stores do best by offering small, convenient locations (and more of them) and many bargain-priced goods. The retail lines are blurring. Every player wants to be the convenient, one-stop shopping destination for shoppers, and it has gotten much tougher for a dollar store or any retailer to stand out. When it’s hard to differentiate yourself in the marketplace, and it’s hard to grow, it’s probably time to combine with someone in the same boat to help you compete. That’s what seems to be happening with Dollar Tree’s purchase of Family Dollar.

MONEY

10 Things Americans Have Suddenly Stopped Buying

Popping bubble gum
Ross Culshaw—Getty Images

America is just not the clean-shaven, gun-buying, soda-drinking, Chef Boyardee-eating place it used to be

For a variety of reasons—including but not limited to increased health consciousness, the harried pace of modern-day life, and plain old shifting consumer preferences,—Americans have scaled back on purchases of many items, sometimes drastically so. Here’s a top 10 list of things we’re not buying anymore, at least not anywhere near as frequently as we used to.

Cereal
In one recent four-week period, cereal sales were down 7%, and cereal giant Kellogg’s sales decreased 10%. The reasons for cereal’s declining dominance at the breakfast table are many. As the Wall Street Journal reported, consumers are more apt nowadays to turn to yogurt or fast food in the morning, and they’re less likely to have time to eat breakfast at home at all—not even if it’s a simple bowl of cereal.

Consumers also want their breakfast to pack more punch, protein-wise. “We are competing with quick-serve restaurants more, but the bigger driver is that people want more protein,” Kellogg CEO John Bryant told the Journal. It’s no coincidence that milk sales have been falling alongside cereal, with cow’s milk struggling especially due to the rise of alternatives like soy and almond milk. (Sales of yet another breakfast-at-home staple, orange juice, have plummeted 40% since the late 1990s.)

To try to put cereal back on the spoon of more breakfast eaters, food makers have been resorting to all manner of gimmicks, including the promoting of new higher-protein cereals, as well as the idea that cereal is a great late-night snack rather than just a breakfast-time basic.

Soda
The crash of soda—diet soda in particular—has been years in the making, with consumers increasingly turning to energy drinks, flavored water, and other beverages instead of the old carbonated caffeine drink of choice. The latest Wall Street report from Coca-Cola showed that the soda giant missed estimates, partly because sales of Diet Coke in North America fell in the “mid-single digits.”

(MORE: 10 Things Millennials Won’t Spend Money On)

While a lot of soda’s slump can be attributed to shifting consumer preferences—more organic, less sugar—the broader war on soda involving taxes and big-beverage bans must factor in too. And if First Lady Michelle Obama has any say in things, the decline of soda is a trend that’ll continue: Her ongoing “Drink Up” campaign encourages kids to consume more water—and, consequently, less soda.

Gum
Likely due to heightened competition from mints and candies, chewing gum sales have dipped 11% over the past four years, the Associated Press reported. The editorial board of the News Tribune of Washington state, for one, weighed in that it is wonderful that gum sales are down in the gutter, sniffing, “Gum-chewing doesn’t do us any favors, making us look like cows chewing our cud. For humans, that’s not a good look.”

Guns
Gun sales have been booming in recent years, with sales periodically juiced when perceived anti-gun politicians enter office or a high-profile mass shooting takes place, prompting consumers to seek guns for protection—or just out of fear they won’t be able to buy them in the future because tougher gun regulations might be passed.

Lately, however, gun sales have fallen, sometimes sharply. The big reasons why this is so seem to be that there’s little in the way of likely gun control for gun enthusiasts to motivate new purchases, and also that everyone who has wanted to buy a gun in the past couple of years has already bought one (or seven). In the first quarter of 2014, the guns-and-ammo-focused Sportsman’s Warehouse retail chain saw comparable stores sales drop 18%, while gun sales at Cabela’s fell 22%.

But a little perspective is necessary. While guns sales and background checks are down compared to the past couple of years, they remain far above the levels of the early ’00s. As gun industry experts have put it, the decline probably just represents a “returning to normal” for gun sales—which aren’t as strong as they once were, but are still very strong nonetheless.

Cupcakes
Well, it looks like many of us at least have stopped buying the pricey “gourmet” variety of cupcakes. That’s the conclusion to be drawn with the collapse of Crumbs, the 65-store chain that shut down abruptly in early July. The news was widely interpreted as a sign that the gourmet cupcake trend is officially dead.

Chef Boyardee
ConAgra recently issued a warning to Wall Street that its consumer food volume experienced a 7% decline, and that it faced “continued profit challenges” due to some of its flagging, tired products—in particular, Chef Boyardee, the 86-year-old canned pasta brand.

Golf Gear
It’s not surprising that going hand in hand with fewer people playing golf, there are also fewer golf purchases being rung up at sporting goods store registers. The most notable eye-opener occurred this past spring, when Dick’s Sporting Goods announced that its golf equipment sales were down around 10%, at the same time the average driver was selling at a price of 16% less.

(MORE: Could Rory McIlroy Be Golf’s Long-Awaited Savior?)

Razors
Beard-loving hipsters were blamed for the decline in razor sales last summer, and in 2014, razor giants like Procter and Gamble (owner of Gillette) has continued to blame poor sales on the trendiness of beards. Everything from the shaggy beards worn by the World Series champion Boston Red Sox, to month-long no-shave “challenges” like Movember and Decembeard have been cited as reasons why guys have scaled back on razor purchases. In response, marketers have introduced even more varieties of new high-tech razors, while also pushing the concept of “manscaping,” with special razors designed just for the task. The hope is that even if men aren’t shaving their faces, they might still shave one or several other parts of their bodies.

Bread
According to one survey, 56% of American shoppers said they are cutting back on white bread. White bread was surpassed in sales by wheat bread sometime around 2006, but in recent years the gluten-free trend has hurt sales of all breads. Sales are even down in European countries like baguette-loving France, where consumption is down 10%. In American restaurants, meanwhile, there’s an epidemic of free bread disappearing from tables, as fewer owners want to bear the expense of putting out free rolls and other breads that no one is going to eat.

Convertibles
The fun-loving, wind-in-your-hair thrill of driving in a convertible just hasn’t been enough to keep consumers buying the classic ragtop in strong numbers. Businessweek noted that convertible sales have fallen 44% since 2004, and automakers have been significantly scaling back the number of models that are even offered in convertible form. Apparently, too many consumers see convertibles as impractical, and/or not worth the $5,000 or so premium one must pay compared to the regular model.

Data recently released from Experian Automotive indicates that the convertible is largely now a toy purchased by the rich. Nearly 1 in 5 convertible buyers have household incomes of at least $175,000 (compared to 11% of buyers of all cars), and 12% of convertible buyers own homes valued over $1 million (compared to 4% of buyers of other cars). For what it’s worth, convertible drivers are also better educated than the average car owner (50% of convertible buyers have at least a bachelor’s degree, versus 38% overall), and nearly one-quarter of all convertibles are now purchased in three sunny states with ample coastlines: California, Florida, and Texas.

Related:

10 Things Millennials Won’t Spend Money On

MONEY Food & Drink

WATCH: Did Dunkin’ Donuts and McDonald’s Hurt Themselves Battling Starbucks?

Dunkin' Donuts and McDonald's both tried aggressive moves to top rival Starbucks, but so far, their efforts have failed.

MONEY Food & Drink

WATCH: It’s National Tequila Day!

If your local bar offers free tastings or discounted shots tonight, you can thank one of the many food-related holidays on the calendar.

MONEY deals

It’s a Great Day for Mas Cheap (Sometimes Free!) Tequila

Margaritas
Jonelle Weaver—Getty Images

In honor of National Tequila Day, bars and restaurants are offering deals like $2 shots and $2 margaritas—and in at least one case, margaritas are totally free.

Thursday, July 24, is being celebrated as National Tequila Day, yet another of what seems like an endless stream of fake, completely made-up holidays. Contrived marketing scheme or not, today’s holiday comes with a range of tequila-infused deals and promotions in bars and restaurants around the country—so, yeah, there’s good reason to celebrate.

Nationally, the On the Border restaurant chain is selling $2 house margaritas and $2 shots of Lunazul Reposado Tequila all day at participating locations. Other national chains with National Tequila Day specials include Abuelo’s, where hand-crafted margaritas are $5.95 all day, and Chevy’s, where deals like $2 house margaritas and $4 shots of Cuervo Silver or Cinge come with the added bonus of being available not only on Thursday, but every day through Sunday, July 27.

Individual bars and restaurants have National Tequila Day specials of their own, so it’s as easy as doing a “Tequila Day Deal + Your Town” search to find them, or just show up at your local watering hole and hope for the best. Here’s a sampling of what you’ll find, thanks to the help of local bloggers and writers around the country:

New York City: Horchata, in Greenwich Village, is teaming up with Patron and is giving away free margaritas featuring the new tequila Patrón Rocca from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. A half-price happy hour stretches from 4 to 7 p.m. as well. Sources such as Metro list tons of other spots that are primed for celebrating National Tequila Day on Thursday.

Washington, D.C.: The options include $3 shots of Sauza Blanco at Agua 301.

Las Vegas: Cabo Wabo has had half-priced tequila shots since Monday, while Park on Fremont and The Salted Lime offer $2 drink specials.

Houston: Look for $2 tequila shots, $1.99 margarias, and $5 appetizers at restaurants throughout the city.

We’ve also come across National Tequila Day promotion roundups for Denver, Phoenix, and all over Connecticut, so suffice it to say: If you’re hankering for a tequila deal today, head to the nearest downtown bar-and-restaurant district and you’ll find one.

As an added unexpected bonus/justification for bar-hopping tonight, a recent health study has found that the sugars in tequila could help you lose weight. Cheers!

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