TIME movies

See Lana Condor and Sophie Turner Go Real 80s on the Set of X-Men: Apocalypse

The film hits theaters in May 2016

X-Men director Bryan Singer shared a new photo of the upcoming film’s newest cast members.

Fun second day with @sophie_789 @lanacondor #JeanGrey #Jubilee #XMEN #XMenApocalypse

A photo posted by Bryan Singer (@bryanjaysinger) on

In a photo uploaded to Instagram on Thursday, Singer offered a first real glimpse at Jubilee and Jean Grey in X-Men Apocalypse. Fans will have to wait a little over a year to see the new cast members—played Lana Condor and Game of Thrones’ Sophie Turner—on the big screen.

X-Men Apocalypse, which is set in the 1980s, will hit theaters in May 2016.

TIME movies

‘Most Dangerous Movie Ever Made’ Charges Into Theaters

Director and star Noel Marshall in a scene from the film, “Roar.”
Drafthouse Films—AP Director and star Noel Marshall in a scene from the film “Roar

The movie is an ill-fated brainchild of Alfred Hitchcock muse Tippi Hedren and her then husband, Exorcist producer Noel Marshall

(LOS ANGELES) — “No animals were harmed during the making of ‘Roar.’ But 70 members of the cast and crew were.” So claims a trailer for the theatrical re-release of a little-seen 1981 adventure film starring Tippi Hedren, daughter Melanie Griffith and 150 lions, tigers, leopards, jaguars and elephants.

Touted as the most dangerous movie ever made, “Roar” was the ill-fated brainchild of Alfred Hitchcock muse Hedren and her then-husband, “Exorcist” producer Noel Marshall. Years past schedule and millions over budget, Hollywood eventually lost interest in “Roar” and the film was never released in North America.

Now, 34 years later, Drafthouse Films is giving “Roar” its big-screen due, re-releasing it in six theaters nationwide on Friday, then expanding it to about 50 cities through May. A DVD release is planned for later this summer.

The story loosely follows a wildlife preservationist whose family comes to visit him and is attacked in their home by the animals. Most of the film has the cast running and hiding in fear as they narrowly escape the all too real danger. Dozens of scenes show full grown lions chasing the actors, pawing at their faces and even wrestling them to the ground.

While the exact number of on-set injuries remains a point of contention, the “Roar” shoot was an OSHA nightmare. Many wounds were well-documented in press coverage at the time and also in Hedren’s 1985 book “The Cats of Shambala,” referring to her Shambala Preserve north of Los Angeles, where “Roar” was filmed.

In one instance, Hedren was bitten on the back of the head by a lion. She also suffered fractures and skin grafts after being thrown by an elephant. Then-teenager Melanie Griffith — who quit the project for a time because she didn’t want to come out of it with “half a face,” according to her mother — returned to the set, only to be mauled and clawed by a lion.

Marshall, who wrote, directed and starred in the film, suffered so many bites, including a few that made the final cut, that he was eventually stricken with gangrene. And Dutch cinematographer Jan de Bont, in his first U.S. shoot, required 120 stitches after being scalped by a lion.

“I got bit really bad early on,” said Noel Marshall’s son, John Marshall, who wore many hats on set in addition to acting in the film. He recalled a harrowing moment when a male lion latched onto his head. It took six men 25 minutes to separate the two. That encounter required 56 stitches.

“It was a very traumatic bite. But I went back two days later,” he said.

Noel Marshall (who died in 2010) was a fearless and unsympathetic leader during the shoot at Shambala, where the family lived. According to his son, the director often refused to call “cut,” even when the actors (mostly family members) cried out for help. He never wanted to lose a take. He also couldn’t show any weakness in front of the animals, his son said.

“Melanie and Tippi would try to gravitate to scenes with me. I would put their lives ahead of mine and they knew that,” said John Marshall, who was basically the only person on set who could stand up to his father.

As one of the few cast members willing to help promote the “Roar” re-release, John Marshall said he still gets nightmares about the experience.

“Don’t get me wrong, I had a wonderful time. But it was stupid,” he said.

During the production, the Shambala Preserve set, located in rustic Soledad Canyon 50 miles north of Los Angeles, was destroyed by two wild fires and one flood. A few lions escaped during the deluge and local law enforcement had to shoot three of them.

And yet, as authentic as the terror is, “Roar’s” flimsy story and cheesy script are sorely lacking. Even Hedren admitted as much after seeing the film at its Australia premiere.

The $17 million film only made $2 million internationally. It was also the death knell for Hedren’s marriage to Noel Marshall.

And “Roar’s” problems continue.

Hedren had invited The Associated Press to her Shambala home for an interview about “Roar” and concerns regarding promotion of the ‘re-release. But she canceled when the Board of Directors of the preserve and her Roar Foundation asked her not to speak publicly about the film.

Through a spokesman, Hedren did tell the AP that promotion for the re-release was filled with “inaccuracies” and that she was “not thrilled.” She added, “There are too many for me to even begin to comment.”

Drafthouse Films, the distribution arm of the hip, Austin-based Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas, uses press quotes like “snuff version of ‘Swiss Family Robinson'” in its promos for “Roar.”

“I think she’s just lately come to not really be so proud of the film anymore,” said Alamo Drafthouse founder and CEO Tim League, who was tipped off to its existence (and harrowing production) by indie director Greg Marcks. He immediately went in search of the rights holder and reached a deal with Olive Films to co-release the film.

League tried to contact Hedren before announcing Drafthouse’s plans to re-release the film but didn’t hear back until after the announcement was made.

“The whole thing is a mess,” said League. “A fascinating and lovable mess.”

TIME Alcohol

Teens Who Watch Boozy Movies Are More Likely to Drink, Study Finds

healthiest foods, health food, diet, nutrition, time.com stock, red wine, alcohol
Photograph by Danny Kim for TIME; Gif by Mia Tramz for TIME

There may be a dark side to Bridget Jones' cute coping sequences

Watching James Bond elegantly guzzle that martini may be having adverse effects on adolescents. A new study from the journal Pediatrics found that 15-year-olds who have watched more alcohol being consumed in films than their peers are more likely to have tried alcohol, more likely to binge drink and more likely to have alcohol-related problems.

“Alcohol is a drug and it has potentially adverse effects, not only for individuals but also for family and friends,” says lead author Andrea Waylen, a lecturer in social sciences at the University of Bristol. “It’s not very often that we see the adverse effects of alcohol portrayed—like vomiting, rotten hangovers,” she adds. “In my view, we don’t really get an accurate representation of what alcohol is like.”

The new paper used data from a longitudinal study in the United Kingdom that surveyed 5,163 15-year-olds on a wide variety of topics. They were asked about their drinking habits and whether they had seen a random selection of 50 popular films, from Bridget Jones’ Diary to Aviator. Waylen and her colleagues used those answers to quantify their exposure to drinking by adding up the minutes in each film that showed alcohol use. (The original study was done in the mid-2000s, when those movies were hot off the reel.)

After controlling for factors ranging from parents’ alcohol use to gender and social class, the researchers found that the kids who had been exposed to the most cinematic swilling were 20% more likely to have tried alcohol and 70% more likely to binge drink. They were more than twice as likely to have a drink more than once per week and to suffer from alcohol-related problems, such as encounters with the police or letting their drinking interfere with school and work.

The recommendation of Waylen and her colleagues is that film ratings take into account heavy drinking; such films, Waylen suggests, would then be more likely to be rated for adults only. In the study, she notes that between 1989 and 2008, 72% of the most popular box office films in the United Kingdom depicted drinking but only 6% were classified as adult only.

A review of top-grossing American films conducted in 2009 found that 49% of PG-13 rated films and 25% of PG-rated films showed more than two minutes of alcohol use. The study concluded that the current rating system was not adequate for parents trying to limit their kids’ exposure to drinking (or smoking, for that matter).

Similar studies conducted in the U.S. and Germany have found connections between kids watching boozing in film and then drinking in real life. Other studies have found similar associations for risky behavior like tobacco use, dangerous driving and early sex.

“My guess is that there needs to be a level of identification with the drinker in the film,” Waylen says. And she believes kids are more likely to identify with consuming characters “in films where alcohol use is made to look cool, get you friends, win the girl or boy.”

Her conclusion is that the officials rating movies need to take demure sips of wine and rowdy spring break chugging contests more seriously. “Adverse outcomes from alcohol use are a large societal public health problem,” the study concludes, “and rating films according to alcohol content may reduce problem-related alcohol use and associated harm in young people.”

TIME movies

Groundhog Day Broadway Musical to Premiere in 2017

Bill Murray runs through the snow in a scene from the film Groundhog Day in 1993.
Columbia Pictures/Getty Images Bill Murray runs through the snow in a scene from the film Groundhog Day in 1993.

Now you can experience it again and again

The 1993 comedy blockbuster Groundhog Day will make its debut as a Broadway musical in March 2017, with casting for the production still in the works, Variety reports.

The Bill Murray classic features a discontented television weatherman stuck repeating Feb. 2 ad infinitum. The comedy favorite grossed $70 million at the box office over its lifetime, according to IMDb.

Now it’s being adapted for the stage by the same talent behind the Tony-award winning Matilda production, including director Matthew Warchus, lyricist-composer Tim Minchin and choreographer Peter Darling. The musical will also involve screenplay writers Harold Ramis and Danny Rubin, who wrote the original story.

The previews are slated to begin Jan. 23, 2017.

[Variety]

TIME medicine

What the Year’s Health Films Got Right—And Wrong

Medical experts dish on how Hollywood handles health

In 2014, health-centered films were some of the most watched and most applauded. Films like The Theory of Everything and Still Alice are nominated for Oscars, and The Fault in Our Stars made well over $124 million at the box office. But how true to health were they?

We asked medical experts, from Alzheimer’s physicians to pain specialists, to grade five of this year’s films for medical accuracy and the authenticity of patient experience. Find out which passed with flying colors—and which ones need a checkup.

  • The Theory of Everything

    THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING, Eddie Redmayne as Stephen Hawking, 2014. ph: Liam Daniel/©Focus
    Focus Features

    The film tells the story of Stephen Hawking, the brilliant physicist who lives with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease. It’s nominated for five Oscars: Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Original Score and Best Adapted Screenplay.

    Reviewer: Dr. Jeffrey D. Rothstein, director of the Brain Science Institute and the Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins University

    Grade: A

    What the film got right: In summer of 2014, the Ice Bucket Challenge forever and dramatically changed our exposure to ALS, a relatively rare and fatal neurological disease. As a physician scientist experienced in diagnosing patients with ALS, caring for them, and carrying out research on the disease, I always feel it’s important that Hollywood portray medical disorders accurately. It’s as important as getting the plot right. In my opinion, the director, writers and, most importantly, the actors did a pretty darn good job at educating viewers about this condition.

    First, the film authentically portrays the subtle and typical early-onset changes that characterize the disease, like the occasional tripping, fumbling or dropping of objects. These changes reflect early hand, foot and leg muscle weakness. The slowing of Hawking’s walk, his clumsy writing and his stumbling when he tries to walk up steps and hold chalk are all common in the early stages of the disease. The actor also so movingly and faithfully shows the terrible frustration patients feel when simple tasks like eating and picking up a spoon become so difficult. The loss of these simple actions rob an individual of their independence in daily activities. The film’s depiction of Hawking’s eventual tracheotomy—the hole in the windpipe which allows for better breathing—accurately shows the tragic loss of speech and communication, and the terrible and primitive way patients years ago had to spell out words to produce simple sentences. The film also successfully relays the emotional and physical stress ALS places on spouses and loved ones. I’ve seen it often in my own practice.

    What the film got wrong: The discussion Hawking and his doctor have about his diagnosis in a hallway is not how physicians tell a patient about such a terrible and impactful diagnosis. It lacks the privacy and respect you need when you’re meeting with a patient, and I hope Hawking had a more appropriate encounter in real life. Sometimes movies get everything wrong when it comes to diseases and treatments, but overall, I don’t think The Theory of Everything got much wrong at all.

  • Still Alice

    STILL ALICE, Julianne Moore, 2014. ©Sony Pictures Classics/courtesy Everett Collection
    Sony Pictures

    A well-respected linguistics professor at Columbia University, Dr. Alice Howland, is diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. The film is Oscar-nominated for Best Actress.

    Reviewer: Dr. Kristine Yaffe, professor of psychiatry, neurology and epidemiology at University of California, San Francisco and member of the Alzheimer’s Association Medical & Scientific Advisory Council

    Grade: B

    What the film got right: In Still Alice, we watch a highly accomplished woman trying to hold onto her life while future is transformed by Alzheimer’s disease. Julianne Moore, who plays Alice, is successful at capturing the initial memory and interrupted thought symptoms of the disease, followed by denial, then attempts at control, and finally solace and grace.

    Since Alzheimer’s disproportionately affects women, the focus on a woman keeps with the statistics. Women are at slightly higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s, and many more women have the disease because they live longer. It almost goes without saying that women are also much more likely to provide care to people with dementia.

    Scientifically, the first phase of Alice’s symptoms and the encounter with her consultant neurologist are very realistic and deeply moving. The movie accurately demonstrates the early word-finding challenges, occasional memory lapses and sense of becoming overwhelmed in once familiar situations.

    What the film got wrong: The course of Alice’s decline from Alzheimer’s was too fast by almost any standard. The character went from early symptoms while lecturing at a conference in Los Angeles to being almost mute, not recognizing her daughter and requiring full-time care all in about a year. While this helps the tempo of the movie, it does not match the often decade-long disease progression we see.

    The viewer may also inaccurately conclude from the movie that Alzheimer’s disease is more definitively diagnosed with neuroimaging (brain scans such as PET and MRI) than it can be, and more genetically influenced than it often is.

    Neuroimaging is among the most promising areas of research focused on early detection of Alzheimer’s, but for now, these tests are appropriately used only to clarify a difficult diagnosis when it is not clear what is causing the dementia symptoms. It’s also used for unusual cases, such as early onset of symptoms.

    Slight reference is given in the film to the young onset type of Alzheimer’s being more grounded in genetic risk. But the jump to genetic testing on the second medical visit, followed by testing Alice’s children and even possibly the pregnant daughter’s offspring was unrealistic and over-simplified. It is important to note that young onset Alzheimer’s affects perhaps only 2 or 3% of the total population of people with the disease—or about 200,000 out of the more than 5 million people living with Alzheimer’s in the U.S. today.

    It was hard for me to connect with any character other than Alice and her youngest daughter. They were the only ones in the film with real intimacy, emotion and connection. In real life, Alzheimer’s disease explodes family dynamics and pushes the diagnosed individual and their family to deal with a disease that slowly strips an individual of certain strengths.

  • Obvious Child

    A117_C002_0418MH
    A24

    A young woman has a one-night stand, an unplanned pregnancy and an abortion.

    Reviewer: Dr. Mary Jane Minkin, professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at Yale School of Medicine

    Grade: B

    What the film got right: In Obvious Child, Donna, a 28-year-old aspiring stand-up comic, breaks up with her boyfriend and meets Max, a very eligible young man who has shown up at her comedy club. They hit it off immediately; much alcohol and a wild night of sex ensue. As you correctly surmise, she conceives, and ultimately at the movie’s end she has an abortion, with Max’s emotional support.

    The film brings attention to some very important themes. One half of the pregnancies that occur in this country are unplanned. Donna is drinking way too much alcohol to conceive a healthy pregnancy. Max speaks about how much he wants to be a father, and one would certainly hope that their relationship will develop well. As an obstetrician, I’d like to see a happy ending: Donna’s stand-up career takes off, she stops drinking such a significant amount of wine, she starts taking a folic acid vitamin every day, and then she conceives. (And of course they live happily ever after!) But that’s not exactly how things play out. However, Donna’s pregnancy symptoms, sore breasts and nausea, were accurately depicted, as was her use of a home pregnancy test kit.

    What the film got wrong: One primary “obvious choice” wasn’t made in the film. After the liaison, one would expect a sophisticated New Yorker to think to herself that during a very intoxicated evening, a condom might not have been used correctly, and that she should proceed to her nearest pharmacy to purchase a morning after contraceptive. Morning after contraception is widely available over the counter to women of all ages, and is extremely effective when used right after the event, actually up to 72 hours later, and is very well tolerated. But then we would have had no movie!

    Donna, quite reasonably, goes to an office of Planned Parenthood. However—and this is what’s most problematic to me—the physician there tells Donna that she is “too early for an abortion.” Donna is about 5 weeks from her last menstrual period, or about 3 weeks pregnant. The doctor is quite correct in suggesting that a suction abortion would not be the appropriate choice at this point, since the gestational sac is so small that it might well be missed during the procedure. But the doctor does not mention any of the medicinal methods of termination, such as the RU-486 pill, which is ideal to use earlier in the gestation. Then again, if Donna takes RU 486, we have no drama. Donna won’t be waiting for two weeks, and we wouldn’t overhear the discussion Donna has with her mother about her mother’s experience having an illegal abortion in the 60s. There would be no dramatic scene in the waiting area of the clinic. Women using RU 486 miscarry at home, and not on a schedule.

  • The Fault in Our Stars

    MCDFAIN FE003
    20th Century Fox

    A love story about teenage cancer patients who meet in a support group.

    Reviewer: Steven Gonzalez, teenage leukemia survivor and member of MD Anderson Children’s Cancer Hospital’s teen advisory council

    Grade: A

    What the film got right: At age 12, I was diagnosed with AML leukemia and was given a 2% survival chance. That year entailed a lot of chemotherapy, a bone marrow transplant and about 130 days of isolation in the hospital and at home. Though I try not to, I tend to view any cancer-related literature with a pretty critical eye. There’s simply too many little details, emotions and events that are left out. The Fault in Our Stars was different, however, and captured a lot of those little details that are so rarely shown.

    For starters, the nonchalant way that the characters addressed cancer was spot-on. I’ve found that the ability to joke about cancer is pretty common among survivors and a lot of patients. For us, it’s a topic that we have lived with and have become more or less comfortable with. I’ve found that cancer survivors make some of the best cancer-related jokes. I also have to applaud the characters’ emotional breakdowns. For example, when one of the main characters, Augustus, breaks down by a gas station, he wasn’t crying for sympathy or attention. He was just too medicated or had too many emotions with no way of controlling them. Those scenes gave me flashbacks.

    Another accurate moment was when Hazel’s mom tells her, “It’s okay to let go.” That foggy, in-and-out, dream-like state is exactly what I remember experiencing as a doctor told me, “You’re gonna be alright, bud,” right before my treatment took effect. The movie also gets points for not portraying the whole bald-but-somehow-still-has-eyebrows look that some television shows and movies seem to like.

    While I understood why everyone else in the theater was crying at the end, I had a different reaction. I thought the ending was happy. I felt the movie captured the tiny details and I felt like my story was finally being told right. The movie reminds us that even though Augustus and Hazel had little time together, they made the most of it and enjoyed every moment. That is the ultimate end goal in life.

    What the film got wrong: The film has a few flaws. The biggest problem I had was that while it made an effort to include details of life with cancer that aren’t usually depicted, it still showed a very Hollywood approach. At first I couldn’t put my finger on it, but after rewatching the movie, I think it boils down to the fact that cancer just isn’t that neat and clean. Literally. It involves a lot of emotions, bodily changes and a lot of bodily fluids coming out in many different ways. I’m not trying to say that cancer is all sadness and pain all day every day—some of my fondest memories, in fact, came from that year I had cancer—but it still feels like an overly polished view. Cancer can be one of the messiest-sterile environments, and The Fault in Our Stars doesn’t quite capture that concept.

  • Cake

    Cinelou Releasing

    A drama about a grieving woman suffering from chronic pain and painkiller addiction, Cake was nominated for a Screen Actors Guild Award and Golden Globe Award.

    Reviewer: Dr. Charles Kim, a pain specialist at Rusk Rehabilitation at NYU Langone Medical Center

    Grade: B+

    What the film got right: Cake embarks on a very difficult task of exploring the complicated condition of chronic pain in a way that people can hopefully appreciate and sympathize with. The movie cogently touches on many things I have seen in some of my patients, such as isolation, depression, addiction and self-realization. Also quite accurate in some patients are the pill-hoarding behaviors, sleeplessness and painful sex depicted in the film. Chronic pain can be described as a nebulous and complex medical condition, at best. It is poorly understood in the medical world and traditionally thought of as a symptom and not a disease condition. But it afflicts about one in five Americans—about 60 million people, more than diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined.

    It was quite apparent to me as a clinician that Claire, played by Jennifer Aniston, was not only inappropriately overusing the pain medications OxyContin and Percocet for her physical pain, but was also self-treating underlying depression from her unresolved grief over the tragic loss of her son. It becomes a vicious cycle. She needs higher and higher doses of these pills, likely due to her built-up tolerance. This under-recognized vulnerability is often experienced with chronic use of painkillers, but often goes untreated until it is too late. Chronic pain is associated with suicide, a point Cake doesn’t hesitate to make known. In fact, chronic pain sufferers are up to three times more likely to commit suicide than those in the general population, presumably due to insufficient control of pain and under-recognition of coexisting depression.

    From a clinical perspective, Cake is a well-executed and contemplative peek into the dark world of uncontrolled chronic pain, depression, and addiction. The film can be thoroughly appreciated by those who have chronic pain, or those close to them, and appreciated by those who have seen the gratifying life outcomes that occur when the condition is well-controlled and managed.

    What the film got wrong: Some parts of the film are exaggerated and amplified for theatrical effect, such as the fuzziness separating the boundaries of hallucination and reality, or the desperate trip to Tijuana for more medication. Very rarely are chronic pain patients in the extremes of hallucination-driven, desperate addictive behaviors. Overall, I give Cake a B+: a “B” for the respectable attempt to tackle the 800-pound gorilla of chronic pain, despite some of the glorified theatrics and excesses, and a “+” for Jennifer Aniston’s laudable portrayal of a chronic pain sufferer in our society.

TIME movies

This Is How Few Women Landed a Top Hollywood Role Last Year

"The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1" - LA Premiere
Axelle—Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic/Reuters Actress Jennifer Lawrence at the Los Angeles premiere of The Hunger Games: Mockingjay–Part 1 on Nov. 17, 2014

The number is even smaller than in 2013

Last year, only 12% of the top 100 grossing films in Hollywood had female lead characters, a three-point decline from 2013.

A study examining 23,000 roles found that in the top-grossing domestic films of 2014, women were severely underrepresented as protagonists. Furthermore, only 11% of all female characters last year were African-American, and only 4% were Latina or Asian.

The occupations in which the on-screen women were cast were often stereotypically female roles like mother, girlfriend or wife — identities that often hinged on a male lead.

The actresses who did land leading roles were also of a younger age than their male counterparts, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

“The chronic underrepresentation of girls and women reveals a kind of arrested development in the mainstream film industry,” said Martha Lauzen at the Center for the Study of Women in Television at San Diego State University.

“It is unfortunate that these beliefs continue to limit the industry’s relevance in today’s marketplace.”

[THR]

TIME movies

Pedro Almodóvar Shares Title of His Next Film, Teases Details

Pedro Almodovar
Juan Naharro Gimenez—WireImage/Getty Images Pedro Almodovar at the 62nd San Sebastian International Film Festival at the Kursaal Palace on Sept. 25, 2014 in San Sebastian, Spain.

Almodóvar described the film as a 'return to the cinema of women'

Pedro Almodóvar’s next film will be called Silencio and will begin shooting in April, the director told the Financial Times. The script has been completed and the film is in its casting phase.

Almodóvar described the film as a “return to the cinema of women” and said it would feature a female lead in the interview released Friday.

“It’s called Silencio because that’s the principal element that drives the worst things that happen to the main female protagonist,” he said.

[Financial Times]

TIME movies

Watch a Supercut Trailer Featuring All the Star Wars ‘Episodes’ So Far

Episode VII will be called The Force Awakens

The teaser for the long awaited Episode VII is showing in select theaters this Friday, according to the official Star Wars website. But for fans need something to tide them over, here is a supercut of the trailers for Episodes 1-6, complete with shots of 3CPO, R2D2, Princess Leia, Luke, Han Solo, Chewbacca, Obi Wan and, of course, Jabba the Hutt.

TIME movies

The Original Cowardly Lion Costume from The Wizard of Oz Is Up for Auction

Bert Lahr In 'The Wizard Of Oz' as the Cowardly Lion
MGM Studios/Getty Images Bert Lahr as the Cowardly Lion in a scene from the film 'The Wizard Of Oz', 1939.

Could fetch more than $1 million

The iconic Cowardly Lion costume donned by Bert Lahr in the Wizard of Oz is up for auction in New York.

The costume is one of many rare film relics being sold at the Bonhams auction house on Monday. The costume is fashioned from actual lion hide and was worn in over a dozen scenes in the 1939 film, Bonhams said. The costume is sure to go for a pretty penny, the Associated Press reports: A secondary version recently sold for almost $1 million.

The costume will appear alongside other film memorabilia including props from the Wizard of Oz and costumes from Gone with the Wind, Pretty Woman and Rosemary’s Baby as a part of “TCM Presents: There’s No Place like Hollywood.

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