TIME viral

If Disney Characters Instagrammed, They’d Be Guilty of These Selfie Crimes

Artist Simona Bonafini created a series that will rock your childhood

The Little Mermaid always wanted to be a part of our world. And we live in a world of selfies — lots and lots of selfies.

Artist Simona Bonafini created a series titled “Selfie Fables” that imagines what your Instagram feed would look like if it were habituated by your favorite cartoon characters. And while it isn’t as disturbing as other Disney re-interpretations, Hercules and company are guilty of some selfie faux pas:

Shirtless gym selfies. We know this is going straight to Tinder:

Simona Bonafini

Bikini shots. There’s no need for #perfectbody thinspo…

Simona Bonafini

Instilling feelings of FOMO. Maybe your invite to the tea party went into your spam folder?

Simona Bonafini

Nothing is wrong with this selfie. Maleficent owns it:

Simona Bonafini
TIME movies

There Will Be a Tetris Movie, and it Will Be ‘Epic’

Game Boy Game "Tetris"
The cover of Nintendo Game Boy game, "Tetris." Boston Globe—Boston Globe via Getty Images

"What you [will] see in Tetris is the teeny tip of an iceberg that has intergalactic significance."

Are you sitting down? Please, tell me you’re sitting down. Because, the Wall Street Journal reports, Tetris will be coming to a theater near you.

No, not for a World Cup competition — the company is determined to turn the classic blockbusting game into a spectator sport — but for a movie. That’s right, there is going to be a Tetris movie. And according to Threshold Entertainment CEO Larry Kasanoff, “It’s a very big, epic sic-fi movie.”

While we don’t know what to expect, Kasanoff, who turned Mortal Kombat into a film in 1995, told the WSJ what we shouldn’t expect. “This isn’t a movie with a bunch of lines running around the page,” he said. “We’re not giving feet to the geometric shapes . . . What you [will] see in Tetris is the teeny tip of an iceberg that has intergalactic significance.”

May this please open the door for other spinoffs of Marble Madness and Pong, too. Blip. Blip. Bloop.

[WSJ]

TIME film

J.J. Abrams Mashes Up Star Wars and Batman in Episode VII Tease

The Millennium Falcon as you've never seen it before

J.J. Abrams made the internet very happy Thursday. The Star Wars director tweeted out a video that at first seems like Episode VII footage, but then becomes something even greater: A Star Wars/Batman mashup.

It’s the Millennium Falcon as you’ve never seen it before.

Abrams has been exchanging these mashups with Batman v. Superman director Zack Snyder:

Fan fiction enthusiasts, commence!

TIME movies

There’s Going to Be a Ben-Hur Remake Starring Jack Huston

Actor Jack Huston arrives for the premiere of HBO's television series "Boardwalk Empire" Season 4 in New York
Actor Jack Huston arrives for the premiere of HBO's television series "Boardwalk Empire" Season 4 in New York September 3, 2013. Carlo Allegri / Reuters

Movie is scheduled for release in February 2016

Boardwalk Empire actor Jack Huston is set to star in a Ben-Hur remake, says the Hollywood Reporter.

The details aren’t finalized yet, but the English actor will reprise the role made famous by Charlton Heston. He will star alongside Morgan Freeman, who will play Ildarin, the Reporter says.

Director Timur Bekmambetov, known for his vampire franchise Night Watch and Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter will take on the challenge of remaking the 1959 classic, which won 11 Oscars, including Best Picture.

Bekmambetov will begin filming in Europe next year, and the movie is scheduled to be released on Feb. 26, 2016.

[THR]

TIME History

FDR’s Polio: The Steel in His Soul

Jeffrey Kluger is Editor at Large for TIME.

Disease can break a lot of people. As a new film by Ken Burns and an exclusive video clip show, it helped make Franklin Roosevelt

No one will ever know the name of the boy scout who changed the world. Odds are even he never knew he had so great an impact on history. It’s a certainty that he was carrying the poliovirus—but he may not have known that either since only one in every 200 infected people ever comes down with the paralytic disease. And it’s a certainty too that he had it in late July of 1921 when he and a raucous gathering of other scouts had gathered on Bear Mountain in New York for a summer jamboree. So important was the event in the scouting world that it even attracted a visit by the former Assistant Secretary of the Navy and 1920 Democratic Vice Presidential nominee, Franklin Roosevelt.

This much is painfully certain too: somehow, the virus that inhabited the boy found its way to the man, settling first in his mucus membranes, and later in his gut and lymph system, where it multiplied explosively, finally migrating to the anterior horn cells of his spinal cord. On the evening of August 10, a feverish Roosevelt climbed into bed in his summer cottage on Campobello Island in Canada’s Bay of Fundy. It was the last time he would ever stand unassisted again.

Roosevelt’s polio, which struck him down just as his political star was rising, was supposed to be the end of him. The fact that it wasn’t is a self-evident matter of history. Just why it wasn’t has been the subject of unending study by historians and other academics for generations. This year, Roosevelt and his polio are getting a fresh look—for a few reasons.

October 28 will be the 100th birthday of Jonas Salk, whose work developing the first polio vaccine was backed by the March of Dimes, which was then known as the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis and which itself grew out of the annual President’s Birthday Balls, nationwide events to raise funds for polio research, the first of which was held on FDR’s 52nd birthday, on January 30, 1934, early in his presidency. That initial birthday ball raised a then-unimaginable $1 million in a single evening, a sum so staggering Roosevelt took to the radio that night to thank the nation.

“As the representative of hundreds of thousands of crippled children,” he said, “I accept this tribute. I thank you and bid you goodnight on what to me is the happiest birthday I have ever known.”

This year too marks one more step in what is the hoped-for end game for the poliovirus, as field-workers from the World Health Organization, Rotary International, UNICEF and others work to vaccinate the disease into extinction, focusing their efforts particularly on Pakistan, one of only three countries in the world where polio remains endemic.

Then too there is the much-anticipated, 14-hr. Ken Burns film, The Roosevelts: An Intimate History, which begins airing on Sept. 14. It is by no means the first Roosevelt documentary, but it is the first to gather together all three legendary Roosevelts—Franklin, Theodore and Eleanor—and explore them as historical co-equals. It’s the segments about FDR and his polio that are perhaps the most moving, however—and certainly the most surprising, saying what they do about the genteel way a presidential disability was treated by the media and by other politicians in an era so very different from our own.

“We think we’re better today because we know so much more,” Burns told TIME in a recent conversation. “But FDR couldn’t have gotten out of the Iowa caucuses because of his infirmity. CNN and Fox would have been vying for shots of him sweating and looking uncomfortable in those braces.”

That’s not a hard tableau to imagine—the competing cameras and multiple angles, shown live and streamed wide. And what Americans would have seen would not have been pretty, because never mind how jolly Roosevelt tried to appear, his life involved far, far more pain and struggle than the public ever knew, as a special feature from the film, titled “Able-Bodied,” makes clear. That segment, which is not part of the broadcast and is included only on the film’s DVD and Blu-Ray versions, which are being released almost contemporaneously with the film, was made available exclusively to TIME (top).

Concealing—or at least minimizing—the president’s paralysis was nothing short of subterfuge, the kind of popular manipulation that wouldn’t be countenanced today. But it’s worth considering what would have been lost by exposing the masquerade that allowed FDR to achieve and hold onto power. Roosevelt, as the Burns film makes clear, was a man whose ambition and native brilliance far exceeded his focus and patience. It was a restlessness that afflicted cousin Teddy too, causing him to make sometimes impulsive decisions, like pledging in 1904 that he wouldn’t run again in 1908—an act he regretted for the rest of his life and tried to undo with his failed third-party presidential bid in 1912.

“Who knows what would have happened if Teddy had had the great crises Franklin had—the Depression and World War II?” Burns says. “I do know he was unstable and always had to be in motion. It fell to FDR, who could not move, to figure out a way to outrun his demons.”

George Will, in an artful turn in the “Able-Bodied” clip, observes that when the steel went onto Roosevelt’s legs it also went into his soul. That may have been true in FDR’s case, but it’s true too that suffering is not ennobling for everyone. Some people are broken by it; some are embittered by it. As polio nears the end of its long and terrible run, the things FDR achieved despite—even partly because of—his affliction remain nothing short of remarkable.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Iceland

Watch Iceland’s Bardarbunga Volcano Spew Lava Into the Air

Bardarbunga has been erupting since Aug. 31

These beautiful images, filmed by Nature Explorer, capture the moment Iceland’s Bardarbunga volcano shoots lava into the air.

Bardarbunga has been spewing out fountains of molten magma over the Holuhraun lava field since it started erupting on Aug. 31.

But the volcano is also emitting noxious gases, like sulfur dioxide, which are putting the health of scientists working at the site at risk, reports the Wall Street Journal.

Residents living in the region have reported a stench in the air.

“It smelled like old redfish,” 68-year-old Unni Johansen, told the Journal.

Children and those with respiratory problems are being advised by Iceland’s health authorities to stay indoors, as scientists have traced the volcano’s toxic gases as far afield as Norway and Finland.

[WSJ]

TIME animals

The Lassie Effect: Study Finds Dog Movies Make Breeds More Popular

Lassie Dog Breeds
Dog whisperer Cesar Millan and Lassie at the taping of the 100th episode of National Geographic Channel's "Dog Whisperer" at Pickwick Gardens in Burbank, Calif. on March 30, 2008. Neilson Barnard—Getty Images

Hollywood stardom can give specific breeds a boost lasting up to 10 years, new research finds

Well-received dog movies can influence the popularity of the specifically featured breed for up to a decade — even if the dogs are cartoons, according to a new study.

Collies saw a 40% bump in registrations through the American Kennel Club after the 1943 release of Lassie, according to research published in Plos One Wednesday, though researchers conceded that may have been assisted by its many sequels. But the study also found that registrations of Old English Sheepdogs went up 100-fold after Disney’s 1959 release of The Shaggy Dog, and 101 Dalmations even had a significant impact on the breed after its 1985 premiere.

Researchers from the University of Bristol, Western Carolina University, and the City University of New York analyzed 87 dog movies in total, comparing them with data from the American Kennel Club, which has registered more than 65 million dogs. They found that early movies had a greater impact than more current ones, which now — alongside internet corgi/frenchie/pug listicles proliferate the market.

And this wasn’t necessarily because the dogs had other laudable traits apart from their fame. “On the whole, breeds with more desirable behaviours, greater longevity, and fewer inherited genetic disorders did not become more popular than other breeds,” said co-author Hal Herzog. “In short, cultural shifts in types of pets largely reflect ephemeral changes in fashion rather than selection for functional traits.”

But hey, at least that’s better movies turning teens into smokers.

TIME movies

J. Lo’s New Movie Trailer Will Make You Feel Really Uncomfortable

In which Jennifer Lopez plays a very bad teacher

Who knew that Jenny from the Block’s block was located on Wisteria Lane?

The trailer for Jennifer Lopez’s new thriller The Boy Next Door takes a page out of the Desperate Housewives playbook — but instead of sleeping with a pool boy, a vulnerable and recently separated Lopez has a steamy night with the high school-aged boy next door, Noah — who has the abs of actor Ryan Guzman.

Realizing that it is really not okay for a 40-something to sleep with a high school student who — spoiler alert! — is friends with your son and a new student in your class, Lopez tries to cut things off. Unfortunately, poor little Noah is a threatening sociopath who won’t take no for an answer. If this trailer is any indication, the movie is a series of stalking, pictures of the affair getting posted around school, and creepy one liners like, “I love your mother’s cookies.”

Cute.

The Boy Next Door is in theaters January 23, 2015.

TIME movies

Guardians of the Galaxy Is 2014’s Biggest Movie So Far

The Marvel sci-fi flick has brought in more money in U.S. ticket sales than any other film this year

All hail, Guardians of the Galaxy! The sci-fi blockbuster was already the hit of the summer and Vulture reports it’s also now the highest-grossing film of 2014 in the U.S.

The film, which opened across the U.S. on Aug. 1 and took in $94,320,883 in its opening weekend, has now raked in around $274,610,000 at the domestic box office alone as of this Labor Day weekend. That leap puts the film ahead of Captain America: The Winter Soldier – which has brought in $259 million at the U.S. box office — to become the highest-grossing movie of the year in the U.S.

The film has also been a hit internationally, taking in more than $273 million. Guardians is also expected to be the first film of 2014 to cross the $300 million mark at the domestic box office.

But 2014 has not been a blockbuster year at the box office. Despite Guardians‘ seemingly successful run, the film is still among the lowest-grossing number one summer films in the U.S. over the past decade, according to Box Office Mojo’s figures. And movie ticket sales are down across the board.

[Vulture]

TIME film

Frozen Director to Adapt A Wrinkle in Time

86th Annual Academy Awards Oscar Week Celebrates Animated Features
Jennifer Lee arrives for the 86th Annual Academy Awards Oscar Week Celebration of Animated Features Gabriel Olsen—Getty Images

Jennifer Lee will write a screenplay based on the classic children's book for Disney

Frozen’s co-writer and director Jennifer Lee has signed on to adapt the children’s book classic A Wrinkle in Time to film for Disney, Variety reports.

The 1962 Madeline L’Engle fantasy, about two siblings and a friend traveling throughout time and space to find their missing astrophysicist father, was reportedly one of Lee’s favorite books growing up. There are four books in the series.

Bridge to Terabithia writer Jeff Stockwell had previously been attached to the film in 2010. No director has yet been confirmed.

[Variety]

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser