TIME movies

Jamie Foxx Will Reportedly Play Mike Tyson in Upcoming Biopic

Grand Opening Celebration at W Hoboken - Inside
Jaime Foxx performs during the grand opening celebration at The Chandelier Room at W Hoboken Dimitrios Kambouris—Getty

Jamie Foxx has been cast to play Mike Tyson, one of the most polarizing modern sports figures, in an untitled biopic, Variety reports. Boardwalk Empire creator Terence Winter is set to write the film.

Although details are sparse, Tyson certainly has a wealth of biographical details to mine, including but not limited to: his rise and fall as a heavyweight champion, his six years in jail on rape charges, the Holyfield ear-biting incident, the tragic death of his daughter, his bankruptcy, and his re-entry into pop culture.

This wouldn’t be Foxx’s first foray into boxing films. The actor, who will appear next in the Annie reboot, played Muhammad Ali’s corner man in Ali.

[Variety]

TIME

Cinema Verite Documentarian Robert Drew Dies at 90

(SHARON, Conn.) — Robert Drew, a pioneer of the modern documentary who in “Primary” and other movies mastered the intimate, spontaneous style known as cinema verite and schooled a generation of influential directors that included D.A. Pennebaker and Albert Maysles, has died at age 90.

His son Thatcher Drew confirmed he died Wednesday morning at his home in Sharon.

Starting in 1960 with “Primary,” Drew produced and sometimes directed a series of television documentaries that took advantage of such innovations as light, hand-held cameras that recorded both sound and pictures. With filmmakers newly unburdened, nonfiction movies no longer had to be carefully staged and awkwardly narrated. Directors could work more like journalists, following their subjects for hours and days at a time and capturing revealing moments. Little, if any, voiceover was needed.

“Nonfiction filmmakers were afflicted by two problems, one technical, the other spiritual,” Drew once said. “Technically, they did not have the equipment to do the sort of work I had in mind. Spiritually, they didn’t care about the work because they’d been mistrained. They’d been mistrained because their equipment was so heavy and complicated that it made it impossible to shoot in situations where you could really capture reality.”

Drew’s dozens of films included “The Chair,” a 1963 documentary about a death penalty case in Illinois, and “784 Days That Changed America: From Watergate to Resignation,” winner in 1982 of a Peabody award. Many of his movies were edited and co-produced by his wife, Anne Drew, who died in 2012.

While a photographer and editor with Life, Drew formed Drew Associates in 1960 with the goal of applying his magazine experience to films. Among those joining him were such future directors as Pennebaker (“Don’t Look Back,” ”The War Room”), Maysles (who with brother David made “Gimme Shelter” and “Grey Gardens”) and Richard Leacock (“Happy Mother’s Day”).

“I wondered why documentaries on television were dull,” he told The New York Times in 2013. “I had no doubt we could make a lighter camera, and I started with that premise and started finding people who could do that.”

Their approach, called cinema verite, or direct cinema, also was used in feature films, by the American director John Cassavetes and the French directors Louis Malle and Agnes Varda. And the new style led to fierce and enduring debates about truth in movies, whether a fly-on-the-wall approach was any more objective than a narrative with a point of view worked out in advance.

Frederick Wiseman, the award-winning documentary maker, would call cinema verite “just a pompous French term that has absolutely no meaning.”

“Primary” is widely ranked among the most important political documentaries and in 1990 was entered into the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry for historic works. It follows presidential candidates and fellow Democrats Sen. Hubert Humphrey and Sen. John F. Kennedy as they campaigned in Wisconsin, a neighboring state to Humphrey’s Minnesota, for their party’s nomination, which Kennedy eventually received.

TIME Television

Sharknado 2: Everything You Need to Know Before Watching The Epically Absurd Second One

Get ready for a fin-tastic voyage

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“You know what you did, don’t you? You jumped the shark.”
— Actual line from Sharknado 2: The Second One, as it desperately tries not to jump the shark

If you’re on Twitter come 9 p.m. Wednesday, consider yourself warned. Because literally the only thing the Internet will be talking about is SyFy’s uber-viral, uber-campy Sharknado 2, featuring Tara Reid, Ian Ziering, droves of quasi-celebrity cameos and, of course, a chain saw.

The movie gained more traction than its SyFy brethren Piranhaconda and Sharktopus ever did, and has become a cult classic even for those who have never seen the film. According to USA Today, while only 1.4 million people watched Sharknado’s original airing, a number that grew in subsequent airings, it inspired 5,000 tweets a minute. (We bet Samuel L. Jackson is kicking himself that Twitter was in its infancy during the Snakes on a Plane release).

So if you are jumping on the bandwagon before Wednesday’s premiere, or just need a quick refresher, here’s a crash course in all things Sharknado.

What the first movie was about:
Due to ambiguous reasons (“global warming?” a newscaster guesses) a massive storm and massive influx of sharks have simultaneously hit Los Angeles. Tiger sharks are flying through the windows of Beverly Hills mansions. Hammerheads are eating angry drivers on the 405 freeway. And it is up to one man with the subtle name of Fin Shepard (Ziering) to not only stop an impending Sharknado (which is exactly what it sounds like), but also to reconnect with his estranged wife April (Reid) and kids. His son saves the day by dropping a bomb into the Sharknado. All of our main characters survive, even though two of them were eaten by the toothy predators. (Note to self: When about to enter a shark’s mouth, remember to wield a chainsaw.) Fin and April make out. All is well.

What is the second one about:
Same concept. Different city. The Sharknado has followed Fin and April to New York as they promote their book, How to Survive a Sharknado and Other Unnatural Disasters: Fight Back When Monsters and Mother Nature Attack. (Available for purchase). Now Fin must use his knowledge to save New York from imminent disaster.

WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT?
Lots of symbolic destruction:
The Santa Monica Pier ferris wheel was shown rolling down the streets of Los Angeles symbolizing THE END OF FUN in Sharknado. Swap that for the Statue of Liberty’s decapitated head catapulting through New York to symbolize . . . something about the shark’s threat of freedom or something, and we’re all set.

It might be kind of educational:
As we learned in Sharknado: “Tornados happen when cold and hot air meet. If you drop a bomb in it, you just might equalize it.” Because SCIENCE.

It also might be kind of political:
Although the first film didn’t exactly take a stand against shark hunting, it was kind of implied considering a poachers face got eaten by a shark.

Hordes of cameos:
Vivica A. Fox, Mark McGrath (a.k.a. Sugar Ray) and Judah Friedlander have joined the cast as Finn’s college friend, his brother-in-law and a helpful cab driver, respectively. But there are also tons of quick hits from “stars” who were itching to ride Sharknado‘s viral wave. Watch for Kelly Osbourne, Andy Dick, The Naked Cowboy, Perez Hilton, Al Roker and Matt Lauer, Kelly Ripa and Michael Strahan, and, of course, Jared the Subway guy, who eats a sandwich as sharks start eating people in a subway. (Get it? He’s eating a Subway sandwich in the subway!)

A total disregard for human life:
The cast of Sharknado appeared totally and completely unphased when a shark would come out of nowhere and rip someone’s leg off. Reid barely batted an eye when her live-in boyfriend was torn apart in the mansion.

Lots of New York “insider” jokes:
Sharknado’s script was riddled with LA jokes including: “It’s just a little water. Typical Californians afraid of the rain;” and “My mama always told me Hollywood would kill me” — right before letters from the Hollywood sign crushes him to death.

Expect gems like this from the sequel: “This is the big apple. Something bites us, we bite back.”

A renewed sense of patriotism:
May we leave you with Fin’s inspiring speech: “They’re sharks. They’re scary. No one wants to get eaten. But I’ve been eaten, and I’m here to tell ya, it takes a lot more than that to bring a good man down. It takes a lot more than that to bring a New Yorker down.”

TIME

This Supercut Shows What Cheesy 80’s Movies Thought Computer Hacking Looked Like

Bring on the cliches

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There’s a series of electronic beeps over a Tron soundtrack. The screen is filled with a series of green letters and then a psychedelic interface. This is computer hacking, as told to you by any number of 1980’s computer films, oozing with cheesy perfection.

FoundItemClothing.com made the video, which features scenes from Real Genius, War Games, and Spies Like Us, to name a few.

TIME movies

Behind the Scenes Look at Lucy, Scarlett Johansson’s Newest Film

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Go behind the scenes of the highly-anticipated film Lucy, starring Scarlett Johansson and Morgan Freeman. The film explores an individual’s brain capacity — the film posits that humans currently use 10 percent of their brains, while asking what might happen if 100 percent was accessed. The film tells the story of a young woman who, when put under extenuating circumstances against her will, is scientifically altered in a way that allows for her to access a much greater capacity of her brainpower. In this sneak peek, the two stars discuss exploring brain capacity, as well as the film’s main character, Lucy. You can see Lucy in theaters nationwide beginning Friday.

TIME Business

Pizza Hut Built a Giant, Real-Life Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Pizza Thrower

Comic-Con fans will be able to take turns operating it

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Some publicity stunts are really, really dumb. Other publicity stunts involve building a 12-foot Pizza Thrower and realizing your Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle dreams. Thank you, Pizza Hut, for providing the latter.

The chain will debut a massive vehicle, complete with a 16-foot rotating cannon to launch pizzas, at Comic-Con in San Diego, which takes place July 24-27.

Comic-Con goers, who probably owned the toy version seen below, will literally eat it up. Well, metaphorically eat it up. Unfortunately the launched pizzas will be fake.

Pizza Hut partnered with Paramount for Michael Bay’s live action Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles film, out August 8.

TIME Behind the scenes

Go Behind the Scenes for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The movie's director, Matt Reeves, and star, Gary Oldman, talk about their new film.

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Here’s an exclusive look at the just-released Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, the highly-anticipated sequel to the 2011 blockbuster Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

In this sneak peek, director Matt Reeves and star Gary Oldman discuss where the last film left off and the status of the apes when this film begins. Now that human civilization has been almost entirely wiped from the planet, the remaining humans struggle for survival as the apes become the dominant species. Oldman also discusses the films use of motion capture.

You can see Dawn of the Planet of the Apes starting Friday, July 11 in theaters nationwide.

TIME film

The Sharknado 2 Trailer Looks Awesomely Bad

Here are the best quotes

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The movie that took the Twitterverse by Great White storm last summer has a sequel. And that sequel — appropriately titled Sharknado 2: The Second One — has a trailer. And that trailer is everything we could ever dream it would be.

This time, the Sharknado has followed the cast from Los Angeles to New York City for Tara Reid’s book tour (stop laughing) to promote: How to Survive a Sharknado and Other Unnatural Disasters: Fight Back When Monsters and Mother Nature Attack. (Available for purchase).

SyFy’s epic, chainsaw-laden preview gives a hint at the cacophony of hokey dialogue we can look forward to for the film’s July 30 release. Get ready for instant classics like:

  • “Holy Shark”
  • “You know what you did, don’t you? You jumped the shark.”
  • “They’re sharks. They’re scary. No one wants to get eaten. But I’ve been eaten, and I’m here to tell ya, it takes a lot more than that to bring a good man down. It takes a lot more than that to bring a New Yorker down.” (Cue the muted cheers.)

Starring Ian Ziering, Tara Reid, Vivica A. Fox, Kelly Osbourne, Judah Friedlander, Andy Dick, Billy Ray Cyrus, Mark “Sugar Ray” McGrath, and a bunch of other people who couldn’t stop themselves from being in a movie with a tagline, “Forget the umbrella. Grab a chainsaw.”, Sharknado 2 is clearly an instant classic.

TIME film

Transformers Writer Will Pen Live-Action Dumbo Remake

Kevin Jonas Visits Disneyland
Kevin Jonas, eldest of the musical Jonas Brothers, took his wife Danielle for a ride on Dumbo the Flying Elephant at Disneyland Getty Images

Elephants. Will. Fly.

Get your Kleenex ready. Disney is planning to remake Dumbo into a live action feature, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

But don’t expect a rerun of the quiet, 64-minute original. Ehren Kruger, who wrote Transformers, has signed on to do the animal flick’s screenplay. He will produce along with Justin Springer, who worked on Oblivion and Tron: Legacy.

THR reports that CG developments might even allow the elephants to actually fly. Just when you think you’ve seen ’bout everything…

[THR]

TIME

X-Men Director Teases Sneak Peek of X-Men: Apocalypse

James McAvoy portrays Charles Xavier in a scene from "X-Men: First Class." The “X-Men” franchise will get another boost in 2016 with the release of “X-Men: Apocalypse.”
James McAvoy portrays Charles Xavier in a scene from "X-Men: First Class." The “X-Men” franchise will get another boost in 2016 with the release of “X-Men: Apocalypse.” Murray Close—AP

The director of 'X-Men: Days of Future Past' has posted an Instagram photo of the beginning of the next 'X-Men' film

Get excited, Marvel fans: The director of X-Men: Days of Future Past posted a photo of the treatment for X-Men: Apocalypse, the next film in the franchise.

Director Bryan Singer created a new Instagram account Tuesday to which he immediately posted the image. Singer’s picture shows part of the first page of the treatment for X-Men: Apocalypse. The treatment, which can be thought of as a detailed synopsis, seems to continue where the post-credits scene of X-Men: Days of Future Past left off.

The film opens in Ancient Egypt. We’re immediately confronted with the four horsemen — Pestilence, War, Death and Famine — who are the servants of Apocalypse, the film’s main villain.

The photo has done more than set fans’ pulses racing. The image, and a photo Singer tweeted last week of him and the film’s co-writers, indicate that the director will be working on the film, something which some observers doubted after allegations of sexual abuse emerged against the director in April and May.

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