TIME fashion

Chrissy Teigen: Forever 21 Fired Me From a Modeling Job For Being ‘Fat’

"I hate you, Forever 21. I hate you so much. Honestly, you're the worst"

Even supermodels suffer from ridiculous body standards. Chrissy Teigen, one of the cover models for Sports Illustrated‘s 2014 swimsuit edition, told Du Jour that clothing retailer Forever 21 fired her when she was younger because she was too fat for them.

“I showed up on set and they asked me if they could take a photo,” Teigen told the magazine. “And they shoot that photo off to my agency, who then calls me as I’m sitting in the make-up chair, and they say, ‘You need to leave right now. They just said that you are fat and you need to get your measurements taken.’”

Luckily the 28-year-old model, who is known for her off-the-cuff humor on Twitter and Instagram, keeps a healthy outlook on the situation years later. “I hate you, Forever 21,” the model told Du Jour. “I hate you so much. Honestly, you’re the worst.”

 

TIME fashion

J. Crew Introduces a Size Smaller Than XXS

J. Crew Shopping Bag
A women holds a J. Crew shopping bag. Bloomberg—Bloomberg/Getty Images

It's for those with a 23 inch waist

You know how it is when you’re in a dressing room and even the smallest size available is still too baggy? What, that’s never happened to you? Well, just in case you know someone who is too small for a XXS or ’00,’ J. Crew has introduced a new ’000′ size for women with a 30.5″ bust and a mere 23″ waist. What does someone with a waist that small look like? Probably a little like Keira Knightly who is famous for her waspy middle. Or burlesque star Dita von Teese who says she’s been wearing a corset for decades to keep her 22-inch waist as she ages.

However, the retailer has received some criticism for introducing the triple zero or ‘XXXS’ size. “J.Crew’s vanity sizing has reached a whole new level of crazy,” wrote the fashion blog Racked. “What’s next, negative numbers?” But is a triple zero really that much smaller than a regular ’0′? After all, a ’00′ or a ’0′ can range from a 22′ to a 25′ inch waist depending on the brand. And the fashion industry has long been accused of vanity sizing, a downwards trend in size numbers in recent decades despite the average woman becoming heavier over the same time period. According to the 2003 SizeUSA study, the average woman is about 5’4″ and 150 pounds, which is 20 pounds heavier than 40 years ago.

“According to standard size measurements, that average 155 pound woman should be wearing a size 16, but thanks to vanity-sizing, she’s probably buying a size 10 or 12,” Jim Lovejoy, the industry director for the SizeUSA survey, told Newsweek. “Most companies aren’t using the standard ASTM [American Society for Testing and Materials] sizes any more. Sizes have been creeping up a half inch at a time so that women can fit into smaller sizes and feel good about it.”

But J. Crew insists that the new ’000′ size has nothing to do with vanity. “We are simply addressing the demand coming from Asia for smaller sizes than what we had carried,” a J. Crew spokesperson told Today. “Our sizes typically run big and the Asia market tends to run small.” And it’s true that all that vanity sizing has left the truly small out in the cold and not just in Asia. Nicole Miller introduced a size 0 (25½-inch waist) about 15 years ago because the company had a strong presence in California there was lots of demand from their Asian customers for something smaller.

In the meantime, we’ve all gotten used to the idea of a size zero—and thanks to vanity sizing more of us can fit into one. Even the double zero doesn’t look as strange as it used to. So who knows, maybe sizes will keep creeping into the negative side of the number line and we’ll all be some kind of zero.

TIME Culture

The Unforgettable Fashion of Seinfeld‘s Elaine Benes

In honor of the 25th anniversary of the famous sitcom's premier, here's a gallery of some of our favorite Elaine looks. (If only we could order them directly from the J. Peterman catalog.)

Twenty-five years after the premiere of Seinfeld, there’s no question about the show’s outsize cultural influence. In its nine-season run, Seinfeld changed the way we talk, the way we joke and even influenced our spending habits. And, yes, the way we dress. You can see deep Seinfeld influences in what’s now called “Normcore,” a fashion trend New York Magazine identified with a photo essay in February 2014. It’s a look best described as the clothes your dad wears when goes to the mall. You know, ill-fitting jeans, fleece vests, flat sandals or white sneakers that are all about comfort.

But forget about Jerry and his famous Puffy Shirt for a second. We should be focusing on the show’s real fashion star: Elaine Benes, played by the incomparable Julia Louis-Dreyfus. We’re not the first publication to point out that many of her outfits look like something you’d find today on a hipster in Williamsburg or an American Apparel mannequin, but that doesn’t mean we can’t take a minute to appreciate her. Elaine’s real strength came from her ability to look modest but stylish: just check out the pattern mixing, the oh-so-90′s light-blue denim, the shoulder pads, floral dresses and more.

So give your BFF a shove, tell them to “Get Out!” and start doing the Little Kicks dance: It’s time to celebrate Elaine.

TIME royals

See Kate Middleton’s Stunning Fashion Evolution

Wearing everything from sleek wrap dresses to those inescapable royal hats, the Duchess of Cambridge is creating her own style — and inspiring countless copycats.

TIME United Kingdom

Julian Assange May Be Britain’s Next Top Model

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange speaks to the media inside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London June 14, 2013.
Wikileaks founder Julian Assange speaks to the media inside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London June 14, 2013. Reuters

The WikiLeaks founder is reportedly set to strut his stuff on the catwalk at London Fashion Week this September

Julian Assange, the fugitive founder of WikiLeaks, may be making a guest appearance at London Fashion Week in September, the Independent reports.

Ben Westwood, son of acclaimed British designer Vivienne Westwood, has reportedly asked Assange to model in his show, which will be held at Ecuador’s embassy.

Though an international embassy might seem a strange choice of venue for good-looking, well-dressed people, Westwood has little choice. His sartorial star has been taking shelter in the embassy for the past two years to avoid extradition to Sweden over allegations of sex offenses.

Unfazed by his model’s infamy, Westwood commented: “I want to highlight Julian Assange’s plight. What happened to him is totally unfair.”

Should the WikiLeaks founder participate he’ll by joined by six other models wearing clothes inspired by Clint Eastwood Westerns and what Westwood called Assange’s “combat-beret look”.

Though Assange has yet to comment on this latest job offer, he is no stranger to publicity, even when in hiding. In October 2012, Lady Gaga swung by the embassy to pay him a visit and in Nov. 2013 he opened rapper M.I.A’s “Matangi” tour via Skype.

Tantalizingly, Westwood has also suggested he’ll showcase a “garment with a Julian Assange print”. Whether this look will be hitting the stores in a few months time remains to be seen.

[Independent]

TIME Music

Five Years After Michael Jackson’s Death, Take a Look Back at His Iconic Style

This infographic highlights the King of Pop's 10 fashion trademarks

Today, June 25, marks the fifth anniversary of Michael Jackson’s death. The folks over at Stylight created this infographic to pay tribute to the King of Pop and his iconic style. Behold, MJ’s 10 signature fashion trademarks, plus some fun facts about each one:

Michael Jackson King of Style Infographic

 

TIME royals

A Prince George Photo Album: See the Royal Baby Grow Up

The newest and arguably cutest — sorry, Prince Harry — member of the British royal family continues to attract attention wherever he toddles.

MONEY Shopping

WATCH: American Apparel Strips Controversial CEO…of Power

American Apparel suspends controversial CEO Dov Charney after an investigation into alleged misconduct.

MONEY Shopping

School’s (Almost) Out! Just In Time for Back-to-School Sales

BSIP SA / Alamy—Alamy

If you thought now was the time to relax and celebrate the end of the school year, J.C. Penney, Walmart, and Lands' End have a back-to-school sale for you.

Last summer, retailers raised eyebrows by rolling out back-to-school sales in early July, within a week or two of when kids escaped the clutches of teachers, principals, and algebra homework. “In seven and a half years, I’ve never once seen so much emphasis put on back-to-school before July 4,” National Retail Federation spokeswoman Kathy Grannis told AdAge at the time.

Fast-forward to June 2014, and retailers are at it again, pushing back-to-school sales earlier than ever. Consumers are getting the message that the time to purchase gear for the upcoming school year is before the current school year has ended. Like, now.

J.C. Penney began promoting back-to-school sales last weekend, according to Consumerist. Walmart already has a back-to-school web page for student fashions, backpacks, and other school gear, as well as another page devoted to back-to-college apparel and tech. Target just introduced a college registry program, so that students can try to get other people to buy them stuff. Apple’s back-to-school promotional deals are expected to be announced any day now. And Lands’ End? It started zapping customers with e-mails a couple of weeks ago, pushing the idea that early June is a fine time to buy school uniforms that kids won’t wear until around Labor Day.

It’s totally understandable why retailers try to move back-to-school shopping earlier and earlier each year. Families generally have finite resources they can allocate to back-to-school fashion and paraphernalia, and once the pencils, protractors, glue sticks, notebooks, and a few new outfits are purchased, their back-to-school expenditures are done (in theory). Retailers want to beat the competition to the punch, before the family’s back-to-school budget is depleted.

“Retailers are going to do what they can to try to get consumers into the stores to shop, but the fact of the matter is they might not have much luck,” Britt Beemer, chairman of America’s Research Group, explained to CNBC. “There aren’t any parents that I can find who have even thought of back-to-school shopping, because for most kids, they haven’t even gotten out of school yet.”

Still, even if shoppers don’t actually buy back-to-school stuff in June, the enticements may get them thinking about their needs for the upcoming school year. Panic sets in for a lot of overwhelmed parents, and they’re more apt to want to cross all of their children’s back-to-school items off their list as soon as possible. How can you relax on a summer vacation when you know there will be dorm rooms to decorate and Number 2 pencils that need to be purchased?

What’s more, early-season promotional efforts are limited mostly to the digital world. It’s much cheaper and easier for a retailer to send out an e-mail blast or put up a back-to-school web page than it is to rearrange shelves and create promotional sections inside thousands of stores. That’ll happen soon enough, of course, during the especially puzzling period when you’re likely to encounter Fourth of July, back to school, Christmas in July, and plain old summer sales in your local megamart, perhaps mixed in with the odd early Halloween aisle.

Of course, retailers risk some customer backlash by taking the expansion of shopping seasons too far. So-called “Christmas creep,” the phenomenon in which the Christmas shopping season kicks off in September and Christmas ads air within a few days of Labor Day weekend, has caused many an observer to groan in exasperation.

When the calendar says one thing and retailers are telling consumers something very different via sales and promotions, the result can be jarring, even off-putting. Yet retailers assume shoppers have short memories, and they hope that whatever bad feelings a too-early sale produces are outweighed by deals that are just too good to pass up.

TIME Horse Racing

A Day At The Races: Best Hats From The Royal Ascot

The Royal Ascot is one of Europe's most famous races, dating back to 1711. The highlight of the British racing season, it is attended annually by the Queen who has owned 22 Royal Ascot winners. However, Ascot is as much about being seen as watching the horses, and nothing attracts more attention than an over-the-top hat. Below are some of the best headpieces from the Royal Ascot's opening day

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