TIME energy

Europe Needs A New Source of Oil and Gas, Fast

Poland fracking gas
Workers in Poland prepare a shale gas well Bartek Sadowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Ukraine crisis underscores the need for a new European energy policy

This article originally appeared on OilPrice.com

Summer is over and many Europeans may have to keep warm this coming winter by thinking about their summer holidays while wrapped in blankets, praying for a short winter or for the world to come to its senses. It both cases, they may well be disappointed.

The never-ending conflicts in the Middle East, mayhem in Libya, uncertainty in the Gulf and a war in Ukraine are all going to take a toll on the energy supplies this winter.

Russia sold 86 billion cubic meters of gas last year, all of which passed through Ukraine. Given what’s happening there now, it is highly unlikely that the Russians would allow their gas to transit a country they are (unofficially) at war with. Just as it is unlikely that Ukrainians would allow Russian gas access through its territory.

Result? Many cold Europeans, many angry Europeans and many very pissed off Europeans. Many Europeans will have to make do without enough gas to heat homes, offices and factories. That’s a bad prospect in northern European countries, where winter is no laughing matter. Winter defeated the armies of both Napoleon and Hitler.

And what does history tell us about cold, angry, pissed-off Europeans? Well, whenever two opposing camps got cold, angry and pissed off enough at each other in the past, they typically went to war.

War in Europe? In our time?

It’s not impossible. If current trends continue, it is not at all impossible. Here’s why:

1. Mounting tension between Russia and the West over Ukraine — a situation that is very likely to worsen as the United States and European Union tighten sanctions on Moscow.

2. NATO forces edging dangerously close to Russian forces.

3. The spread of the violence and reach of the Islamic State. Besides the havoc they are creating in the region, there is the added threat of hundreds, if not thousands, of their supporters who have learned how to fight in Syria and Iraq returning to their home countries in Europe.

4. Turkey, which in recent years has played a stabilizing role in the region, is moving today in a different direction that could well lead to a new point of conflict. From jumping head first into the Middle East conundrum under former prime minister and now President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the country’s new prime minister, Ahmet Davutoglu, started off by possibly igniting a new fight when he announced — much to the pleasure of Azerbaijan, and certainly to the dismay of Armenia — that “the liberation of occupied Azerbaijani lands would be a strategic goal for Turkey.”

These remarks refer to the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh and outlying areas that have been occupied by Armenia since a violent conflagration around the time of the break-up of the Soviet Union. Armenians and Azerbaijani troops have been engaging in exchanges of fire on a daily basis over the past few months.

5: Mounting tension between Iran and Israel, and between Iran and an unnamed former Soviet republic in the region that Iran says allowed Israel to launch a drone from its territory to spy on Iran. Tehran has promised a stern response. The country in question is thought to be Azerbaijan, Armenia or Turkmenistan.

6. Continued mayhem in Libya, where the political turmoil is affecting the flow of oil and gas to Europe.

7. The continued state of unrest in Israel/Gaza and the surrounding area.

All these points of conflict are complicating Europe’s search for more reliable sources of energy. Europe is hoping to solve its gas shortage problems by purchasing Azerbaijani gas, but it’s unrealistic to depend only on Azerbaijani gas, since Europeans would be at the mercy of interruptions to gas and oil flows from this South Caucasus country.

What Europe desperately needs is a source of energy that with not be interrupted by conflict or politics, that can be delivered via pipeline or by sea, but will not need to transit through sea lanes in areas of conflict.

And although EU Energy Commissioner Guenther Oettinger said last week that he is not worried about gas supplies from Russia via Ukraine, that show of confidence did not stop him from going to Moscow to plead Europe’s case with the Russians.

So where does that leave the Europeans other than out in the cold? Trend energy analyst Vagif Sharifov believes the new bonanza of natural gas lies in the Arctic, where more than 1,500 trillion cubic feet of natural gas can be found.

But polar drilling comes with a high cost and huge challenges. Europe might need to keep looking.

TIME Economy

A Global Jobs Crisis Is Coming, Says World Bank

And a new report says there’s no immediate solution in sight for the problem

We are heading for a global jobs crisis, says the World Bank, warning that 600 million new jobs would have to be created by the year 2030 just to keep up with current levels of population growth.

A study released by the organization Tuesday at the G-20 Labor and Employment Ministerial Meeting in Australia indicates there are currently over 100 million people unemployed and around 447 million that live on less than $2 per day across G-20 member nations, reports Agence France-Presse.

“As this report makes clear, there is a shortage of jobs — and quality jobs,” said Nigel Twose, the World Bank’s senior director for jobs. He warns that although progress had been made in emerging economies like Brazil, China and South Africa, wage and income inequality continues to widen in several G-20 countries.

“There is no magic bullet to solve this jobs crisis, in emerging markets or advanced economies,” Twose said, adding that the creation of enough jobs to sustain the growing population calls for “a whole of government approach cutting across different ministries, and of course the direct and sustained involvement of the private sector.”

[AFP]

MONEY

Job Report Misses Expectations, Fewest Jobs Added in 8 Months

The U.S. economy added only 142,000 jobs in August, the slowest employment growth in 8 months.

The economy added 142,000 jobs in August, substantially missing analyst expectations, according to the latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Economists had predicted another month of high employment gains, with estimates predicting that 225,000 positions would be added. Instead, the August hiring missed that number by almost 40% and signalled the lowest employment growth in eight months. Unemployment remained virtually static at 6.1%.

The report also showed the number of long-term unemployed persons declined by 192,000 to 3 million in August. This group currently makes up about a third of the overall unemployed population, but has declined by 1.3 million over the past year. The labor force participation rate — the percentage of workforce that is either employed or actively looking for work — remained mostly unchanged at 62.8%.

Friday’s numbers were a surprise considering recent economic growth.

One important question is how the Federal Reserve will interpret the report. As MONEY’s Taylor Tepper reports, Fed chair Janet Yellen has made stronger employment growth a core part of her monetary policy, and has signaled the Fed will raise interest rates only when slack in the labor market decreases. Slow job growth may convince the central bank to hold back on rate increases even longer and wait for further employment gains.

TIME Economy

The Worst Stock Tip in History

Stock Market Crash
Messengers from brokerage houses crowd around a newspaper in New York City on October 24, 1929. New York Daily News Archive / Getty Images

Sept. 3, 1929: The market reaches its highest point before the Great Depression

At this time 85 years ago, Yale economist Irving Fisher was jubilant. “Stock prices have reached what looks like a permanently high plateau,” he rejoiced in the pages of the New York Times. That dry pronunciation would go on to be one of his most frequently quoted predictions — but only because history would record his declaration as one of the wrongest market readings of all time.

At the time he said it, in early October, he had good reason to believe he was right. On Sept. 3, 1929, the Dow Jones Industrial Average swelled to a record high of 381.17, reaching the end of an eight-year growth period during which its value ballooned by a factor of six. That was before the bubble began to burst in a series of “black days”: Black Thursday, October 24, when the market dropped by 11 percent, followed four days later by Black Monday, when it fell another 13 percent; and the next day, Black Tuesday, when it lost 12 percent more.

Fisher, consistently bullish, pronounced the slide only temporary.

In his defense, he was not the only optimist on Wall Street. After witnessing nearly a decade of growth, most economists, investors, and captains of industry believed that the market’s natural direction was up. The beginning of the crash struck them not as a sign of financial doom, but as an opportunity for bargains. Following the first of the black days, the New York Times was full of positive predictions: “I have no fear of another comparable decline,” said the president of the Equitable Trust Company.

Many of those optimists, including Fisher, went broke by mid-November, when the Dow had lost nearly half its pre-crash value. Fisher’s reputation likewise plummeted.

He went on to develop a new theory about what had triggered the crash: overly liberal credit policies that encouraged Americans to take on too much debt, as he himself had done in order to invest more heavily in stocks. By then, however, no one was listening. His theory didn’t gain traction until the 1950s, when, years after his death, Harvard economist Milton Friedman pronounced him “the greatest economist the United States has ever produced.” Fisher’s debt-deflation theory found its way into the spotlight again when overgenerous credit lines and huge debts prompted another U.S. market crash — this time in 2008.

Read Niall Ferguson’s comparison between 1929 and 2008 here in TIME’s archives: The End of Prosperity?

TIME Economy

Happy Birthday, U.S. Treasury

Exterior of the US Treasury building.  (
The U.S. Treasury building in 1937 Carl Mydans — The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

You still look like a million bucks

It was 225 years ago today that the still-nascent United States finally decided to get its financial house in order. The Department of the Treasury was established on Sept. 2, 1789, during an early session of the 1st United States Congress. The Department’s duties, according to the founding law, are:

“…to digest and prepare plans for the improvement and management of the revenue…to prepare and report estimates of the public revenue, and the public expenditures; to superintend the collection of revenue; to decide on the forms of keeping and stating accounts and making returns, and to grant under the limitations herein established, or to be hereafter provided, all warrants for monies to be issued from the Treasury, in pursuance of appropriations by law.”

Or, in layman’s terms, the Treasury Department issues savings bonds, prints cash, mints coins, collects taxes through the IRS and enforces laws related to alcohol and tobacco. People often conflate the duties of the Treasury with those of the Federal Reserve, but the two are actually separate organizations. The Treasury is a department of the executive branch and is generally concerned with properly maintaining the day-to-day activities of the government. The Federal Reserve is an independent body that sets long-term fiscal policy in an effort to control borrowing and inflation rates.

Our first Secretary of the Treasury was Alexander Hamilton, a key figure in the development of early American fiscal policy who advocated heavily for a central banking system and the federal assumption of state debts following the Revolutionary War (and no, he didn’t put himself on the $10 bill — he wasn’t added to the currency until the 1920s). The current secretary is Jack Lew, appointed by President Obama in 2013.

In addition to the Treasury’s birthday, we also just passed another significant fiscal anniversary. In August 1971, the U.S. stopped converting dollars held by foreign governments to gold at a value of $35 per ounce. The policy, called the Bretton Woods system, had been put in place following World War II to convince rebuilding countries like Germany and Japan to invest in American dollars. But by the 1960s, the system was placing strain on the U.S. economy as the number of dollars held by foreign countries outpaced the amount of gold the U.S. had on hand. Following a secret meeting at Camp David with this top advisers, President Richard Nixon announced on August 15 a suspension of the policy, transforming the dollar into a floating currency not pegged to any particular exchange rate. Nixon also announced a 90-day freeze on prices and wages in the U.S. and an additional 10% tariff on imports.

Nixon's Economic Gamble
The Aug. 30, 1971, cover of TIME

Collectively known as the “Nixon Shock,” the measures surprised people both at home and abroad. Reporting in the days following the announcement, TIME wrote of foreign leaders abandoning their summer vacations to react to the announcement amid worries that the dollar, no longer tied to a fixed rate, would plummet in value. In the years that followed, countries in Europe and Asia also allowed their currencies to float, making exchange rates more volatile than they had been in the past.

Read TIME’s original 1971 report on Nixon’s controversial decision to abandon gold: The Dollar: A Power Play Unfolds

TIME India

Why India’s Modi and Japan’s Abe Need Each Other — Badly

India's PM Modi shakes hands with Japan's PM Abe during a signing ceremony at the state guest house in Tokyo
India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi, left, shakes hands with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during a signing ceremony in Tokyo on Sept. 1, 2014 Shizuo Kambayashi—Reuters

The two Asian leaders are looking to strengthen ties during their meetings in Japan to counter a rising China

Cuddly is not an adjective that comes to mind when describing the Prime Ministers of either Japan or India. Shinzo Abe, like most Japanese politicians, often appears overly formal, while Narendra Modi has a reputation for being demanding and stern. But apparently the two feel warm and fuzzy about each other. Abe made the unusual gesture of welcoming Modi on his five-day official visit to Japan with an uncharacteristic hug. After that, the duo chatted over an informal dinner and strolled through a temple in the historic cultural center of Kyoto.

The leaders of Asia’s two most prominent democracies have good reasons to cozy up. Greater cooperation between India and Japan could prove critical in helping Abe and Modi achieve their economic goals at home and their strategic aims in the region — which means countering an aggressive China. That’s why the two have gushed about the importance of the India-Japan relationship. Modi said in a statement that his visit would “write a new chapter” in relations, while Abe in a Monday press conference said that their bilateral ties have the “most potential in the world.”

They have a lot of catching up to do. For economies of such size — Japan and India are the second and third largest in Asia, respectively — their exchange is still relatively small. Trade between the two reached only $15.8 billion in 2013 — a mere quarter of India’s trade with China. Japanese direct investment into India totaled $21 billion between 2007 and 2013, making Japan an extremely important investor for the country. But recently, the inflows have tapered off amid India’s economic slowdown. Over the past three years, Japanese firms have invested more in Vietnam and Indonesia than India.

That may be about to change. The fact is that the economic interests of the two nations dovetail nicely. Modi is looking to restart India’s slumbering economic growth by upgrading its woeful infrastructure, strengthening its manufacturing base and constructing a network of new “smart” cities across the nation — all of which Japanese money, technology and investment can help make a reality. Abe on Monday pledged $33 billion of financing and investment for India from public and private sources over the next five years. “Japanese trade and investment ties with India are set to strengthen significantly over the next decade and beyond,” Rajiv Biswas, Asia-Pacific chief economist for consulting firm IHS, predicted in a recent report.

Meanwhile, Abe is trying to jump-start a Japanese economy that has been stalled for two decades, and badly needs new sources of exports and revenue for ailing Japan Inc. India, with its 1.2 billion increasingly wealthy consumers and bottomless investment opportunities, can provide just what Japan requires. That is especially the case due to Tokyo’s souring relations with that other Asian giant, China. As tensions have risen over disputed islands in the East China Sea, investment and trade between China and Japan has deteriorated.

China is pressing Tokyo and New Delhi closer together for other reasons as well. Abe is trying to forge ties with countries across the region to contain a rising and increasingly assertive China. Meanwhile, Modi, who has his own territorial disputes with Beijing on India’s borders in the far east and north, is aiming to enhance the country’s military capabilities. Much of a joint declaration signed by the Prime Ministers dealt with strategic cooperation. The two pledged to “upgrade and strengthen” their partnership in defense by regularizing joint maritime exercises and collaborating on military technology.

China wasn’t specifically mentioned in the declaration, but which country Abe and Modi have in mind is no secret. Modi, in fact, took a clear swipe at Beijing in a speech to businessmen on Monday. “Everywhere around us, we see an 18th century expansionist mind-set: encroaching on another country, intruding in others’ waters, invading other countries and capturing territory,” Modi said.

None of this has gone unnoticed in the Middle Kingdom. An editorial in the state-run Global Times written in response to Modi’s comments attempted to downplay the friendly Abe-Modi summit. “The increasing intimacy between Tokyo and New Delhi will bring at most psychological comfort to the two countries,” the newspaper contended. “If Japan attempts to form a united front centered on India, it will be a crazy fantasy generated by Tokyo’s anxiety of facing a rising Beijing.”

Whether closer India-Japan ties are a fantasy will become apparent quickly. China’s President Xi Jinping is due to visit Modi in India later in September. Let’s see if he gets a hug.

TIME White House

Biden Celebrates Labor Day With Call For ‘Fair Wage’

A job's about a lot more than a paycheck. It's about your dignity, it's about your place in the community, it's about who you are."

Vice President Joe Biden celebrated Labor Day with a call for a “fair wage” at a union rally for workers in Detroit on Monday.

“Folks, the middle class is in real trouble now,” Biden said to an enthusiastic crowd. “A job’s about a lot more than a paycheck. It’s about your dignity, it’s about your place in the community, it’s about who you are.”

Biden’s 20-minute speech employed a populist and personal tone as he took on everything from the estate tax to American corporations that have moved operations overseas.

Biden, who is known for his blue collar roots, referenced his family roots and his ties to labor.

“‘Joey, you’re labor from belt buckle to shoe sole,'” Biden said his uncle told him.

 

MONEY Jobs

The Economy is Improving, but May Face a New Speed Limit

empty cubicles
Get ready for Boomers to leave the work force. Getty Images

The recession is gradually ending, but we're about to enter a world where fewer and fewer people work.

While it might not feel like it yet, the economy is getting better. On Thursday, the Bureau of Economic Analysis announced the U.S. economy grew faster than expected in the second quarter of this year.

Here’s the thing, though. Even as employers add jobs, we’re about to enter an era with the lowest percentage of working Americans since 1973. Below is a Congressional Budget Office projection, from a new set of charts they’ve released here, showing the labor force participation rate—the number of people working or looking for a job—through the year 2024. As you can see, despite the economic recovery, it has a distinctly downward trend.

Screen Shot 2014-08-29 at 12.06.20 PM
Source: Congressional Budget Office.

Why doesn’t a better economic climate mean more workers? The boomers, largest generation in American history, is on the cusp of retirement, and will soon begin to drop out of the workforce in even greater numbers. Over time, this will have an dampening effect on the economy—though by how much is disputed. The CBO predicts that GDP growth will average around 2.2% per year, noticeably less than the growth we got used to in the 1980s and 1990s.

Another way to visualize the change is something called the dependency ratio, which measures the proportion of the population that aren’t of working age (below 18 or over over 65). As FiveThirtyEight’s Ben Casselman points out, that number is about to increase from 59% in 2010 to 75% in 2030.

Screen Shot 2014-08-29 at 12.05.20 PM
Source: U.S. Census.

As you’ll notice from the above chart, we’ve been a demographically fortunate nation of late, but we’re about to lose that tailwind. On the other hand, this country has faced big demographic changes before: Look the at the jump in the dependency ratio from the 1950s to the 1960s. Back then, an increasingly prosperous nation spent part of its wealth on kids. Those kids grew up and made the economy even larger, and soon we’ll have to spend part of that prosperity on their retirement.

TIME Education

Here Are the Crucial Job Skills Employers Are Really Looking For

483636127
Tom Merton—Gety Images

'Soft skills' like professionalism and oral communication rank among the most valued, regardless of education level

Labor Day offers an opportunity for politicians and economists to offer their two cents on the state of labor. It’s a good bet that some of that commentary will focus on the so-called “skills gap” — the notion that millions of jobs in highly technical fields remain unfilled while millions of Americans without those skills remain unemployed.

The solution according to the pundits? Education and training that focus on technical skills like computer engineering, or on crucial but scarce skills like welding. Match these newly trained employees with open jobs that require those skills and, voila, the skills gap is gone — and the labor market is steadied.

If only it were so simple.

Yes, more American workers need to learn skills that are underrepresented in the labor market. And yes, those technology titans who advocate for more challenging school curricula, for greater funding for science and engineering education and for immigration reforms to bring more skilled workers are responding to a real problem. But that’s not all there is to it. The problem with the skills gap argument is that it accounts for only one set of skills that employers consider important.

I work at Books@Work, a non-profit organization that brings university professors to the workplace to lead literature seminars with employees. The employers with whom we work want to provide professional development opportunities for all members of their organizations, and — we like to think — are more creative in their approach to doing so than most. Yet even this group of employers has few ways of helping their employees to develop skills that aren’t about content or subject matter — skills like communication, critical thinking, creativity, empathy and understanding of diversity.

Such skills cut across sector, hierarchy and function – and are, according to employers, crucial to the success of their companies. According to research conducted by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU), 93 percent of business and non-profit leaders who were surveyed consider critical thinking and communication skills to be more important than a person’s undergraduate major when it comes to hiring.

That’s bad news because, while many public programs try to bridge gaps in the knowledge of future workers, there are few programs to address the gap in skills that are more difficult to measure, like creativity and critical thinking. My colleagues and I often hear from hiring managers who are hungry for programs that will encourage their employees (at all levels of the organization) to think more creatively, communicate more effectively and become more adept at reacting to changing circumstances.

The gap in these “soft” skills is very real. Professionalism/work ethic, teamwork/collaboration, and oral communication rank among the top five skills valued by employers hiring candidates at any educational level, according to one study. Yet employers rank significant portions of those entering the workforce deficient on all these dimensions. The problem is particularly acute among those without a college degree. Employers rate those entering the workforce with a high school degree deficient on professionalism/work ethic, critical thinking/problem solving, and oral communication. Meanwhile, employers do not regard a majority of college graduates deficient in any of these areas.

The introduction at the K-12 level of the Common Core, which is supposed to emphasize critical thinking and problem solving, may produce changes in these figures in the years to come. But for now, those without access to a university education — and even some workers with college degrees — enter the workforce lacking the interpersonal, reasoning and thinking skills necessary for success. Unlike direct knowledge areas — like computer basics — that can be taught through employer training sessions, there is no set curriculum for critical thinking or applied reasoning.

There is no silver bullet for addressing this gap, though our approach at Books@Work, having employees read literature and reflect on it, is one example of an attempt to disseminate some of the benefits of a liberal arts education beyond the confines of the traditional university setting. We need many more such efforts. In discussing Macbeth or Frankenstein, workers explore complex (and timeless) interpersonal dynamics — an opportunity that a training on the latest operating system or review of safety regulations is unlikely to provide.

We’ve found that reading literature with colleagues can offer a new perspective on the practice of work itself, leading to greater professionalism and new ways of doing things. Themes of empathy in a powerful novella by May Sarton, As We Are Now, which is about a woman in a terrible nursing home, led workers in one hospitality company to reconsider their approach toward customers, resulting in a renewed awareness of customer needs and expectations. A conversation about the racial tension in the post-war Northwest in David Guterson’s Snow Falling on Cedars became a platform to discuss personal integration issues in a company growing rapidly through acquisition and organizational acculturation.

Programs like Books@Work are not an adequate substitute for public policy solutions to the gap in thinking and interpersonal skills. We do not address disparities in such skills among job applicants — only among those who are hired. And they place the burden for addressing the problem squarely with employers. But programs that address the significant divide in soft skills are a first step toward realizing that solving the so-called skills gap requires more than teaching kids to code, retraining the unemployed as welders or encouraging college dropouts to complete technical degrees. We all need to continue to improve the most important skill of them all – our thinking.

Rachel Burstein, Ph.D. is Academic Director at Books@Work. This piece originally appeared at Zocalo Public Square.

MONEY Jobs

If Jobs Are Back, Where’s My Raise?

Empty pockets of businessman
Dude, where's my raise? Jeffrey Coolidge—Getty Images

Despite good jobs numbers, wages aren't growing much. The reason why is the biggest debate in economics right now

Today’s strong jobless claims data, which show that applications for unemployment benefits dropped again, is one reason to be cheerful heading into the Labor Day weekend.

Yet despite this, and the fact that the unemployment rate is now down to 6.2%, the economy still has this glaring weak spot: Workers aren’t getting serious raises.

Here’s how two important measures of wage growth have done since the recession. (The Brookings Institution keeps a running tab of these and other key economic indicators in the excellent interactive graphic here.)

fredgraph

Basically, what you are seeing is that pay to workers, whether measured as hourly wages or salaries plus benefits, has been running neck-and-neck with inflation of a bit under 2%. As Fed chair Janet Yellen pointed out in her recent speech at a Fed symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyo., wages are also growing less than workers’ productivity.

Why is this happening? Yellen, for one, likely thinks there’s some remaining “slack” in the economy. Employers are still wary about whether there’s growing demand for their stuff, and so they remain slow to hire. The low unemployment figures leave out a large number of workers who have become discouraged after a long time out of work. But if the slack explanation is right, as companies continue to hire, more of those labor-force dropouts will be drawn back into the employment pool. You won’t see companies under serious pressure to raise wages until that process has played out and companies start competing for a scarcer pool of job-seekers.

Yellen points to (though doesn’t endorse) another possible explanation. Many economists believe wages are downwardly “sticky”—even when companies want to cut costs, they’d rather lay people off than reduce the pay of the people they hang onto. That means that for people who kept working after the recession, wages were higher than they’d otherwise be. And now that the economy is (fitfully) coming back, maybe that means there’s also less room for wages to rise.

Another factor, of course, is that both corporate managers and workers are human, and people can take some time to adjust to new economic signals. Back in July, I sat down with a stock fund manager, who talked about what he was seeing going on at the companies he kept in touch with. More than five years after the financial crisis, he said, the corporate culture among top managers had changed. The people in the C-suite got their positions not by expanding their companies and finding great new hires, but by cutting costs. And they got used to a slack labor market. The manager used the specific example of truckers: You always know you can get a guy to drive a truck from your warehouse to your customer on a moment’s notice. So why worry about hiring more truckers?

As it happens, at the New York Times Upshot blog earlier this month, Neil Irwin wrote that this may be changing. A trucking company called Swift told investors it was having hard time finding enough drivers. The company says the problem is that there aren’t enough skilled people, but Irwin wonders if the problem is really that companies just aren’t paying enough. Trucker pay has fallen, in real terms, over the past decade. Irwin writes:

The most basic of economic theories would suggest that when supply isn’t enough to meet demand, it’s because the price—in this case, truckers’ wages—is too low. Raise wages, and an ample supply of workers should follow…. But corporate America has become so parsimonious about paying workers outside the executive suite that meaningful wage increases may seem an unacceptable affront.

The question now is, how strong does the economy have to get before employers are forced to change their thinking?

Related:
If You’re Looking for Work, the Outlook is Brightening
Why the Fed Won’t Care About Higher Prices Until You Get a Real Raise
What’s the Deal With America’s Declining Workforce?

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