TIME Business

The World’s Second-Richest Man Thinks You Should Work Only 3 Days a Week

Mexican businessman Slim attends the media after talking in the 20th annual meeting of the Circulo de Montevideo Fundation in Luque
Mexican businessman Carlos Slim attends the 20th annual meeting of the Circulo de Montevideo Fundation in Luque, Paraguay July 17, 2014. Jorge Adorno—Reuters

But retirement would be delayed until age 70 or 75

Carlos Slim, the world’s second-richest man finally said the one thing we’ve all been waiting for a self-made billionaire to say: work less. Way less.

At a business conference in Paraguay, the telecommunications magnate said it was time for a “radical overhaul” in the way people work, the Financial Times reports: people should only work three days a week.

“With three work days a week, we would have more time to relax; for quality of life,” Slim said. “Having four days [off] would be very important to generate new entertainment activities and other ways of being occupied.”

Well said, Mr. Slim. Well said.

But there’s a catch: in exchange for working fewer days a week, we should work for more of our lives. Instead of retiring at 50 or 60, workers should work until the age of 70 or 75, the 74-year-old Slim said.

Slim is the CEO of Telmex, which recently instituted a labor contract for workers to begin in their late teens and retire before they turn 50, with the option of continuing to work past retirement at four days a week for full pay.

Slim is worth upwards of $80 billion, according to Forbes, and is a major philanthropist and passionate Rodin collector.

[FT]

MONEY early retirement

How to Figure Out Your Real Cost of Living in Retirement

Your retirement savings “number” gets a lot of press. But your expense number is even more important, especially if you retire early.

Many financial advisors say you’ll need some fixed percent of your previous income in retirement—often 80% is considered “reasonable.” But that’s nonsense. What it costs you to live in retirement, or before, is not a function of how much you make! There are millionaires who live like college students, and college students who live like millionaires—for a while anyway, on credit.

Where are you on the lifestyle spectrum? To get serious about retirement planning, you’ve got to have an accurate picture of your monthly living expenses. You need to know your bare minimum or fixed expenses, your average or normal expenses, and your ideal expenses—allowing for some luxuries.

Spending is a personal area, so everyone’s pattern will be different. But on average the first phase of retirement is when you’re likely to spend the most, since you’re finally free to travel, dine out and enjoy other leisure activities. Among older Americans, average annual expenditures peaked at about $61,000 for those in the 45-54 year age range, according to the latest data from the Consumer Expenditures Survey. By ages 55-64, spending dipped to $56,000, and down again to $46,000 between ages 65 to 74. At 75 years and older, average spending was only $34,000, though health care expenses may spike up for many.

We are in our mid-50’s and live a modest but comfortable lifestyle, which currently costs us about $4,500 a month, in addition to housing. We rent a smaller, two-bedroom house (about $1,500 monthly), and share a single gas-efficient car ($370 a month, including gas, insurance and repairs). But we eat well, own some nice things, and have plenty of fun—mostly free or cheap outdoor activities. And our living expenses run about 25% above the national average for our age.

This past year we moved to our ideal retirement location. So we’ve had to spend a bit more than usual due to the relocation. But these have generally been one-time home or personal expenses—not recurring expenses that would inflate our lifestyle forever more.

Health care costs remain a concern, since we are too young for Medicare. Fortunately, I was able to get coverage through my wife’s retirement health plan, thanks to her former career as a public school teacher; we pay $1,100 a month on average for premiums, co-pays, deductibles and the like. That’s one of our larger expenses, but it is manageable, for now. (For more on our spending in early retirement, see my blog here.)

If you’re willing to live in a cheaper area, buy used, and eat simpler, you can probably live on much less than we do. On the other hand, if manicured retirement communities, luxury vehicles, and international travel are your idea of retirement living, you could need quite a bit more. In most surveys of consumer expenses, the biggest items are housing and transportation. So, if you want to optimize your retirement lifestyle, start with your home and vehicle.

Without a complete understanding of how much it costs you to live, your retirement planning can’t get off the ground. The best way to determine your expenses is to actually keep track of them for at least a year, as you approach retirement. You can record expenses using dedicated tools like Quicken on the desktop or Mint on the web, or you can use an electronic spreadsheet or paper journal.

As an engineer, tracking expenses was second nature to me. But what if you aren’t the detail-oriented type? You could estimate your expenses based on those government averages above, but in the long run you’ll need more accuracy to be confident about your own situation.

One approach is to sit down with your checking and credit card statements, and use them to estimate a monthly or annual amount for each important budget category. You can start with this short list: housing, transportation, food, health care, entertainment, and personal expenses. Just don’t forget those less-frequent items such as home and auto repairs, vacations, and property taxes!

Your retirement savings “number” gets a lot of press. But even more important than that is your expense number. Understanding your expenses is a critical stepping stone to building wealth and retiring comfortably. If you still don’t know where your money goes, why not get started today?

Darrow Kirkpatrick is a software engineer and author who lived frugally, invested successfully, and retired in 2011 at age 50. He writes regularly about saving, investing and retiring on his blog CanIRetireYet.com. This column appears monthly.

MONEY early retirement

4 Secrets of Financial Freedom

140701_HO_FinancialIndependence_1
Feng Yu—Alamy

You can shorten the path to early retirement if you start with the right strategies.

Ever since I retired at age 50, I’m often asked how I managed to reach financial security. Looking back, I see that the key factors fall into four categories—family support, career choice, money management, and personal habits and attitudes. Here’s how you can use these building blocks to reach your goals.

Start from a Strong Foundation
Some of us were fortunate to start out in families that instilled integrity, prudence, and hard work. If that’s your experience, you can be grateful. But, if not, then it’s still within your power to cultivate those qualities now. Not only will that create the conditions for your own financial success, but it will benefit everyone around you as well.

Throughout you will need patience. Typically the personal and financial decisions that will pay off in the long run require sacrificing a little today. Patience helps you live with the reality that true rewards usually require some short-term discomfort.

Choose a Career Wisely
Your choice of career is one of the most important decisions you’ll ever make. You need to love your work if you want to be great and prosper from it. So pay attention not only to your gifts, but to what makes you enthusiastic about getting up in the morning. Then, find a career path that plays to those strengths.

If you’re just starting out, and it suits you, a high-paying career in a technical or professional field will clearly advance your cause. Competence in math or technology can be a first-class ticket to building wealth. But, if that’s not possible, at least be aware of the financial implications of your college education and early career choices. A graduate in an esoteric major with five digits of student debt starts out life doubly handicapped. You can pursue your passions, integrate them with a professional track, and stay out of significant debt—but only if you make informed choices.

If you’re already in a career, look for mentors and other professional relationships that complement your skills and personality. Having been on both sides of the equation now, I can tell you that older, more experienced people generally enjoy counseling a talented and enthusiastic newcomer. It’s a relationship that pays dividends on both sides. So be open to wisdom when it’s offered. You don’t have to take every piece of advice, but it can be your starting point.

Learn to Manage Money
You might start out with a great family foundation. You might have a high-paying career that you love. But unless you live on less than you make, it won’t put you any closer to financial freedom. In fact, if you develop expensive tastes in houses and cars, and need to look as affluent as your neighbor, you could wind up worse off financially—no matter how much you make. You can start heading in the right direction by simply tracking your expenses, as well as learning about saving and budgeting. Identify the few areas where money spent truly pays off in better quality of life for your core interests. Spend there, and cut back everywhere else.

Next, find a mentor to help you become a confident investor. You need to master any fear of stocks, so you can profit from them in the long run. Offset the risk of stocks by allocating into other asset classes as well. Start small and carefully, but do start. Learn and abide by a few bedrock investing principles: diversification, patience, simplicity, low expenses. Track your net worth and your overall portfolio return each year, so you know what direction you’re going, and why.

Related: Find the right mix of stocks and bonds

Once your career and finances are on track, you can explore more entrepreneurial paths for wealth building—perhaps by owning a small business or real estate. These can leverage your time and money, getting you to financial independence years earlier. They can be fun and rewarding too!

Keep Your Perspective
Even with all these potent ingredients for success, be sure to take life one day at a time. Again, cultivate patience. You’ll need it for the long stretches.

Remember the goal—financial independence —but don’t obsess on it. Don’t sacrifice the present for the future; it won’t turn out as planned anyway. Make time for your loved ones and meaningful activities, even if you must work longer in the end. As great as it is to achieve financial freedom and retire early, you don’t want to arrive there having missed out on life along the way.

Darrow Kirkpatrick is a software engineer and author who lived frugally, invested successfully, and retired in 2011 at age 50. He writes regularly about saving, investing and retiring on his blog CanIRetireYet.com. This column appears monthly.

MONEY working in retirement

How to Find Happiness in Your Second Career—and Earn Money Too

These days, the retirement-planning conversation goes something like this: How can I earn an income after my initial career and give back at the same time?

This article was originally published at NextAvenue.org.

Cindy Lennartson is a 48-year-old library specialist at the University of Texas Libraries, in Austin. She has worked for a university library system for 25 years and is excited about retiring from there at 52 (when she can collect her pension) to start her next career. But she’s not quite sure how to do it.

After Lennartson read my inaugural column on rethinking retirement, “Why I’m Not Buying the Retirement Gloom,” she emailed me for insights on how she might make, and embrace, a life transition. I’ll offer them, as well as advice for others contemplating their move into “unretirement,” shortly.

The Lure of Trying Something New

To find out more about Lennartson’s situation and the future she envisions, I spoke with her. She told me that she’s a recently divorced mother of three who has loved her job and, until a few years ago, believed she’d retire at 62. But the lure of trying something new has convinced Lennartson to start reimagining her next chapter.

(MORE: Busting the Myths About Work in Retirement)

With her new plan of “retiring” at 52 when her children are out of the house, Lennartson said, she can use the next four years to find an encore career that will be meaningful and will come with a paycheck. “I’m rethinking the whole retirement thing — what else do I want to do,” she says. “I’m in the exploratory stage.”

Lennartson is far from alone. For more than three decades, the national conversation among people contemplating retirement was dominated by the haunting question: What is my number? Of course, the sum of savings we’ll need to live comfortably when we’re no longer working is disconcertingly uncertain. There’s no way of knowing what the market will return, let alone how much money will be enough to fund a lifestyle and medical bills.

The New Retirement Question

That’s why, these days, the retirement-planning conversation is increasingly focused on a different question: How can I earn an income after my initial career and give back at the same time?

Recent polls have found that most boomers expect to earn a paycheck during retirement. For example, 72% of pre-retirees age 50 and over just surveyed by Merrill Lynch and the Age Wave consulting firm said they want to work during the traditional retirement years. (You can read more about the survey in the Merrill Lynch report: Work in Retirement: Myths and Motivations, Career Reinventions and the New Retirement Workscape.)

What I found particularly striking in that survey was that many of the respondents said they see retirement “as a chance to try something new and even pursue careers dreams they were unable to explore during their pre-retirement years,” according to the report.

(MORE: Bright Spots and Challenges of Growing Older)

The Payback for Working in Retirement

The personal financial return from earning even a slim paycheck well into the traditional retirement years is big.

Your savings can continue compounding and you’ll live off your accumulated assets for a shorter period of time. A job can also allow you to delay filing for Social Security. Benefits are more than 75 percent higher if you start claiming at age 70 than at 63.

The difficult issue, as Lennartson has discovered, is figuring out what to do next — locating a paying gig that is also engaging.

Lennartson is smart to have a four-year exploration horizon and I encourage you to do the same. “You should be looking for the kind of jobs you could do that are challenging and interesting and offer an acceptable income,” says Arthur Koff, the septuagenarian founder of Retired Brains, an online job and advice portal. “The time to do it is while you’re working.”

(MORE: Change Careers With the ‘Sugar Grain’ Principle)

Why Planning Ahead Can Help

Making inroads before you retire can also help make you more valuable in retirement, as Jake Warner, the founder of Nolo.com, the self-help legal publisher explained to me.

“Let’s say someone thinks of themself as an environmentalist and dreams about working in environmental causes when they retire. But because of work, saving money, raising kids — all the pressures of daily life — they don’t get engaged,” said Warner. “Now they’re 70 and they have time. They head toward an environmental group they admire and say, ‘Here I am. How can I help you?’ The answer is going to be probably not much. Now, take that same person who gets involved with several local environmental groups in their 40s or 50s. At age 70, they’re valued and they’re needed. They earned it.”

The Librarian’s Encore Career

What might Lennartson do for her encore career? Well, she currently volunteers at a nonprofit, recording incarcerated fathers reading to their children and that’s an activity she finds deeply fulfilling. Perhaps there’s a paying job for her with the nonprofit or a similar endeavor.

Alternatively, since her undergraduate degree was in Spanish, she could try to land a job that would let her use her language skills.

Whatever she decides, a part-time gig would probably be best, since Lennartson wants the freedom to travel with her daughter, an activity they enjoy doing together.

Part of the equation revolves around her finances.

Running the Numbers

Lennartson had initially thought she would keep her house in retirement so her children would have a bedroom to come back to. Now, with her new next chapter mindset, she wonders if maybe just a couch is enough. A move into a smaller place would lower her expenses, giving her greater financial freedom.

Henry “Bud” Hebeler, founder of the retirement planning website Analyzenow.com, recommends Lennartson run the numbers to see how much downsizing will boost her cash flow. (That’s a useful site for anyone over 50 noodling a next act.) When she gets closer to making a shift, Lennartson could run her financial blueprint by a professional planner, he says.

As Lennartson is finding, transitions can be tricky and the process takes time. But they’re also liberating. “I feel like I am in college, so much is open to me,” says Lennartson. “It’s like I’m 21 or 22 once again,” she says. Now, that’s exciting.

Chris Farrell is economics editor for APM’s Marketplace Money, a syndicated personal finance program, and author of the forthcoming Unretirement: How Baby Boomers Are Changing the Way We Think About Work, Community, and The Good Life. He will be writing on Unretirement twice a month, focusing on the personal finance and entrepreneurial start-up implications and the lessons people learn as they search for meaning and income. Tell Chris about your experiences so he can address your questions in future columns. Send your queries to him a tcfarrell@mpr.org. His twitter address is @cfarrellecon.

MONEY Health Care

The Retirement Decision That Could Cost You $51,000

An early retirement may be good for reducing stress but it will also shrink your nest egg.

If you’re worried that health care costs will take a big bite out of your retirement income, don’t retire early.

Couples retiring at age 65 will spend an average $220,000 on health care expenditures, according to the 2014 Retiree Health Care Cost Estimate by Fidelity Investments.

But if you leave the job before 65, you’ll face even higher costs. A couple retiring at 62 would pay $17,000 a year in insurance premiums and out-of-pocket expenses—a total of $51,000—before reaching Medicare eligibility at 65, Fidelity calculated. That would push your total retirement health care costs to $271,000.

“If you have to buy health insurance when you’re older and you’re not on Medicare yet, it’s going to be a lot more expensive,” says Carolyn McClanahan, a doctor and a certified financial planner in Jacksonville, Florida. Even under the Affordable Care Act, older people spend $500 to $1,000 more a month than younger people do in premiums, she points out.

All the more reason to delay your retirement as long as you can. If you wait till age 67, you could save $10,000 a year on your medical expenses. That’s assuming you stay employed and your company pays the majority of your health care costs, which allows you to delay taking Medicare. “On average, Medicare picks up much less than the typical employer plan,” says Sunit Patel, senior vice president of Fidelity Benefits Consulting.

There is some good news in Fidelity’s latest analysis. Health care expenses have moderated in recent years, so this year’s $220,000 lifetime expense is unchanged from 2013. That slowdown is the result of reduced costs for long-term prescription drugs covered by Medicare Part D, as well as lower per-enrollee Medicare expenditures.

Still, whether you retire at 62 or 67, health care is a big-ticket item—and you need to plan for more than just the medical bills. Fidelity’s estimates don’t include the cost of paying for long-term care services, such as a home health aide or a nursing home, in the event you become disabled.

Of course, the timing of your retirement isn’t always something you can control. About half of retirees report that they left the workforce earlier than planned because of health issues, a layoff, or to care for an elderly relative, according the Employee Benefit Research Institute.

If you want to retire early, or think you’ll be forced to leave the workforce, be sure to estimate your health care costs and budget that into your retirement spending. If you’re in ill health or have a chronic condition such as diabetes, you may need to set aside more money for doctor visits and prescription drugs. And take whatever steps you can to improve and maintain your health. “If you’re in your 50s, this is the time to take good care of yourself,” says McClanahan.

MONEY early retirement

I Retired At 50—Here’s How

It is possible to retire early—if you live below your means and stick to a detailed budget. You can even splurge once in a while on things that really matter to you.

What does it take to retire early, or to retire at all? How much do you need to save before you can make the leap? And once you’re retired, how will you manage your investments for reliable income?

Almost everybody faces these questions eventually. If you’re thinking about them sooner than later, then you’re ahead of the game. Those with successful careers and a taste for simple living have the best options. That was my situation: Instead of climbing further up the corporate ladder, or inflating my lifestyle, I retired at age 50.

How did I do it? I was fortunate to grow up in a military family where I learned integrity, economy, and the value of hard work. In college I earned an engineering degree, discovered personal computers, and taught myself to program. Eventually I started my own small software company, which I merged with another, and helped grow into a larger company.

But I’m not a dot-com millionaire. I didn’t become financially independent from selling a business or flipping real estate or trading hot stocks. I did it the traditional way: hard work, frugality, prudent investing, and patience. Financial independence was a slow process: I began serious saving and investing in my mid-30′s—maxing out my retirement contributions, invested raises and bonuses—and ultimately it paid off in early retirement.

Along the way, I had the help of some wise financial mentors, and my wife Caroline, who, like me, has always been happy living below our means. We ignore what other people are buying, and splurge in the few areas that matter to us. I track our expenses and keep a detailed budget. We can number on one hand the times we didn’t pay off credit card balances in the same month, and it’s been decades since we had a car loan. We paid off our house early too. Even when it might make economic “sense” to borrow, we don’t, favoring the simplicity and security of living debt-free.

In my investment portfolio, I also focus on simplicity and accountability. After some early detours, I’ve resisted the urge to pick stocks or chase the latest hot idea. The bulk of our portfolio now consists of just 10 holdings (all low-cost mutual funds or ETFs) in just two accounts. I’ve tracked our net worth for many years, and calculated our overall portfolio return each year, so I would understand if we were going in the right direction, and why or why not.

At heart, I’m still an engineer. When it comes to managing money, my top priorities are simplicity, reliability, and safety. Now my mission is to help others get on track to financial freedom, through my blog and other writing about personal finance. Whatever your starting point—whether you’re just leaving school, working to get out of debt, or building your retirement savings—you can reach financial independence sooner by using the principles I’ll discuss here.

In the months ahead I’ll be drawing on my experience plus some of the latest research to explore strategies for saving, investing, and retiring earlier. My favorite topics include saving big, cheap travel, passive index investing, retirement calculators, and early retirement lifestyles. You’ll get my best tips and lessons learned—first-hand knowledge for becoming financially independent and retiring sooner in the real-world. So stay tuned!

__________________________________________

Darrow Kirkpatrick is a software engineer and author who lived frugally, invested successfully, and retired in 2011 at age 50. Now he writes regularly about saving, investing, and retiring on his blog CanIRetireYet.com. This column will appear monthly.

More from Darrow Kirkpatrick:

The One Retirement Question You Must Get Right

How to Figure Out Your Real Cost of Living in Retirement

4 Secrets of Financial Freedom

MONEY early retirement

Planning To Retire Early? A Second Paycheck Comes In Handy

In the 1980s, Kevin Howard started buying houses, fixing them up, and renting them out. That rental income let him leave his job at 55. Sam Comen

No question, picking up a part-time gig after you walk away from 9-to-5 work will ease the pressure on your finances. And that’s the plan for many: Three-quarters of workers believe they will have a job in retirement, a May Gallup poll found.

It’s not just about the money. In a survey of 44- to 70-year-olds by the second-act job site Encore.org, a third of those who want to work part-time cited enjoyment as the reason.

But reality doesn’t match expectations. In EBRI’s 2013 Retirement Confidence Survey, only 25% of retirees report ever having worked for pay after calling it a career.

Would-be retirees are often unrealistic about landing meaningful part-time work, says Colorado planner Leitz. Lining up a 15- to 20-hour-a-week job sounds great, but there aren’t too many stimulating and well-paying jobs in professional fields that allow that. “Flexibility is great for you, but not really for employers,” says Leitz.

What to do

Go for projects, not a job. Even when firms don’t want a 20-hour-a-week senior staffer, they still may have high-level work that needs to get done. Set yourself up to be the consultant they hire, says Dick Dawson of CareerCurve, a coaching firm for 55-plus workers.

Start where you’re known: your old workplace and your network. Keep going to industry events and seek out contractors who do similar work and may hear of jobs they can’t take. Visit elance.com and peopleperhour.com, which match employers with freelancers in fields such as marketing, writing, and design.

Make your hobby pay. Working doesn’t have to mean sticking with the same career. Before retiring at 58, Susan Morgan Hoth was a high school teacher in Richmond who spent summers painting silk scarves. As she approached retirement, she started selling her scarves online through sites like Etsy.

Her business nets about $4,000 a year, enough to let Hoth, now 64, splurge more. “It helps me afford things I would not spend money on otherwise,” she says.

Similarly, you might find that a part-time retail job that matches your interests — in a golf shop, say, or a health-food store — is all you need to pad your income. Discounts on greens fees or organic granola are an added bonus.

Don’t get too comfortable. A lot can happen over 40 years, from a financial pinch to boredom. So even if you don’t work out of the gate, keep yourself employable. That means maintaining professional credentials, following changes in your industry, and staying in touch with former colleagues.

Think way ahead. Many early retirees plant the seeds for a second paycheck well before retirement. One way to do that is by investing in rental real estate. Hearts & Wallets found that 27% of those who successfully retired before 62 went that route.

Rental income is what made it possible for Kevin Howard, 57, to leave his full-time job as a procurement manager for Boeing two years ago. In the mid-1980s he began rehabbing and renting out houses. The properties — three in Seattle, where he lives, and one in his former hometown of Houston — provide half his annual $140,000 income (the rest is a pension and savings).

Still, “I don’t want to fix plumbing as I get older,” he says. He plans to sell his Houston house soon and the others within five years.

Now, instead of working on aerospace projects, Howard is learning to play the standing bass. He’s clocked 14,000 miles in 26 states on his motorcycle, and takes his VW Vanagon camper to blues festivals.

“I worked for 30 years,” Howard says. “I want another 30 years doing the things I want to do.”

MORE: New rules for early retirement

Rule 1: Early retirees: Don’t fear losing your health insurance

Rule 2: Getting ready to retire? Save more, spend less

Rule 3: Use your home to boost retirement savings

Rule 4: Get the first decade of retirement right

 

MONEY retirement planning

Early Retirement: Why You Must Get The First Decade Right

How you allocate your portfolio and monitoring the market is crucial to maximizing your long-term income. Photo: Shutterstock

You should fear a bear.

The S&P 500 has turned in 16% average annual gains over the past three years, propelling the typical 401(k) balance to a record high this year, Fidelity reports. For workers 55 or older, it’s $255,000, nearly double what it was in March 2009, the depths of the bear market.

What stocks have in store now is crucial for early retirees, who might be inclined to count on continued high returns out of the gate. But stocks are looking expensive. Based on a conservative price/earnings ratio developed by Yale economist Robert Shiller, which uses 10 years of averaged profits, stocks are forecast to return 5% a year over the next decade. That could include down years as well.

Here’s why the market matters so much. Early on in retirement, you tend to spend more freely, as you can finally do all the things you were too busy to do when you worked: travel, eat out more, or indulge a costly hobby.

After you hit your mid-70s, your outlays start to drop, even when you take health care spending into account. People 65 to 74 spend 37% more than those 75 and older do, according to the Consumer Expenditure Survey. Retire young, and you’re starting those free-spending years early.

At the same time, crafting an income is trickier. Not only can’t you take Social Security until age 62, you’ll lock in a higher payment if you wait until full retirement age to claim (66 for a 60-year-old today; 67 for those born in 1960 or later). If you’re eligible for a pension and collect before 65, you’ll have to settle for as much as 30% less. So you’re especially dependent on your investments for income.

What to do

Hold out for a bigger check. As you navigate these bridge years, you’ll be better off if you can rely on your own resources first.

For every year you delay taking Social Security until age 70, you’ll collect an 8% bigger benefit. From then on, you can enjoy an annuity payment, in essence, that’s indexed to inflation. That’s worth waiting for.

Be willing to change. With bond yields low, a portfolio withdrawal rate that starts at 3% and adjusts for inflation is considered safer than the traditional 4% rule, says retirement researcher Wade Pfau. And that’s for 30 years, not the 35- or 40-year time horizon of an early retiree. For that, a safer rate dips to a measly 2.6%.

When you’re living entirely on withdrawals, 2% to 3% won’t cut it (unless you’ve saved a lot of dough). Simply boost your withdrawal rate, though, and you run a high risk of running out of money.

A 60-year-old couple earning $120,000 today a year and hoping to live on 70% of that, say, would have to withdraw 7% initially from a $1.2 million portfolio. But even if they cut back to 4% when full Social Security kicks in at 66, the chances of their money lasting until 90 drop below 50%.

To improve those prospects, get by on less. If the 60-year-old couple can live on 60% of their income, they can drop their withdrawal rates to 6% before claiming Social Security, then 3%, doubling their shot at success.

Crucially, if you allow yourself a higher withdrawal rate early on, you must cut back when Social Security kicks in. And since your spending patterns and market returns will undoubtedly vary, stay flexible. “This isn’t something you do once and forget about,” says planner Schroeder. “You need to review your income plan at least annually.”

Fear the bear. The other challenge is how to allocate your portfolio. In provocative new research, Pfau and Michael Kitces, director of research at Pinnacle Advisory Group, make the case for starting retirement with just 20% in stocks and gradually buying more over time. Do this, and chances are you’ll stretch out your savings a few more years and, more important, protect yourself from crippling anxiety and steep losses at the outset.

If a bear strikes early, you preserve capital and buy stocks on the upswing. If you retire into a bull market, you will miss out on some gains. But your overall odds are still better. “Heads you win, tails you won’t lose,” says Kitces.

Shifting money into stocks as you age may be too counterintuitive for you to pull off. A 50% or 60% stock stake that you gradually trim is also a good approach, says Vanguard investment research analyst Colleen Jaconetti. “In 2008, if you had been 50-50, you’d be ahead of where you are now,” she adds.

You’re walking a fine line. It’s hard to make your money last without the higher returns stocks can provide. But you need to preserve what you have. A bull market later won’t make up for early losses, says Jaconetti.

MONEY Retirement

Use Your Home to Boost Retirement Savings

Do you dream of leaving full-time work behind at 60, or even sooner? In MONEY’s 2014 Retirement Guide, you’ll learn the five essential rules for pulling off early retirement — rules built on tough lessons from recent years and new thinking about investing.

Rule 3: Be grateful, not greedy, about your gains

The housing market’s recent recovery may be one of the things that’s giving you the confidence — and the wherewithal — to retire ahead of schedule. Home prices in 20 major metro areas are up 12% over the past year, the biggest gain since 2006, according to the widely followed S&P/Case-Shiller home price index.

In seven of those markets, values are higher than or nearing their pre-crash peak, says David Blitzer, managing director at S&P Dow Jones Indices. American homeowners have seen their equity rise more than $2 trillion in just the past year, according to the Federal Reserve.

Alas, you can’t count on a housing boom to keep padding your net worth. With rising mortgage rates and tepid economic growth, the pace of price gains is expected to slow. “A year from now home prices will be higher, but half the double-digit gains we’ve seen,” says Blitzer.

You need to set realistic expectations for what your home can do for you, and plan prudently with what you have. That might mean leaving your old digs behind.

What to do

Lose two bedrooms. Moving out of your home of decades can pay off in two ways. By selling into a strong market now and buying a smaller house, you can lock in your good fortune, letting you add to your savings or wipe out any lingering debts.

Related: How much house can you afford?

Plus, if retiring early means learning to live on less, there’s no better way to do that than to cut your housing costs, which typically eat up 40% of retirees’ budgets, according to the Consumer Expenditure Survey.

Get out of town. Only 10% of retirees pick up stakes, though boomers look to be a bit more likely to relocate than previous generations were. In a 2012 AARP survey, two in 10 boomers said they planned to move in retirement.

“Boomers are different,” says Fred Brock, author of Retire on Less Than You Think. “They are willing to move to cheaper parts of the country.” With families more mobile, he adds, you don’t need to be tied to one place to stay near your kids.

Join this minority and move to a town with lower property taxes and lower living costs, as well as cheaper homes, and you can leverage your profits even more. That’s what Sheri and Bill Pyle did when they sold their three-bedroom Cape Cod outside Chicago for $185,000, paid cash for a $128,000 four-bedroom ranch in Tennessee, retired a home equity line and car loan, and added $30,000 to their savings.

And though their income is less than 40% of the $126,000 they used to earn, their cost of living is so low that they are able to get by on their combined Social Security, leaving their $400,000 in retirement savings to grow for now.

Their property taxes plummeted from $7,000 to $500 a year. Milder winters mean their heating bills are a third of what they used to pay. “We could never have done it if we stayed in Chicago,” says Sheri.

Beware the trap of leisure fees. Whether you downsize locally or across the country, it’s crucial that you don’t simply trade maintenance costs for steep association fees.

“I see a lot of people who move into a new home for retirement, and their cost of living goes up, not down,” says Colorado Springs financial planner Linda Leitz, national chair of the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors.

When Gundy and Karen Gunderson retired in 2007, the Seattle couple bought a home in a gated country-club community in Las Vegas. But they were surprised at how quickly the costs added up. Gundy, 66, a former commercial airline pilot, and Karen, 67, a homemaker, estimate they were spending $1,000 a month on dues for the private golf course, tennis and fitness classes, the club’s restaurant minimum, and maintenance on their pool and lawn.

Related: 10 Best Places to Retire

“We ran the numbers and knew we had to make an adjustment if we wanted our money to last,” says Gundy. So this year they downsized a second time, to a Henderson, Nev., retirement community overlooking two public golf courses. Now all they pay is a $93 monthly association fee.

Invest in staying put. All this said, what if you really don’t want to leave your home? At a minimum, early retirees told us they avoided carrying a mortgage into retirement, as 30% of retirees do.

While you’re still working, invest in improvements that will cut costs later, like replacing old appliances and drafty windows and upgrading your heat and electrical systems. “If you’ve been in your home a long time, there’s a lot you can do to make it less costly,” says Stillwater, Okla., financial planner Louise Schroeder.

MORE: New rules for early retirement

Rule 1: Early retirees: Don’t fear losing your health insurance

Rule 2: Getting ready to retire? Save more, spend less

Rule 4: Get the first decade of retirement right

Rule 5: Retiring? Time to look for a part-time gig

MONEY

Getting Ready to Retire? Save More, Spend Less

Do you dream of leaving full-time work behind at 60, or even sooner? In MONEY’s 2014 Retirement Guide, you’ll learn the five essential rules for pulling off early retirement — rules built on tough lessons from recent years and new thinking about investing.

Rule 2: Early retirement means tradeoffs, now and later

Funding your retirement, never a breeze, has become tougher in this economy. Interest rates are hovering near historic lows, and bond guru Bill Gross recently warned that low rates may persist for decades. So what you can earn on low-risk cash and bonds will remain paltry.

Wade Pfau, a researcher and professor at the American College of Financial Services, has calculated sure-fire retirement savings rates in this rate environment.

If you hope to retire at age 65 and start saving at 35 — when baby boomers typically began, a May 2013 Bank of America Merrill Edge survey found — it’s 15% to 19% a year. Move your retirement date up by five years, and those rates go to 23% to 29%, Pfau says.

You probably can’t hit those daunting targets year in, year out. So the trick is to gain ground when you can — and be willing to make the math work by living on less.

What to do

Buckle down. You can catch up with bursts of savings — often easier once big expenses like college or a mortgage fall away.

According to retirement research firm Hearts & Wallets, saving 15% or more of your income for eight to 10 years — early or late in your career — can ensure that you save enough to retire comfortably at 65. Such power saving is common among early retirees too, says Hearts & Wallets co-founder Laura Varas, but the rate is 25% or more.

Related: 10 Best Places to Retire

Calvin Lawrence was able to retire from his job as executive director at Corinthian College in Chesapeake, Va., four years ago at 59, even though he hadn’t gotten serious about retirement planning until after he divorced at 50.

At that point he had about $200,000 set aside. With his two children out of college (and out of the house), tuition and other child-care bills were gone. And a promotion had boosted his pay by $20,000.

Even though he made $110,000 a year, “I lived like I earned $50,000,” says Lawrence, now 63. “I found that I don’t need to spend a whole lot of money to be happy.” The result: He built his savings to $800,000.

Put windfalls to work. Whether it’s an inheritance or a bonus, a windfall can make the difference between leaving early and working until 65.

When Bill Balderaz, now 39, sold the social media marketing business he founded in 2011, he and his wife, Christina, an elementary-school teacher, put themselves on the road to retirement in their fifties. With profits of a few hundred thousand dollars, the couple wiped out the big expenses that often make saving for the future hard — paying off the mortgage on their home in Upper Arlington, Ohio, and setting aside public school college tuition for their kids. The rest went toward retirement funds, which now total $600,000.

Related: Will you have enough to retire?

Just as critically, they didn’t ratchet up their spending. “We didn’t buy a Mercedes or build a new house or send our kids to private schools,” says Bill, now president of Fathom Columbus, the online marketing firm that bought him out.

He still drives a 17-year-old Toyota Tacoma pickup truck. In the market for a boat for the family — the children range from 10 months to 11 years — he bought a decade-old 18-footer off Craigslist for $9,000. A similar new one would have cost $27,000. “We live like the acquisition didn’t happen,” Bill says.

Set low expectations. To get away with saving less, commit to living on less. Planners typically suggest you aim to replace 70% to 80% of your pre-retirement income, which doesn’t amount to a dramatic lifestyle change once you eliminate the money you were saving, Social Security taxes, and commuting costs.

If you can make it on 50%, you need to save 11.8 times your income by age 60, vs. 17 times if you hope to live on 70%, says Charles Farrell, CEO of Northstar Investment Advisors.

As you’ll see in rule No. 3, housing could be the key to doing this. Plus, “people who want to retire early are usually already living well below their means,” notes Farrell. “This might not be a big change.”

MORE: New rules for early retirement

Rule 1: Early retirees: Don’t fear losing your health insurance

Rule 3: Use your home to boost retirement savings

Rule 4: Get the first decade of retirement right

Rule 5: Retiring? Time to look for a part-time gig

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