TIME Companies

Famous Logos Redesigned in Protest Are Pretty Shocking

Qatar Looks To 2022 FIFA World Cup
Sean Gallup/Getty Images DOHA, QATAR - OCTOBER 24: Arab men sit at a shoemaker's stall with a replica of the FIFA World Cup trophy in the Souq Waqif traditional market on October 24, 2011 in Doha, Qatar. Qatar will host the 2022 FIFA World Cup football competition and is slated to tackle a variety of infrastructure projects, including the construction of new stadiums. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Pressure is mounting over worker deaths in Qatar

More than 1,400 workers have died at World Cup construction sites in Qatar, and now designers are putting the pressure on FIFA’s sponsors.

Today, nine FIFA officials were arrested in Switzerland and indicted with U.S. corruption charges—but these arrests appear unrelated to the worker deaths in Qatar. A new campaign led by the International Trade Union Confederation, a global trade group representing workers’ rights, calls for more attention on the dire issue and estimates that there will be 62 worker deaths for each World Cup game played in Qatar. As a result, major World Cup sponsors like Visa and Adidas have issued stern statements of concern, but have not pulled their sponsorships.

A number of designers online have taken up the mantle of pressuring those same sponsors by redesigning their corporate logos, tweaking the art and adding the slogan “proud sponsor of the human rights abuses of World Cup 2022.” They have submitted designs with the logos of Coca-Cola, Budweiser, Adidas, Sony and others.

The new logo designs are being posted at Bored Panda, where anyone on the Web can submit additional designs. Many of them also play with the official slogans of the sponsors, such as one that takes Sony’s “make believe” and changes it to “make slavery.”

Some of the most striking redesigns are below:

Adidas

Sony

McDonald’s

Coca-Cola

Visa

TIME Companies

Elon Musk’s SpaceX Is About to Tap a Huge New Market

US-SPACE-SPACEX-DRAGON V2 SPACECRAFT-ELON MUSK
Robyn Beck—AFP/Getty Images SpaceX CEO Elon Musk introduces SpaceX's Dragon V2 spacecraft, the companys next generation version of the Dragon ship designed to carry astronauts into space, at a press conference in Hawthorne, California on May 29, 2014.

It'll take on Boeing and Lockheed

The U.S. Air Force certified SpaceX to launch satellites for the Pentagon, it was announced Tuesday.

This is significant news for Elon Musk’s 13-year-old aerospace company, which has long been involved court case over certification from the Pentagon. As the Washington Post reports, obtaining Pentagon certification means SpaceX can compete with United Launch Alliance, a joint space venture formed in 2006 by Lockheed Martin and Boeing Defense, Space & Security.

ULA provides launch services to government entities like NASA and the Department of Defense—customers SpaceX also wants to service.

The certification process began when SpaceX sued the U.S. Air Force in April of last year, arguing its bidding process for awarding contracts to launch Pentagon satellites had turned ULA into an unfair monopoly. (In 2012, the Air Force awarded 36 launches to ULA, which was the only contractor certified to launch under the EELV, or Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle program.) Musk framed the lawsuit as a broader effort to get future launches reopened to widespread competition.

The suit was a rare and risky example of a company suing the organization that would be its biggest customer if it won the suit. In January of this year, SpaceX dropped the lawsuit and the certification process began.

Now Musk has earned what he sought—the right to compete. It’s a big win for Musk and SpaceX, which last year won a contract to fly astronauts to NASA’s International Space Station. In a statement about earning Pentagon certification, Musk said it is an “important step.”

He’s not the only one that thinks so. The news is getting big reactions from major names in the defense industry. Republican Senator John McCain, for instance, said in a statement: “The certification of SpaceX as a provider for defense space launch contracts is a win for competition . . . I am hopeful that this and other new competition will help to bring down launch costs and end our reliance on Russian rocket engines that subsidizes Vladimir Putin and his cronies.”

Read next: Watch What It’s Like to Get Blasted to 100MPH in 1.2 Seconds

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Companies

Why AOL’s CEO Is Getting a $59 Million Bonus

Tim Armstrong, Chairman and CEO of AOL Inc., speaks during an interview with Fox Business Channel in New York
© Brendan McDermid / Reuters—REUTERS Tim Armstrong, Chairman and CEO of AOL Inc., speaks during an interview with Fox Business Channel in New York December 3, 2014.

His new long-term contract with Verizon includes a 'Founders' Incentive Award'

We already knew that AOL chief executive Tim Armstrong stood to make a bundle from his company’s $4.4 billion sale to Verizon Communications. Thanks to new documents filed Tuesday, we also know that Armstrong’s payout includes a “Founders’ Incentive Award” worth about $59 million.

The bonus stems from Armstrong’s deal with Verizon [fortune-stock symbol=”VZ”] — a long-term contract that will keep him employed with the telecom giant — which stipulates the AOL CEO will get stock equal to 1.5% of AOL’s [fortune-stock symbol=”AOL”] market value once and if the sale is finalized. AOL’s market value was around $3.9 billion when the deal was announced, which means Armstrong would get about $59 million in stock options. Half of them would vest three years after the deal closes, while the remaining half vest after four years.

Armstrong, who collected about $6.9 million in compensation from AOL last year, has a 6.7% ownership stake in that company, which would be worth about $84 million based on current market value.

Tuesday’s filing also confirmed previous reports that Verizon had considered pursuing a joint venture that would have given Verizon access to AOL’s advertising technology business, which is seen as a key component to the deal.

[Re/code]

TIME Google

This Is What Google Could Announce This Week

Inside The Google I|O Developers Conference
David Paul Morris—Bloomberg/Getty Images Sundar Pichai, senior vice president of Android, Chrome and Apps for Google Inc., speaks during the Google I/O Annual Developers Conference in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, June 25, 2014.

Google's I/O Conference agenda hints at a major update to Android and a push toward wearables, virtual reality and the internet of things

Google’s annual developers’ conference kicks off Thursday at San Francisco’s Moscone Convention Center. As always, the agenda hints at a slew of new product announcements, including…

Android M. Google wouldn’t let a developers’ conference go to waste without promoting the latest changes to Android, and this year the changes could be significant. A new operating system codenamed “Android M” may not release to the public until next fall, along with a batch of new Nexus devices, but Google is expected to offer developers a peek under the hood. The operating system may introduce several features that are now familiar to iPhone users, including one-tap payment and a fingerprint scanner to unlock devices.

Google also appears to have released an intriguing talking point, first spotted by 9to5 Google, that shows a new emphasis on Android’s business users:

“This opens huge new markets for hundreds of millions of devices to workers at small business, deskless workers, logistics and warehousing jobs,” read one item on the conference agenda shortly before it was taken down.

Smart Home Devices. This may be the year the “Internet of Things” at last becomes a thing, especially if Google releases a new development platform that could seamlessly connect Android devices to everything but the kitchen sink.

Google is reportedly working on a new platform codenamed “Brillo” that would enable anything from locks to lightbulbs to garage doors to wirelessly connect to the Internet, offering Android users a new measure of control through their mobile devices.

The announcement could steal some thunder from Apple’s highly anticipated launch of HomeKit, a new smart device platform expected to go live with its first compatible products this June.

Virtual Reality. The darling of last year’s conference was Google’s startlingly low-tech answer to virtual reality headsets: Cardboard, a corrugated cardboard enclosure for a smartphone, with two eyeholes cut out for viewing virtual reality apps. This year Google may double down on the virtual reality apps for Android, or it may at last offer a clue of what’s going on at Magic Leap, a virtual reality company that lured Google into a $500 million funding round last year. At least one conference session will focus exclusively on how virtual reality “may change our lives.”

Wearables. The Apple Watch may have superseded Google’s release of Android Wear smart watches last summer, so Google may attempt to rejuvenate its wearables line with a few product improvements, including rumors of stronger batteries and smarter fitness tracking sensors. One conference session, spotted by CNET, will hone in on health data generated by Google Fit, an app that rolls up fitness data into one comprehensive dashboard.

MONEY Companies

5,000 Reasons Why Apple Needs Jonathan Ive

One number that shows how important the newly-promoted design guru is to Apple's success

Apple announced Monday that its legendary designer Jonathan Ive would take on a new role at the company as Chief Design Officer. The iPhone-maker’s hardware and software design will now be led by Richard Howarth and Alan Dye, while Ive will move to supervisory role that will expand to include overseeing the look and feel of the company’s retail stores and new campus.

The promotion has worried some Apple watchers who think the designer’s new position could take away from his current focus on product design. According to Apple CEO Tim Cook, Ive has his name on 5,000 design and utility patents. Ive doesn’t personally own that intellectual property, but the sheer number of inventions with his byline proves beyond a doubt that the newly crowned Design Officer’s fingers have been in a huge portion of the company’s innovations.

Some, like Business Insider‘s James Cook, think this diffusion of responsibility could even be an “exit path” for Ive, who, after working at Apple full-time for 23 years, may be looking forward to spending more time with his wife and two sons. (The Telegraph article that first reported Ive’s promotion said “Jony will travel more,” which Apple pundit John Gruber takes to mean “live in England” where his family resides.)

It’s all speculation at this point, but if Ive does indeed step back from product development, he would be nearly impossible to replace. Since joining the Apple in 1996, Ive has worked on everything from the design of the iPod, iMac, iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch to details like the MagSafe charging connector and the iPad’s Smart Cover. He has won multiple prizes for his work, including a National Design Award, a prestigious Red Dot award, and was even knighted by the British Crown for “for services to design and enterprise.”

TIME mergers

Why the Latest Cable Merger Won’t Fail Like Comcast

The Charter deal would not be on the scale of the proposed Comcast-TWC merger

Is Charter Communications Inc bold or foolish? The cable company announced it will acquire rival Time Warner Cable Inc – even though Comcast’s attempt to pull off the same deal foundered just weeks ago on anticompetitive concerns.

Comcast, recall, struck out after spending 14 months and $336 million on legal and lobbying bills. The price of failure for Charter would be even steeper: It has agreed to pay Time Warner Cable a $2 billion break-up fee in the event the deal doesn’t go through. But, for now at least, merger fans have little to worry about.

Even though the deal, which also involves Charter swallowing another small operator called Bright House Networks, would create a broadband behemoth, it would not be on the scale of the proposed Comcast-TWC merger. (The latter deal would have given Comcast exclusive control of over half the high-speed broadband connections in the country; the figure in the Charter deal will be closer to one quarter).

That scale difference alone is likely to quell anticompetitive concerns. While FCC Chair Tom Wheeler is already making noise about the need for the deal to “benefit” consumers, this likely means the agency will try to extract a few promises from Charter rather than erecting full-blown roadblocks.

Also aiding Charter is that, unlike Comcast, it doesn’t own content verticals like NBC. In the view of regulators, this reduces the chances of major mischief in the form of the merged company favoring some type of broadband content over others.

One more good sign for Charter is that public interest groups, which promptly threw a fit after Comcast announced its merger plans in early 2014, are so far keeping their powder dry. The president of Public Knowledge, for instance, said that his group is still assessing the implications.

“No, we have to review all details,” said Gene Kimmelman in response to an email asking if his group plans to oppose the merger. “And it must be shown to benefit the public in the FCC review, which is certainly not clear at this point in time. We may oppose unless certain public interest protections are put in place.”

Finally, Charter’s chances are improved by the simple fact that it is not named Comcast. As Fortune editor Alan Murray recently explained, Comcast’s rotten customer service helped it achieve a singular infamy, even by the low standards of America’s little-loved cable companies. This ensured that consumers and regulators alike were determined to stop Comcast from growing bigger.

All this is why the Charter deal, while no slam-dunk, is likely to go through with relatively few hitches.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

TIME Autos

Ford CEO Mark Fields Wants to Make a Self-Driving Car for the Masses

Ford President and CEO Mark Fields speaks at Ford's manufacturing facility and engineering plant in Sanand, India on March 26, 2015.
Ajit Solanki—AP Ford President and CEO Mark Fields speaks at Ford's manufacturing facility and engineering plant in Sanand, India on March 26, 2015.

The company, "where it makes sense," will cooperate with Google and others on self-driving cars

Ford CEO Mark Fields is trying to navigate his company through an era of upheaval in the auto industry. Cars are no longer merely steel on wheels. They’re mobile computers that can respond to voice commands, serve as a hub for digital entertainment and drive themselves.

Fortune spoke with Fields recently at Ford’s Silicon Valley lab, an office that opened earlier this year as a beachhead for innovation. He’s hoping that having workers on the ground in the heart of the tech industry’s capital will help the company identify and adopt new technology more quickly. Ford is facing a stiff challenge to keep up from the usual auto making suspects plus newcomers like Google and Tesla. Even Uber, the ride hailing app, is a threat if people stop buying cars and use its service instead to be driven where they need to go.

The following is a Q&A with Fields that has been edited for length and clarity:

Q: How important are self-driving cars to Ford?

They’re important. But it’s more important to think about self-driving cars more holistically. We call this Ford Smart Mobility. It’s not only about autonomous vehicles, it’s about the connected car, it’s about mobility and ride sharing. It’s around the enabling technologies for the retail experience. All these things are connected. You can’t have an autonomous vehicle unless you have a connected car, and visa versa. You can’t have ride sharing without having the connection. They’re all intertwined.

Q: Is it important to be first? Ford isn’t really seen as being in the lead on self-driving cars.

It’s not the No. 1 thing that drives us. I think the No. 1 thing that drives us, and it gets back to our DNA as a company going back to our founder, Henry Ford, is around innovating to make things accessible to everyone — not just the rich. Even now, semi-autonomous features are the building blocks for full autonomy. When you look the breadth of semi-autonomous features that we have in our vehicles, we’re in a leading position there. With everything from our Fiesta all the way up to our Lincolns — customers can get a lot of these features. So as we go forward, we’re going to make sure that we continue to build on that legacy and push ourselves to make sure it’s accessible and affordable – not necessarily being the first.

Q: Are you considering partnering with Google, which is only a few miles from here, or other companies on self-driving cars?

When you think about some of these enabling technologies, we have to ask ourselves some very important questions like what do we want to develop as our own core competency? Who do we want to partner with? We’ve done that throughout our history as a company. Where it makes sense, we’ll work with others.

Q: You talk about selling autonomous vehicles to the masses, but the components cost thousands of dollars extra. How do you get to the price where the average person can buy a self-driving car?

You innovate. In Silicon Valley, there’s Moore’s Law (the axiom that microchips will get more powerful and less expensive). I don’t know what the law is for the automotive industry. We’re always looking for ways to increase performance and capabilities and decrease cost. There are cameras, radars, and 3-D mapping. When you look at the cost of cameras, it’s coming down significantly. When you get to autonomous vehicles, you’ll need much more computer processing capability in the vehicle. The cost of microprocessors is continuing to go down. Also, scale is important, and as a company, I think we have pretty good scale.

Q: How much of a challenge is Uber under the theory that fewer people will need to buy cars in the future?

We’re looking at some of these societal trends around mega cities with more than 10 million or more vehicles – the congestion, the air quality implications, and the growth of the middle class around the globe. Of course, the first thing they want to do is buy a car, which increases the congestion even more. We’re looking at that as an opportunity in two ways: One is to sell cars to people who want to own them. Two is to provide mobility experiences to people who otherwise we are not serving today. We’re doing these 25 experiments around the world right now – we’re about halfway through them – to understand what are some of the mobility issues [Editor’s note: the experiments include a car sharing service, a commuter shuttle service, and technology that spots open parking spaces]. Then we’re asking ourselves: How do we help solve some of these societal issues?

Q: How are those experiments going? And are you really interested in getting into those businesses?

It may seem far-fetched from a traditional automaker. But we’re asking our people to challenge and question tradition. That’s extremely empowering to the organization. This is a culture of innovation. We as a senior team need to allow it. Not all of these experiments will succeed. But that’s okay, because we are looking to learn from them. Some may go on to the next step and ultimately become some kind of service or product.

Q: How much do the high valuations of tech companies dissuade you from making tech acquisitions?

Any company needs to be always on the lookout for technology that makes sense. It gets back to what I mentioned earlier: Making decisions about what’s core for us versus who do we want to go out and partner with. In some cases, we have made acquisitions. We bought a company called Livio about two years ago (a developer of in-car connectivity software), because we thought that was core for us. But I think also you have to be wary of it. Because what can look like a really cool technology this month, may look like something else in six months.

Q: How much to you pay attention to the really far-out tech beyond self-driving cars?

In our business, you have one foot in today – making sure you’re running your business, meeting your sales forecasts, meeting your quarterly earnings – and also one foot into tomorrow: 10, 15 years down the road. We have a very disciplined process. That’s one of the reasons we’re here and growing. Some of these unique technologies are being born here today as we speak and will be born six months from now. That’s why it’s important for us to be part of this community.

Q: Ford’s is facing a tough challenge in China. General Motors and Volkswagen sell a lot of cars there. How is Ford going to do better?

We’re doing very well now in China. We’ve had record market share. In the first quarter this year, our share was 4.5%. Clearly that’s not as large as some of our main competitors who are in the 10% or 11% range. But that’s up from almost 2% a couple of years ago. In the first quarter, we went from No. 8 in the passenger vehicle segment to No. 5. We were in Shanghai last week introducing our Taurus. We were not in the full-size segment – that’s a big segment in China. Now we’re going to be there. We now have a full lineup of SUVs. We’re expanding our manufacturing capability. We’re expanding our dealer network, particularly in the Tier 3 through 6 cities, where a lot of the growth is coming from.

Q: Ford is pushing to make Lincoln a global luxury brand. It’s not the first time. Similar efforts have ebbed and flowed over the years.

It’s flowing now.

Q: Why is this time different?

The reason it’s different this time is that we understand the strategic importance of the luxury market. The luxury market is maybe 9.5% or 10% of the global industry. When you look at the profitability, it’s about one-third. So it’s very compelling. There are a lot of good competitors in the luxury segment. We thought long and hard about how do we differentiate Lincoln in a relevant way. At the same time, we have to understand that we are one of the smallest luxury players. So how do we turn that to our advantage and give that customer personal service? When you look at our dealerships in China, which we get to start from a clean sheet, it’s like walking into a high-end boutique. It’s not one of these large factory-type things like a bakery where you take a number.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

TIME Companies

Goldman Sachs Just Hired the Guy Who Locked Up Bernie Madoff

Bernard L. Madoff leaves US Federal Cour
TIMOTHY A. CLARY—AFP/Getty Images Bernard L. Madoff leaves US Federal Court after a hearing regarding his bail on January 14, 2009 in New York. Madoff will remain free on bail, a US judge ruled Wednesday, rejecting a bid by prosecutors to detain Madoff pending trial. AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Patrick Carroll moves from the FBI to Wall Street

Goldman Sachs just brought an agent from the Federal Bureau of Investigation onboard.

Patrick Carroll, who headed securities fraud and white collar crime during his law enforcement tenure, has joined the banking firm as a vice president in the compliance, surveillance and strategy group, Bloomberg reports.

Carroll spearheaded the use of wiretaps when he helped take down Raj Rajaratnam, co-founder of Galleon Group, who was convicted of netting tens of millions of dollars through insider trading. The former agent also helped bring undercover tactics traditionally employed to take down mob members and drug cartels to securities-fraud cases. He may be best known for his role in bringing Bernie Madoff, the world’ biggest Ponzi-scammer, to justice.

Roy Smith, a former Goldman Sachs partner and professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business, told Bloomberg that the hire reflects his past employer’s attempt to deal with the proliferation of governmental rules and regulations: “It’s really about how Goldman is reacting to the tidal wave of litigation that now seems to be part of the ongoing government toolkit for regulating banks,” he said. “It can help to have some people who know how government prosecutors and investigators think, some guy who has the mindset of an alligator.”

Carroll is not the only Fed to go to the other side. Assistant director of cyber investigations at the FBI Joseph Demarest previously worked in Goldman Sachs’ global security before returning to the agency, Bloomberg notes.

Carroll told Bloomberg about his motivations for leaving the force.

Carroll says he already knew many people at Goldman Sachs, having worked with “their compliance for many years.” His leaving was motivated by a desire for a new challenge after 25 years at the FBI, he said.

Given the fate of former employers Lehman Brothers and Merrill Lynch, he added with a wry smile, “I haven’t told the FBI this, but every place I’ve left has crumbled.”

For more, read about what life is like in prison for white collar criminals.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

TIME Companies

Amazon Is Going to Pay More Tax in Europe

Amazon Unveils Its First Smartphone
David Ryder—Getty Images Amazon.com founder and CEO Jeff Bezos presents the company's first smartphone, the Fire Phone, on June 18, 2014 in Seattle, Washington.

A move towards country-by-country reporting will expose the online retailer to much higher tax bills in key markets

Under pressure from E.U. authorities, Amazon.com Inc. has changed the way it books revenue from sales in Europe, a move that could lead to it paying much more in tax, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The WSJ reported at the weekend that it is now booking revenue through national branches in four of the five largest markets in the E.U.: the U.K., Germany, Italy and Spain. It attributed those details to “a person familiar with the matter,” but said a spokesman confirmed a change in practice as of May 1.

So far, Amazon has booked the overwhelming majority of its sales in the E.U. through a subsidiary registered in tiny Luxembourg, where it has arrangements that allow it to pay a fraction of the taxes that would be due if it traded through local subsidiaries. In 2012, it famously paid only 2.4 million pounds ($3.6 million) of tax on over £4 billion in sales.

The E.U.’s antitrust division said in January there were reasons to believe that this tax arrangement represented unfair state aid, and should be stopped. National governments have howled in protest that Amazon’s practices, which are legal under the E.U.’s Single Market legislation, are killing local retailers and eroding their own tax base.

The probe into Amazon is one of four of a kind that the E.U. started last year. Others affect a tax agreement between Apple Inc. and Ireland, and one between Starbucks and the Netherlands. It isn’t clear whether either company has yet followed Amazon’s lead.

This story first appeared on fortune.com

TIME Companies

Apple’s Design Guru Just Got a Big Promotion

Jonathan Ive gets a new title

Jonathan Ive is taking on an even more important role at Apple. The design mastermind behind the look of the iPhone and the iPad will be promoted from senior vice president of design to the newly created position of chief design officer, CEO Tim Cook said in a memo to staff.

“Jony is one of the most talented and accomplished designers of his generation, with an astonishing 5000 design and utility patents to his name,” Cook said in the memo, obtained by 9to5Mac. “His new role is a reflection of the scope of work he has been doing at Apple for some time.”

Ive is already responsible for overseeing the physical look of Apple products as well as the design of the company’s software. In his expanded role, he’ll have more time to focus his design expertise on other parts of Apple’s empire, such as its Apple Stores, the physical packaging of its products and even the design of its massive new spaceship-shaped headquarters, which is set to open by 2017.

In an interview in the Telegraph, which first reported the promotion, Ive revealed that one of the touches he’s added to the new campus is custom-designed desks that can be raised or lowered with the press of a button.

Freeing up Ive to do more big-picture thinking will be two men taking on some his previous day-to-day managerial duties. Richard Howarth is being promoted to vice president of industrial design and Alan Dye will become the vice president of user interface design. The changes take place on July 1.

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com