TIME Military

Army Launches Review Into Whether ROTC Cadets Were Forced to Wear Heels

For a sexual assault awareness event

The U.S. Army is investigating allegations that ROTC cadets on college campuses were told to wear high heels to an event marking Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month.

The review by the U.S Army Cadet Command comes after an anonymous poster on Reddit claimed that ROTC cadets at Arizona State University would have faced disciplinary action if they didn’t attend an event on Monday called “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes,” during which students donned red high heels to “stomp out” sexual assault on campuses. The post quickly garnered attention online and pointed critics of the alleged policy to other ROTC campus units that held similar events.

In a statement shared with TIME, the U.S. Army Cadet Command said they did not direct the ROTC units on exactly how the cadets should participate in the sexual assault awareness events.

“After receiving some comments about uniforms, we are currently gathering facts in order to review how local ROTC units implemented their participation in these events designed to raise awareness on the issue of sexual assault,” the statement said.

A video posted by ASU’s student nhttps://vimeo.com/125515628ewspaper shows the event at the Phoenix university. Maj. Michelle Bravo, a military science professor at Arizona State, says in the video that the cadets “planned and decided” to host the walk, where they mostly wore khakis and polo shirts with their heels.

The Temple University ROTC hosted a similar event earlier this month, and cadets there wore their uniforms with heels as they walked.

The U.S. Army Cadet Command also noted units could have participated in other events including “JROTC/ROTC 5K Run/Walk,” which doesn’t explicitly mention wearing high heels.

TIME Innovation

Are We Breaking Up With Saudi Arabia?

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

These are today's best ideas

1. Is the special Saudi-U.S. relationship on the rocks?

By Ray Takeyh at the Council on Foreign Relations

2. Two-year degrees can really pay off.

By Liz Weston at Reuters

3. A self-contained urban farm, delivered in a box, could slash water use by 90 percent.

By Danny Crichton in TechCrunch

4. How a lake full of methane could power Rwanda and DR Congo.

By Jonathan W. Rosen in MIT Technology Review

5. Nope, we’re not going to live on crickets in the near-future.

By Brooke Borel in Popular Science

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

MONEY College

Here’s What the Average Grad Makes Right Out of College

new grad in front of height chart that measures salary
Kutay Tanir—Getty Images

Income for new bachelor's degree holders varies widely depending on college major.

Students who graduated college in the class of 2014 earned median starting salaries of $45,478, according to a new report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

The survey, which looked at the first-year income of more than 45,000 graduates, found big differences in pay depending on the new hires’ college majors.

Here’s the breakdown:

Bachelor’s Degree Major Median Starting Salary
Business $49,035
Engineering $64,367
Liberal arts and Humanities $36,237
All $45,478

Final numbers are not yet out for what starting salaries 2015 graduates can expect, but initial NACE projections earlier this year were in the low- to mid-$60,000s for engineers and the mid-$40,000s for humanities majors.

On the highest end are the class of 2015’s petroleum engineers, projected to earn an average of $80,600 in their first year out of college.

For a look at the college majors that pay you back the most, check out PayScale’s 2014-2015 College Salary Report, with information on more than 200 majors.

Read Next: How to Write E-mails That Will Land You a Job

MONEY job search

4 Job Interview Takeaways From College Senior’s Facebook Rant

Elizabeth Bentivegna
Elizabeth Bentivegna in the outfit she wore to an interview at a Cleveland tech company. She says a recruiter told her it looked like she was ready to go "clubbing."

An Oberlin College student's Facebook post about the reason she believes a tech company cut her from its job applicant pool has ignited a firestorm of comment about proper interview attire and etiquette. Here's what you can learn from the incident.

An Oberlin College senior named Elizabeth Bentivegna recently vented in a Facebook post about being rejected for a programming job at a Cleveland software company. Specifically, she was outraged by what she feels is sexism in the tech industry, and her post has sparked fierce debate online about whether there are different standards for men and women and just what is appropriate conduct during and after a job interview.

As reported in the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Bentivegna said that a recruiter contacted her for the position, and after she interviewed with the tech company, passed along the feedback that she didn’t appear “put-together.”

“She said they’d love to hire me based on my technical ability and my personality, but were not going to because A: I looked like I was about to go clubbing and not be on an interview, B: I had a huge run in my tights and C: I was late. And I told them I was going to be late,” Bentivegna told the Plain Dealer.

The company said in prepared statement that Bentivegna was passed over for the job because they had more qualified applicants, not because of her appearance.

Regardless of gender—or your opinion on Bentivegna’s choice of interview outfit—there are a couple things every young person entering the job market can learn from this incident, says New York career coach Roy Cohen. Here are some takeaways.

1. Plan Your Outfit Carefully

Rather than going with your gut or an outfit that has worked for previous summer job interviews, research what type of interview attire is considered standard for the industry you’re looking to break into. Even if you know your industry or this company is more jeans and T-shirt than suit and tie, err on the conservative side with your fashion picks.

If you are working with a recruiter, ask for her advice. “Say: ‘I’m excited for the chance to interview and want to make the best possible impression, do you have any recommendations on interview attire?'” Cohen suggests. Alternatively, you can always seek guidance from your college’s career services center on how to prepare. You can even wear the outfit you’ve got in mind to your meeting with career services as a way of vetting it beforehand.

(For more tips on how to avoid making work-wear mistakes, see our summertime office ensemble guide.)

2. Be On Time

Just because a recruiter or company suggests an interview time does not mean you are beholden to it. If other engagements, say class or another job, conflict or overlap with the time they’ve slotted, simply explain why that time will not work and suggest an alternate time during typical business hours, Cohen recommends. Don’t hurt your prospects unnecessarily by scheduling the interview too closely to other engagements either. Give yourself space to deal with a traffic jam or whatever else life may throw at you.

3. Stay Off Social Media

It’s OK to post in celebration of landing a new gig. But ranting about a rejection or unfairness could lead you to make a career-destroying blunder as these social media users did.

If an interview experience goes poorly or you receive criticism from an employer or recruiter, keep your venting offline. Tell it to a friend. Write it in a journal. “No matter how the interview goes, if you post about an organization, you need to keep it positive. If you have nothing nice to say, it’s better to say nothing at all,” says Cohen. “Venting in that kind of public way could easily tarnish your reputation and raises issues concerning your temper, judgment, and loyalty in the eyes of future employers who fear a similar treatment.”

If you’ve already posted such a rant, purge it from your history. Hiring managers and the Internet have a way of uncovering your entire online identity, even those stupid offhand comments you may have made six years ago. If you don’t remember whether your web history includes such a venting session or something more offensive, a new app called Clear promises to search your social media accounts and flag anything questionable, then delete it.

4. Bounce Back from Rejection

“Feedback is always valuable. We can use it to become smarter interviewers and gain insight into how we are being perceived,” says Cohen. “We can’t personalize every rejection, it would distort our own value. After all, companies have to reject someone.”

But if you do feel the company misjudged you, maybe because of an outfit or a timing issue beyond your control, respond by sending the appropriate person at the company a thoughtful note expressing your disappointment at not being selected. Don’t challenge them on the reasons they or the recruiter might have given for the decision. Instead, outline the value you can add to the company once more and request another interview opportunity. You can also always ask to be kept in mind for any future openings.

Read Next: 5 Ways Women in Tech Can Beat the Odds

 

MONEY College

When a Two-Year College Degree Pays Off

Dental hygienist
Peter Dazeley—Getty Images

You generally do better with a four-year degree, but sometimes a quicker diploma can launch you on the road to success.

Steven Polasck of Corpus Christi, Texas, liked math and science in high school. He considered attending a four-year college but ultimately decided to use his strengths to get a two-year degree in instrumentation from Texas State Technical College. He has not looked back.

“I went to work on the Monday after graduation,” said Polasck, 27, who monitors and fixes systems at a Valero Energy Corp refinery. “The first year I made almost $80,000.”

An associate’s degree has long been considered an inferior alternative to a bachelor’s degree. Now that more states are tracking their graduates’ incomes, however, it is becoming apparent that some two-year degrees offer much higher earnings than the typical four-year degree—at a fraction of the cost.

Making more students and parents aware of these better-paying options could help ease the college affordability crisis, which has so far led to more than $1 trillion in student loan debt.

The average net annual cost of a community college education—for tuition, fees, room and board, minus financial aid—is just under $6,000, according to the College Board. The average undergraduate at a four-year public college pays twice that amount out of pocket, and most students attending a public school now take five or more years to complete their degrees.

The fact that people still think a bachelor’s degree is always the better option is probably due to popular charts that hang in many high school guidance counselor offices, said Michael Bettersworth, vice chancellor and chief policy officer for Texas State Technical College, which has nearly 30,000 enrolled students.

The “chart” is a graphic representation of earnings by educational attainment, using Bureau of Labor Statistics data showing professional degrees at the top, bachelor’s degrees in the middle and associate’s degrees just above high school diplomas.

Median weekly earnings for those with bachelor’s degrees last year reached $1,101, or $57,252 a year, compared to $792, or $41,184 annually, for those with an associate’s degree, according to BLS.

But the chart fails to capture the full range of salaries earned by those with two-year degrees, particularly those in technical fields, Bettersworth said.

“It’s far more important what you study than how much you study,” he said.

While the average starting salary for somebody with a bachelor’s degree in Texas is around $40,000 per year, many technical associate’s degrees offer first-year pay of more than $70,000, according to College Measures, which tracks earnings and other outcomes for higher education.

Some well-paying jobs require less than two years of study. A line worker certification, a requisite for working on electrical power lines, takes about a year and brings an average starting salary of $70,000, Bettersworth said.

Texas is one of the states that has been gathering income data as a way to gauge and improve the success of its public college graduates. Other states conducting similar studies include Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Tennessee, and Virginia.

The earnings advantage of some two-year degrees can persist throughout a worker’s lifetime. More than one in four people with associate’s degrees end up making more than the average of somebody with a bachelor’s degree, according to a 2011 report by Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workplace.

Four of the 30 fastest-growing job categories according to BLS require associate’s degrees. The jobs include dental hygienist (median annual earnings of $70,210), diagnostic medical sonographers ($65,860), occupational therapy assistants ($53,240) and physical therapist assistant ($52,160).

Other jobs with strong growth and above-average pay that require two-year degrees are funeral service managers ($66,720), web developers ($62,500), electrical and electronics drafters ($55,700), nuclear technicians ($69,060), radiation therapists ($77,560), respiratory therapists ($55,870), registered nurses ($65,470), cardiovascular technologists and technicians ($52,070), radiologic technologists ($54,620), and magnetic resonance imaging technologists ($65,360).

Polasck said it is not unusual for experienced people with his type of degree to make up to $150,000 a year with “reasonable” amounts of overtime. Job prospects are good even with declining oil prices, since refineries produce gas and other byproducts regardless of prevailing prices.

“If I can go to this school for two years, and not be in much debt at all at the end, and be making pretty good money to start, why wouldn’t I do that?” Polasck said. “It’s common sense.”

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: April 15

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. The U.S. is safer than we’ve been in generations. So why do we see threats around every corner?

By Stephen Kinzer in the Boston Globe

2. Is college worth it? There’s a checklist for that.

By Brandon Busteed at Gallup

3. Life is teaching your kid the value of white lies.

By Melissa Dahl in the Science of Us

4. The secret to success for unregulated currencies like Bitcoin might be more regulation.

By Larry Greenemeier in Scientific American

5. Scotland’s new drunk-driving law works so well, it’s hurting their economy.

By Chris Green in the Independent

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Rand Paul

Rand Paul Borrows an Idea from President Bartlet

Martin Sheen as President Josiah "Jed" Bartlet in "The West Wing".
NBC/Getty Images Martin Sheen as President Josiah "Jed" Bartlet in "The West Wing".

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul must be watching “The West Wing.”

Addressing a crowd of about 400 largely college students on the fourth day of his presidential roll-out, the Republican hopeful called for making college tuition tax deductible for all students — an idea first floated on the White House TV drama.

Responding to President Obama’s proposal to provide free community college to millions of eligible students, Paul said while it sounded good, taxpayers would be left on the hook.

“The president says, well, I just want to give you free college,” Paul said at the University of Iowa. “It sounds good at first, but think about it, how could it be free? Well, somebody still has to pay. Someone has to pay the professors, the electricity, the janitorial services. Somebody pays.”

“I have a better idea,” he continued. “Let’s let college students deduct the entire cost of their educations over their working careers. Let’s make college tuition entirely deductible.”

Paul offered no details how he would pay for the tax break or how it would work. A spokesman for Paul didn’t immediately respond to a request for details on the proposal.

Under current federal law only several thousand dollars of education spending is tax deductible per year, depending on income level.

On an episode of “The West Wing,” two advisors to fictional President Jed Barlet are stranded in Iowa when they meet a man touring colleges with his daughter who worries about making his tuition payments. “It should be a little easier—Just a little easier,” he told the presidential aides Toby Ziegler and Josh Lyman.

They aides huddle in a subsequent episode are having the simultaneous epiphany to make college tuition fully tax deductible, and struggle to devise pay-fors. On the show, they suggest closing a tax loophole for corporate bonuses.

Watch “The West Wing” clip below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJRcDHKrSqw

MONEY Viewpoint

Taxpayers Should Stop Subsidizing “Country Club” Colleges

An education policy expert argues that it's time for more elite colleges to open their doors to low-income students.

For years, Washington University in St. Louis has held the dubious distinction of being the least socioeconomically diverse college in the country.

Just 85 members of its freshmen class entering in the fall of 2012 (5%) came from families with incomes low enough (typically below $50,000 a year) to qualify for a federal Pell Grant. (That’s the most recent year with federal data available.)

Washington University’s proportion of low-income students is remarkably tiny, considering more than a third of all full-time undergraduates qualify for the need-based Pell Grants. It’s also low for schools with tough academic standards. Other elite colleges maintain top reputations while providing many more opportunities to the non-rich: About a third of the students at the University of California-Berkeley—generally considered one of the top universities in the world—qualify for Pell Grants, for example. And more than 20% of students at elite schools like Amherst College and Columbia University come from low-income families.

Adding financial injury to this insult: “country club” private colleges that bar the door to the poor—thus reinforcing socioeconomic inequality—are receiving large tax subsidies from you and me, in part because of their tax-exempt status.

But there finally may be a little good college opportunity news on the horizon. Perhaps in response to the growing criticism of taxpayer subsidies of such country club colleges, some schools like Washington University are starting to at least inch towards providing more opportunities.

This January, Washington University announced a plan to double the proportion of Pell Grant recipients that it enrolls by 2020. Under the plan, Wash U. will spend at least $25 million a year for five years to increase the share of students who qualify for Pell Grants.

“Improving the socioeconomic diversity of our student body is not just important; it’s critical to our success as a university,” Holden Thorp, the university’s provost and executive vice chancellor for academic affairs, said in a news release.

Four other private colleges that currently have low-income populations of only about 10% tell me they are also now working to recruit more low-income students.

Some of the colleges say the problem—and solution—boils down to money.

Officials at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Wash., for example, say one key reason their student body is currently only 10% low-income is that the financial crisis of 2008 reduced their endowment, which is used to fund financial aid. They are now trying to raise more money for scholarships so a more diverse group of students can afford to attend the school. “We have a responsibility to increase access wherever we can,” says school president George Bridges, who is leaving Whitman at the end of the school year to become president of The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash.

Likewise, Elon University, in North Carolina, is in the middle of a 10-year campaign to double the amount of need-based institutional aid that it awards. “Elon must not become a gated community open only to those of privilege,” the college states on its website, “and our classrooms and campus life will be much richer when we recruit more students from diverse backgrounds who challenge and lead us by sharing their own life stories…” Because of the difficulty of raising the large sums needed, however, Elon is making “slow progress” in increasing the proportion of Pell students it enrolls, says President Leo Lambert. “We are digging hard into this issue of access, because it makes a big difference in the quality of the kind of community we aspire to be,” he says.

Other colleges are combining fundraising with new recruiting efforts. Colorado College is raising more money for financial aid and partnering with nonprofits such as QuestBridge to recruit low-income historically underrepresented students. “We are really diversifying the pool of highly qualified low-income students that we enroll,” says president Jill Tiefenthaler.

And Kenyon College, in Gambier, Ohio, is increasing its diversity in part by changing its application. In 2013, Kenyon simplified its admissions application, removing extra essays that the school found discouraged first-generation students. It seems to be working: For next year’s incoming class, Kenyon admitted 408 minority students, up 9% from last year, and 128 first-generation college students, the second most the college has admitted in the last decade. “It’s clear to us that we can do better than where we are and where we’ve been in recent years,” says Sean Decatur, Kenyon’s president.

But this battle is far from won. There are still plenty of other colleges that aren’t making an effort to provide opportunities to more than a handful of lucky low-income students. “Just trying to increase the number of Pell Grant recipients might be good for PR, but may be bad policy for our college,” says Randy Helm, the outgoing president of Muhlenberg College, a private college in Pennsylvania where only 8% of the students come from low income families.

Part of the reason is financial. Washington University can afford to spend more on financial aid, since its endowment equates to about $500,000 per student. Muhlenberg’s endowment equates to one-tenth of that: $50,000 per student.

Helm, who is retiring in June, doesn’t think it would be healthy for Muhlenberg to make a concerted effort to recruit and finance substantially more Pell-eligible applicants. If it did, the school would have to spend its entire $36 million financial aid budget supporting them, and wouldn’t have any aid left for middle-income students who are also struggling to pay the school’s $55,000 annual cost of attendance.

“We’re not going to be a school that serves the very, very rich and the very, very poor,” he says. “I don’t think that would be fair to middle-income students, the college, or the country.”

Another reason for the lack of college opportunities may be the pursuit of prestige. Muhlenberg, for example, devotes a significant share of its institutional aid to the pursuit of high-achieving students, who often come from well-to-do families.

A page on Muhlenberg’s website, entitled “The Real Deal on Financial Aid,” acknowledges that the college and many of its competitors often use institutional aid as a “recruiting tool.” “It used to be that you could try for that reach school and if you got in, you didn’t have to worry because everybody who got in, who needed money, got money,” the college’s financial aid office states. “Today, however, as colleges are asked to fund more and more of their own operation with less and less assistance from government, foundations, and families, they are increasingly reluctant to part with their money to enroll students who don’t raise their academic profile.”

Muhlenberg provides “merit aid”—which is not based on financial need—to about 32% of its freshmen, with an average award of nearly $12,500 per student, according to data the college reports to magazines that publish college rankings.

Higher education researchers, the news media, and even the White House have been putting colleges on notice that they must do a better job serving low-income students. It’s encouraging to see that this pressure has been pushing some of the biggest laggards to make progress in this area. Those colleges that continue to hold out, however, deserve additional scrutiny. At a time of growing inequality, we can no longer afford to subsidize colleges that cater to the rich at the expense of the poor.

(Here are Money’s lists of the Most Generous Colleges and the 25 Best Colleges You Can Actually Get Into.)

Stephen Burd is a senior policy analyst with New America’s Education Policy Program. This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news website focused on inequality and innovation in education.

MONEY College

The 25 Best Colleges for Earning a Degree in Business

University of California Berkeley
Melanie Stetson Freeman—AP University of California Berkeley

The surprising public colleges that beat out many pricey private schools.

Anyone with a mind for business has the same question about college: What’s the return on my investment? If I’m going to take on some $28,400 in student debt, will that stake pay off in a lifetime of higher earnings?

Economists generally agree that a college degree pays off, but new research from PayScale has even better news for students planning on majoring in business: You don’t have to go to a pricey private school to reap the biggest return. In fact, you’re often better off at a state school.

PayScale calculates the expected “return”for colleges all around the country—how much more graduates earn over 20 years compared to high school grads, minus the total cost of school (everything from tuition to books) and the four years of income you give up while you’re studying.

The best return on investment for business majors? An education at the University of California-Berkeley (which overall ranks as the 13th best college value in MONEY’s Best Colleges list). Apparently the road to business success is lined with Birkenstocks.

The total in-state tuition and expenses is over $34,000, and the average borrower leaves Berkeley with $23,360 in loans. But that pays off with a median $1,133,100 return on investment over 20 years.

Precocious young investors might see those numbers a different way: That’s a 12.2% annualized ROI. Good luck finding that kind of return in the stock market.

And nine more public schools make the top 25 list: University of Virginia, University of North Carolina, Rutgers, University of Washington, UCLA, SUNY at Binghamton, Georgia Institute of Technology, University of California-San Diego, and Cal Poly.

Why do public institutions fare so well? “It’s likely a combo of lower tuition costs and location,” Lydia Frank of PayScale writes in an email. “You’ll notice that many of the public schools that rank well on that list are located in places like California where salaries tend to be higher. If alumni are sticking around after graduation, they’re going to fare better than students who went to public school somewhere in the Midwest and ended up working there.”

School 20-year net return on investment Total 2014-2015 tuition and expenses (on campus; in-state rates)
1. University of California-Berkeley $1,133,100 $34,356
2. University of Pennsylvania $1,039,000 $64,200
3. Babson College $762,800 $62,440
4. Santa Clara University $756,200 $61,638
5. University of Virginia $745,100 $27,010
6. Cornell University $730,000 $63,606
7. New York University $693,700 $66,022
8. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill $664,300 $25,650
9. Rutgers University-New Brunswick $655,400 $29,933
10. Lehigh University $653,800 $58,835
11. Villanova University $650,100 $60,694
12. University of Washington-Main Campus $643,800 $26,698
13. University of California-Los Angeles $637,500 $32,978
14. SUNY at Binghamton $636,900 $23,648
15. Georgia Institute of Technology $636,300 $24,748
16. University of California-San Diego $635,000 $31,254
17. Loyola University Maryland $620,200 $59,925
18. California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo $619,800 $24,683
19. Saint Mary’s College of California $611,000 $59,327
20. George Washington University $609,800 $63,210
21. Brigham Young University $605,700 $12,150
22. Washington University in St. Louis $605,000 $66,376
23. University of Notre Dame $596,600 $62,461
24. American University $595,100 $59,120
25. Hofstra University $589,200 $56,046

Of course, part of the reason those nine public schools offer such a high return on investment is because your upfront cost is much smaller when you pay in-state tuition. But even when you consider the cost for out-of-staters, public institutions top the list. Case in point: You’re still best off going to Berkeley, even if you have to pay more than $57,000 a year in out-of-state tuition.

School 20-year net return on investment Total 2014-2015 tuition and expenses (on campus; out-of-state rates)
1. University of California-Berkeley $1,041,600 $57,234
2. University of Pennsylvania $1,039,000 $64,200
3. Babson College $762,800 $62,440
4. Santa Clara University $756,200 $61,638
5. Cornell University $730,000 $63,606
6. New York University $693,700 $66,022
7. Lehigh University $653,800 $58,835
8. Villanova University $650,100 $60,694
9. University of Virginia $643,700 $56,196
10. Loyola University Maryland $620,200 $59,925
11. Saint Mary’s College of California $611,000 $59,327
12. George Washington University $609,800 $63,210
13. Brigham Young University $605,700 $12,150
14. Washington University in St. Louis $605,000 $66,376
15. Rutgers University-New Brunswick $603,900 $44,711
16. SUNY at Binghamton $600,900 $35,288
17. University of Notre Dame $596,600 $62,461
18. American University $595,100 $59,120
19. Hofstra University $589,200 $56,046
20. Boston College $588,900 $63,022
21. Wentworth Institute of Technology $583,600 $49,855
22. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill $583,300 $50,732
23. California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo $574,600 $35,843
24. Wittenberg University $573,800 $50,562
25. University of Washington-Main Campus $572,600 $47,817

Notes: Cost of tuition, fees, room and board, books, and supplies; does not include the salaries of college graduates who went on to get more advanced degrees; schools excluded if PayScale does not have statistically significant samples of earnings data.

MONEY College

The 6 Most Promising Industries for the Class of 2015

These businesses will be booming until 2020 and beyond.

Graduating from college in a few weeks, and looking to start a career where the most growth is? Research firm IbisWorld recently delved into its database of more than 700 industries and came up with a list of the fields most likely to show strong revenue and employment growth, along with above-average salaries, for at least the next five years. Here are the top six businesses for new grads now:

Hospitals/health care. Projected to grow by 19.5% between now and 2020, the medical industry will benefit partly from an aging population that will need more health services in the years ahead. Current average industry salary: $66,567.

Engineering services. The industry “is expected to hire thousands of new graduates over the next five years as business confidence increases,” along with higher government spending on infrastructure, the Ibis study says, for a growth rate of 19%. Average industry salary this year: $87,246.

Management consulting. With an 18% growth rate from now until 2020, profitability — and demand for new hires — has been climbing as the economy recovers and companies invest more in strategy, Ibis reports. Average 2015 industry salary: $58,702.

Accounting. The industry, projected to grow 17%, benefits from the recent rise in financial regulation, which keeps auditors busier than ever. More globalization will also “lead to more cross-border corporate deals that require expertise in U.S. accounting standards.” Current average salary: $67,474.

Semiconductors and circuits. Demand for “advanced wireless consumer electronics, such as smartphones,” including new chip technology that can integrate existing WiFi and mobile networks, will generate 16% growth by 2020, with electrical engineers in especially big demand. Average salary now: $93,167.

Software development. The job market for software engineers, developers, and programmers has been rosy for years, but the Ibis study projects that demand for smartphone app developers in particular will soar at an annual rate of 37.6%, far outpacing the projected 15.5% growth rate of the software business as a whole. The industry’s voracious appetite for talent shows in the average annual 2015 salary: $147,274.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

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