TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: November 17

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. America needs a national service year: “Citizenship is like a muscle that can atrophy from too little use; if we want to strengthen it, we need to exercise it.”

By Stan McChrystal in the Washington Post

2. It’s time to pay college athletes.

By Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in Jacobin

3. So-called ‘conversion therapy’ to change someone’s sexual orientation is discredited, dangerous and should be classified as torture.

By Samantha Ames in The Advocate

4. Wikipedia searches are the next frontier on monitoring and predicting disease outbreaks.

By Nicholas Generous, Geoffrey Fairchild, Alina Deshpande, Sara Y. Del Valle and Reid Priedhorsky at PLOS Computational Biology

5. Many kids lack an adult connection to spur success in school and life. A program linking them to retired adults with much to offer can solve that problem.

By Michael Eisner and Marc Freedman in the Huffington Post

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

MONEY Kids and Money

4 Costly Money Mistakes You’re Making With Your Kids

parents cheering softball players
Yellow Dog Productions—Getty Images

Help your kids become financially literate.

When you’re a parent, it’s easy to get caught up in day-to-day money issues: Which brand of milk is a better value? Is Old Navy having a school uniform sale? How much lunch money is left in the kids’ accounts? But parenting is ultimately about the long view, with the goal of raising capable, self-sufficient adults. Dealing with daily details, we sometimes neglect important money issues that can have a huge impact on our kids — and on our finances — as they prepare for college and adult life.

The mistake: Not talking enough about money

Too many parents don’t talk about money with their kids at all. Others skirt topics they don’t know much about, like investing and debt. Parents are the main source of money information for children, but 74% of parents are reluctant to discuss family finances with their kids, according to the 2014 T. Rowe Price Parents, Kids, and Money Survey. That’s too bad, because ignorance about money can set your kids up to make bad decisions — and eventually pass those bad habits on to your grandkids.

The solution: Make financial literacy a family value

In her book, Do I Look Like an ATM?: A Parent’s Guide to Raising Financially Responsible African American Children, Sabrina Lamb details “the business of your family household.” Lamb, founder and CEO of WorldofMoney.org, says all families should work together on five financial topics: learning, earning, saving, investing, and donating time or funds to causes you value. She recommends a daily diet of business news, occasional meetings between the kids, your banker, and other financial advisors, and support of your older kids’ entrepreneurial goals.

The mistake: Believing in the “Scholarship Fairy”

A lot of parents pin their hopes on pixie dust when it comes to funding their kids’ college educations. Eight in 10 parents think their kids will get scholarships. In the real world, less than one in 10 U.S. students receive private-sector scholarship money — an average of $2,000 apiece, according to FinAid.org.

Even more unrealistic is the myth that great grades and high test scores will lead to a full scholarship. The truth, per scholarship portal ScholarshipExperts.com, is there are many more 4.0-GPA students than there are full-tuition awards, and only one-third of one percent (0.3%) of all U.S. college students earn a full-ride scholarship each year. The time to learn this hard truth is now, not when college acceptance letters start arriving.

The solution: Save something now (or accept that you can’t)

There’s a considerable body of literature out there on the merits of 529s, trusts, and other college savings options. Don’t let the details distract you from the real issue, which is that if you want to help finance your child’s higher education, you must save regularly, starting now.

If there’s no money to save, be honest with your kids about it. You can start educating them about ways to finance college through loans and cut costs with community college transfer credit and placement tests. It’s perfectly acceptable to expect your kids to take responsibility for their own higher learning as long as you prepare them properly to face that reality.

The mistake: “Investing” in extracurricular activities

Everyone’s heard about overscheduled kids with too many after-school activities. Not as much is said about the huge dent extracurriculars can put in your budget — hundreds or thousands of dollars each year for lessons, league fees, uniforms, and more. If you’re sacrificing because you think these activities will pay off when your child gets an athletic scholarship, remember that the Scholarship Fairy is rarely seen. The odds of any particular student getting even a small athletic scholarship at a Division 1 school aren’t significantly better than the odds of a student getting a full-ride academic scholarship.

The solution: Treat extracurricular activities as extras

If your child loves soccer, piano, or hip-hop and you have the time and money to spare, that’s ideal. But if it’s a choice between paying for extras and saving for college, save for college. Find cheaper after-school options for now, and don’t apologize for making that decision.

The mistake: Not teaching your kids to negotiate

There’s a big distinction between a child who’s been taught how to speak up when appropriate and one who’s been trained to be passive in the face of authority. The kids who know how to negotiate tend to earn more money as adults, even when they’re doing the same jobs as those who keep quiet. Salary.com found last year that workers who negotiated a raise every three years earned a million more dollars over the course of their careers than workers who simply accepted whatever they were offered.

The solution: Teach your kids how to deal

Show your kids the ins and outs of deal making through trading games, doing some haggling at garage sales, and expecting them to keep their word. You can find specific age-appropriate suggestions here.

By talking about money and business a little each day, being realistic about college planning, and giving your kids the skills to advocate for themselves, you’ll give them long-term advantages when it comes to understanding and earning money. That’s a valuable legacy to pass from one generation to the next.

MONEY College

The Best and Worst Places to Live for a Low-Cost College Education

Classroom with map of United States on chalkboard. Wyoming is shaded pink.
Want to save $50,000 on your kids' college education? Move to Wyoming. Sarina Finkelstein (photo illustration)—John Kuczala/Getty Images (classroom); Tuomas Kujansuu (chalkboard)

With a wide spread in tuition and tax burdens, the cost of sending your children to local public schools can come to just over $40,000 for four years—or more than $130,000—depending where you live. See where your state ranks.

Want to cut your family’s college tuition bills by more than $50,000? Bring up your kids in Wyoming. Or Florida. Or even New York. But not New Hampshire.

Using new College Board data on the average cost of tuition and fees at public colleges in all 50 states and the average amount of state tax dollars that go toward higher education, MONEY calculated where parents would spend the most and least to raise two children and send both to an in-state public university.

Wyoming, which the Tax Foundation reports has the lowest total tax burden in the country, is also the nation’s best bargain in higher education, thanks to the lowest public-college tuition in the U.S. Yet low taxes alone aren’t enough to make a state a good deal. Although New Hampshire has the sixth-lowest tax burden in the nation, Granite State parents face the highest college-related bills.

To estimate the total cost of a public education in each state, MONEY calculated how much a family earning $50,000 a year would likely pay in state taxes earmarked for higher education over 25 years, and added that to four years of in-state tuition for two children. This back-of-the-envelope analysis, of course, assumes no change in prices or taxes, nor any financial aid.

The results, while rough, do a reasonable job of showing the impact of different philosophies toward government services, says Andy Carlson, senior policy analyst at the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association.

You’ll generally pay more if you live in a state where the students who earn the benefits of the degree have to pay the bulk of the costs, Carlson says. And you’ll usually—though not always—face lower overall college costs in states that view access to higher education as a public good, and as a result direct significant tax support to public universities.

The Best Places to Live

For families, how this difference usually plays out is in higher or lower in-state tuition. And you’ll end up paying the most for your kids’ education in states with high in-state tuition, even if those states have comparatively low college-related taxes.

New Hampshire has no tax on earned income. It funds government services with taxes on things like investment income, real estate, and liquor. For a family earning $50,000, the amount of state revenues that support the state’s colleges equates to about $82 this year, or a little more than $2,000 over 25 years. Not surprisingly, New Hampshire has the highest average public college tuition in the country—$14,712 this year—pushing total higher education tuition and tax spending for parents of two children to more than $132,000 over two decades.

Wyoming, which has low direct taxes on its residents, funds much of its government services with taxes on mineral and energy mining. Out of those revenues, it allocates the equivalent of nearly $600 a year per family to higher education, the highest subsidy in the nation. As a result, tuition and fees at the University of Wyoming are just $4,646. The total higher education taxes and tuition costs for a typical Wyoming family adds up to just $42,000—or $90,000 less than New Hampshire families pay.

Some high-tax and high-subsidy states are bad deals for parents, however. Illinois taxpayers, for example, spend 13% more than the national average on higher education support—about $340 a year per middle-class family. And Illinois public colleges charge some of the highest tuition in the U.S. As a result, Illinois has the nation’s fifth-highest combined tax-and-tuition bill for a typical family—$115,000.

In contrast, a middle class household North Carolina contributes about $500 worth of state taxes to higher education annually. That high level of taxpayer support helps keep North Carolina’s in-state tuition, $6,700 this year, below the national average. The total higher education tax and tuition costs for parents with two children comes in at about $60,000.

One last surprising note: You don’t have to travel far to reap big savings. Moving across the river from high-tax New Jersey, for example, to slightly higher-tax New York cuts the public college tuition you’re likely to pay by about $5,000 a year, and a family’s total lifetime higher education bill by more than $50,000.

The 50-State Ranking

Here’s how the math plays out in all 50 states. For more on finding a great college value, check out our Best Colleges rankings, including the 25 Best Public Colleges.

State State higher-ed spending per $1,000 in personal income 25-year total state higher-ed spending for families earning $50,000 Average in-state tuition 2014-15 Estimated total tuition costs for two children Total estimated tuition + taxes
1. Wyoming $11.92 $14,896 $4,646 $37,168 $41,814
2. Alaska $10.48 $13,101 $6,138 $49,105 $55,243
3. Utah $7.63 $9,537 $6,177 $49,416 $55,593
4. New Mexico $11.51 $14,387 $6,190 $49,523 $55,714
5. Montana $5.70 $7,125 $6,279 $50,233 $56,512
6. Florida $4.84 $6,048 $6,351 $50,808 $57,159
7. Nevada $4.49 $5,616 $6,418 $51,341 $57,759
8. Idaho $6.59 $8,236 $6,602 $52,816 $59,418
9. West Virginia $7.80 $9,753 $6,661 $53,292 $59,953
10. North Carolina $9.62 $12,027 $6,677 $53,418 $60,096
11. Mississippi $9.50 $11,877 $6,861 $54,888 $61,749
12. Oklahoma $6.52 $8,145 $6,895 $55,157 $62,052
13. New York $4.91 $6,134 $7,292 $58,338 $65,631
14. Louisiana $5.98 $7,471 $7,314 $58,510 $65,824
15. Nebraska $8.07 $10,093 $7,404 $59,234 $66,638
16. North Dakota $10.02 $12,522 $7,513 $60,106 $67,620
17. Arkansas $8.01 $10,013 $7,567 $60,535 $68,102
18. South Dakota $5.04 $6,303 $7,653 $61,224 $68,877
19. Iowa $5.92 $7,402 $7,857 $62,857 $70,714
20. Kansas $6.06 $7,577 $8,086 $64,684 $72,770
21. Georgia $7.31 $9,139 $8,094 $64,753 $72,847
22. Missouri $4.02 $5,023 $8,383 $67,068 $75,451
23. Tennessee $6.25 $7,810 $8,541 $68,324 $76,865
24. Maryland $5.42 $6,771 $8,724 $69,790 $78,514
25. Wisconsin $4.51 $5,632 $8,781 $70,248 $79,029
26. Texas $5.78 $7,226 $8,830 $70,637 $79,467
27. Oregon $4.01 $5,018 $8,932 $71,453 $80,385
28. Indiana $6.69 $8,363 $9,023 $72,182 $81,205
29. California $5.84 $7,306 $9,173 $73,381 $82,554
30. Kentucky $7.44 $9,301 $9,188 $73,508 $82,696
31. Maine $4.99 $6,243 $9,422 $75,378 $84,800
32. Alabama $8.18 $10,220 $9,470 $75,759 $85,229
33. Colorado $2.78 $3,479 $9,487 $75,897 $85,384
34. Hawaii $8.08 $10,106 $9,740 $77,921 $87,661
35. Ohio $4.42 $5,526 $10,100 $80,799 $90,898
36. Arizona $3.57 $4,468 $10,398 $83,181 $93,578
37. Minnesota $5.42 $6,780 $10,527 $84,217 $94,744
38. Connecticut $4.63 $5,782 $10,620 $84,957 $95,577
39. Washington $4.81 $6,017 $10,846 $86,765 $97,610
40. Virginia $4.40 $5,503 $10,899 $87,192 $98,091
41. Rhode Island $3.45 $4,316 $10,934 $87,469 $98,403
42. Massachusetts $2.88 $3,605 $10,951 $87,608 $98,559
43. Delaware $5.44 $6,798 $11,448 $91,581 $103,029
44. South Carolina $5.38 $6,729 $11,449 $91,594 $103,044
45. Michigan $4.31 $5,386 $11,909 $95,271 $107,180
46. Illinois $6.77 $8,467 $12,770 $102,156 $114,926
47. New Jersey $3.99 $4,993 $13,002 $104,020 $117,022
48. Pennsylvania $3.02 $3,775 $13,246 $105,967 $119,213
49. Vermont $3.21 $4,018 $14,419 $115,353 $129,773
50. New Hampshire $1.64 $2,050 $14,712 $117,698 $132,411

Sources: College Board, MONEY calculations

TIME Education

College Application Essays Don’t Matter as Much as You Think

There's good news and bad news when it comes to college essays

Correction appended, November 14.

Parents: sit down before you read this. Kids: deep breaths. You know that beautifully crafted, deeply felt, highly unusual college application essay you’ve been polishing? It might not make a difference for your college admission chances.

Stanford sociologist Mitchell Stevens spent 18 months embedded with admissions officers at an unnamed top-tier liberal arts college and found that, even in cases where students were within the admissible range in terms of scores and grades, officers rarely looked to the personal essays as a deciding factor. He wrote about his experience for The New Republic, and here’s the most interesting part:

Yet even in these middling cases, personal essays rarely got even cursory attention from admissions officers. There were simply too many files to consider in too small a time frame, and too many other evaluative factors that mattered much more. How likely was an applicant to accept our offer of admission? Had we already accepted anyone from his or her remote zip code? Had the applicant received any special endorsement from a college alumnus or a faculty member? Did someone in the office owe a favor to the applicant’s guidance counselor? Those are the questions that get debated before a verdict is reached. But during the hundreds of deliberations I sat in on over two admission cycles, I literally never heard a decision made on the basis of a personal essay alone.

The good news? Three former admissions officers I spoke to told me that, contrary to Steven’s observations, officers read every essay that comes across their desks. “We definitely read the essays,” says Joie Jager-Hyman, president of College Prep 360 and former admissions officer at Dartmouth College. “You don’t do that job unless you enjoy reading the essays. They’re kind of fun.” Elizabeth Heaton, senior director of educational counseling at admissions-consulting firm College Coach, and former admissions officer at the University of Pennsylvania, says she took notes on every single piece of writing a student submitted, whether she advocated for them or not.

The bad news? No matter how gorgeous your prose is, you can’t get into college based on the strength of your essay alone. “No-one ever gets into college because you write a great essay,” Heaton says. “You can not get in because you write a really bad one.”

And even Joan Didion herself wouldn’t get into college on her writing skills if she had lackluster grades or scores. The officers told me they did sometimes look to the essays to explain weaknesses in the application (like if there was a year of bad grades that coincided with an illness,) but they said that kind information was usually best kept in the “additional information” section of the application.

Some officers recalled moments when they were so moved by an essay that they advocated for the student to be admitted despite other weaknesses on the application, but none had ever recalled a time where that strategy had worked. “There were a couple of incidents were I really wanted to admit a student and recommended that they move forward because their writing and personal qualities were so interesting, but I was not successful,” says Shoshana Krieger, a counselor for Expert Admissions who formerly worked in the admissions office at the University of Chicago and at Trinity University in San Antonio, TX. “There are certain cases where if a student is simply too far off academically, it’s then just not going to make a difference.”

“I never saw a phenomenal essay suddenly make up for everything” Heaton agreed. “These days, there’s just so little wiggle room to be able to make that call.” She also noted that it looks suspicious when a kid with mediocre grades and scores submits a spectacular essay, and raises doubts that the student might not have written it herself.

Later in his piece, Steven notes that the college essay may be more of a psychological outlet than a practical asset in the college application process, since it’s one of the only things that’s still in the applicant’s control during the fall of their senior year (most of their transcript and scores are already behind them.) Joie Jager-Hyman said she agreed with that assessment. “There’s so much anxiety right now in the air,” she said. “It’s the thing they feel like they have power over.” She also noted that focus on the essay could help kids become better writers in the long-run, even if it might not necessarily make or break their college admissions chances, and “that’s not totally a bad thing.”

So even if all the revising and nitpicking on the college essay may not help your kid get into college, it will almost certainly make him or her a better writer. So don’t put away that red pen yet.

Correction: The original version of this post misstated the location of Trinity University in Texas. It is in San Antonio.

TIME Education

West Virginia University Student Nolan Burch Dies

West Virginia Mountaineers Campus
General view of the Woodburn Hall on the campus of the West Virginia University Mountaineers circa 2011 in Morgantown, West Virginia. West Virginia/Collegiate Images/Getty Images

Greek organizations at many U.S. colleges have come under scrutiny in the wake of several deaths and injuries of pledges in the past year

The West Virginia University freshman who was found unconscious and not breathing inside a fraternity house — leading to a suspension of all Greek activities on campus — has died, university officials said Friday afternoon. Nolan Michael Burch, 18, of Williamsville, New York, had been in critical condition in intensive care at Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown, police and a hospital spokesman said.

“Words cannot describe the heartache we, as a West Virginia University family, feel at the loss of one of our own — Nolan Michael Burch — who passed away today,” WVU President E. Gordon Gee said in a…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME Education

One Expert’s Secrets to Staying Sane While Applying to College

Don't get so caught up in SAT scores and grades

In an era of rising tuition and worries about “paper classes,” it’s easy for students (and parents) to get overwhelmed about making the right decisions during the college admissions process.

Admissions expert Pamela Donnelly, author of the recently published 4 Keys to College Admissions Success, offers several tips for families looking for a way to stay sane.

The process “is a blip on the chart of a much larger movie called life,” Donnelly says, encouraging students to not get so caught up on SAT scores and grades that it becomes overwhelming. Once applications are in, Donnelly wants students to “let it go” and celebrate the completion of the process rather than stressing about where they may get in.

Catch more of her tips in the video above.

TIME Education

West Virginia University Suspends All Frats, Sororities After Incident

West Virginia Mountaineers Campus
General view of the Woodburn Hall on the campus of the West Virginia University Mountaineers circa 2011 in Morgantown, West Virginia. West Virginia/Collegiate Images/Getty Images

After 18-year-old was found unconscious in frat house

All fraternities and sororities at West Virginia University were suspended Thursday after an 18-year-old freshman was found unconscious and not breathing inside a fraternity house, just a week after a different fraternity was suspended after 19 pledges got into a street brawl, university officials and police said.

Nolan Michael Burch, 18, of Buffalo, New York, was in critical condition in intensive care Thursday at Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown, police and a hospital spokesman said. Morgantown police said they were called to the Kappa Sigma house about midnight Wednesday and found a man performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation on Burch, who was lying on…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

 

MONEY College

Average College Grad Now Leaves School With $28,400 in Debt

man overboard waving arms in the air for help
Gary John Norman—Getty Images

A new report from the Project on Student Debt shows that many recent grads are drowning in student loans, but also offers advice for avoiding this destiny.

Student debt has hit another record—with the typical 2013 college grad who borrowed commencing post-collegiate life with loan bills totaling $28,400, according to a Project on Student Debt report released Thursday.

That number is up 2% over the class of 2012, who owed $27,850.

Not all the news was so grim: a new College Board study of financial aid also released Thursday indicated that the total amount of undergraduate federal student loans fell by about 7% in 2014, while enrollment only fell about 1%.

But several debt experts warned against celebrating this as a herald to the end to the student debt crisis.

The recent decline in federal borrowing may simply reflect parents’ shift to other kinds of borrowing, like home equity loans, noted Lauren Asher, president of The Institute for College Access and Success, which runs the Project on Student Debt.

Also, nearly one-fifth of new graduates’ debt load is made up of private student loans, which charge much higher rates than federal loans and have much less flexible repayment plans, she added.

Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of Edvisors.com, attributes the recent dip in borrowing to the economic rebound. But since states continue to stint on funding for public colleges, and since college prices are rising faster than financial aid budgets and incomes, borrowing will likely soon bounce back up, he predicts.

State budget cuts “will continue to shift the burden of paying for college from the government to students and their families. Family income and savings do not increase enough to cover the added cost. This forces students to shift their enrollment to lower-cost colleges and to increase their debt at graduation,” Kantrowitz warns in his own recent analysis of student debt numbers.

The key takeaway for students, says Asher is that students should continue to pursue degrees—for the great advantage they provide in the job market—but should also be making sure to limit their debt loads.

Perhaps the single most important step: choosing a college with a net price you can afford using your family’s savings, earnings, your scholarships and no more than the maximum standard federal student loans: $5,500 a year for freshmen, $7,500 a year for upperclassmen. (Here’s more advice on how to avoid crushing student debt.)

The Project on Student Debt also noted that there were many low-debt schools students could choose from. These tend to have some combination of low tuition and/or generous financial aid. They range from private schools such as Princeton University and Berea, to the public campuses of the City Universities of New York and the California State Universities.

On the other hand, colleges that load students up with debt tend to have high tuition and small financial aid budgets. That list includes public schools such as the University of New Hampshire and private schools like the Ringling College of Art and Design.

You can also search for low-debt colleges using MONEY’s list of the 100 colleges with the lightest debt loads.

This story was updated on Nov. 14 to delete an incorrect description of the rate of borrowing by 2012 college graduates.

MONEY College

Why College Costs Keep Eating Up More Of Your Paycheck

141113_FF_College
Aydin Buyuktas / Alamy

Tuition is rising faster than incomes. But a new private college price war and the improved economy have meant lower prices for many students.

College became a little less affordable again for most students in 2014, as the typical school raised prices faster than financial aid—and faster than average income growth.

In its annual analysis of the state of college prices, the College Board found that most higher education charges continued to outpace the 1.5% average growth in incomes. The cost of attending the typical public university–including dorms, dining hall privileges, textbooks, and miscellaneous expenses—reached $23,410, up 2.6% from last year. Private college costs hit $46,272, up 3.4%.

Even after subtracting scholarships and grants, the average cost of a public education rose by 3.5%. The average net cost of attending a private college was up 4.1%.

A Few Bright Spots

With college costs continuing to eat up a higher percentage of most families’ incomes, “you can see why there is a lot of stress for people” says Sandy Baum, a co-author of the College Board report.

But, she added, “things are looking a little bit better” for some students. The lowest-cost option—attending a local community colleges while living at home—remained comparatively affordable. The total for tuition, fees, textbooks, and commuting to campus averaged $6,410 this year, a 3.1% increase over 2013. But since most of those students received grants or were able to take advantage of at least some of the $2,500 American Opportunity Tax Credit, the net cost of attending a community college averaged $1,320.

And the College Board noted that in real terms—in other words, after adjusting for inflation—private colleges are about 4% less expensive than they were in 2008. The reason: A decline in the number of 18-year-olds has sparked a scramble to fill seats at many small and non-prestigious private colleges, says Susan Fitzgerald, who analyzes college finances for Moody’s Investors Services.

Elite colleges are in such high demand that they can charge whatever they want. But schools without national reputations, Fitzgerald says, “are facing a very competitive environment, and one of the ways they are competing is on price.” So while such colleges typically hike published tuition prices, they are also raising the amount of financial aid they offer. As a result, the net prices charged to new freshmen have remained fairly flat.

A Pause at the Publics

In 18 states, the average cost of public college tuition rose by less than the 2% inflation rate, the College Board found. For example, after many years of dramatic tuition increases, the University of California, Berkeley charged tuition and fees of $12,972 this year. While that’s an 80% increase over 2007, it’s a rise of only 1% from last year. At the other end of the country, tuition and fees at the University of Maine averaged $10,606 this year, up only $6 from 2013, and $24 from the fall of 2011.

Many public universities have been able to moderate tuition inflation because the economic rebound has increased state tax coffers. And states have used some of those gains to at least partially alleviate the severe higher education budget cuts of the past few years, Baum says.

But, she notes, on average states are providing about 20% less funding per student to public colleges than they were prior to 2007.

A recovery in state budgets has put tuition inflation on pause in many states, she says. Unfortunately, there’s no guarantee that tuition hyperinflation won’t return. “We will again at some point experience tighter state budgets,” Baum warns.

In fact, in an ominous sign, some college leaders are already pushing for tuition hikes in 2015. Janet Napolitano, president of the University of California system, last week requested permission to raise tuition by 5% a year for the next five years.

Public universities: Sticker price Public universities: est. average net cost (after grants and tax aid) Private colleges: Sticker price Private colleges: est. average net cost (after grants and tax aid)
2013-14 $22,826 $16,717 $44,750 $33,710
2014-15 $23,410 $17,300 $46,272 $35,082
1-year $ increase $584 $584 $1,522 $1,372
1-year % increase 2.6% 3.5% 3.4% 4.1%

Source: The College Board

More on saving for college from Money 101:

MONEY College

How to Give the Gift of College This Holiday Season

stacks of money wrapped with a gold bow
Deborah Albers—Getty Images

The kids in your family could probably use cash towards school more than a new toy (or at least parents might prefer that). Here's how to make it happen.

Saving for college can be tough, but many families do not tap a potentially generous resource: relatives and friends.

Various companies are trying to change that by making it easier for parents to ask for, and receive, contributions to college savings plans. As the holidays approach, these providers are stepping up their efforts to publicize these options and convince families to try them.

“I think people can feel comfortable going out and saying they prefer gifts that are more meaningful,” says Erin Condon, vice president of Upromise, a college savings and cash rewards program, run by Sallie Mae.

“They can say, ‘Instead of giving our son a truck, how about helping us save for college? Or giving him a smaller truck and putting $20 into his college savings plan?'”

Named after Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code, 529 college savings plans allow contributors to invest money that can grow tax-free to pay for qualified higher education costs.

Although typically sponsored by states, the plans are run by investment companies and account balances can be spent at any accredited college or vocational school nationwide.

Upromise released a survey last week that found seven out of 10 parents would prefer their children received money for college rather than physical gifts. Upromise offers a way to let others do just that: it is called Ugift, a free online service that families can use to solicit their social networks for college contributions.

Friends and family are emailed bar-coded coupons they can print out and send in with a paper check. The service is available to customers of the 29 Upromise-affiliated 529 plans, which include two of the country’s largest: New York’s 529 College Savings Program and Vanguard 529 College Savings Plan in Nevada.

Upromise has found that customers who enlist others to help them save via the site’s rewards program and shopping portal typically accumulate three times as much as customers who do not, Condon says.

The 529 plans run by Fidelity Investments also offer a free service that allows parents to set up a personalized contribution page and share links via email or social media that allow direct contributions to a child’s college savings account via electronic check.

Fidelity released its own poll recently, which found 9 out of 10 grandparents surveyed said they would be likely—if asked—to contribute to a college savings fund in lieu of other gifts for a holiday, birthday or special occasion. Fidelity manages 529 plans for Arizona, Delaware, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire.

These programs tap into the crowd-funding zeitgeist that has seen people appealing to their social networks to help pay for creative projects, charitable causes as well as personal costs such as medical expenses, travel and weddings.

As college costs rise, more people see the need for such help, according to Joe Hurley, founder of the 529 information site SavingForCollege.com.

“It’s a reaction to material gifts, and also the rising cost of college that’s creating so much anxiety for parents,” says Hurley.

Create a College Registry

A few sites facilitate contributions to any 529 plan. GradSave, for example, lets parents set up a free college savings registry that accepts contributions from friends and family. The money is held in an FDIC-insured account until the parents transfer it to their 529 accounts.

Leaf College Savings, meanwhile, offers an education gift card that anyone can use to make a 529 contribution for someone else. The giver loads an amount between $25 and $1,000 onto the card and gives it to the parent, who can then redeem it at the Leaf site and transfer the funds to his or her 529 plan. If the parents do not have a plan, the site helps them set one up.

The gift card, however, comes with an “activation fee” of at least $2.95 plus another $2.95 to get a physical card rather than one sent by email or Facebook or printed out on your computer.

But givers do not need an intermediary to contribute to a college savings plan, says Hurley, since virtually every 529 plan accepts third-party gifts. Those who want to contribute directly to a child’s account typically will need to include the account number and perhaps the child’s Social Security number, but Hurley notes there is a way to bypass that requirement.

“Just make the check out to the 529 plan, hand it to the parents and say, ‘Here, put it into the plan,'” he says. “That’s pretty easy.”

One thing that may not be easy is figuring out who gets the tax break for the gift. Most states offer tax deductions for 529 contributions when the contributor is a parent. Some offer the break to any contributor. And some do not offer any tax break at all.

The solution? Talk to your tax professional.

Related: More on college savings plans

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