TIME Food & Drink

This New 3D Printer Is a Game Changer for Latte Art

Put birthday messages or Instagram photos on any latte

Sure, we’ve watched our fair share of latte art how-tos on YouTube, but trying out the technique IRL could prove disastrous for some.

Enter The Ripple Maker, an innovation that is a total game changer for coffee lovers and 3-D printing enthusiasts alike.

The machine, which goes for just under $1,000, creates high-resolution designs and messages with tiny coffee droplets (which could be anything from customized text to a replica of your favorite Instagram) on the top layer of pre-made lattes. As the company states, “Milk froth is your canvas. Coffee extract is your medium.”

What’s even better: The Ripple Maker takes only 10 seconds to “print” your coffee art.

We foresee many coffee dates in the near future (if, you know, you’re willing to shell out those big bucks).

This article originally appeared on People.com

TIME nestle

Nestle Is Using Naked Baristas to Sell Coffee Creamer

Can models in nothing but body paint make a coffee product ad go viral?

What do naked people have to do with coffee creamer?

Nestle is using the former to try and sell you the latter. It’s part of a new ad campaign for the Nestle-owned Coffee-Mate Natural Bliss, a line of naturally flavored dairy creamer launched in 2011.

Back on April 24, marketers from Nestle and ad agency 360i took over a small coffee shop, Irving Farm Coffee Roasters, on Irving Place in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The marketers set up shop in the store’s basement while naked models, covered only in body paint (a la Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue), served free coffee—and of course pushed Coffee-Mate creamer—to surprised customers. Additional models and actors in body paint sat in the cafe among the regular customers to add to the gag.

Now the advertisement resulting from that stunt is set to hit the Web in full (and naked) force on Friday. The video begins, “How would you react if your typical morning coffee was anything but?” The text then changes “but” to “butt.”

It’s part of Nestle’s all-digital ad campaign planned for the flavored creamer. Codie Richards, a marketing manager with Nestle, told AdWeek that the one-day pop-up shop “was totally new for us” and added, “We know that consumers want something natural in their creamer.”

Well, Nestle hopes they want the natural creamer. But will Millennials — that oh-so-coveted of target audiences — want to share the naked-barista video? To that effort, Nestle will push the minute-and-a-half video, plus a 30-second preview clip, to Facebook, YouTube and other social platforms in the days to come. It’s given the campaign the requisite social hashtag, too (#NaturalBlissCafé), and paid ad slots for the video will begin this month and run through September.

A spokesperson told Fortune the new campaign is a way to tell the Natural Bliss story “in a cheeky and authentic way” (get it?) and is “designed to get consumers to take a closer look.”

TIME Starbucks

Starbucks Is Now Offering its Cold Brew Coffee Nationwide

Courtesy of Starbucks Starbucks Cold Brew.

Coffee grounds steep in cool water for 20 hours

Just in time for the hottest days of summer, Starbucks is rolling out Cold Brew as a core menu item in its locations in Canada and the United States, the company announced Tuesday.

The coffee drink is made without heat; instead, the coffee grounds steep in cool water for 20 hours to create a sweet and concentrated drink. Cold Brew is considered a smoother drink than hot-brewed coffees because of the long steeping process.

Since an initial launch this spring, Cold Brew was only available across the Northeast and parts of the Midwest, where iced coffee sales are strongest year-round. The new drink will cost $3.25 for 16 ounces, according to USA Today — that’s 60 cents more than the $2.65 price tag for a similarly sized iced coffee.

But you don’t have to order fancier coffee to pay more at the Starbucks counter. Prices at the chain are generally rising. On Monday, Starbucks bumped up its brewed coffee prices across the board by as much as 20 cents.

The introduction of Cold Brew in Starbucks stores follows a national trend toward the naturally sweeter iced drink. This summer, Peet’s Coffee switched to only serving cold-brewed iced coffee drinks.

TIME Starbucks

Starbucks Is About To Jack Up Its Prices

Operations Inside A Starbucks Corp. Coffee Shop
Jason Alden/Bloomberg

Steep coffee.

Cue groans and grumbles.

On Tuesday, Starbucks, the Seattle-based coffee chain, is preparing to boost its prices, AP reports. The cost of most affected drinks will rise somewhere between a nickel and 20 cents, the company says. The new price amounts to a price increase of roughly 1%.

For most people, this means the price of a brewed coffee will jump 10 cents, bumping the cost of a large coffee in most U.S. shops to $2.45, according to AP, although that figure varies regionally. The company says it will use the extra revenue to offset wage increases and rising rent.

Last year Starbucks raised its prices by a similar amount. Coffee prices had then been on the rise in commodity markets.

Some critics weighed that the last price hike went too far. One commentator decried it a “luxury tax.”

This year’s slate price increase, on the other hand, has nothing to do with the cost of coffee. Arabica futures, notes MarketWatch, have declined to 42% since last year’s high.

The new prices will affect certain brewed coffees, not the bagged variety.

Is the increase all because of rent? Perhaps that claim holds some water. On a recent episode of Fortune Live, Zillow CEO Spencer Rascoff told host Leigh Gallagher that the the presence of a Starbucks within a quarter mile of a residence increased its property cost by about 96% on average between 1997 and 2014. Perhaps the company is a victim of its own halo effect.

MONEY consumer psychology

5 Foolish Money Myths You Can Stop Believing Right Now

114895696
lina aidukaite—Getty Images

Drink your latte.

Whether you think of yourself as money-savvy or you’re acutely aware of where your personal-finance knowledge is lacking, it’s always good to make sure you aren’t managing your money on assumptions that are faulty to begin with.

Here are a few common money myths to kick to the curb.

Myth No. 1: Credit cards are evil

With the average credit card debt sitting at just over $15,000 per household, it’s easy to think that plastic is the irresponsible way to pay. Not so fast.

It’s not the method of payment that’s the problem; in fact, having credit cards can actually help your credit score. A full 10% of your credit score depends upon having a mix of credit types — installment credit, like a car loan, and revolving credit, like credit cards.

In addition, credit cards offer more security than any other form of payment, allowing you to dispute fraudulent activity without footing the bill.

Myth No. 2: Skipping your morning coffee will make you rich

Cutting back on small expenses might offer some breathing room in your budget over the long term, but money not spent doesn’t necessarily equal money saved. To grow that money, it would need to be put into a place where growth can occur — like an investment account or, at the bare minimum, a savings account.

You may think cutting out a daily expenditure is putting you on a path to financial independence, but that’s only step one.

Myth No. 3: It’s too risky to invest your money

The truth opposing this myth is simple — it’s too risky to not invest your money.

If you’re already diligent about socking away money each month, that’s a great start. But with interest rates sitting so low, money put into a savings account will likely lose more to inflation than it can make up in growth. That’s where investing comes in.

Through the power of compounding, a single $500 investment made at the age of 20 earning a conservative 5% return would be $4,492.50 at the age of 65. Imagine that scenario with ongoing contributions and larger returns. It would put any savings account to shame.

Myth No. 4: All debt should be paid before saving

Unfortunately, emergencies and unexpected expenses occur at all stages of life — even when you’re working to pay off student loans or crawl out from underneath credit card debt.

A study recently released by Bankrate found that 60% of Americans wouldn’t have the funds available to cover even small hiccups — like a $500 medical bill or car repair. Think about how many of those expenses you’ve run into in the last six to 12 months; probably at least one.

If you want to avoid incurring more debt as a result of life’s curveballs, work to save while paying off debt. This will give you a better chance of smooth sailing to the finish line.

Myth No. 5: You should borrow the most money offered to you

Wondering how much house you can afford? Don’t let the loan amount offered by the bank be your guiding light.

Those in the business of making loans are incentivized to offer the biggest loan possible that you’ll be approved for. So while they may be checking out your debt-to-income ratio, this simple equation doesn’t always offer an accurate snapshot of what you can actually manage to pay each month.

The same goes for credit card limits — having a $20,000 limit doesn’t mean your finances can easily handle paying back $20,000 worth of purchases.

More From Trulia:

TIME Diet/Nutrition

This Is the Caffeine Capital of America

Here are the places in the U.S. with the most coffee lovers

Everyone knows that America doesn’t run on patriotism and hard work—it runs on caffeine. When Starbucks baristas spell your name wrong, it’s a harbinger of bad luck for the rest of your day; if your hands and mouth don’t suffer from spilled-coffee burns on a weekly basis, you’re not doing it right.

It seems like wherever you go around the country, one thing is for certain: you’ll undoubtedly be able to get your fix and be on your way. In fact, according to the National Coffee Association’s 2013 online survey, 83% of U.S. adults drink coffee, averaging three cups a day per person.

But, of course, some cities are much more wired than others. Out of many buzzing contenders, FindTheHome collaborated with FindTheCompany, to identify the cities in California with the most coffee shops per capita. The competition was intense, but only one city was crowned the beating heart that keeps the American dream…awake.

28. Boulder, CO

Cafés per 10K people: 10.86
Population: 100,363

27. Pasadena, CA

Cafés per 10K people: 10.87
Population: 138,004

26. Bend, OR

Cafés per 10K people: 10.88
Population: 78,128

25. West Palm Beach, FL

Cafés per 10K people: 10.91
Population: 100,778

24. San Rafael, CA

Cafés per 10K people: 11
Population: 58,162

23. Jupiter, FL

Cafés per 10K people: 11.03
Population: 56,219

22. Redmond, WA

Cafés per 10K people: 11.17
Population: 55,505

21. Palo Alto, CA

Cafés per 10K people: 11.19
Population: 65,234

20. Hoboken, NJ

Cafés per 10K people: 11.19
Population: 50,929

19. Fort Lauderdale, FL

Cafés per 10K people: 11.21
Population: 168,603

18. Miami, FL

Cafés per 10K people: 11.61
Population: 407,526

17. Berkeley, CA

Cafés per 10K people: 11.75
Population: 114,037

16. Portland, OR

Cafés per 10K people: 11.80
Population: 594,687

15. Asheville, NC

Cafés per 10K people: 11.89
Population: 84,883

14. Brookline, MA

Cafés per 10K people: 11.92
Population: 58,738

13. Hialeah, FL

Cafés per 10K people: 12.45
Population: 228,943

12. Portland, ME

Cafés per 10K people: 12.53
Population: 66,227

11. Cambridge, MA

Cafés per 10K people: 12.58
Population: 105,737

10. Kendall, FL

Cafés per 10K people: 13.37
Population: 77,018

9. Santa Fe, NM

Cafés per 10K people: 13.95
Population: 68,800

8. Newport Beach, CA

Cafés per 10K people: 14.07
Population: 86,001

7. Delray Beach, FL

Cafés per 10K people: 14.22
Population: 61,875

6. San Francisco, CA

Cafés per 10K people: 14.69
Population: 817,501

5. Sarasota, FL

Cafés per 10K people: 14.83
Population: 52,588

4. Seattle, WA

Cafés per 10K people: 15.01
Population: 624,681

3. Santa Monica, CA

Cafés per 10K people: 15.87
Population: 90,752

2. Boca Raton, FL

Cafés per 10K people: 16.15
Population: 86,671

1. Miami Beach, FL

Cafés per 10K people: 21.70
Population: 89,412

This article originally appeared on FindTheBest

More from FindTheBest:

TIME Food

Here’s Why We’re Suddenly Consuming Less Coffee

Leading Coffee Supplier J.M. Smucker Co Raises Coffee Prices Nine Percent
Mario Tama—Getty Images In this Photo Illustration, a woman holds a cup of coffee on the street August 3, 2010 in New York City.

Consumption is dropping for the first time in years

Keurig Green Mountain’s K-Cups have gotten plenty of flak for being wasteful. In 2014, the company sold enough non-recyclable containers to circle the earth 10.5 times. The cups almost always end up in landfills. But Keurig machines might also be creating less waste, in a manner of speaking.

According to a biannual report on coffee released Friday by the USDA, coffee consumption is declining in the United States for the first time since 2009-2010. The reason? The rise of Keurig machines means fewer Americans are pouring their extra drip coffee down the drain.

According to the report, coffee consumption will drop in 2015-16 from 24 million 60kg bags to 23.7 million. While the decline is slight, it makes the United States the only top coffee-drinking country to see demand fall after steady growth.

Meanwhile, spending on coffee is up. Reuters reports that while Americans spent a record $11.9 billion on coffee in 2014, they’ll be spending $13.6 billion by 2016. Almost a quarter of American homes now own Keurig-style machines. But since the brewers generally only make one cup at a time, Americans who used to make a pot of drip coffee for themselves each morning no longer have to pour half their coffee down the drain. Says one roaster to Reuters: “We’re losing the sink as a consumer.”

MONEY Food & Drink

Starbucks Just Released an App Update That Lets You Skip Waiting in Line

starbucks-skip-the-line
Zhang Peng—LightRocket / Getty Images

Coffee fans in 21 more states will be able to order their drinks ahead of time using Starbucks' mobile app.

Good news, Starbucks fans: The company is expanding a pilot program that lets customers order ahead of time and bypass the checkout line to 21 new states.

That program, known as mobile Mobile Order & Pay, launched last December in Portland and works through Starbucks’ existing iPhone app. Users can simply select their drink, their local store (the app even features wait times at various locations) and pay for their drink using the app. Then they can just stroll through the door and pick up their order—no line-waiting required.

In March, Starbucks expanded the program to Pacific Northwest, including Seattle, and now the company has announced the Mobile Order & Pay is also coming to 3,400 locations in the southern and central United States.

So far, Android users are still locked out of using the service—Mobile Order & Pay is currently iPhone-only—but Techcrunch reports the program will expand to all company-operated stores and the Android platform later this year.

TIME South Sudan

Why George Clooney is Supporting Coffee Farming in South Sudan

South Sudan food insecurity
Charles Lomodong—AFP/Getty Images Internally displaced persons queue to register at a refugee camp in Bentiu, South Sudan in February 2015.

A possible solution to the chaos in the world's youngest country can be found at the nexus of celebrity, cause and commerce

When it comes to celebrities and their causes, there is perhaps no more indelible pairing than George Clooney and the nation of South Sudan. After decades of conflict and a genocide that left 2.5 million dead in the East African nation of Sudan, Clooney turned the light of his celebrity on the issue, rallying international support for a long promised referendum on independence for the southern part of the country, that, on January 9, 2011, gave birth to South Sudan. But an 18-month-long civil war, fueled in part by disputes over the new country’s lucrative oil fields, threatens to turn the world’s youngest nation into its latest failed state. On 10 June the Red Cross issued an urgent appeal, warning that 4.6 million South Sudanese were facing “severe food insecurity,” and that in some of the worst afflicted areas people were reduced to eating water lilies to survive. Clooney, who on the eve of South Sudan’s independence cautioned that the early years in the new country were likely to be chaotic, also laid the groundwork for an alternate future that is slowly starting to bear fruit – literally.

In the southwestern state of Central Equatoria, 300 farmers are tending to some 20,000 newly planted coffee trees in an ambitious attempt to reduce the importance of oil to the national economy by focusing on the sustainable export of coffee. And not just any coffee: Premium espresso beans destined for the aluminum capsules of Nespresso, the other name indelibly associated with Clooney. Associated internationally at least — American fans may not be aware he is the brand’s spokesman everywhere else in the world.

At the nexus of celebrity, cause and commerce, Nespresso’s South Sudan project aims to build the coffee industry from the ground up, by planting trees, training farmers in sustainable growing practices, and helping locals set up basic processing mills and sales cooperatives. They have invested $750,000 so far through TechnoServe, a nonprofit development organization that seeks to solve poverty through creating local business. If the pilot project goes well, Nespresso anticipates investing a total of $2.1 million through 2016 and creating a market big enough for some 15,000 coffee farmers. Already the signs are good. In 2013, South Sudanese farmers sent 1.8 metric tons of unroasted coffee beans to Nespresso in Switzerland. It was the country’s first ever non-oil export to Europe, and though the amount was small, the reception was ecstatic.

Like wine, good coffee comes from specific terroirs — climatic and soil conditions that create a distinct flavor profile. The signature aroma of a good South Sudanese coffee, according to Nespresso’s coffee experts, is of “cereals and plum.” Coffee originates from Africa’s Rift Valley, and the area now known as South Sudan was once known for coffee that was exported across the Middle East centuries ago. But decades of war, and a growing reliance on oil exports, saw the industry decline long before South Sudan became independent.

As anyone who has ever walked into a Nespresso boutique knows, the brand stakes its prestige on carefully cultivated coffee terrorirs, from Columbia to Ethiopia and Brazil. Most of those coffee-producing nations have spent decades building up markets and a reputation for quality that transcends any particular purveyor, be it Starbucks, Illy or Intelligentsia. In South Sudan, Nespresso has an opportunity to stamp its name on an entirely new coffee origin. In doing so it is capitalizing on novelty, quality and the feel-good aspects of investing in a good cause that happens to be backed by an international celebrity. “George did introduce us to South Sudan because of his passion for the country. But even though he is influential, we wouldn’t be interested in the country but for the fact that it has exceptional coffee,” says Daniel Weston, Nespresso’s Director of Creating Shared Value, a position that focuses on developing the communities that provide Nespresso its raw materials.

Coffee, as a commodity sold around the world at fluctuating prices, is not lucrative on a small scale. But if farmers develop a niche product that can be sold at a premium, they have a chance of creating a worthwhile livelihood that sustains their communities while minimizing environmental impacts. That’s where TechnoServe, which has been working in coffee for nearly 50 years, comes in. In South Sudan, their agronomists have essentially elevated a local product from the coffee equivalent of table grapes to a distinct cultivar that stands on its own when passed through an espresso machine. The farmers can then sell those beans to Nespresso, or anyone else, at a 40% premium. “A small farmer working an acre of land can produce the best and most valuable coffee in the world,” says TechnoServe CEO William Warshauer, speaking on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum for Africa in Cape Town in early June. “We want the multinationals to make profits, and we want farmers to lift their families out of poverty. This project ticks both boxes.”

No one believes that coffee alone will pull South Sudan from the brink, least of all George Clooney. But it’s a start. “If there is to be lasting peace and prosperity in South Sudan, part of the equation will be a diversified economy and opportunities that benefit the people of the country,” says Clooney in a statement. “The investment by Nespresso and TechnoServe in South Sudan’s coffee sector, even while the conflict is ongoing, is providing much-needed income for hundreds of farmers and their families.” As with espresso, sometimes all that is needed is a quick shot to get things going.

TIME celebrities

Hugh Jackman on Building a Coffee Empire: ‘It’s Advocacy, and It’s Also Entrepreneurism’

Premiere Of Dukale's Dream
Robin Marchant—2015 Getty Images NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 04: Actor Hugh Jackman attends the premiere of Dukale's Dream on June 4, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Robin Marchant/Getty Images for The 7th Floor)

Hugh Jackman's coffee side project is the subject of a new documentary

Australians, according to Hugh Jackman, are “arrogant” about their coffee—but Jackman’s interest in the beverage has taken a turn that’s both altruistic and entrepreneurial.

Last week saw the limited opening of the documentary Dukale’s Dream, which charts a trip Jackman took to Ethiopia, where he met the coffee farmer that inspired the film’s title and learned about fair trade. Dukale’s name is also on one of the blends of Jackman’s Laughing Man coffee that as of last week became available in pods via Keurig Green Mountain; there are two Laughing Man cafes in New York City and a Laughing Man Foundation.

TIME talked with Jackman—who insisted he couldn’t tell us whether or not he’s going to show up in X-Men: Apocalypse—about the documentary and his coffee-related goals.

TIME: The documentary traces your journey to understanding. Was that always the way you conceived it?
Hugh Jackman: It originally began as probably a 15 to 20 minute short film highlighting the work of World Vision. In Australia, I don’t know if they have them here, they are a lot of World Vision specials. And [Tim Costello] said, let’s tell the story of coffee because actually that’s a really practical way people can, on a daily basis, make a massive difference. I had no idea six years later the ending of that story would be a major launch with Keurig Green Mountain with Dukale’s name on the brand of the coffee.

Obviously the documentary shows your relationship with Dukale. Was that an instant thing?
I just felt a connection with him. We didn’t speak the same language. I worked with him. He would laugh at me because he could tell I was struggling a little bit at times. I’m an actor, after all—I’m not used to real hard work.

Do you still keep in touch with him?
We write letters to each other.

About?
First of all he has two trees there named after my kids. He wrote to me a couple years back that they’re bearing beans, and he said you’ve got to come out and harvest some beans.

How do you balance entrepreneurship and advocacy?
I see a meld with those. With Paul Newman I saw a really practical strong, powerful way to use his capital of his profile for incredible good beyond his life. That company continues to grow. In its pure form, I believe in capitalism too, so I love the idea that Paul Newman has created a great product. As an actor I had no idea I was going to be famous—you can’t bank on that. It wasn’t my goal. It happens and all of a sudden people approach you: You could be an ambassador! You could be a patron! You could do this! That’s valuable, but next to the model I saw from Paul Newman, not nearly as valuable. Not that you’ve just got your name on it—you can create something that can create jobs as well as really give back to the growers like Dukale. We buy from Dukale and his beans are in our cafe right now in Tribeca. We make sure he gets a great price, and also you can provide jobs. That’s why I love this project in particular. So in a way it’s advocacy, and it’s also entrepreneurism and that’s something we would like to foster more of.

People are coffee aficionados. Were you interested in coffee?
“Snob” is the word I’d use. Coffee snob. I’m Australian—we love our coffee and we’re a little arrogant about it. That’s why one of the reasons we have the cafe there, so I could get a really good flat white in the city. The coffee house in Australia is that kind of meeting place. There’s a slightly different atmosphere in a cafe in Australia and the coffee’s slightly different. We’ve tried to emulate that.

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