TIME Careers & Workplace

How to Make Moving for a New Job as Smooth as Possible

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Organization is key for a smooth transition into a new city

It’s a big world out there–there’s so much to see and do and the best way to experience all a city has to offer is to live there. Relocating is no small task, and corporate relocation can be even harder: you’re expected to face all the challenges of living in a foreign environment, whilst hitting the ground running at your new job. It can be done though – trust me! In January, I moved from New Zealand to Boston to join the Startup Institute team. I arrived with a very heavy suitcase, no friends, and the hope that everything would just kind of “work out” (spoiler alert: it did).

If you’re considering moving for a job, I’d like to share some key insights from my own experience. I hope they’ll help to make your transition as smooth as possible:

The decision: to move, or not to move?

Relocating for work means you’ll need to find a new place to call home. You’ll need to navigate a new environment, master a new job and build a new social network. All at the same time. First, there are a few questions you should ask yourself:

What are the relocation costs?

Relocating can be expensive. The first thing you should do is research how much it will cost to live in your new location. How do housing, food and transport costs compare to what you’re currently paying? Once you know this, you can start budgeting for the move. If you’re stuck, try using a cost of living calculator. Remember to budget for some emergency cash too, in case you get caught in between paychecks.

If you’re looking for financial support, find out if your company offers relocation assistance to help with some of your moving expenses. To support your case, do some research on how much you think the move will cost to give them an idea of how much financial support you require.

Why do you want to move?

Packing up and moving to a new place is so exciting! However It can also be a little scary, mainly because there are some things you can’t really predict or plan for. Because of this it’s really important you have a very clear reason in your mind as to why you want to relocate for this job. Is it the company culture that attracts you? Perhaps it’s the industry you’re excited to be a part of, or a specific opportunity that will grow your career? Maybe you’ve always wanted to live in that city? Whatever the reason, it needs to be strong enough to get you through any early rough patches as you settle in and familiarize yourself with your new location.

What else does the new city have to offer?

Even if you’re moving for a job, you will still spend a large portion of your time outside of the office. Do some research about the city and see what’s on offer! Do you know anyone living in the city that you could reconnect with? What kind of activities could you try there? What’s the ‘vibe’ of the city? How about the weather? These are all factors that will contribute towards helping you feel at home in your new location.

If you enjoy socializing and eating out, Yelp is a good place to begin to see what the highest rated bars and restaurants in your new city are. If you’re looking to check out new activities, jump onto Trip Advisor and see what’s popular too.

Be organized:

Once you’ve evaluated the opportunity and determined that relocating is the right decision for you, it’s important to get yourself organized. Do yourself a favor and find a place to stay before you relocate. It doesn’t need to be a long-term arrangement, but it will give you peace of mind to know you’ve got somewhere to settle into whilst you’re learning to navigate your new city.

Consider these options when looking into accommodation:

If you’re a super organized person, try and familiarize yourself with the city a little bit before you get there. Find out where work is in relation to where you’re staying, and what the best mode of transport to get there is. If you’re stuck, you can always ask your employers for advice on places to stay and transport options.

Make it feel like home:

Once you’ve arrived in your new city there are a few things you can do to help familiarize yourself with your new surroundings.

Explore your surroundings

If you have some time before work starts, get to know the area you’re living in. Consider doing some site-seeing and visiting tourist attractions so you can give yourself some reference points and learn how to move around the city. Citymapper is a great site that can help you navigate in your new area – simply select your city, choose where you want to go and it will tell you the best way to get there. It’s that easy.

Keep an ear out for upcoming events

When I moved to Boston, I quickly discovered that there are several Twitter accounts and events calendars that focus on continuously publishing new events, concerts, restaurant openings and deals happening in the city. If you’re in Boston I’d recommend giving Boston Attitude and Boston.coma follow on Twitter. Otherwise, search your city in the Twitter search and look down the feed to follow the accounts that look most interesting to you.

Expand your social circle

This is especially important if you’re moving to a place where you don’t know anyone. The obvious place to start is at work. Make an effort to know everyone’s names and find out a little bit about them. If you’re entering a big company then at least get to know the people in your team. Join colleagues for lunch and after work drinks and attend industry events to practice your networking skills while meeting new people.

Outside of work, Meetup.com and Eventbrite are great ways to meet groups of people with similar interests as you. Otherwise, harness your hobbies and join a local sports team, art class, book club – whatever takes your fancy.

Take It One Day At A Time

Whether you’re moving for a job, or just a change of scenery, it’s important to establish some kind of routine in your daily life. One thing I’ve discovered is that you only need to do something once to start establishing familiarity. Before you know, it will all start to feel like home.

This article originally appeared on Startup Institute

TIME Money

Why Companies Should Pay Bonuses Twice a Year

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A semi-annual bonus can be a better motivator for employees than a single year-end payment

Whether you find personal satisfaction in your job or work purely for a paycheck, money is an important motivator. Intellectual stimulation or a sense of accomplishment are great to have but they don’t pay the bills. A common and popular mechanism used by companies to reward employees is the year-end bonus, which serves as a carrot for workers to aspire to as well as a stick for those who don’t perform.

But does it really work as it should and is a semi-annual bonus more effective in motivating employees?

Here is why a year-end bonus is problematic. Even though it ties employees down for a whole year with the company and theoretically makes them work hard for it all year round, twelve months is a long time and employees can lose their motivation during that period for a number of reasons. These include uncertainty and worry about whether they will be rewarded appropriately at the end of the year, lack of financial milestones along the way to indicate how they’re actually doing, and resentment at their bonus being withheld so long, especially if they’re struggling to meet financial obligations during the year.

Handing out bonuses twice a year, by contrast, can mitigate uncertainty, send a clear signal to employees about how well they’re performing, reduce their resentment at being forcibly tied to the company for an entire year, and enable them to lead a more comfortable life with money in their pocket. This in turn can engender more loyalty from employees and incentivize them to do their best work for a company that they feel cares about and values them.

In addition, since a bonus serves as the perfect report card, a semi-annual bonus can be used to encourage employees to adjust their performance during the course of the year instead of only at the end when they receive their annual performance review. That obviously benefits the company but can also help employees improve their work product and increase their chances of a receiving a higher bonus in the next cycle.

Finally, a side benefit for a company of a semi-annual bonus cycle is in budgeting. Since employee compensation is often a large portion of a business’s costs, handing out part of the bonus at mid-year can provide a more realistic assessment of the money left over to meet other operating costs and prompt the company to plan the rest of the year accordingly.

For all these reasons, businesses that hand out bonuses only once a year should consider changing their policy.

S. Kumar is a tech and business commentator. He has worked in technology, media, and telecom investment banking. Kumar does not own shares of the companies mentioned in this article.

TIME

7 Things You Must Take Off Your LinkedIn Profile Immediately

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Drop what you're doing and get rid of these clunkers

Your LinkedIn profile can be the ticket to a better job and career advancement, but if you’ve got the wrong stuff in there, it’s going to just hold you back instead. Career experts say these are the top offenders.

Your unemployed status. Don’t use your headline to write that you’re unemployed, even if you use the somewhat gentler-sounding “looking for my next opportunity,” the blog Things Career Related advises. “This is prime real estate for branding yourself and including some keywords.” The odds that a potential employer will be searching for “unemployed?” Zilch.

A bad picture. The average recruiter spends all of six seconds looking at a resume, according to a study conducted by TheLadders. A weird, unflattering or distracting picture will distract people. “Use a professional photographer to get an image that viewers will find appealing,” Katherine Burik advises on the Interview Doctor blog. We have a hard time seeing pictures of ourselves objectively, she says. Having a crisp, professional head shot can help mitigate that.

The third-person summary. Yes, the summary is kind of like a resume in terms of the information it delivers, but it also needs to convey who you are as a person. Wooden, third person or passive voice will just fall flat, according to a Business Insider interview with LinkedIn’s former career expert, Nicole Williams. “This a great place to reflect your professional brand… [but] remember this is a place to infuse personality.”

Dust. Metaphorical dust, that is. Keeping your profile active is one of the most important signals you can send to a prospective employer, says LinkedIn career expert Catherine Fisher. “A robust and active profile can be your ticket to a variety of professional opportunities,” she says. If you don’t have the time or the writing chops to keep up a blog, don’t worry; there are other ways to show that you’re plugged-in to what’s going on in your industry. “An easy way to do this is to like or comment on the status updates of others in your network,” Fisher says.

Lame cliches. Every year, LinkedIn publishes a roundup of the most overused words people have in their profiles. The current top culprits: motivated, passionate and creative. Although some industries have other words that make the most-overused list — in the sales and talent fields, for instance, “strategic” is the biggest offender — notice what makes all of these words terrible: They’re generic, which means they’ll say nothing about why you in particular would be a good fit for a certain job.

Anything out of date. If you don’t update your resume often, it’s not the end of the world as long as you’re not looking for another job. LinkedIn is different, though; you have to approach it with the attitude that you’re always open to job-seekers, which means keeping your profile up-to-date in every way.

Fibs, white lies and exaggerations. Just don’t. It’s so easy to fact-check almost anything about a person’s work history these days, this is almost guaranteed to be a fail.

TIME Careers & Workplace

4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Starting Your Career Path

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Corporate versus startup

If you’re a college senior cramming for your final final exams, stealing longing glances at your cap and gown hung teasingly on a hook in the corner of your dorm room—daring you to daydream of the light at the end of tunnel—there’s a good chance you’re wondering what’s next?

You may have had enough of academia and are ready to dive into the workforce. If this is true for you, you’ll need to do some soul searching to decide what type of work will best enable you to achieve your goals and accelerate your career. Too often, new grads rush blindly into roles, accepting the first job offers they receive to begin paying off student loans. The important thing to remember is– when it comes to your career—there are no right answers. As you consider the options, the best you can do is to experiment, push your boundaries, and then reflect purposefully to inform your next moves.

Many recent grads looking for jobs after graduation decide to get their starts in corporate work but, for some, smaller companies offer more opportunities for growth. Ask yourself these questions to determine if a corporate job or work for startups will offer you the experiences you need to thrive:

Do you need structured training to learn?

Corporate work is all about structure. You’re likely to go through a formal onboarding process, and there may be company trainings that you’re required to participate in.

Generally speaking, startups don’t have the resources and training programs that larger companies do, but the loads of responsibility and creative freedom at startups offer a more immersive kind of education than multi-day orientations and professional development trainings.

Are you the self-starter type or do you learn better through formal training? If you like a lot of structure, a corporate environment would be more likely to support your learning needs, while comfort and confidence with a trial-and-error approach is critical to success at a startup.

How much influence do you want to have?

Coming into a company at the ground-floor, you’ll have a hand in shaping company culture, operations, and developing the product from scratch. You’re likely to work closely with company executives and every choice you make will have an impact. Are you comfortable with that level of responsibility?

Conversely, recent grads coming into corporate jobs after graduation are probably coming in at entry-level. Your responsibilities will be far less weighty, allowing you to build experience before you take on a key role.

Can you work under ambiguity?

Startups are constantly in flux. Whether you’re in hyper-growth mode or pivoting in search of greater success, startup employees need to expect the unexpected. It’s up to you to manage the chaos and work through problems on the fly with limited information and resources. Larger companies, on the other hand, tend to have more stable infrastructures and procedures in place.

What are your career goals?

Larger companies often have siloed departments and established career paths. You always have the opportunity to move around and change direction, but your specific role at any point will be very focused.

Alternatively, employees at startups often have to juggle a number of diverse responsibilities while working closely with teammates of all disciplines. If you’re interested in getting your hands dirty and exploring all aspects of the business, startup work may be a great choice for you.

Startups aren’t for everyone, but neither are large corporations. If you’d rather find the best of both worlds– the innovation and dynamism of a startup with the structure of a large company– you may want to look at employment opportunities at scaleup companies. Whichever way you go, do your research to decide if it’s the right choice for you.

Are you a recent or soon-to-be graduate looking to set yourself up for a successful and fulfilling career? Our guide to getting (and loving) your first job after graduation will help you figure out what kind of role is right for you and will give you the tips you need to ace the interview.

This article originally appeared on Startup Institute‘s blog The Whiteboard

TIME Business

This Is What It’s Like to Work in Silicon Valley as a Teen

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It can be socially isolating — and I've struggled with impostor syndrome

Answer by Alexandr Wang, Performance Engineer at Quora, on Quora.

I’ve been sitting in front of my laptop for a few hours writing an answer to this question. The short answer is that it’s not that different from being a 20-something-year-old working in Silicon Valley. Only a few years separate an 18-year-old and a 21-year-old, and in most respects, they’ll have a pretty similar experience working in tech. But, for this answer to be interesting and meaningful, I’ll mostly be focusing on the differences. Of course, I’ll mostly be speaking from my own experience, which could be very different from other teens working in Silicon Valley.

As with most things, it’s not easily describable with the adjectives taught in school. It’s exciting, interesting, challenging, rewarding, confusing, and 20 other words I could rattle off for you which all seem meaningful and meaningless at the same time. But, bear with me, and I promise it’ll all make sense.

First off, working in tech immediately out of high school was liberating and forced me to change my perspective on a number of things. All of a sudden, I gained a large amount of optionality by getting a full-time job in tech. I could afford to travel at my own discretion and make my own financial decisions, and in general I had much more freedom than I would at college. I was asking myself questions like “What would I gain out of college?” and “Do I need to attend college?”, when before it was obvious that I needed to go to college, at the very least for the sake of my career. It forced me to examine my motives more carefully and make much harder decisions than before, rather than just following the default path. (See my answer to Should I take a gap year from MIT? for an example)

Additionally, working in tech, and at Quora specifically, has given me the chance to have a pretty significant impact and scope, probably at least as much as any other opportunity I could’ve had at my age. And by impact, I mean both impact within the company and impact on the world in general (this might seem like a bold and somewhat nebulous claim, but Quora is becoming more and more ubiquitous in a way that I’m confident saying this). Coming out of high school, where I was doing things for the sake of doing things, it was pretty incredible to be working on something which actually has the potential to change the world. It’s both invigorating and frightening at times; on the one hand I’m basically helping to build the internet, on the other I’m inexperienced and young, and I have the ability to screw everything up.

One thing I’ve personally struggled with while working in Silicon Valley has been impostor syndrome. If you’re unfamiliar, it’s basically this feeling that you don’t really deserve what you’ve accomplished, and your achievements have only come as the result of luck. Before working in tech, I had essentially no experience in computer science other than competitive programming (at which I was good, but nowhere close to being the best). It was hard for me to believe that I actually deserved the offers and opportunities I was getting, especially compared to thousands of other applicants who certainly had more experience and knowledge than me. On the other hand, it was easy for me to believe that I simply got lucky on the interviews and was able to slip by, naiveté and inexperience undetected. Oftentimes people expect a young person who’s “succeeded” in tech to be haughty and pretentious, but we’re just teenagers, and we face the same internal struggles as our peers (MIT students, for example).

Unlike a college setting, though, tech can be pretty socially isolating as a teenager, especially when it’s not the summer. Essentially all of my coworkers are 21 or older, many of them married and some have children. Because of the age and maturity gap, it was difficult to relate to my coworkers initially, and even harder to socialize with them. Over time I was able to be more integrated within the company, but even then, it’s hard to build friendships as strong as those from high school or college. I initially tried to overcome this by spending time at Stanford or Berkeley, but it was sometimes equally difficult to relate with students because I was not also a student. I fit imperfectly between two worlds, making it near impossible to latch onto any social graph.

Closely related to impostor syndrome, it was sometimes frustrating to be an unproven teenager in a workplace of adults. You’re constantly fighting against the default and almost subconscious expectation your coworkers have of you, which is an inexperienced and risky teenage hire. You won’t have any ethos to begin with, and the only way to overcome the initial teenager stigma is to perform much better than people expect you to. Even then, if you make a mistake, it can hugely affect how coworkers perceive you because the implicit expectation is that you’re not as experienced or knowledgable as an employee with more schooling or experience. The magnitude of this effect varies between companies, and I’m thankful to say Quora doesn’t suffer much from this because many of the teenage hires have been really successful.

I’ll close with a few realizations I’ve had from working in Silicon Valley over the past year:

  • You (and I) are not special. Working in Silicon Valley as a teenager doesn’t make you special. It doesn’t matter if you were a wunderkind who managed to get offers at 12 companies and start a startup at 16, your age is only relevant to the headlines. Your success will be determined by what you accomplish, independent of your age. Being a teenager in Silicon Valley doesn’t entitle you to any special attention or treatment. The bottom line is you’re not too different from everybody else working in tech, unless you prove it through your actions and endeavors.
  • Tech isn’t Wonderland. After reading about Silicon Valley in the news, and maybe after one’s first few onsite interviews, one might think that Silicon Valley is this glamorous place where thousands of incredibly smart people come together to solve some of the most interesting problems humanity has ever faced. In some sense, this is true; Silicon Valley does have a lot of very smart people, and there are a lot of interesting problems being worked on. But, just like any industry, there are also incompetent people, arrogant people, and malicious people. Sometimes these people are even very successful. You should expect to encounter these people, and you should be prepared to realize that many companies and projects are not actually interesting, innovative, or revolutionary.

Overall, being a teenager in tech can be extremely rewarding or frustrating depending on the opportunities you have. I would not say that it is always glamorous or exciting as is sometimes portrayed, and one should be aware of the trade-offs and caveats of working in Silicon Valley as a teen.

This question originally appeared on Quora: What’s it like to be a teen working in Silicon Valley?

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TIME Careers & Workplace

7 Lessons on How to Hack Your Own Brain

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How you can make yourself more confident, more generous, and less likely to succumb to stress

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Would you like to be smarter, more confident, kinder, more resilient under stress, and more successful? Of course you would, and you can. In a fascinating series of TED Talks, social psychologists describe ways we can trick our own brains to make ourselves better in almost every way. Here are some of the most compelling.

1. Stop fearing stress.

A couple of years ago, health psychologist Kelly McGonigal made a disturbing discovery. For years she’d been warning people that stress kills. And it does, new research showed–but only if you expect it to. People who experienced a lot of stress and believed that stress was harmful were indeed much likelier to die than those who experienced little stress. But those who experienced great stress but believed itwasn’t harming them were in no more danger than the stress-free, she explains in atalk that may change your whole relationship with the stressors in your own life.

2. Recognize your own optimism.

How do I know that you’re an optimist? Because we all are, as cognitive neuroscientist Tali Sharot explains. Being optimistic makes us happier and more resilient–and without a heavy dose of optimism, no one would ever start a business. However, problems arise when we make bad decisions out of excessive optimism, as happened before the financial crisis, for example. The solution? Stay unreasonably optimistic–but keep in mind that you are.

3. Use body language to increase your own confidence.

Social psychologist Amy Cuddy explains how in this moving talk. Besides communicating confidence to others, when we adopt confident body language we fool our own brains into actually being more confident. Something as simple as going someplace private and adopting a confident stance (legs apart, arms extended) for a few minutes before going into a meeting or making a presentation can make a big difference. Try it and see.

4. Remind yourself to be generous.

A rigged game of Monopoly shows what many have observed in life: The more fortunate and richer you are, the more entitled you feel, and the less likely you are to offer help to those who need it. But, social psychologist Paul Piff tells us, it doesn’t have to be that way. A small reminder, such as a 46-second video on child poverty, is enough to reverse that nasty piece of human nature. So provide yourself with those reminders and you’ll remain a good person, no matter how rich and successful you become.

5. Don’t put too much faith in your own memories.

The number of eyewitness accounts and identifications that have been proved wrong by DNA or other evidence is only one example of how unreliable human memory is, as psychologist Elizabeth Loftus describes in her TED Talk. Not only that, it’s surprisingly easy to implant false memories in people, as some psychologists have unintentionally done when they thought they were unearthing repressed memories. So think twice next time you’re “sure” about something you remember.

6. Surround yourself with people you want to emulate.

Everybody cheats, at least a little, at least some of the time. An elaborate series of experiments explores just how much and when, as described by behavioral economist Dan Ariely in a thought-provoking talk. One intriguing finding: People are more likely to cheat if they see someone doing it who they consider part of their own group, such as someone wearing a sweatshirt with their school’s logo. If the cheater is wearing a different school’s logo, it has no effect. On the other hand, people are less likely to cheat if they’ve been asked to recite the Ten Commandments–whether or not they are religious, and even if they can’t remember most of them.

Obviously, our ideas about right and wrong are not as fixed as we think they are. We’re highly suggestible, and easily influenced by the people around us. We should select those people carefully.

7. Learn to delay gratification.

In a Stanford experiment, 4-year-olds were left alone in a room with a marshmallow. If they could resist eating it for 15 minutes, they were told, they’d be given a second one as well, speaker and author Joachim de Posada tells the audience in this short and entertaining talk (complete with hidden-camera footage of the kids).

Only about a third of the kids had the self-discipline to resist. When researchers followed up more than a decade later, those who had were significantly more successful than those who had succumbed. There’s a lesson here for us all.

This post is in partnership with Inc., which offers useful advice, resources and insights to entrepreneurs and business owners. The article above was originally published at Inc.com.

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TIME Careers & Workplace

50 Inspiring Quotes on Leadership for Everyone

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“A leader is a dealer in hope.”

Every entrepreneur knows that the success of their business ultimately rests on their shoulders. Yes, the product you build and the team you hire are important, but your ability to lead is what carries your company.

With that kind of pressure, it’s easy to feel stressed, lonely and overwhelmed at times. Every great leader has faced a challenge that defined their greatness, which is why we often turn to their advice when needed.

Whether you’re an entrepreneur, business owner, or team leader, here are 50 inspirational quotes on leadership for when you need a little pep talk.

1. “A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be.” –Rosalynn Carter

2. “A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves.” – Lao Tzu

3. “It’s hard to lead a cavalry charge if you think you look funny on a horse.” – Adlai E. Stevenson II

4. “Great leaders are almost always great simplifiers, who can cut through argument, debate, and doubt to offer a solution everybody can understand.” – Colin Powell

5. “The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality. The last is to say thank you. In between, the leader is a servant.” – Max DePree

6. “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” – John Quincy Adams

7. “A leader is a dealer in hope.” – Napoleon Bonaparte

8. “A leader…is like a shepherd. He stays behind the flock, letting the most nimble go out ahead, whereupon the others follow, not realizing that all along they are being directed from behind.” – Nelson Mandela

9. “He who has never learned to obey cannot be a good commander.” –Aristotle

10. “Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower

11. “As we look ahead into the next century, leaders will be those who empower others.” – Bill Gates

12. “A good leader is a person who takes a little more than his share of the blame and a little less than his share of the credit.” – John Maxwell

13. “Become the kind of leader that people would follow voluntarily; even if you had no title or position.” – Brian Tracy

14. “The leaders who offer blood, toil, tears and sweat always get more out of their followers than those who offer safety and a good time. When it comes to the pinch, human beings are heroic.” – George Orwell

15. “I start each day by telling myself what a positive influence I am on this world.” – Peter Daisyme

16. “Earn your leadership every day.” – Michael Jordan

17. “Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others.” –Jack Welch

18. “Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations.” – Peter Drucker

19. “My job is not to be easy on people. My job is to take these great people we have and to push them and make them even better.” – Steve Jobs

20. “The led must not be compelled. They must be able to choose their own leader.” – Albert Einstein

21. “Great leaders find ways to connect with their people and help them fulfill their potential.” – Steven J. Stowell

 

22. “To have long-term success as a coach or in any position of leadership, you have to be obsessed in some way.” – Pat Riley

23. “If you think you are leading and turn around to see no one following, then you are just taking a walk.” – Benjamin Hooks

24. “The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not bully; be thoughtful, but not lazy; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant; have humor, but without folly.” – Jim Rohn

25. “A man who wants to lead the orchestra must turn his back on the crowd.” – Max Lucado

26. “To do great things is difficult; but to command great things is more difficult.” – Friedrich Nietzsche

27. “It is absolutely necessary…for me to have persons that can think for me, as well as execute orders.” – George Washington

28. “Leaders aren’t born, they are made. And they are made just like anything else, through hard work.” – Vince Lombardi

29. “A cowardly leader is the most dangerous of men.” – Stephen King

30. “A man always has two reasons for doing anything: a good reason and the real reason.”- J.P. Morgan

31. “Not the cry, but the flight of a wild duck, leads the flock to fly and follow.” – Chinese Proverb

32. “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

33. “No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself, or to get all the credit for doing it.” – Andrew Carnegie

34. “Average leaders raise the bar on themselves; good leaders raise the bar for others; great leaders inspire others to raise their own bar.” –Orrin Woodward

35. “Those who try to lead the people can only do so by following the mob.” – Oscar Wilde

36. “Outstanding leaders go out of their way to boost the self-esteem of their personnel. If people believe in themselves, it’s amazing what they can accomplish.” – Sam Walton

37. “Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing.” – Albert Schweitzer

38. “If your actions create a legacy that inspires others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, then, you are an excellent leader.” – Dolly Parton

39. “I am reminded how hollow the label of leadership sometimes is and how heroic followership can be.” – Warren Bennis

40. “In this world a man must either be an anvil or hammer.” – Henry W. Longfellow

41. “It is absurd that a man should rule others, who cannot rule himself. (Absurdum est ut alios regat, qui seipsum regere nescit.)” – Latin Proverb

42. “The history of the world is but the biography of great men.” – Thomas Carlyle

43. “A ruler should be slow to punish and swift to reward.” – Ovid

44. “You don’t have to hold a position in order to be a leader” – Henry Ford

45. “Rely on your own strength of body and soul. Take for your star self-reliance, faith, honesty, and industry. Don’t take too much advice — keep at the helm and steer your own ship, and remember that the great art of commanding is to take a fair share of the work. Fire above the mark you intend to hit. Energy, invincible determination with the right motive, are the levers that move the world.” – Noah Porter

46. “Don’t blow off another’s candle for it won’t make yours shine brighter.” Jaachynma N.E. Agu

47. “I cannot give you the formula for success, but I can give you the formula for failure, which is: Try to please everybody.” – Herbert Swope

48. “He who has learned how to obey will know how to command.” –Solon

49. “If one is lucky, a solitary fantasy can totally transform one million realities.” – Maya Angelou

50. “The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self-restraint to keep from meddling with them while they do it.” – Theodore Roosevelt

Bonus:

“Screw it, let’s just do it.” – Richard Branson

This article originally appeared on Entrepreneur.com

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How to Set Yourself Apart During Job Interview

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Focus on the strengths

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“Just take a chance on me.”

It was a common line in my cover letters a few years ago, when I was desperate to make the switch out of management and into marketing—without a related degree or experience. Even so, I was so sure that if the employer just gave me a chance, he or she wouldn’t regret it.

But when an employer has a pool of fully qualified candidates, why would he or she take a chance on someone who’s on the edge of meeting the job requirements?

I’ll tell you this much: It takes more than including a pretty unconvincing pick-up line in your cover letter. Here are a few tips to get your foot in the door.

Don’t Draw Attention to Your Lack of Skills or Experience

The key to this whole process isn’t necessarily to convince the hiring manager to take a chance on you, but to get him or her to actually think you’re a good fit for the role. So the very first thing you have to do is stop apologizing for your lack of skills or experience.

Whenever you include a sentence in your cover letter such as “While I’ve never been in a marketing role before…” or “Although I don’t have any management experience…” or even “If you would just take a chance on me…” all you’re doing is telling the hiring manager you can’t do the job.

“Instead of drawing attention to your weaknesses, a better way to move on to your qualifications is to state your skills and ability to contribute directly,” recommends career counselor Lily Zhang. “Stay positive, focus on your strengths, and immediately launch into your transferable skills and infectious enthusiasm for the position.”

Showcase What Sets You Apart

No matter what you’re transitioning from or to, you do have transferable skills.

For example, while my management roles didn’t involve any true marketing, they did require me to network and form relationships with other businesses in the community, manage multiple projects at a time, and communicate effectively with our customers—all of which would be helpful in a marketing role. (Here’s a great cover letter template that can help you show off your transferable skills.)

Even more important is demonstrating your additive skills, says career expert Sara McCord. That means fully embracing your career background and finding a way to express how that background will uniquely suit you for this job.

“Think about it: If you’re slightly underqualified, there’s a reason why,” she says. “If you spent the first two years of your career in a different sector, you bring experience from that industry.”

For example, when I first wanted to write for The Muse, I had absolutely no writing experience—but I did have management experience, which made me an ideal candidate to write management content.

Take a Risk

To get a hiring manager to choose you out of a sea of other applicants, especially when you may not be as qualified as the others, you might as well take a risk to stand out. Otherwise, you may simply pass under the radar. (And let’s be honest: What do you have to lose?)

For example, just take a look at some of the boldest applications we’ve seen around the web: an action figure resume, an interactive resume, and an infographic resume.

These types of applications certainly get the attention of the hiring manager, clearly conveying that the person just might have something the tips the scale in his or her favor. (Just make sure to follow these tips to make sure you’re not going too over the top.)

But maybe you don’t want (or don’t have the means) to be that bold. You can stand out in plenty of other ways, says counselor and Muse columnist Caris Thetford. For example, maybe you submit a project proposal with your application or compile your writing samples in an online profile. This can help you stand out from the other applicants just enough to show the hiring manager that you may deserve another look—and ideally, an interview.

Do Everything Else Right

You can’t afford to slip up when you think your resume might be on the bottom of the pile. That means sending every thank you note on time, following up in a timely (but not annoying) fashion, and proofreading your resume and cover letter a dozen times over to check for errors.

These may seem like small and insignificant gestures, but the smallest flaws can remove a candidate from the hiring process—and you don’t want that to be you.

By proving your worth in your application materials, you’ll have a much better chance of landing an interview—and then, you can showcase your cultural fit and passion face-to-face. Do that well, and you just may convince the hiring manager to take a chance on you.

This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article above was originally published on The Muse.

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TIME Money

These 3 Decisions Will Change Your Financial Life

Make these decisions consciously

There’s nothing worse than a rich person who’s chronically angry or unhappy. There’s really no excuse for it, yet I see this phenomenon every day. It results from an extremely unbalanced life, one with too much expectation and not enough appreciation for what’s there.

Without gratitude and appreciation for what you already have, you’ll never know true fulfillment. But how do you cultivate balance in life? What’s the point of achievement if your life has no balance?

For nearly four decades, I’ve had the privilege of coaching people from every walk of life, including some of the most powerful men and women on the planet. I’ve worked with presidents of the United States as well as owners of small businesses.

Across the board, I’ve found that virtually every moment people make three key decisions that dictate the quality of their lives.

If you make these decisions unconsciously, you’ll end up like majority of people who tend to be out of shape physically, exhausted emotionally and often financially stressed. But if you make these decisions consciously, you can literally change the course of your life today.

Decision 1: Carefully choose what to focus on.

At every moment, millions of things compete for your attention. You can focus on things that are happening right here and now or on what you want to create in the future. Or you can focus on the past.

Where focus goes, energy flows. What you focus on and your pattern for doing so shapes your entire life.

Which area do you tend to focus on more: what you have or what’s missing from your life?

I’m sure you think about both sides of this coin. But if you examine your habitual thoughts, what do you tend to spend most of your time dwelling on?

Rather than focusing on what you don’t have and begrudging those who are better off than you financially, perhaps you should acknowledge that you have much to be grateful for and some of it has nothing to do with money. You can be grateful for your health, family, friends, opportunities and mind.

Developing a habit of appreciating what you have can create a new level of emotional well-being and wealth. But the real question is, do you take time to deeply feel grateful with your mind, body, heart and soul? That’s where the joy, happiness and fulfillment can be found.

Consider a second pattern of focus that affects the quality of your life: Do you tend to focus more on what you can control or what you can’t?

If you focus on what you can’t control, you’ll have more stress in life. You can influence many aspects of your life but you usually can’t control them.

When you adopt this pattern of focus, your brain has to make another decision:

Decision 2: Figure out, What does this all mean?

Ultimately, how you feel about your life has nothing to do with the events in it or with your financial condition or what has (or hasn’t) happened to you. The quality of your life is controlled by the meaning you give these things.

Most of the time you may be unaware of the effect of your unconscious mind in assigning meaning to life’s events.

When something happens that disrupts your life (a car accident, a health issue, a job loss), do you tend to think that this is the end or the beginning?

If someone confronts you, is that person insulting you, coaching you or truly caring for you?

Does a devastating problem mean that God is punishing you or challenging you? Or is it possible that this problem is a gift from God?

Your life takes on whatever meaning you give it. With each meaning comes a unique feeling or emotion and the quality of your life involves where you live emotionally.

I always ask during my seminars, “How many of you know someone who is on antidepressants and still depressed?” Typically 85 percent to 90 percent of those assembled raise their hands.

How is this possible? The drugs should make people feel better. It’s true that antidepressants do come with labels warning that suicidal thoughts are a possible side effect.

But no matter how much a person drugs himself, if he constantly focuses on what he can’t control in life and what’s missing, he won’t find it hard to despair. If he adds to that a meaning like “life is not worth living,” that’s an emotional cocktail that no antidepressant can consistently overcome.

Yet if that same person can arrive at a new meaning, a reason to live or a belief that all this was meant to be, then he will be stronger than anything that ever happened to him.

When people shift their habitual focus and meanings, there’s no limit on what life can become. A change of focus and a shift in meaning can literally alter someone’s biochemistry in minutes.

So take control and always remember: Meaning equals emotion and emotion equals life. Choose consciously and wisely. Find an empowering meaning in any event, and wealth in its deepest sense will be yours today.

Once you create a meaning in your mind, it creates an emotion, and that emotion leads to a state for making your third decision:

Decision 3: What will you do?

The actions you take are powerfully shaped by the emotional state you’re in. If you’re angry, you’re going to behave quite differently than if you’re feeling playful or outrageous.

If you want to shape your actions, the fastest way is to change what you focus on and shift the meaning to be something more empowering.

Two people who are angry will behave differently. Some pull back. Others push through.

Some individuals express anger quietly. Others do so loudly or violently. Yet others suppress it only to look for a passive-aggressive opportunity to regain the upper hand or even exact revenge.

Where do these patterns come from? People tend to model their behavior on those they respect, enjoy and love.

The people who frustrated or angered you? You often reject their approaches.

Yet far too often you may find yourself falling back into patterns you witnessed over and over again in your youth and were displeased by.

It’s very useful for you to become aware of your patterns when you are frustrated, angry or sad or feel lonely. You can’t change your patterns if you’re not aware of them.

Now that you’re aware of the power of these three decisions, start looking for role models who are experiencing what you want out of life. I promise you that those who have passionate relationships have a totally different focus and arrive at totally different meanings for the challenges in relationships than people who are constantly bickering or fighting.

It’s not rocket science. If you become aware of the differences in how people approach these three decisions, you’ll have a pathway to help you create a permanent positive change in any area of life.

This piece was adapted from Tony Robbins’ new book, Money Master the Game: 7 Simple Steps to Financial Freedom.

This article originally appeared on Entrepreneur.com

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The 9 Traits That Define Great Leadership

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Extraordinary leaders are accountable to everyone's performance, including their own

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Many leaders are competent but few qualify as remarkable. If you want to join the ranks of the best of the best, make sure you embody all these qualities all the time. It isn’t easy, but the rewards can be truly phenomenal.

1. Awareness There is a difference between management and employees, bosses and workers. Leaders understand the nature of this difference and accept it; it informs their image, their actions, and their communication. They conduct themselves in a way that sets them apart from their employees–not in a manner that suggests they are better than others, but in a way that permits them to retain an objective perspective on everything that’s going on in their organization.

2. Decisiveness All leaders must make tough decisions It goes with the job. They understand that in certain situations, difficult and timely decisions must be made in the best interests of the entire organization, decisions that require a firmness, authority, and finality that will not please everyone. Extraordinary leaders don’t hesitate in such situations. They also know when not to act unilaterally but instead foster collaborative decision-making.

3. Empathy Extraordinary leaders praise in public and address problems in private. a genuine concern The best leaders guide employees through challenges, always on the lookout for solutions to foster the long-term success of the organization. Rather than making things personal when they encounter problems, or assigning blame to individuals, leaders look for constructive solutions and focus on moving forward.

4. Accountability Extraordinary leaders take responsibility for everyone’s performance, including their own. They follow up on all outstanding issues, check in on employees, and monitor the effectiveness of company policies and procedures. When things are going well, they praise. When problems arise, they identify them quickly, seek solutions, and get things back on track.

5. Confidence Not only are the best leaders confident, but their confidence is contagious. Employees are naturally drawn to them, seek their advice, and feel more confident as a result. When challenged, they don’t give in too easily, because they know their ideas, opinions and strategies are well-informed and the result of much hard work. But when proven wrong they take responsibility and quickly act to improve the situations within their authority.

6. Optimism The very best leaders are source of positive energy. They communicate easily. They are intrinsically helpful and genuinely concerned for other people’s welfare. They always seem to have a solution and always know what to say to inspire and reassure. They avoid personal criticism and pessimistic thinking, and look for ways to gain consensus and get people to work together efficiently and effectively as a team.

7. Honesty Strong leaders treat people how they want to be treated. They are extremely ethical and believe that honesty, effort, and reliability form the foundation of success. They embody these values so overtly that no employee doubts their integrity for a minute. They share information openly and avoid spin control.

8. Focus Extraordinary leaders plan ahead and they are supremely organized. They think through multiple scenarios and the possible impacts of their decisions, while considering viable alternatives and making plans and strategies–all targeted toward success. Once prepared, they establish strategies, processes, and routines so that high performance is tangible, easily defined, and monitored. They communicate their plans to key players and have contingency plans in the event last-minute changes require a new direction (which they often do).

9. Inspiration Put it all together and what emerges is a picture of the truly inspiring leader: someone who communicates clearly, concisely, and often, and by doing so motivates everyone to give their best all the time. They challenge their people by setting high but attainable standards and expectations, and then giving them the support, tools, training, and latitude to pursue those goals and become the best employees they can possibly be.

This post is in partnership with Inc., which offers useful advice, resources and insights to entrepreneurs and business owners. The article above was originally published at Inc.com.

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