TIME World

This Young Woman Fighting Stage-4 Cancer Remains Positive and Inspirational

Nicole Jannis, 29, was diagnosed with breast cancer last year

Having a stage-4 cancer diagnosis at 29 might prompt some people to frantically attempt every far-flung journey on their bucket lists.

But Ontario resident Nicole Jannis – who is continuing to fight the disease – says her goals are much simpler.

“You really just want to sit at home with your husband and your dog and watch Netflix and do what’s normal to you. That’s what you crave,” Jannis told Yahoo! News’s Daily Brew in a story that detailed her fighting spirit and upbeat attitude in the face of cancer.

Jannis wasn’t surprised by her breast cancer diagnosis last year, as cancer runs in her family and she had been told she was BRCA positive at 27.

She always assumed it would be an inconvenience she would treat and beat.

“From the very beginning it was, ‘All right! I’m going to go through cancer, and this is going to be something I do and then be done with it and I’ll move on and have my babies and life carries on.’ I never ever wavered from that,” said Jannis.

To keep the mood light, she and her mom wore wacky outfits to her chemotherapy appointments. She also chronicled her cancer journey with a series of optimistic posts on her blog, Boobie and the Beast.

“I think that’s a huge testament of how I’ve been able to get through this past year, probably denial, but also pure optimism to the point where I was like ‘Oh, I’ll never die from this, that’s crazy,’ ” she said.

Staying on top of her treatment and feeling positive about her prognosis, she was taken aback in January when she was told the cancer had been deemed stage 4 and “terminal,” metastasizing to her bones and spreading to her liver and lungs.

Now faced with a new reality, Jannis admits it took some time to adjust.

“I remember throwing up right away ’cause that was just my go-to,” she said of learning the grim diagnosis. “It was just utter despair at first, like holy s—, let’s just give up.”

But after the shock wore off, Jannis’s upbeat spirit shined through again – and she is choosing to continue her treatment.

“You can only wallow for so long,” she said. “You should never be told you’re going to die, because I think if you believe that then you will.”

“I’m positive because I don’t know how not to be,” she added.

This article originally appeared on People.com.

TIME Switzerland

This Country Has the World’s Happiest People

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Dale Reubin—Getty Images/Cultura RF View of mountains and lakeside village, Switzerland

Life expectancy, social connections, personal freedom and the economy all play a role in happiness

The happiest people in the world live in Switzerland, a new study found.

The third World Happiness Report, released by the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Solutions Network on Thursday, ranked 158 countries based on Gallup surveys from 2012-15 and analyzed the key factors contributing to happiness levels.

Switzerland, Iceland, Denmark, Norway and Canada were the top five happiest countries, while the West African nation of Togo was the least happy.

The report aims to provide policymakers around the world with new metrics that place a higher emphasis on subjective well-being. While income appeared to play a significant role in boosting happiness—the GDP per capita is 25 times higher in the 10 happiest countries than in the 10 least happy—it was far from the only factor. Life expectancy, social connections, personal freedom, generosity and corruption levels also helped explain the happiness scores, according to the report.

The U.S., for example, ranked 15th in the world, one below Mexico and three below Costa Rica, where per capita GDP is roughly a fifth of that in the U.S.

“This report gives evidence on how to achieve societal well-being,” Jeffrey Sachs, the director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, said in a statement. “It’s not by money alone, but also by fairness, honesty, trust, and good health.”

But sharp economic changes in a country can play a role in people’s happiness, the report found. Greece, where the global recession triggered prolonged economic turmoil, saw its happiness levels fall the most since 2005-07, compared to 125 other countries where data was available.

Still, the report warned policymakers against overemphasizing income levels.

“When countries pursue GDP in a lopsided manner, forgetting about social and environmental objectives, the results can be adverse for human well-being,” the report said. “Many countries in recent years have achieved economic growth at the cost of the sharply rising inequalities of income and grave damage to the natural environment.”

TIME trends

Here’s a Fascinating Breakdown of Emoji Use by Country

Hong Kong Rugby Sevens: beer, costumes and, somewhere, a result
Stringer—AP Fans wearing emoji masks watch a rugby match of the Hong Kong Seven in Hong Kong on March 28, 2015

Did somebody say "national stereotypes"?

The French are serious and romantic while Australians are all about partying according to a survey on emoji use worldwide.

In a new report published on Tuesday, British app developer SwiftKey drew some conclusions after analyzing over 1 billion pieces of emoji data taken from communications made in 16 different languages.

According to their findings, Canadians scored highest in categories associated with violence and money, loving the gun and cash emoji more than other nationalities.

Down under, Australians surprised few by embracing icons suggestive of alcohol and drugs, using those symbols are least twice as frequently as the global average.

France was the only country the smiley-faced icon was not the most used emoji. However, French speakers did use the heart emoji with greater frequency than anybody else.

No clear traits emerged for the U.S., but the report said Americans “lead for a random assortment of emoji … including skulls, birthday cake, fire, tech, LGBT, meat and female-oriented emoji.”

Check out the full report here.

Read next: Everything You Need to Know About Snapchat’s New Emoji Feature

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Canada

Vancouver’s 4/20 Marijuana Smoke Fest Sees 64 Taken to Hospital

Thousands attend a 4-20 event in downtown Vancouver, B.C., on April 20, 2015
Jonathan Hayward—AP Thousands attend a 4-20 event in downtown Vancouver, B.C., on April 20, 2015

Patients complained of nausea, vomiting, palpitations and "a decreased level of consciousness"

Vancouver’s 4/20 marijuana-smoking rally led to hospitalization for 64 revelers Monday, turning a celebratory occasion into a headache for ER workers.

“Sixty-four people in the emergency department is a large number, in an already busy emergency department,” Providence Health Care spokesperson Dave Lefebvre told CBC.

Patients were complaining of nausea, vomiting, palpitations and “a decreased level of consciousness,” Lefebvre said.

Authorities speculate that many revelers were consuming marijuana in edible form and thus unaware of the strengths of the dosages ingested.

Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson criticized the event as “very disruptive,” adding that “I know there will be lessons learned from what happened yesterday. There were certainly more challenges this year than ever before.”

Vancouver police reported a higher turnout this year, with as many as 25,000 people crowding into Vancouver Art Gallery’s plaza and making it difficult for police and officials to manage the event.

TIME Canada

Rob Ford Sold His Tie on eBay

The tie sold for $1,445

Former Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has sold the tie he wore when he confessed to smoking crack for $1,445 on eBay.

The tie, which features several NFL team logos, was worn by the former mayor, and current city councillor, when he admitted he smoked crack cocaine at a 2013 news conference.

The tie was originally posted to Ford’s eBay page in February, CTV News Toronto reports, when it went for over $16,000. But Ford posted a Twitter message on Sunday saying some items were re-posted due to fraudulent bidding.

There were 30 bids made for the tie.

TIME Canada

Report Finds Radio Station ‘Condoned’ Presenter’s Sexual Harassment

Former CBC radio host Jian Ghomeshi, left, and his lawyer, Marie Henein, arrive at court in Toronto on Jan. 8, 2015.
Nathan Denette—AP Former CBC radio host Jian Ghomeshi, left, and his lawyer, Marie Henein, arrive at court in Toronto on Jan. 8, 2015.

An independent report found CBC turned a blind eye to Jian Ghomeshi's behavior towards women

More than six months after the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation fired its popular radio host Jian Ghomeshi amid revelations of sexual assault and harassment, an independent report has found that the broadcaster itself had failed to previously investigate complaints made about their star. The report, released on Thursday, determined that Ghomeshi’s behavior was “considered to create an intimidating, humiliating, hostile or offensive work environment” and concluded that “CBC management condoned this behavior.”​​

After Ghomeshi was quietly fired from his gig hosting the CBC’s flagship radio program Q back in October, the 47-year-old star posted on Facebook that he had been dismissed because he enjoyed “adventurous forms of sex” and was being smeared by a jealous ex-girlfriend. Yet soon after the Toronto Star published a story featuring allegations by women who said that they had been punched or choked by the radio star without consent. The Star story also included allegations of sexual harassment by a former Q employee. The revelation spurred more women to come forward with their own allegations about Ghomeshi and, in November, the disgraced host was formally charged and now faces seven counts of sexual assault and one count of “overcome resistance – choking.” Ghomeshi has repeatedly denied that he inflicted any non-consensual violence.

For their part, the CBC said that the Ghomeshi was fired after executives saw what they described as evidence that he had physically injured a woman. But the company soon faced questions over when higher-ups were first made aware of Ghomeshi’s reported harassment of women in the workplace. Janice Rubin, an independent investigator and a Toronto employment lawyer who works in the field of workplace harassment, was hired to examine the CBC’s handling of Ghomeshi. Her report also found that the CBC had failed to provide its staff a workplace “free from disrespectful and abusive behavior.”

“Less prevalent, but also present in a small number of cases, was behavior that constituted sexual harassment,” the report adds, although it states that management was unaware of the allegations of harassment. The report says that when information about Ghomeshi’s behavior was shared “upwards,” it had a tendency to become “diluted,” and also cites three instances where management failed to investigate allegations and concerns about Ghomeshi’s behavior while he was working for the corporation.

The CBC also announced on Thursday that two managers — Chris Boyce, in radio, and Todd Spencer, in human resources — were leaving the company after having been placed on leave following the scandal. (The company declined to offer details on the executives’ departure.)

TIME animals

CEO Fined $5,000 for Kicking a Puppy

Surveillance footage shows the now disgraced executive kicking the animal repeatedly

Des Hague, the former CEO of U.S. catering company Centerplate who was caught on camera kicking a puppy in an elevator, has been fined $5,000 and banned from owning an animal for three years.

Hague pleaded guilty to animal cruelty in February after surveillance footage from a Vancouver hotel elevator surfaced in August 2014. It showed him kicking a Doberman puppy five times and tugging the dog into the air by its leash, reports CBC News.

In the wake of the incident, Hague resigned from the top job at the company, which employs around 30,000 staff. He was also ordered by Centerplate to donate $100,000 to animal charity.

“Clearly this is something I am very, very sorry about,” he told the court on Wednesday. “I can assure the court these incidents will never happen, ever again.”

[CBC]

TIME politics

Why Ted Cruz’s Campaign Will Break Barriers

GOP Presidential Hopeful Ted Cruz Campaigns In South Carolina
Richard Ellis—Getty Images Senator and GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz answers questions from local media following a town hall meeting on April 3, 2015 in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Zocalo Public Square is a not-for-profit Ideas Exchange that blends live events and humanities journalism.

Cruz was born in Canada

Go, Ted Cruz!

I am very excited that the senator from Texas is running for president, so that we can rid this country of one of its most pervasive myths: that you need to be born on U.S. soil to be a real American.

Admittedly, that is not why most of Cruz’s fervent backers are excited he’s in the race. Or why donors have already sent his campaign tens of millions. The reasons most of them are excited about Cruz’s candidacy — his aversion to compromise in politics, the centrality of God in his political platform, and his disdain for any sensible immigration reform — are precisely the reasons why I would be horrified to see him actually win the race I am so glad he is running. If Ted Cruz ever became president, I’d be tempted to flee to Canada.

Which brings me back to the one thing I love about Ted Cruz: The man was born in Canada!

If his candidacy is taken seriously, and his qualifications aren’t challenged in any of the primary states he contests, Cruz will be joining Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in the list of presidential candidates whose campaigns broke barriers for minorities in the political process — in Cruz’s case, for Americans born outside the country.

I am one such “natural-born” American born elsewhere—in Mexico—and it’s been one of my lifelong frustrations to have people question my Americanness, and be utterly ignorant about the fact that you can indeed be born a U.S. citizen outside the country, if born to an American parent. I have nothing but the utmost respect for naturalized Americans who opt to become citizens later in life, but I am not one of them – I was born clenching my blue passport.

Who cares, you might ask, is the only difference between “natural-born” and naturalized Americans — in terms of their rights — is the right to be president? That awkward phrase “natural born” is in the Constitution, listed among the other qualifications for the highest office. Listed, but not defined, which is one of the reasons for all the confusion.

The qualification made its way into the Constitution because the Founding Fathers wanted to prevent their young republic from ever being hijacked by scheming European monarchs. It’s clear from both the prevailing English common law and from the first major law passed by Congress on matters of citizenship in 1790 that “natural-born” citizens included Americans born to an American father in another country. (American mothers, thankfully for me and Sen. Cruz, gained the equal right to transmit U.S. citizenship to their kids by a law passed in 1934.) Federal statutes over time have further defined what it means to be a natural-born American, often requiring a certain period of residency within the United States before an American parent could be entitled to pass on US citizenship to a child born outside the country.

So go on, Senator Cruz (but not too far!), and make everyone understand that you are as American as anyone, qualified (at least on this count) to be our leader. And don’t feel ashamed of your background — tell folks who come to your website where you were born, as opposed to just telling them, as your site currently does, where your mom was born.

Now that I have made clear that I belong in the “natural-born” club, I should add that it is an absurd club. All American citizens should share the same privileges, including the right to lead the nation. It’s shameful that countries like Germany and France are more open to the possibility of a naturalized immigrant becoming their head of state than we are. Can’t we just trust the voters to determine whether presidential candidates are sufficiently American for them?

Andrés Martinez is the editorial director of Zócalo Public Square and a professor at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Syria

Canadian Jets Have Begun Bombing ISIS Targets in Syria

A Canadian Armed Forces CF-18 Fighter jets arrive at the Canadian Air Task Force Flight Operations Area in Kuwait
Reuters Canadian Armed Forces CF-18 fighter jets arrive at the Canadian Air Task Force Flight Operations Area in Kuwait on October 28, 2014 .

They joined a coalition sortie attacking the ISIS stronghold of Raqqa

Two Canadian fighter jets conducted their nation’s first air strikes targeting ISIS forces in Syria on Wednesday, following the passage of a new mandate in Ottawa last week that expands Canada’s role in the ongoing war against the militant group.

“The [Canadian Armed Forces’s] first airstrike against ISIS in Syria has been successfully completed,” said General Tom Lawson, the country’s Chief of Defense Staff, in a statement. “Canadians can be proud of the work that their Canadian Armed Forces are doing, and the contribution they are making to coalition efforts.”

During Wednesday’s mission, two Canadian CF-18 Hornets joined eight other coalition jets in a sortie targeting an ISIS garrison near the group’s stronghold in Raqqa, Syria. The Canadian aircrew and aircraft returned safely to base following the raid.

TIME climate change

Quarter of Global Forest Losses Caused by Fires in Russia, Canada, Study Shows

Blazes also contributed greatly to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change

Forest fires in large parts of Canada and Russia resulted in almost a quarter of global forest losses between 2011 and 2013, a new study revealed.

The study was conducted by researchers from Global Forest Watch, who analyzed the loss of forests by combining over 400,000 pictures of the earth’s surface. They found that a total of 18 million hectares were lost in 2013, with Canada and Russia being the most significant contributors to forest cover losses in the preceding two years.

A more worrying implication from the fires in the two countries is their contribution to greenhouse gas emissions leading to climate change.

“If global warming is leading to more fires in boreal forests, which in turn leads to more emissions from those forests, which in turn leads to more climate change,” study co-author Nigel Sizer told the Guardian. “This is one of those positive feedback loops that should be of great concern to policy makers.”

The other three main contributors to global deforestation between 2011 and 2013 were Brazil, the U.S. and Indonesia, although the latter’s losses fell to their lowest level in over a decade in 2013 in what is seen as an encouraging sign.

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