TIME Hillary Clinton

Here Are Hillary Clinton’s Favorite Emoji

She's all about those handclaps

As part of a free flip-flop giveaway, Old Navy has launched an online tool that lets you analyze the most-used emoji on yours and other social media feeds—including any public Twitter account.

TIME and MONEY dug around to find some of the most interesting results from famous politicians, business leaders and celebrities, including presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton, Marco Rubio, and Jeb Bush. Click through the list to also see the favored emoji of Bill Clinton, Narendra Modi, Elon Musk, Travis Kalanick, Taylor Swift, and Miley Cyrus.

Clinton’s Twitter feed had a lot to offer but neither of Barack Obama’s feeds seemed to make use of emoji, nor did Warren Buffett’s or Kanye West’s.

  • Hillary Clinton

    Hillary Clinton Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Democratic presidential front-runner and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (or at least the folks running her Twitter feed) seems to favor the checkmark, clapping hands, and “sparkles” emoji—though the American flag also makes the cut.

  • Jeb Bush

    Jeb Bush Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    GOP presidential hopeful Jeb Bush doesn’t reveal much in his choice of emoji: He is the former governor of sunshine state Florida, after all.

  • Marco Rubio

    Marco Rubio Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Florida Senator Marco Rubio is a fan of the clapping hands emoji.

  • Narendra Modi

    Narendra Modi Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is partial to the “okay” sign.

  • Elon Musk

    Elon Musk Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    The only emoji that pops up for Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s Twitter feed is the “see-no-evil” monkey.

     

  • Travis Kalanick

    Travis Kalanick Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has most often used the “person raising both hands in celebration” symbol, which seems about right.

  • Taylor Swift

    Taylor Swift Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Taylor Swift’s collection of most-used emoji is as much a window into her emotional world as many of her songs, with hearts, the “smiling face with heart-shaped eyes,” and “face with tears of joy” among her favorites. And like Hillary Clinton, she’s a fan of sparkles.

  • Miley Cyrus

    Old Navy / emoodji.com Miley Cyrus Favorite Emoji

    Miley Cyrus seems to use a wide variety of symbols on her Twitter feed—even more so than Taylor Swift—including the ever-evocative money and smiling poop emoji.

  • Bill Clinton

    Bill Clinton Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Last but not least, former President Bill Clinton appears to have made use of only one emoji: the folded hands, or prayer symbol. That’s one more than either of current POTUS Barack Obama’s Twitter accounts have used.

TIME Comedy

Watch Darrell Hammond Break Down His President Clinton Impression

It's all about the "vocal crinkle"

Comedian Darrell Hammond is the longest-serving cast member in the history of Saturday Night Live and for 14 seasons was often the sketch comedy show’s go-to impressionist. Before he left SNL in 2009, Hammond honed impressions of dozens of celebrities, but he’s probably best-known for one of them: President Bill Clinton, which was an almost weekly occurrence on the show in the late 1990s thanks to the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

Hammond, who recently took on the role of Col. Sanders in a new advertising campaign for KFC, is back at SNL as the show’s announcer, and his lip-biting, thumb-wagging Clinton has returned as well. Last week, Hammond stopped by TIME’s offices and shared a few tricks on how to become the former president. (Hint: Perfect a “vocal crinkle.”)

TIME Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton Comes Out in Force to Defend His Foundation

Clinton Global Initiative University
Larry Marano—Getty Images Former US President Bill Clinton attends the Clinton Global Initiative University at University of Miami on March 7, 2015 in Miami, Florida.

A response to a barrage of unflattering revelations in the press

Bill Clinton joined his allies in defending his family’s foundation in an open letter on Friday, emphasizing the charity’s philanthropic work in the face of criticism over its foreign donors and alleged entanglement in politics.

“It’s the political season in America, so the purpose and impact of the efforts your support makes possible has largely been ignored in recent coverage of the Foundation,” the former president said in his note. “But we are and always have been a non-partisan, inclusive foundation with lots of support from and involvement by people across the political spectrum and governments from right to left, all committed to our creative solutions-centered work.”

Clinton recounted in his note many of the charitable deeds the Foundation has accomplished around the world, including “helping smallholder farmers in Africa increase their yields” and supporting “women entrepreneurs in Latin America.” Nearly 10 million people in 70 countries have access to HIV/AIDS medicines through the Clinton Health Access Initiative, Clinton wrote.

“We will also continue to look for ways to improve our reporting systems so that we can operate as accurately, efficiently, and transparently as possible – a goal to which we have been committed since day one,” said Clinton in the note.

The Clintons’ allies have voiced their support of the family’s charity in recent days as well, with Foundation donor Jay Jacobs penning a blog post Thursday saying one reason voters should elect Hillary Clinton is her connection to the Foundation. Lynn Forester de Rothschild, a major fundraiser for Hillary Clinton’s previous presidential election and former advisor in President Clinton’s administration, wrote an op-ed published earlier this week in the Huffington Post defending the Foundation.

The Clinton Foundation has come under fire for accepting donations from foreign businesses and governments with business before the U.S. State Department, while Hillary Clinton was Secretary of State. No specific evidence of intervention on behalf of donors has been found, though in several cases the foundation failed to abide by Clinton’s pledge to disclose all donors during her tenure.

Bill Clinton has also been criticized for giving speeches and making appearances that appear to benefit foundation supporters on the global stage. This week, the foundation came under further scrutiny when it was revealed that Sidney Blumenthal, a longtime friend and adviser of the Clintons, had a $10,000 a month job at the foundation doing unspecified work during the time he was providing Hillary Clinton with purported intelligence tips about activities of various political factions in Libya.

In recent weeks both Bill and Hillary, who is now running for president, have defended the foundation. Hillary said during an event in Iowa last week that she is “proud of the foundation,” and Bill said earlier this month in an interview with NBC that the charity has never done anything “knowingly inappropriate.”

TIME White House

Here Are the Best Responses to Obama Joining Twitter

The President now has his very own handle, @POTUS

President Barack Obama tweeted from his personal Twitter account first the first time on Monday.

It took just a few hours after the tweet went up at 11:38 a.m. ET for @POTUS to rack up more than 1 million followers, appearing to handily beat the current Guinness World Record for the fastest time to hit that milestone (it took Robert Downey Jr. 23 hours and 22 minutes in April 2014).

A video posted by the White House gave what seemed to be proof that it was actually Obama typing on a smartphone and not a staffer:

The Chicago Cubs appeared slightly offended that Obama, a noted White Sox fan, followed the Sox, Blackhawks, Bulls and Bears, but not their team.

Michelle seemed pretty excited:

Joe Biden was pleased:

And Valerie Jarrett, Obama’s senior advisor, was glad he signed up:

But it was perhaps No. 42 who had the greatest reaction—and a good question (#askingforafriend, of course):

Despite a busy schedule—he tweeted from Camden, New Jersey—Obama responded promptly, and with a good question in response:

Read next: You Asked: Why Are My Devices Messing With My Brain?

TIME Hillary Clinton

Clintons Earned $25 Million From Paid Speeches Since 2014

NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 29: Presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered a speech during the David Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum at Columbia University in Manhattan, NY April 29, 2015.  (Photo by Kevin Hagen/Getty Images)
Kevin Hagen—2015 Getty Images Presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered a speech during the David Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum at Columbia University in Manhattan, NY April 29, 2015.

Hillary and Bill Clinton have earned a combined $25 million giving paid speeches since January 2014, a massive income boost ahead of Hillary’s candidacy for president.

In addition, Hillary Clinton earned at least $5 million in income from her memoir Hard Choices, published in June. A senior campaign official confirmed the details of a financial disclosure form filed with the Federal Election Commission on Friday.

The couple’s earnings over the last year puts them among the country’s very wealthiest earners, and among the wealthiest candidates for president in 2016. Their effective federal income tax for 2014 was more than 30%, the campaign official said.

The couple has an awkward history of talking about their wealth. Justifying her speaking fees last year, Hillary said the family was “dead broke” when they left the White House. In an interview this month with NBC, Bill said he had to give paid speeches because “I gotta pay our bills.”

Bill and Hillary combined have given more than 100 paid speeches since last January. Hillary has entertained clients from a camps convention to an auto dealers association.

With reporting by Philip Elliott

TIME celebrity

Bill Clinton Would Move Back Into the White House Under These 3 Conditions

He's hopeful

Bill Clinton joked about his future living arrangements on Tuesday night’s Late Show With David Letterman.The former president said he would move back into the White House on three conditions: The first, his wife, Hillary Clinton, is nominated for president; the second, Hillary wins the election in 2016; the third, he gets asked.

But beyond the stipulations for moving, Clinton was very supportive of his wife. “It would be a good thing for America if she wins,” Clinton said. “I hope she does.”

Late Show With David Letterman airs at 11.35 p.m. ET/10:35 CT on CBS.

This article originally appeared on EW.com.

TIME Economy

Here’s the Secret Truth About Economic Inequality in America

Mmmmmoney: Get a grip; it's just paper
KAREN BLEIER; AFP/Getty Images Mmmmmoney: Get a grip; it's just paper

Once you look at the issue this way, it's hard to think of it any other way

We all know that inequality has grown in America over the last several years. But the conventional wisdom among conservatives and even many liberals has always been that inequality was the price of growth–in order to get more of it, we needed to tolerate a bigger wealth gap. Today, Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz, the Columbia professor and former economic advisor to Bill Clinton, blew a hole in that truism with a new report for the Roosevelt Institute entitled “Rewriting the Rules,” which is basically a roadmap for what many progressives would like to see happen policy wise over the next four years.

There are a number of provocative insights but the key takeaway–inequality isn’t inevitable, and it’s not just a social issue, but also an economic one, because it’s largely responsible for the fact that every economic “recovery” since the 1990s has been slower and longer than the one before. Inequality isn’t the trade-off for economic growth; rather, it’s both the cause and the symptom of slower growth. It’s a fascinating document, particularly when compared to the less radical Center for American Progress policy report on how to strengthen the middle class, authored by another former Clinton advisor, Larry Summers, which was widely considered to set out what may be Hillary Clinton’s economic policy agenda.

While the two have some overlap, the Stiglitz report is bolder and more in-depth. It’s also a much more damning assessment of some of the policy changes made not only during the Bush years, but also during Bill Clinton’s tenure, in particular the continued deregulation of financial markets, changes in corporate pay structures, and tax shifts of the early 1990s. During a presentation and panel discussion on the topic of inequality and how it relates to growth (I moderated the panel, which included other experts like Nobel laureate Bob Solow, labor economist Heather Bouchley, MIT professor Simon Johnson and Cornell’s Lynn Stout, as well as pollster Stan Greenberg), Stiglitz made the point that both Republican and Democratic administrations have been at fault in crafting not only policies that forward inequality, but also a narrative that tells us that we can’t do anything about it. “Inequality isn’t inevitable,” said Stiglitz. “It’s about the choices we make with the rules we create to structure our economy.”

One of the big economic questions in the 2016 presidential campaign will be, “why does inequality matter?” The answer–because it slows growth and thus affects everyone’s livelihood–is simple. But the reasons behind it are complex and systemic. Senator Elizabeth Warren and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio were on hand to help connect the dots on that front, with de Blasio calling for more social action in order to “move to a society that rewards work over wealth,” and Warren re-iterating a hot button point that she made last week about inequality and the trade agenda; she believes that Fast Track trade authority for President Obama would allow big bank lobbyists on both sides of the Atlantic to further water down financial reform that could combat inequality, which led the President to call her ill-informed (he didn’t elaborate much on why). Warren noted that the trade deal was being crafted in conjunction with 500 non-governmental actors, 85 % of whom are either industry lobbyists or from the big business sector.

Warren’s mantra about how America’s economic game “is rigged,” ties directly into two of the key takeaways from the Stiglitz report; first, that inequality is all about the political economy and Washington policy decisions that favor the rich, and secondly, that it’s not one single decision–Dodd Frank, capital gains tax, healthcare, or labor standards–but all of them taken together that are at the root of the problem. “Our economy is a system,” says Stiglitz, and combatting inequality is going to require a systemic approach across multiple areas–financial reform, corporate governance, CEO pay, tax policy, anti-trust law, monetary policy, education, healthcare, and labor law. It might also involve revamping institutions like the Fed; Stiglitz and Solow both agreed that the Fed needs to start tabulating unemployment in a new way, perhaps focusing not on a particular number target, but on when wages actually start to go up, which Stiglitz said is the best sign of when the country’s employment picture is actually improving.

Thinking in these more holistic terms would be a big shift for lawmakers used to tackling each of these issues alone in their respective silos. But as Stiglitz and the other economists on the panel pointed out, they are often interrelated–consider the way in which pension funds work with shareholder “activists” to goad corporations into over-borrowing to make large payouts to investors even as lowered wages and profits kept in offshore tax havens mean that long-term investments aren’t made into the real economy, slowing growth. Or how continuing to tie worker’s healthcare benefits to companies makes them virtual slaves, decreasing their ability to negotiate higher wages, not to mention start their own businesses.

It’s a huge topic, and the Roosevelt discussion was part of the continuing campaign on the far left to try to make sure that presumptive nominee Hilary Clinton doesn’t continue business as usual if and when she’s in the White House. Progressives are looking for her to do more than talk about minimum wage and redistribution; they want her to make fairly radical shifts in the money culture and political economy of our country. That would mean a decided split from the policies of the past, including many concocted by her husband’s own advisors, ghosts that Hilary Clinton has yet to publically reckon with.

TIME Hillary Clinton

How Bill Clinton’s Library Promotes Hillary Too

William J. Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Arkansas.
Scott Olson—Getty Images The William J. Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Arkansas.

The 1992 presidential campaign was sold as two for the price of one

Hillary Clinton worked to expand health care, improve failing schools and served as “America’s foremost ambassador.” And that was just during her time as First Lady.

That’s the portrait painted by the William J. Clinton Presidential Library, which despite the name has no shortage of material on Hillary. Around every corner of the Little Rock museum is another testimonial to Hillary’s role in his administration and a reminder that—as he put it in the 1992 campaign—voters got “two for the price of one.”

These days, Hillary Clinton is running as her own woman, stressing her time as U.S. Senator from New York and Secretary of State in the Obama Administration. She’s also moving away from her husband’s record on issues as varied as trade deals, gay rights and policing.

(Bill Clinton can hardly take offense. He even does a bit of that in his own library. In one display, the library tries to distance him from the now-scrapped Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy that barred gays and lesbians to serve openly in the military. “The law was never applied as intended,” reads a placard.)

Throughout the modern and spacious library, Bill Clinton offers nothing but the predictably glowing account of his wife’s skills and experience as a public servant. Even in failure, as was the case in her push to overhaul the nation’s health care system, Clinton’s library pitches success. “The effort to expand coverage, led by the First Lady, set the stage for step-by-step improvements to our health care system over the next seven years,” reads one caption.

Similarly, Hillary Clinton was tapped to “spearhead” education reform. And in describing her landmark address in China, in which she declared women’s rights are human rights, the library’s displays lauded her: “As America’s foremost ambassador, she brought to Beijing a message of hope, empowerment and social development.”

An inquiry to the library about how the former First Lady is represented and how the exhibits might have changed since they opened in 2004 was referred to a public relations adviser, Jordan Johnson. He did not return phone messages.

Yet not all depictions of Clinton are exactly flattering. After all, it isn’t every museum that has depictions of a spouse on needlepoint or on a quilt. Or includes a pair of cream cowboy boots emblazoned with her initials in gold leather, a gift from a Houston admirer. Or a stitched blanket from a California supporter that includes not just the Clintons’ October wedding date but also daughter Chelsea’s birthday.

At the same time, the scandals of the 1990s are obviously whitewashed and political scores are settled, as is the case at most presidential libraries. The Clintons single out House Speaker Newt Gingrich as pushing the “politics of personal destruction.” The museum reminds visitors that in 1994, shortly before becoming Speaker of the House, Gingrich publicly described Clinton Democrats “the enemy of normal Americans.”

In describing the government shutdowns the followed GOP takeover of Congress, the Clinton library describes Republicans as “rejecting compromise” and bringing “an ideological agenda.”

The library’s take on independent counsel Kenneth Starr, who discovered Clinton’s relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky? “A conservative activist who had never before prosecuted a case.” The resulting impeachment had “no constitutional or legal basis.”

And on the failed land deal known as Whitewater that set off the string of scandals that threatened Clinton’s presidency, the library is terse: “No evidence of wrongdoing was ever found.”

But there is no escaping some of the awkwardness that crept into the Clinton presidency amid the tumult. In a 1998 holiday portrait taken in the White House’s formal Blue Room, the pair is not touching or even looking at each other. Bill Clinton admitted to having an affair with Lewinsky during the summer of that year.

By the following year, facing a shared Republican enemy and the threat of impeachment, the Clintons again were embracing and working as political partners, as the library is fond of portraying them.

TIME Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton Says His Policies Put Too Many People in Prison

MOROCCO-CONFERENCE-ECONOMY-DEVELOPMENT
Fadel Senna—/Getty Images Former US president and founding chairman of the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI), Bill Clinton, gestures during the opening session of the CGI Middle East and Africa on May 6, 2015 in the Moroccan city of Marrakesh.

He laments fallout from the "three strikes" provision

Former President Bill Clinton on Wednesday conceded his administration’s role in the overcrowding of U.S. prisons.

In an interview with CNN, Clinton said the “three-strikes” policy passed while he was in office contributed to over-incarceration. The provision, part of a larger 1994 crime bill, mandates life sentences for criminals convicted of a violent felony after two or more prior convictions.

“The problem is the way it was written and implemented is we cast too wide a net and we had too many people in prison,” Clinton said. “And we wound up… putting so many people in prison that there wasn’t enough money left to educate them, train them for new jobs and increase the chances when they came out so they could live productive lives.”

Clinton’s wife Hillary Clinton, who is now running for President, supported the provision in 1994 but has since changed her tune, calling for criminal justice reform and an end to “mass incarceration.”

TIME Software

See How Presidents Age in the White House, According to Microsoft

Perhaps no job can add gray hairs and wrinkles like serving as President of the United States. While Presidents do live longer than their fellow citizens (“Even in the 19th century, when the average man died at age 47, U.S. Presidents lived an average of 69 years,” according to Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy), their looks show the weight of the office famously quickly. But how fast? By using Microsoft’s new age-guessing tool how-old.net, released Thursday, we might be able to get an idea. While Barack Obama’s only been in office six years, judging by a photograph from 2009 and 2015, the wizards at Microsoft claim Obama’s looks have aged 13 years. George W. Bush, according to these two images, added nine years to his face during his eight years working in the Oval Office. Bush’s father, George H.W. Bush worked in the White House for four years–and his face grew four years older too. Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan both served for 8 years. Clinton’s features clocked 15 years while Reagan added a mere 2 years onto his looks during the same stretch.

 

 

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