TIME Internet

Read Monica Lewinsky’s Moving Speech on Online Shaming

Cannes Lions : Day Five
Marc Piasecki—Getty Images Monica Lewinsky attends the 'Cannes Lions Festival' on June 25, 2015 in Cannes, France.

Read excerpts of her speech provided exclusively to TIME

Monica Lewinsky is back in the spotlight, this time as an activist working to end cyberbullying and online shaming.

Almost two decades after she was thrust into international infamy for her affair with then President Bill Clinton, Lewinsky has emerged as a fierce advocate for victims of online shaming, arguing that her experience as a 22-year-old intern made her “patient zero” of online internet shaming, perhaps the earliest example of what internet shame can do to someone’s life.

In a series of articles and speeches, including a TED Talk earlier this year, Lewinsky says that we all need to work together to create what she calls a “compassionate society.” On Thursday, Lewinsky delivered the Ogilvy + Inspire speech at the Cannes Lions advertising festival on the relationship between the media and public shaming, and what advertising can do about it.

Here are extensive excerpts from her remarks, provided exclusively to TIME:

If you were a brand, what brand would you be?

That’s a question I was asked in an interview. A job interview, just a few years ago. Let me tell you, when you’re Monica Lewinsky, that’s a loaded f*cking question.

All of you here today touch marketing and advertising … with successful, established and respected companies. You are familiar with what it means to shepherd, nurture, shape and grow your brand … and, while unfortunate, it is likely that at one point or another you have been at the center of a “brand crisis” — when your brand’s narrative ran away from you.

But, can you imagine what that is like when the brand, is you? You. Personally. Your likeness. Your name. Your values. Your history. Your soul.

That’s what happened to me in 1998.

Gossip websites, paparazzi, reality programming, politics, news outlets and sometimes hackers all traffic in shame. It’s led to desensitization and a permissive environment online to troll, harass, invade privacy and cyber bully.

This shift, has created what Professor Nicolaus Mills calls … a Culture of Humiliation. And in this Culture of Humiliation, there is another kind of price tag attached to public shaming. The price does not measure the cost to the victim – which Tyler [Clementi] and too many others have paid,but rather, the price measures the profit of those who prey on them.

This violation of others is raw material efficiently and ruthlessly mined, packaged, and… sold at a profit. Whether tallied in dollars, clicks, likes or just the perverse thrill of exposure…A marketplace has emerged … where shame is a commodity. Public humiliation an industry. How is the money made? Clicks.

The more shame, the more clicks; the more clicks, the more advertising dollars. The more advertising dollars — you can see where this is going — the more of what sells … shame.

Of course, this is not an indictment of advertising dollars. Nothing wrong with advertising dollars … and everyone in the room can agree on that!

But I believe we can also agree that there are boundaries where profit halts and social responsibility steps in.

Now, we’re in a dangerous cycle: the more we click on this kind of gossip, the more numb we get to the human lives behind it … and the more numb we get, the more we click.

All the while, someone is making money off the back of another’s suffering.

Political commentator Sally Kohn pointed out in a Ted talk on clickbait, that because of online algorithms, we … are now co-creating our content by clicking behavior. As she said, “we are the editors of the new media. Clicking is a public act. “

I would argue, a moral act, too. We don’t stop to think that with a click on clickbait, we are entering the online Coliseum.

Building a more compassionate society is going to be a bilateral exercise between individuals and the brands that represent their aspirations, their values and their truths. People make brands. If people are compassionate, brands will be compassionate in return.

We can lead one another to a more compassionate, more empathic place. We can help change behavior. We can all learn from our mistakes and be more resilient. And we can together make a society where the sometimes distancing effect of technology doesn’t remove our fundamental humanity.

All of the most vibrant creative minds in the world are here — and here this week. You are the creative engines that will drive our culture moving forward.

Will you help me?

And so I end, where I began: if you were a brand, what brand would you be?

 

TIME Culture

Monica Lewinsky Slams a Society Where ‘Shame Is a Commodity’

Cannes Lions : Day Five
Marc Piasecki—Getty Images Monica Lewinsky attends the 'Cannes Lions Festival' on June 25, 2015 in Cannes, France.

Urges brands to help build a more "compassionate society"

Monica Lewinsky made a powerful speech at Cannes Lions festival conference Thursday about how public shaming, media and advertising are connected.

“The more we click on this kind of gossip, the more numb we get to the human life behind it,” she said, according to AdAge. “And the more numb we get, the more we click. All the while, someone is making money off of the back of another suffering.”

Lewinsky has re-emerged as a public figure two decades after she was thrust into the center of a media maelstrom over her affair with then-President Bill Clinton. In the last year, she’s come out as a vocal advocate of online compassion—she even gave a speech at TED2015 where she called herself “patient zero”of internet shaming.

“Violation of others is raw material, efficiently and ruthlessly mined, packaged and sold at a profit,” she said Thursday at Cannes. “Whether tallied in dollars, clicks, likes, or just the perverse thrill of exposure, a marketplace has emerged where shame is a commodity, and public humiliation an industry.”

But Lewinsky was quick to add that her focus on shaming wasn’t an indictment of advertising—it was a call to action.

“Building a more compassionate society is going to be a bilateral exercise between individuals and the brands that represent their aspirations, their values and their truths. People make brands. If people are compassionate, brands will be compassionate in return.”

[AdAge]

TIME Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton Aides Shed Light on Bill’s Role in Her Campaign

Former president Bill Clinton attends the Forbes' 2015 Philanthropy Summit Awards Dinner on June 3, 2015 in New York City.
Dimitrios Kambouris—Getty Images Former president Bill Clinton attends the Forbes' 2015 Philanthropy Summit Awards Dinner on June 3, 2015 in New York City.

Bill Clinton is providing low-key advice to Hillary Clinton’s campaign for president, two top aides said Friday.

Speaking at a panel discussion organized by Politico in New York City, Hillary Clinton communications director Jen Palmieri and campaign manager Robby Mook discussed the former president’s role in his wife’s campaign.

“He doesn’t come to every meeting we have, but he does join his wife often in some of our discussions, and I’m always fascinated to hear what his observation is going to be because it’s always something no one said,” Palmieri said. “We’re going to use him when we need him. He’s one of the most—if not the most—strategic political minds in the country.”

The former president has not accompanied his wife on the campaign trail, and has rarely appeared with her in public since she announced her candidacy. In an interview with Town and Country magazine earlier this year, Bill said that his role would primarily be as a “backstage adviser.”

Bill Clinton’s campaigning for his wife backfired in 2008, when in South Carolina he seemed to attribute Barack Obama’s victory in the early primary state to his race. But the former president has a deep knowledge of the ins and outs of campaigning, having won large victories in both 1992 and 1996.

That news that Bill is providing some advice to the campaign is consistent with what the Clinton camp has suggested in the past, but Friday evening’s discussion provided more insight into the former president’s involvement than ever before.

“He’s a really helpful big picture sounding board,” said Mook. “Another thing I remember him saying at one meeting is, ‘let’s major in the majors, not in the minors.’ He’s a really brilliant communicator.”

In early May, Bill Clinton’s chief of staff told the Washington Post that he is “not directly engaged in the campaign” but when his advice is asked for “he’s happy to give it.”

Mook also dismissed recent poll numbers that suggest Hillary Clinton’s favorability numbers are slipping. According to a CNN poll published last week, 57% of Americans think the former secretary of state is not trustworthy. “A lot of the public polling is not very reliable,” Mook said. “I don’t pay a whole lot of attention to it.”

Palmieri said that Clinton’s main goal in her campaign will be demonstrating that she is someone Americans can trust to fight for them and solve the big problems facing the country.

Hillary began campaigning in mid-April but will hold her first official campaign rally on Saturday on Roosevelt Island, in New York, where she will lay out her vision for the country and her rationale for her presidential bid.

TIME 2016 Election

Bill Clinton Opens Up on Marriage, Hillary’s Bid for President

Mark Mezvinsky, Hillary Clinton, Chelsea Clinton, Bill Clinton
William Regan/AP Former President Bill Clinton, right, and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, second from right, wave to the media as Marc Mezvinsky and Chelsea Clinton pose for photographers with their newborn baby, Charlotte, after the family leaves Manhattan's Lenox Hill hospital in New York.

"I believe in you. You've got this," Hillary told Bill after his Arkansas loss

Bill Clinton lifted the veil on America’s most enigmatic political couple—at least slightly. In an interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper, which is to air in its entirety on Sunday at 9 a.m., Clinton described the couple’s personal and political relationship, and how they constantly negotiate the two.

The former president admitted that his political aspirations took the front seat during the first two decades of their marriage, and referred to Hillary as his “rock” during politically and personally tumultuous times.

He pointed to his 1980 loss to Republican Frank D. White in the Arkansas gubernatorial election as one such moment.

“I was the youngest former governor in American history in 1980 on election night…My career prospects were not particularly bright,” he said to Tapper. “And she never blinked. She just said, ‘Hey. It’ll turn around. I believe in you. You’ve got this.'”

Bill implied that now was Hillary’s time, echoing sentiments he shared in a 2014 interview with “BBC Newsnight” in India. In that interview, he described their marriage as a 52-year pact.

“We were married a very long time when she was always, in effect, deferring to my political career,” he said. “I told her when she got elected to the Senate from New York that she’d given me 26 years, and so I intended to give her 26 years. Whatever she wanted to do was fine with me. If she wanted to know my opinion, I would tell her, but she had carte blanche to make whatever decisions she wanted, and tell me what I was supposed to do about it.”

Bill has taken a backseat in Hillary’s campaign. Though he plans to be by her side at her first rally of the campaign on Saturday, he has yet to travel or raise money for her. This was not the case in her 2008 bid.

[CNN]

TIME Comedy

Why Darrell Hammond Modeled Himself After Eddie Murphy

The comedian with a skill for impersonations on how it all started

Comedian Darrell Hammond’s first impressions came at age seven alongside his mother, who liked doing impersonations of the neighbors. Hammond realized he, too, had a knack for impressions and was soon doing voices of Scrooge from A Christmas Carol, cartoon characters like Foghorn Leghorn and Popeye, and a host of others.

Fifty years later, Hammond’s repertoire includes dozens of celebrities, including Bill Clinton, Donald Trump and Sean Connery, all of whom he made famous in the 1990s and early 2000s as the longest-serving cast member in the history of Saturday Night Live. His latest character is Colonel Sanders, the founder and mascot of fast-food chain KFC, who Hammond has resurrected as an off-kilter, mandolin-loving Southern goofball just a bit out of touch with 2015.

Hammond recently stopped by TIME’s offices to discuss his latest transformation, Eddie Murphy’s outlandish impressions, and what it’s like being back at SNL as the show’s new announcer.

TIME Hillary Clinton

Here Are Hillary Clinton’s Favorite Emoji

She's all about those handclaps

As part of a free flip-flop giveaway, Old Navy has launched an online tool that lets you analyze the most-used emoji on yours and other social media feeds—including any public Twitter account.

TIME and MONEY dug around to find some of the most interesting results from famous politicians, business leaders and celebrities, including presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton, Marco Rubio, and Jeb Bush. Click through the list to also see the favored emoji of Bill Clinton, Narendra Modi, Elon Musk, Travis Kalanick, Taylor Swift, and Miley Cyrus.

Clinton’s Twitter feed had a lot to offer but neither of Barack Obama’s feeds seemed to make use of emoji, nor did Warren Buffett’s or Kanye West’s.

  • Hillary Clinton

    Hillary Clinton Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Democratic presidential front-runner and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (or at least the folks running her Twitter feed) seems to favor the checkmark, clapping hands, and “sparkles” emoji—though the American flag also makes the cut.

  • Jeb Bush

    Jeb Bush Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    GOP presidential hopeful Jeb Bush doesn’t reveal much in his choice of emoji: He is the former governor of sunshine state Florida, after all.

  • Marco Rubio

    Marco Rubio Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Florida Senator Marco Rubio is a fan of the clapping hands emoji.

  • Narendra Modi

    Narendra Modi Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is partial to the “okay” sign.

  • Elon Musk

    Elon Musk Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    The only emoji that pops up for Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s Twitter feed is the “see-no-evil” monkey.

     

  • Travis Kalanick

    Travis Kalanick Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has most often used the “person raising both hands in celebration” symbol, which seems about right.

  • Taylor Swift

    Taylor Swift Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Taylor Swift’s collection of most-used emoji is as much a window into her emotional world as many of her songs, with hearts, the “smiling face with heart-shaped eyes,” and “face with tears of joy” among her favorites. And like Hillary Clinton, she’s a fan of sparkles.

  • Miley Cyrus

    Old Navy / emoodji.com Miley Cyrus Favorite Emoji

    Miley Cyrus seems to use a wide variety of symbols on her Twitter feed—even more so than Taylor Swift—including the ever-evocative money and smiling poop emoji.

  • Bill Clinton

    Bill Clinton Favorite Emoji
    Old Navy / emoodji.com

    Last but not least, former President Bill Clinton appears to have made use of only one emoji: the folded hands, or prayer symbol. That’s one more than either of current POTUS Barack Obama’s Twitter accounts have used.

TIME Comedy

Watch Darrell Hammond Break Down His President Clinton Impression

It's all about the "vocal crinkle"

Comedian Darrell Hammond is the longest-serving cast member in the history of Saturday Night Live and for 14 seasons was often the sketch comedy show’s go-to impressionist. Before he left SNL in 2009, Hammond honed impressions of dozens of celebrities, but he’s probably best-known for one of them: President Bill Clinton, which was an almost weekly occurrence on the show in the late 1990s thanks to the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

Hammond, who recently took on the role of Col. Sanders in a new advertising campaign for KFC, is back at SNL as the show’s announcer, and his lip-biting, thumb-wagging Clinton has returned as well. Last week, Hammond stopped by TIME’s offices and shared a few tricks on how to become the former president. (Hint: Perfect a “vocal crinkle.”)

TIME Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton Comes Out in Force to Defend His Foundation

Clinton Global Initiative University
Larry Marano—Getty Images Former US President Bill Clinton attends the Clinton Global Initiative University at University of Miami on March 7, 2015 in Miami, Florida.

A response to a barrage of unflattering revelations in the press

Bill Clinton joined his allies in defending his family’s foundation in an open letter on Friday, emphasizing the charity’s philanthropic work in the face of criticism over its foreign donors and alleged entanglement in politics.

“It’s the political season in America, so the purpose and impact of the efforts your support makes possible has largely been ignored in recent coverage of the Foundation,” the former president said in his note. “But we are and always have been a non-partisan, inclusive foundation with lots of support from and involvement by people across the political spectrum and governments from right to left, all committed to our creative solutions-centered work.”

Clinton recounted in his note many of the charitable deeds the Foundation has accomplished around the world, including “helping smallholder farmers in Africa increase their yields” and supporting “women entrepreneurs in Latin America.” Nearly 10 million people in 70 countries have access to HIV/AIDS medicines through the Clinton Health Access Initiative, Clinton wrote.

“We will also continue to look for ways to improve our reporting systems so that we can operate as accurately, efficiently, and transparently as possible – a goal to which we have been committed since day one,” said Clinton in the note.

The Clintons’ allies have voiced their support of the family’s charity in recent days as well, with Foundation donor Jay Jacobs penning a blog post Thursday saying one reason voters should elect Hillary Clinton is her connection to the Foundation. Lynn Forester de Rothschild, a major fundraiser for Hillary Clinton’s previous presidential election and former advisor in President Clinton’s administration, wrote an op-ed published earlier this week in the Huffington Post defending the Foundation.

The Clinton Foundation has come under fire for accepting donations from foreign businesses and governments with business before the U.S. State Department, while Hillary Clinton was Secretary of State. No specific evidence of intervention on behalf of donors has been found, though in several cases the foundation failed to abide by Clinton’s pledge to disclose all donors during her tenure.

Bill Clinton has also been criticized for giving speeches and making appearances that appear to benefit foundation supporters on the global stage. This week, the foundation came under further scrutiny when it was revealed that Sidney Blumenthal, a longtime friend and adviser of the Clintons, had a $10,000 a month job at the foundation doing unspecified work during the time he was providing Hillary Clinton with purported intelligence tips about activities of various political factions in Libya.

In recent weeks both Bill and Hillary, who is now running for president, have defended the foundation. Hillary said during an event in Iowa last week that she is “proud of the foundation,” and Bill said earlier this month in an interview with NBC that the charity has never done anything “knowingly inappropriate.”

TIME White House

Here Are the Best Responses to Obama Joining Twitter

The President now has his very own handle, @POTUS

President Barack Obama tweeted from his personal Twitter account first the first time on Monday.

It took just a few hours after the tweet went up at 11:38 a.m. ET for @POTUS to rack up more than 1 million followers, appearing to handily beat the current Guinness World Record for the fastest time to hit that milestone (it took Robert Downey Jr. 23 hours and 22 minutes in April 2014).

A video posted by the White House gave what seemed to be proof that it was actually Obama typing on a smartphone and not a staffer:

The Chicago Cubs appeared slightly offended that Obama, a noted White Sox fan, followed the Sox, Blackhawks, Bulls and Bears, but not their team.

Michelle seemed pretty excited:

Joe Biden was pleased:

And Valerie Jarrett, Obama’s senior advisor, was glad he signed up:

But it was perhaps No. 42 who had the greatest reaction—and a good question (#askingforafriend, of course):

Despite a busy schedule—he tweeted from Camden, New Jersey—Obama responded promptly, and with a good question in response:

Read next: You Asked: Why Are My Devices Messing With My Brain?

TIME Hillary Clinton

Clintons Earned $25 Million From Paid Speeches Since 2014

NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 29: Presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered a speech during the David Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum at Columbia University in Manhattan, NY April 29, 2015.  (Photo by Kevin Hagen/Getty Images)
Kevin Hagen—2015 Getty Images Presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered a speech during the David Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum at Columbia University in Manhattan, NY April 29, 2015.

Hillary and Bill Clinton have earned a combined $25 million giving paid speeches since January 2014, a massive income boost ahead of Hillary’s candidacy for president.

In addition, Hillary Clinton earned at least $5 million in income from her memoir Hard Choices, published in June. A senior campaign official confirmed the details of a financial disclosure form filed with the Federal Election Commission on Friday.

The couple’s earnings over the last year puts them among the country’s very wealthiest earners, and among the wealthiest candidates for president in 2016. Their effective federal income tax for 2014 was more than 30%, the campaign official said.

The couple has an awkward history of talking about their wealth. Justifying her speaking fees last year, Hillary said the family was “dead broke” when they left the White House. In an interview this month with NBC, Bill said he had to give paid speeches because “I gotta pay our bills.”

Bill and Hillary combined have given more than 100 paid speeches since last January. Hillary has entertained clients from a camps convention to an auto dealers association.

With reporting by Philip Elliott

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com