TIME endangered species

This Guy Just Killed an Endangered Black Rhino After Paying $350,000

Warning: The video contains material that some viewers may find distressing

A man from Texas has hunted and killed an endangered black rhino in Namibia after bidding $350,000 in an auction to win a hunting permit.

Since the auction last year, Corey Knowlton has faced intense criticism and even death threats from animal-rights advocates, but he said the hunt is an essential part of conservation work for saving black-rhino populations in Namibia.

The 36-year-old hunter from Dallas told CNN the rhinoceros he hunted was an older bull that was considered a threat to the herd, as it was harming younger males.

But opponents, including several animal-welfare groups, disagree with killing any endangered animal.

Read more on the debate at CNN.

TIME Fine Art

See the Picasso Painting That Just Set a World Record for Art at Auction

It surpassed a Francis Bacon piece that sold in 2013

Spring Art Auctions Preview
Courtesy of Christie’s and the Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS)/APPablo Picasso’s “Women of Algiers (Version O),” auctioned at Christie’s in New York City on May 11, 2015.

A Picasso painting became the most expensive work of art ever sold at auction on Monday, going for more than $179 million.

Christie’s said “Women of Algiers (Version O)” sold for $179,365,000. That figure, which the Associated Press reports to include the auction house’s premium, surpasses a Francis Bacon work called “Three Studies of Lucian Freud” that held the top spot, also selling at Christie’s for $142.4 million in 2013.

Picasso painted the work as part of a 15-painting series (versions A through O) created in 1954 and 1955, inspired by Eugène Delacroix’s 1834 “Women of Algiers.” Industry experts say art world prices are staying high as collectors see these top works as strong and lasting investments.

TIME France

Original Asterix Artwork Raises Over $150,000 for Charlie Hebdo Victims

FRANCE-ATTACKS-CARTOONS-CHRISTIES-AUCTION-ASTERIX-UDERZO
Kenzo Tribouillard—AFP/Getty Images A picture taken on March 14, 2015, shows the original drawing of the Asterix comic book Les Lauriers de César (Asterix and the Laurel Wreath), displayed at Christie's auction house in Paris

Christie's auction house also waived its commission

The original artwork for an Asterix cartoon from the 1970s was auctioned for more than $150,000 on Sunday, with proceeds going to victims of January’s attack on French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

The cartoon panels from the iconic comic-book series bore a special dedication from co-creator Albert Uderzo, the BBC reported.

Uderzo, 87, briefly came out of retirement earlier this year to draw two tributes to the 12 victims of the attack on Charlie Hebdo’s offices in Paris, where two gunmen opened fire on Jan. 7 over the magazine’s publication of cartoons lampooning the Prophet Mohammed.

Auction house Christie’s reportedly waived its commission for the sale of the artwork, which comes from the 1971 comic Asterix and the Laurel Wreath.

[BBC]

TIME Basketball

Michael Jordan’s Basketball Shoes from 1984 Are to Be Auctioned

Chicago Bulls' Michael Jordan (23), right, prepares to go up with the ball as Los Angeles Lakers guard Michael Cooper (21), looks on during first half NBA action at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif., Dec. 2, 1984
Reed Saxon—AP Chicago Bulls' Michael Jordan (23), right, prepares to go up with the ball as Los Angeles Lakers guard Michael Cooper (21), looks on during first half NBA action at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif., Dec. 2, 1984

The shoes have been in a closet for 30 years

The earliest known game-worn Michael Jordan basketball shoes will be auctioned online by SCP Auctions, with bidding from April 8 through to Apr. 25, according to ESPN.

The Nikes have reportedly been in the shoe closet of former Los Angeles Lakers ball-boy Khalid Ali for the last 30 years.

“I didn’t really talk about them much. People who met me after my teenage years don’t even know I have them,” he said.

The shoes, according to SCP Auctions vice president Dan Imler could fetch more than $50,000. They came from a game played in Los Angeles on Dec. 2, 1984. The Bulls won 113-112 and Jordan scored 20 points.

Another pair of shoes that Jordan wore during the 1984-1985 season went for $31,070 in 2013.

TIME India

India’s Prime Minister Is Auctioning a Suit With His Name Embroidered All Over It

Indian Prime Minister Modi, wearing a dark pinstripe suit repeatedly embroidered with the words "Narendra Damodardas Modi", meets with U.S. President Barack Obama in New Delhi
Jim Bourg—REUTERS Indian Prime Minister Narenda Modi, wearing a dark pinstripe suit embroidered with his name, meets with U.S. President Barack Obama at Hyderabad House in New Delhi on Jan. 25, 2015

Attention, Narendra Modi fans

The suit that Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi wore during President Barack Obama’s visit to New Delhi last month is set to be auctioned on Wednesday.

The garment attained infamy because it has Modi’s name embroidered all over it in the form of widely spaced pinstripes.

The auction will take place in Surat, a city in Modi’s home state Gujarat, and will include 465 items gifted to Modi since he became Prime Minister in May 2014, the Indian Express reports.

An Indian industrialist has reportedly already bid the rough equivalent of $160,000 for the suit.

Proceeds from the auction will reportedly go to the Clean Ganga project, an initiative to combat the pollution of India’s most sacred river. Some 361 items belonging to Anandiben Patel — Modi’s successor as Gujarat’s chief minister — will also be sold, with the proceeds going toward female education.

TIME People

Rare JFK Vacation Photos Will Go Under the Hammer

The images are unusually relaxed and candid

Rare photographs of John F. Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline on vacation in Cape Cod will be put up for auction later this month.

The pictures were taken in August 1961 and depict the then First Couple in rare moments of candor — the former president casually enjoying a meal at Listerine heiress Rachel ‘Bunny’ Mellon’s beach house, Jackie smoking a cigarette and JFK going for a swim in the bay.

The photos are the latest in a series of JFK memorabilia to go under the hammer, with negatives from the couple’s wedding ceremony selling for $34,000 in October 2014.

“They’re amazing pictures,” Jackie Style author Pamela Keogh told People. “These were the masters of the universe in their downtime, sitting on beach chairs, smoking and eating clam chowder.”

See two of the images here.

TIME France

French Catholics Bought a Gay Bar So They Could Turn It Into a ‘Pub of Mercy’

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Getty Images The harbor of Toulon

The Missionaries of Divine Mercy, whose church is next door to the bar, said the purchase was part of an effort to evangelize the area

A gay bar in Toulon is set to be turned into a religious meeting venue, after a group of Christian missionaries in the French city bought it in a recent auction.

The group known as Missionaries of Divine Mercy, whose church is located next door to the Texas Bar, said in a statement that their purchase, which follows the bar’s bankruptcy, is part of an effort to evangelize the neighborhood.

“The bar of Sodom will become the pub of mercy,” they said.

But they might need “a whole bunch of exorcists to get rid of everything that’s happened in there,” one of the leaders of the city’s gay community told the Local.

The president of the Gay Power Toulon association, 41-year-old Titi, said he “would have preferred if someone else got it, but they’ve wanted the place for years.”

TIME movies

The Piano That Was Used in Casablanca Has Been Sold for $3.4 Million

Movie MemorabiIia Auction
Richard Drew—AP This Nov. 21, 2014 photo shows the piano on which Sam plays "As Time Goes By," a bamboo and cane cafe chair the front doors of Rick's Cafe Americain, and a Moroccan-style painted metal floor lamp from "Casablanca," part of the "There's No Place Like Hollywood" movie memorabilia auction, at Bonhams auction house, in New York.

"Play it once, Sam. For old times' sake."

The piano on which Ilsa famously asked Sam to play “As Time Goes By” in Casablanca was sold at a New York auction on Monday for $3.4 million.

A miniature instrument, and golden yellow in color, the piano is hard to recognize as an iconic prop from the 1942 blockbuster, which featured Ingrid Bergman as Ilsa, Humphrey Bogart as Rick and prominent African-American jazz drummer and band leader Dooley Wilson as barroom pianist Sam. (Remarkably, since posterity remembers him as a pianist, Wilson did not actually play the piano, but had the keyboard tinkling for Casablanca overdubbed.)

Despite the piano’s diminutive size — it has 30 fewer keys than normal — it didn’t fail to upstage the other movie memorabilia on sale at Bonhams. The Cowardly Lion costume from The Wizard of Oz came closest, fetching $3.077 million.

Catherine Williamson, the director of entertainment memorabilia at Bonhams, said that the Casablanca piano is such a significant piece because Humphrey Bogart hides the letters of transit, his only possible escape from Morocco, in the instrument.

“Fifteen minutes into the movie, he tucks them in there,” she told the New York Times. “They’re under there while Sam plays; they’re there for all of the activity that happens in the cafe. The piano is there. It represents the way out for them. That’s what made it so important.”

The letters of transit were sold separately for $118,750.

TIME On Our Radar

Sebastian Junger’s Fight to Save Journalists’ Lives

Ever since the death of his friend and colleague Tim Hetherington, who — along with Getty’s Chris Hondros — was killed in a mortar attack in Libya in April 2011, Sebastian Junger has been advocating for increased medical training for freelance journalists.

“Most journalists who have salaried jobs get medical training, but freelancers are completely independent and often find themselves in very exposed places,” Junger tells TIME. “They fall between the cracks.” A filmmaker, best-selling author and the founder of a nonprofit, Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues (RISC), Junger was inspired to get involved in the fight to save freelancers’ lives after talking with a combat medical officer about Hetherington’s death. The CMO told him that Hetherington could probably have survived his injuries if his colleagues on the scene had had first aid training. Junger resolved to do something to try and help others avoid his friend’s fate.

Junger created RISC in 2012 and has trained close to 200 freelance journalists in the sort of simple and essential medical skills — tying a tourniquet, carrying an injured person to safety, etc. — that, in the field, can mean the difference between life and death.

This year, RISC is holding a benefit auction of photographic prints to raise money to help pay for the training it provides. (Each training session costs $24,000 for 24 New York-based students; overseas sessions cost $36,000.)

This year, 46 photographers have donated prints for the auction, with bids accepted from Nov. 19 until Dec. 3, when the charity will hold a live event at the Aperture gallery in New York City.

Junger hopes to raise $200,000 to sustain the organization and train more than 70 freelance journalists in 2015. “We’re sort of putting it all together each year, and we know we won’t make all of it at the auction,” he says. “But the auction is one way to raise a bit more.”

For more information about RISC, visit the RISC website. The online auction is hosted by Paddle8, with the live event taking place on Dec. 3. Tickets are available now.


Olivier Laurent is the editor of TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @olivierclaurent


TIME Pop Culture

Lost Love Letters Belonging to Marilyn Monroe to be Sold at Auction

Joe DiMaggio Marilyn Monroe
Associated Press In this June 2, 1955 file photo, actress Marilyn Monroe, right, dressed in a glamorous evening gown, arrives with Joe DiMaggio at the theater.

Monroe’s “Lost Archives” is a collection of 300 items including letters, photographs, paintings and clothes

Correction appended Nov. 12, 1:19 p.m. ET

A collection of love letters and other memorabilia belonging to Marilyn Monroe will go up for auction next month at Julien’s Auctions in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Monroe’s “Lost Archives” is a collection of 300 items including letters from her second husband, baseball star Joe Dimaggio, that were sent just before their divorce, the Associated Press reports.

“I love you and want to be with you,” Dimaggio wrote in one letter. “There is nothing I would like better than to restore your confidence in me.”

Also found in the trove are correspondences from her third husband, playwright Arthur Miller, and from friends including Clark Gable, Cary Grant and Jane Russell, along with various paintings, photographs and clothes.

The curators are expecting a huge turnout for the auction, which will run Dec. 5-6.

“We anticipate a lot of fans will be here. They’ll fly in from all over the world,” said auction owner Darren Julien, who estimates some pieces could go for more than $1 million.

The collection will be put on display for the public four days before bidding begins.

This article originally misstated the profession of Joe Dimaggio. He was a baseball player.

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