MONEY online shopping

Amazon Wants to Invade Your Home With Its One-Click Buying Button

Amazon boxes in front of door
Goss Images—Alamy

If Amazon has its way, one day our homes will be equipped with devices that detect when we're running low on household supplies and let us order more—from Amazon, of course—with one touch of a button.

According to Reuters, Amazon is developing a device that would be installed in a house—perhaps tucked away on a kitchen counter, or inside a closet or pantry—and enable customers to order detergent, toothpaste, paper towels, and other home supplies by simply pressing a button.

Amazon, which tends to be notoriously tight-lipped about its innovations and experiments until Jeff Bezos feels like blowing everyone’s minds (see the “60 Minutes” story on drone deliveries last year), isn’t talking publicly about the one-button device it reportedly has in the works. It’s also unclear if and when such a device would be ready to be tested in actual homes. Anonymous sources cited by Reuters say that the device is being developed by Lab 126, the secretive outfit owned by Amazon that has helped design and engineer gadgets such as the Kindle and Amazon Fire Phone.

In theory, the device would be installed in an Internet-connected home, in which various appliances would “talk” to each other via wi-fi. Sensors would be able to detect when the home is, say, in need of a new air-conditioning filter, or when you’re due to buy more laundry detergent, and it would prompt the customer to order new supplies with one press of a button.

In addition to the one-button device, Amazon is also looking into developing wearable gadgets that might allow customers to place orders for home supplies and other items with a single touch. The potential of such innovations follows right in line with Amazon’s ongoing efforts to be the destination of consumers seeking to purchase, well, pretty much anything and everything you can imagine.

Amazon Prime is brilliant not only because it gets customers to fork over $99 upfront annually in exchange for two-day shipping, but more importantly because it results in members making far more of their everyday purchases at Amazon. The online shopping giant’s forays into same-day delivery, groceries, and a household supply service called Prime Pantry are all part of its mission to eliminate tedious shopping errands by allowing customers to handle them via Amazon and one-click buying. Amazon thereby has been systematically horning in on the everyday sales of its competitors, which include players ranging from Best Buy to Costco, and CVS pharmacies to Kroger supermarkets.

Then there’s the Fire Phone, which hit the market this past summer and stood out from the pack most significantly thanks to Firefly—a feature that scans the barcodes of items and lets you purchase them instantly, via Amazon of course. Anyone buying the phone also got a free year of Amazon Prime, which brings customers further into the Amazon purchase-sphere. Less than two months after the Fire Phone entered the market at a minimum price of $199 (with a two-year contract), it was discounted to 99¢ (a price drop that some had predicted the moment the device was introduced).

Nonetheless, the Fire Phone flop isn’t going to slow Amazon’s pursuit of innovations—and a larger and larger portion of our purchases. Earlier this year, the Wall Street Journal spread the word that Amazon was a developing a service dubbed “anticipatory shipping,” in which the company would anticipate customer needs before any order had been placed, and it would ship what it felt you needed before anyone ever clicked “buy.” Now it looks like Amazon wants to have devices installed in customer homes, so that it can anticipate our shopping needs at a deeper, more invasive level and sell us stuff before anyone even considers other shopping possibilities, let alone actually leaving the home to make a run to a store.

The goals for Amazon in such developments is to ease any friction and slowdown in the purchase transaction, to eliminate hassles and save time for customers—and to sell us more and more stuff.

TIME Companies

Everything You Need to Know About Alibaba and its Mega-IPO

Chinese online retail giant Alibaba CEO Jack Ma (center) waves as he arrives at the New York Stock Exchange in New York City on Sept. 19, 2014.
Chinese online retail giant Alibaba's executive chairman and founder Jack Ma (center) waves as he arrives at the New York Stock Exchange in New York City on Sept. 19, 2014. Jewel Samad—AFP/Getty Images

What you need to know about the Chinese Internet firm's massive U.S. IPO

The Wall Street hype machine is in full swing for the Chinese online retail giant Alibaba’s initial public offering. The company, which operates a series of vast online marketplaces in China, raised $21.8 billion when it priced its IPO at $68 per share Thursday night, making it the largest offering in U.S. history. But that was just the beginning of the investor craze—shares began trading just before noon on the New York Stock Exchange Friday at $92.70, a 36% jump from the IPO price. That opening price puts Alibaba’s overall valuation at almost $230 billion, more than Amazon and eBay’s valuations combined.

Alibaba has already been called so many things–the Amazon of China, the biggest IPO of all time, the harbinger of a new Internet era—that it can be hard to pin down exactly what Alibaba does and how it makes money. TIME has assembled this helpful primer for the uninitiated to understand the hottest public offering of the year. Here’s what you need to know about Alibaba:

What is Alibaba?

Alibaba Group is a Chinese Internet corporation involved in a variety of Web businesses. Its most important elements are its online retail sites: Taobao Marketplace, a large eBay-like commerce site; Tmall, an online marketplace for name-brand retailers like Apple; and Juhuasuan, a daily deals site similar to Groupon.

The company is also affiliated with a PayPal-like mobile payments service called AliPay, and it has investments in online video, mobile messaging and cloud computing, among other businesses.

So is Alibaba the “Amazon of China” or not?

Not exactly. Unlike Amazon, Alibaba itself does not sell and ship items to customers. Instead, it acts as a kind of online bazaar where merchants as small as local vendors and as large as Nike can hawk their wares. Alibaba makes money mainly by convincing these sellers to place search ads on its website to reach more potential customers through keywords (like Google) or by charging a commission on some transactions (like eBay).

The company also makes money by selling premium memberships, cloud computing services and access to analytics data — so there are some comparisons to be made to Amazon.

Why is Wall Street so obsessed with Alibaba?

Two big reasons.

First, Alibaba processes a lot of sales and makes a ton of money doing it. Alibaba generated $248 billion in transactions on its three biggest marketplaces last year. By comparison, eBay generated $83 billion.

More staggering is the profit the Chinese giant reaps from these sales: Alibaba made about $2 billion in profit in the most recent quarter, tripling its earnings from a year ago. EBay, on the other hand, made $676 million and Amazon lost $126 million. Alibaba keeps costs low by hiring fewer employees than its closest American competitors and, unlike Amazon, avoiding the costly expense of operating fulfillment centers to ship products to customers.

Investors are also excited because Alibaba offers the most direct way to own a piece of China’s booming tech scene. The Internet population in the country is expected to reach 800 million by next year, according to government estimates, making it the largest market of online users by far. Tencent, another Chinese tech giant, offers many services that compete with Alibaba’s, but it’s traded on Hong Kong’s stock exchange. With Alibaba on the New York Stock Exchange, it will be easier for U.S. residents to invest in the company.

Who’s the mastermind behind Alibaba?

That would be Jack Ma, a former English teacher who founded Alibaba out of his Hangzhou apartment in 1999. Ma is not your average tech executive. He didn’t start using the Internet until 1995 and still doesn’t know how to code. He’s an eccentric character who once donned a blonde wig and black lipstick to sing “Can You Feel the Love Tonight?” at a 10th anniversary celebration for his company.

But he’s also a ruthless businessman who effectively ran eBay out of China in the early 2000s and maintains significant influence over Alibaba’s activities even though he’s no longer the CEO.

Who are the other key players at the company?

Yahoo, which owns about one-fifth of Alibaba, stands to make a windfall when it sells more than 120 million of its shares during the IPO, reaping as much as $8.3 billion before taxes. Yahoo will still have a 16.3% stake in Alibaba after the IPO and its stock price will likely continue to be buoyed by Alibaba’s rapid growth. However, Softbank, the Japanese tech firm that owns Sprint, is Alibaba’s biggest shareholder. Softbank will have a 32.4% stake following the IPO.

Despite their large stakes, these companies have relatively little say in the operational activities of Alibaba. They have ceded much of their shareholder influence to a group of executives called the Alibaba Partnership.

What is the Alibaba Partnership?

It’s a group of longtime of Alibaba employees, including Ma and his right-hand man Joe Tsai, who exert incredible control over the company’s activities. Alibaba also has a board of directors, but the Alibaba partnership reserves the right to nominate the majority of the board members, meaning the Partnership essentially controls the activities of the company by proxy without the need for input from other shareholders.

Should investors be concerned about this structure?

Well, it is highly unusual. The Partnership structure was rejected by the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, which is how Alibaba ended up on Wall Street in the first place. Though members of the Partnership must have a “meaningful” equity stake in Alibaba, according to the company prospectus, it’s not spelled out how large the stake must be. As Harvard Law School professor Lucian Bebchuk points out, partners could choose to later pare down their stakes in Alibaba and attempt to influence the company in ways that are not beneficial to other shareholders (remember, Yahoo and Softbank have basically handed their votes to the Partnership).

The ability of Alibaba’s executives to act unilaterally has already caused concerns before. Jack Ma spun off the fast-growing payments platform Alipay to another company he owns in 2011, which angered Yahoo.

Forget the risks! How do I get in on this IPO?

You don’t, unless you’re really rich. The banks underwriting Alibaba’s IPO will sell shares to mutual funds, hedge funds, and large-scale individual investors. The Average Joe’s first chance to get a piece of the company will likely be Friday morning, once the stock is publicly trading. But those shares could come at a significantly higher price than the IPO price range of $66 to $68. Twitter, for instance, started trading above $45 back in November even though its IPO price was just $26, due to extremely high demand for its stock. Unless you’re well-connected, it would be almost impossible to game the IPO to turn a quick buck. You should either plan to buy in as a long-term investor after carefully studying Alibaba’s prospectus or just relax and watch the chaos unfold without worrying about making or losing money.

What’s next for Alibaba?

The company’s breakneck growth in China shows no signs of abating, and Alibaba also has plans to compete on U.S. shores. Over the summer, the company launched 11 Main, an Etsy-like platform that connects shoppers with boutiques and other small vendors. And during Alibaba’s road show pitching the IPO to potential investors, Ma made his most direct statements yet about his already-massive company’s global ambitions.

“After we go public in the U.S., we will expand strongly in Europe and America,” Ma said. “Because after all we’re not a company from China, we are an Internet company that happens to be in China.”

MONEY Shopping

Now You Can Return Stuff to Sears Without Getting Out of Your Car

Sears Returns
Mel Evans—AP

A new service from Sears promises shoppers that they can make returns and exchanges in less than five minutes, without ever having to step foot outside the car.

For old-fashioned brick-and-mortar-based stores, it’s hard if not impossible to compete with the cut-throat pricing and convenience of online shopping. The strip malls and shopping centers of America are littered with shuttered stores once occupied by iconic retailers like Barnes & Noble, Staples, and yes, Sears. This week, Sears shares plummeted when news hit that the struggling retailer needed a $400 million loan from its CEO, Eddie Lampert—actually, the loan came by way of a hedge fund Lampert owns—to stay on track with plans to, well, not totally go out of business.

Also this week, Sears announced a new service that will hopefully make it a more appealing shopping option compared with online and physical store competitors alike. Earlier this year, Sears rolled out In-Vehicle Pickup as an option for its Shop Your Way app, and now customers can not only do curbside pickups of purchases without going inside stores, they can do exchanges and returns as well.

In recent years, grocery stores and select chains such as the Container Store have introduced drive-thru and pickup services targeted at today’s harried, on-the-go consumers, who can pre-order merchandise online and then swing by to pick it up—without having to actually “go shopping” for the goods inside, and without ever having to get out of the car.

To take advantage of Sears’s new service, the customer requests a return or exchange at the Sears website, and after getting an email confirmation heads to the selected store to handle the physical transaction. Once you’re in the parking lot, you use the app to alert the store you’ve arrived, and Sears guarantees a store associate will appear within five minutes to complete the return or exchange. A YouTube video explains further:

Obviously, Sears prefers that customers keep the merchandise they purchase rather than return or exchange it. But a good return policy is incredibly important in helping retailers drum up sales in the first place. Shoppers are more likely to make purchases when they know it’ll be quick and easy to return or exchange the merchandise. And once items are bought, they tend to stay bought. So long as customers don’t take advantage of the system, generous return policies generally benefit stores even more than they do shoppers.

One of the biggest reasons for the success of online sellers such as Zappos (which is owned by Amazon) is that they are renowned for terrific customer service, especially when it comes to easing the return process—complete with free shipping in both directions. Shoppers like anything that makes their lives easier, and the ability to conduct purchase pickups, returns, and exchanges from the comfort of one’s car certainly qualifies.

TIME Tablets

Amazon Unveils $99 Tablet, Refresh of Fire HDX Line

The kiddie Fire HD prohibits tots from making in-app purchases--a solution to an issue the company has run into in the past

A slew of new products and updates to Amazon’s Kindle reader and Fire tablet lines are on their way, the company announced Wednesday–the biggest announcement of all that they’ll offer a new Fire device for just $99.

The new Fire HD comes in six and seven-inch models, with the smaller version costing $99 and the larger one costing $139. The device features a quad-core, 1.5 Ghz processor that Amazon says can run graphically intensive games. Front and rear-facing cameras should make selfies a breeze, and all the new devices will have unlimited photo storage in Amazon’s cloud services. The company claims that its new tiny tablets are more resistant to falls than any other devices on the market, including the iPad Air.

Amazon is also rolling out a slightly more expensive but nearly identical product aimed at kids. The Fire HD Kids Edition will have all the same features as the regular edition, but will also include a kid-centric interface called FreeTime, which serves up videos, books and apps aimed at children. The FreeTime mode prohibits kids from making in-app purchases–an issue Amazon has been accused of negligence on by the Federal Trade Commission. (Amazon is challenging those allegations in court).

The kiddie Fire HD also comes with a colorful protective case and a free year of FreeTime Unlimited, which is an all-you-can-eat subscription-based service that gives kids access to a variety of entertainment content. The 6-inch kids’ tablet is $149 and the 7-inch version is $189.

On the other end of the audience spectrum, Amazon announced a new version of a high-end tablet, the Fire HDX, which features an 8.9-inch screen, has a faster processor that clocks in at 2.5 Ghz, and which, at 13.2 ounces, is 20% lighter than the iPad Air. The new Fire HDX will also feature faster Wi-Fi, improved Dolby audio and a new dynamic light control system that changes the display to accommodate ambient light, making it more similar to the paper-like screen of the Kindle.

Amazon will also include a suite of office software called WPS Office, to encourage using the Fire HDX (and the cheaper Fire HD) as a productivity device. A super-thin keyboard made specifically for the new tablet will sell separately for $59.99. The HDX will cost $379 for the basic version, while the 4G-enabled version will cost $479.

Tying all these products together will be a new version of Amazon’s mobile operating system, Fire OS 4 (also known as “Sangria”). The new OS is packed with a lot of new features, including a service called Family Library that allows family members to share games, videos and other content they’ve purchased across multiple devices. Family members will also be able to create individual profiles on a single device with different app and content lineups to allow for easier sharing.

Fire OS 4 also pulls in some of the most prominent features from Amazon’s two new product lines this year: the Fire TV and the Fire Phone. Firefly, which lets people scan real-world objects to find out more information about them, will now be available on all the tablets, as will a video pre-buffering feature from the Fire TV called Advanced Streaming and Prediction. The popular Mayday button, which provides 24/7 customer support, will also make a return.

The devices continue Amazon’s habit of undercutting competitors on price by selling fairly sophisticated products at relatively low cost. It’s a strategy that’s a boon for customers, if not for Amazon’s bottom line. The company lost $126 million in the most recent quarter.

All the devices are available for pre-order now on Amazon.com and will begin shipping in October.

TIME Gadgets

Amazon Just Unveiled Its Most Advanced Kindle Yet

The Kindle Voyage is Amazon's thinnest Kindle yet Amazon

The Kindle Voyage is designed to offer a more tactile experience

Correction appended Sept. 18

Amazon is updating its Kindle line with its slimmest e-reader to date. On Wednesday, the company announced the $199 Kindle Voyage, which is 7.6 mm thick and weighs less than 6.4 oz. It will feature a higher-resolution Paperwhite display that boasts 300 pixels per inch.

The specially designed glass on the device makes the display readable in even the most glaring of sunlight and features an etching pattern so that it feels more like paper to the touch. The lighting of this high-end Kindle has also been improved, with a new adaptive front light that lowers the display’s brightness over time in a dark room, to match how the human eye adjusts to dark environments.

The Kindle Voyage will also feature a pressure-sensitive bezel that functions as a page-turning button. When pressing the outer edges of the Kindle, users will feel a small vibration as the page turns to offer a more tactile experience. Amazon says the feature will help people read for longer periods of time compared with swiping the touch screen to turn pages. Like previous fancy Kindle models, the new Voyage will also come with free 3G connectivity.

In addition to the new device, Amazon is updating its Kindle mainstays. The basic Kindle will double its storage capacity to 4 GB and feature a touch interface for the first time, at a cost of $79. The Paperwhite, Amazon’s best-selling Kindle, will also get double the storage and cost $119.

All the Kindles will come with updated software that features tighter integration with Goodreads, the book-club website that Amazon bought last year, and an expanded vocabulary-teaching functionality, among other tweaks.

The Kindles are available for preorder now and begin shipping in October.

Correction: The original version of this article misstated the day the Kindle Voyage was announced.

TIME marketing

Coca-Cola Is Bringing Back SURGE

Coke dials up the 1990s nostalgia

Coca-Cola’s 1990s SURGE citrus drink is back by popular demand.

The Mountain-Dew inspired soda, which debuted in 1996 but was discontinued in the early 2000s, has been the subject of a nostalgia-fueled online campaign to lobby the company to bring back the drink.

A Facebook group devoted to SURGE has over 129,000 likes, and Coca-Cola said in a statement that they’ve decided to re-issue the drink thanks to “a passionate and persistent community of brand loyalists who have been lobbying The Coca-Cola Company to bring back their favorite drink over the last few years.”

SURGE will be sold on Amazon.com, which represents the first time a Coca-Cola product has been sold exclusively through an online retailer. SURGE’s relaunch will also be an experiment in social media marketing for the brand, since they said they will not invest in any traditional marketing for this product.

TIME Peru

Top Peruvian Foe of Illegal Logging Slain

112236185
Illegally cut mahogany trees wait to be hauled to the main river in Peru Richard Olsenius—Getty Images/National Geographic Creative

"He threatened to upset the status quo"

(LIMA, PERU) — An outspoken Peruvian opponent of illegal logging and three other native Ashaninka community leaders were shot and killed in the remote region bordering Brazil where they live, villagers and authorities said Monday.

The activist, Edwin Chota, had received frequent death threats from illegal loggers, who he had tried for years to expel from the lands for which his community was seeking title.

Illegal loggers were suspected in the killings, said Ashaninka regional leader Reyder Sebastian. Pervasive corruption lets the loggers operate with impunity, stripping the Amazon region’s river basins of prized hardwoods, especially mahogany and tropical cedar.

“He threatened to upset the status quo,” said David Salisbury, a professor at the University of Richmond who was advising Chota on the title quest and had known him for a decade. “The illegal loggers are on record for wanting Edwin dead.”

Chota and the others were apparently killed on Sept. 1, the day they left Saweto, the village he led on the Upper Tamaya river, to hike to a sister Brazilian Ashaninka community, said the village schoolteacher, Maria Elena Paredes.

When the men did not show at the Brazilian village, worried comrades who had traveled ahead of them returned and found the bodies — apparently killed by shotgun blasts — near some shacks on the Putaya river, Paredes said.

She said by phone that vultures had begun to feed on the bodies, which were found a six-hour walk from the 45-inhabitant village.

Paredes identified the other slain men as Jorge Rios, who was Chota’s deputy, Leoncio Quinticima and Francisco Pinedo.

She said no villagers had seen the killers.

“The community has always and continues to be threatened by the big loggers,” she said from Pucallpa, the Ucayali regional capital, where she arrived Monday night after a three-day boat journey with widows and children of the slain men.

Peru’s main indigenous federation, AIDESEP, expressed outrage at police and the judiciary in a statement for “doing absolutely nothing despite repeated complaints” to protect the slain men, who it said had joined “the long list of martyrs who fell in defense of their ancestral lands.”

Peru’s deputy minister for intercultural affairs, Patricia Balbuena, said authorities planned after police debrief the delegation to fly by helicopter to Saweto to investigate and retrieve the bodies.

Chota had campaigned for years for the title for his community, emboldening other settlements along the Tamaya to similar seek legal claim to traditional lands, said Sebastian.

Now, he said, people in those communities fear for their lives.

“We have been fighting for 12 years and now look what happens,” said Paredes.

Sebastian said he would demand a meeting with President Ollanta Humala to obtain assurances for his people’s safety.

The Ashaninkas are Peru’s leading Amazon ethnic group and Sebastian says violence against them has been rising since they began agitating for titles to their territories.

Chota had written more than 100 letters to state institutions about illegal logging and titling efforts in Ucayali, said Salisbury, “and he was an incredible incredibly dynamic and charismatic leader who gave hope to not just his community but many others by his courage and convictions.”

He said he and Chota personally met with Peru’s national forestry director, Fabiola Munoz, in July and that forestry inspectors had just visited forestry concessions that overlapped with Saweto that were beinglogged without permission.

Telephone calls to Munoz seeking comment on the progress of Chota’s titling efforts were not immediately returned.

So widely known was Chota, who was in his early 50s, that foreign reporters sometimes accompanied him into the jungle.

Journalist Scott Wallace last year described him in National Geographic as “a sinewy, 52-year-old firebrand with rakish, jet-black hair and a hawk’s beak of a nose.”

Chota’s region is home to about 80 percent of illegal logging in Peru, which thrives on a web of corruption involving the widespread issuance of counterfeit logging permits.

The wood from a single old-growth mahogany tree can fetch more than $11,000 on the U.S. lumber market, the Environmental Investigation Agency nonprofit said in a 2012 report on Peru’s trouble forest concession system.

TIME technology

Amazon’s Fire Phone Is Now Just 99 Cents

AN AT&T worker holds the new Amazon Fire phone at an AT&T store on July 25, 2014 in San Francisco.
AN AT&T worker holds the new Amazon Fire phone at an AT&T store on July 25, 2014 in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan—Getty Images

Critics turned off by an over-emphasis on selling the user Amazon products

Amazon’s first-ever smartphone now costs under a buck, the company announced Monday, after less than two months on the market. The Fire phone’s price has been cut to just 99 cents under a two-year contract with AT&T.

The online retailer is notoriously reticent to divulge sales figures for its specific products, but the fact that the Fire phone has tumbled nearly $200 in price in a matter of weeks implies that its sales were not up to Amazon’s expectations.

The device, Amazon’s latest ambitious foray into the world of electronics, launched during the summer to middling reviews. Critics praised its high-quality camera and 3D screen but were turned off by the limited app store offerings and over-emphasis on selling the user Amazon products.

Amazon’s price-drop comes one day before Apple is expected to launch two new, larger iPhones and a smartwatch.

TIME celebrities

Joan Rivers’ Book Sales Up 60,000 Percent

Joan Rivers Signs And Discusses Her New Book "Diary Of A Mad Diva"
Comedian Joan Rivers poses before signing copies of her new book "Diary Of A Mad Diva" at Barnes & Noble bookstore at The Grove on July 10, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. Amanda Edwards—WireImage

The celebrity released her last book in July

Sales of Joan River’s last book, Diary of a Mad Diva, are up nearly 60,000% on Amazon. It’s now in the number two position on the online retailer’s site.

Rivers, who died Thursday, wrote twelve books over the course of several decades. Diary of a Mad Diva was released in July.

The book also ranked first on the site’s list of “Movers & Shakers,” which tracks the products with the greatest sales gains in the past 24 hours. Rivers’ I Hate Everyone…Starting with Me is ranked third on the list. That book’s sales have grown more than 20,000% in the past 24 hours.

TIME Regulation

Google Refunding Parents At Least $19 Million for Kids’ Unwanted Purchases

Holiday Shoppers Visit A Google Winter Wonderlab
A shopper plays the Riptide 2 GP video game on a Google Inc. Nexus 7 tablet computer at the Winter Wonderlab inside the Roseville Galleria mall in Roseville, California, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Apple made a similar settlement and Amazon may do so as well

Google is the latest tech company to be dinged by federal regulators for making it too easy for kids to rack up unwanted in-app charges on their parents’ phones. The tech giant has agreed to a settlement of at least $19 million with the Federal Trade Commission to refund parents for their children’s unauthorized charges.

According to the FTC complaint, Google in 2011 did not require any password authorization to confirm in-app charges in its Google Play Store, then called the Android Market. The feature was added later, but inputting a password opened up a 30-minute window in which purchases could be made without a password confirmation. These issues led some parents to complain that their kids managed to rack up hundreds of dollars in charges buying virtual goods in games and other apps, according to the FTC. Seemingly harmless children’s mobile games can sometimes have individual items or features priced at as much as $200.

In addition to the refunds, Google will be required to get express consent from consumers when charging for in-app purchases in the future.

The Google settlement is the latest action in an ongoing campaign by the FTC to force tech companies to make their mobile payment systems more transparent. The Commission reached a $32.5 million settlement with Apple over the same issue in January, and is currently suing Amazon to seek similar refunds for customers whose kids placed unwanted charges.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser